Official 'ultralight' specs?


Nick B.
 
Edited

I'd like to nominate the Sangean ATS-606A, also sold here in the UK as the Roberts R876. It's an older portable based around the Sony CAX1238M, but there is only one fixed bandwidth (450kHz IF filter). It has an external antenna socket which works on MW/LW without modification and the internal ferrite rod is a wideband FET amplifier. The audio quality is very crisp and clear.

Note that the original ATS-606 (not A, also Roberts R617) does not have the fine-tune facility which allows you to tune in 1kHz steps.

I've heard several North American TAs on mine  here in the UK using an external antenna, as well as stations around Europe and the Middle East.

73s and good DX
Nick B.


Zacharias Liangas
 

I really wonder of this includes the Chibo radios
C330 was the best of all of its models with very sharp audio (sibilant in HIFi jargon) in its FM . Sad that later it was broke. Half size of Degen DE-1102
There is another model, quite smaller but fatter with very bad specifications. I later littered it


K8HU and ex-NMN
 

The change in the SSB requirement is good to know, Gary as it opens the door to a few more radios. I used to tease John with the thought that my R390A ought to be grandfathered in because it does have handles.... 2 in fact.  You are buried in making FSL's, I'm in a similar situation restoring GE Super Radio's.  I located a line of audio grade capacitors which will fit in the space available allowing the 30 year old, dried up electrolytic to be pulled and replaced with the audio grades.  Audio is much more smooth and detailed.  Also am replacing the 280 kHz wide Chinese filter in the FM IF with a 180 kHz Murata.  Very helpful, does not change the response on these mono radios but makes them competitive on FM DX.  I want to add a super small but bright LED, out of sight but lighting up the dial pointer.  If it will fit AND not cause QRN, that'll be a winner.

Still have my hot-rodded PL-380 and 1 spare 7.5" ferrite bar.  That'll go on the D-808.
--
Chuck Rippel, K8HU
Chesapeake, VA
USCGR, ret.


Mark
 

Hi Paul, 

That's great - thank you.

M


Mark
 

Hi Jorge,

Thanks for this - interesting insights..

I'll have a look at your link!

All the best, 

M. 


Mark
 

Hi Gary, 

Thanks for this - it's everything I needed plus more, very helpful.

Good news that SSB is no longer a deal breaker and I wish you luck in wading through your list for FSL antennas!

Cheers, 
M. 


Jorge Garzón <iberiaDX@...>
 

Hello M.I.H.0,
Additionally, here in Europe we keep two categories. One is Ultralight (de bolsillo, in Spanish) as Gary pointed; and 'Small portables" (portables pequeños) which are those up to 500 cm3 or 30, 5 cubic inches. This latest one allows receivers like XHDATA or DEGEN DE-1103,being used, as both are widely owned by several radiolisteners and DXers here in the Old World. 

You can find some receivers sizes in one of my posts, ordered as a table, here: https://iberiadx.wordpress.com/ulr-dxing-o-dx-de-bolsillo/

73's
Jorge

El sáb., nov. 6, 2021 a 23:57, Paul Blundell
<tanger32au@...> escribió:
That's pretty much it.

This is from my blog which is based on the "original" guide from when I first joined the Ultralight dxing hobby.

What is an Ultralight Receiver?
The ULR Definition Committee has come up with the following guidelines:
1. It is a simple shirt pocket-sized radio of not more than approximately 20 cubic inches.
2. It is an entertainment-grade radio, as opposed to enthusiast’s radio. As such, it will usually not have selectable filters, AM synchronous detection or SSB clarification.
3. It is readily available to the hobby in new or used markets at the time of its approval.
4. It costs no more than $100 retail at the time of approval.
5. It is primarily a radio. While it may have other features as well (MP3 recorder, etc.), the design and function should have radio reception as its focus.
6. It is not a "novelty radio" such as Coca Cola Can radio, Mr Potato Head, etc.


On Sun, 7 Nov 2021, 9:36 am M.I.H.0 via groups.io, <metagenetics=protonmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
Good evening everyone -

Can anybody tell me what the 'official' specifications of an ultralight DX radio are?

The only consistent stat I can find is that it must not exceed 20 cubic inches. Other things I've seen online is that the radio must be a hobby grade receiver with no SSB capacity and also must not have or had a value in excess of 100$£€, when new on the market. 

Other than this I can't see too much. 

Thanks in advance. 
M.I.H.0


Paul Blundell
 

That's pretty much it.

This is from my blog which is based on the "original" guide from when I first joined the Ultralight dxing hobby.

What is an Ultralight Receiver?
The ULR Definition Committee has come up with the following guidelines:
1. It is a simple shirt pocket-sized radio of not more than approximately 20 cubic inches.
2. It is an entertainment-grade radio, as opposed to enthusiast’s radio. As such, it will usually not have selectable filters, AM synchronous detection or SSB clarification.
3. It is readily available to the hobby in new or used markets at the time of its approval.
4. It costs no more than $100 retail at the time of approval.
5. It is primarily a radio. While it may have other features as well (MP3 recorder, etc.), the design and function should have radio reception as its focus.
6. It is not a "novelty radio" such as Coca Cola Can radio, Mr Potato Head, etc.


On Sun, 7 Nov 2021, 9:36 am M.I.H.0 via groups.io, <metagenetics=protonmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
Good evening everyone -

Can anybody tell me what the 'official' specifications of an ultralight DX radio are?

The only consistent stat I can find is that it must not exceed 20 cubic inches. Other things I've seen online is that the radio must be a hobby grade receiver with no SSB capacity and also must not have or had a value in excess of 100$£€, when new on the market. 

Other than this I can't see too much. 

Thanks in advance. 
M.I.H.0


Gary DeBock
 

Hello M.I.H.0,

There is no way to keep a list of all "official" Ultralight radios currently on the market because this information changes so rapidly that such a list would be outdated as soon as it is drafted. In addition, all of our previous volunteers in the Ultralight Classifications Committee are no longer active in the group, and I lack the free time to assist in this (with a waiting list of over 20 DXers hoping to get an FSL antenna).

For now, just go by the common rules of under $100 US in price, under 20 cubic inches in volume and readily available for purchase on the open market. The radio should also be a "consumer model, " and not a novelty radio. SSB function is no longer a deal breaker, as long as all the other criteria are met. Also, "official" Ultralight radio status only applies to the Ultralight Awards program and the Ultralight Records List-- both of which are currently in limbo because of (you guessed it) a lack of volunteers. As for reporting DX loggings on this list, you are free to report any loggings made with any portable you wish-- nobody will quibble about it.

73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)


Mark
 

Good evening everyone -

Can anybody tell me what the 'official' specifications of an ultralight DX radio are?

The only consistent stat I can find is that it must not exceed 20 cubic inches. Other things I've seen online is that the radio must be a hobby grade receiver with no SSB capacity and also must not have or had a value in excess of 100$£€, when new on the market. 

Other than this I can't see too much. 

Thanks in advance. 
M.I.H.0