ABC DRM Transmissions


Jorge Garzón
 

Some more info here...


Jorge Garzón Gutiérrez "IberiaDX" 
(EB7EFA · EA1036 SWL · BDXC Member 1409) 
QTH: IN83ag / 43º15' N · 03º56' W
Urb. San Roque 95, casa 5 (Villasevil)
39698 Santiurde de Toranzo (ESPAÑA - SPAIN)
..................................................................................
Blog: IberiaDX  · Twitter: @IberiaDX


En miércoles, 28 de julio de 2021 16:41:19 CEST, DX Pedro <pmm.andrade@...> escribió:


Really, Jorge? I thought India and Brasil were championing DRM, but mostly India after "killing" some (if not most) FM and AM stations They were making Receivers, implementing it on cars and tuk-tuks (of sorts) on a very "cheap way".
I do know China, Romania and (occasionally) BBC do make DRM broadcasts regularly.

// pedro andrade


On Tue, Jul 27, 2021 at 7:59 AM Jorge Garzón via groups.io <iberiaDX=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Paul, 
I think remote receivers in the WebSDR network are DRM decoding capable. In case they are, you could decode it directly. 

In my opinion DRM is senseless and just adds noise to our already 'overnoised' AM band. India was one of the nations supporting this and they decided to give it up abruptly some months back. 
¡Saludos! 
J


El mar., jul. 27, 2021 a 3:36, Richard Allen via groups.io
<dx747j=me.com@groups.io> escribió:
I agree.  They only reason I can hear DRM is because it was included in the software I use to listen to my WiNRADiO SDR.  

You can have a listen to the difference between DRM and AM by going to:  https://www.drm.org/what-can-i-hear/

It seems their is a push to put DRM receivers in automobiles in some countries.  Here in the USA a lot of modern car radios can receive digital signals (not DRM) which are piggy-backed on the existing channels in the FM (88-108 MHz) band.  The receiver in my Toyota Tacoma can receive them where available.  They have tried something similar on the AM (540-1700 kHz) band here but it has fizzled.

Richard.

On Jul 26, 2021, at 18:34, Paul Blundell <tanger32au@...> wrote:


Thanks Richard, I don't have anything that can decode it. I am not sure why they are doing this as I don't think many people would be able to hear it.


DX Pedro
 

Really, Jorge? I thought India and Brasil were championing DRM, but mostly India after "killing" some (if not most) FM and AM stations They were making Receivers, implementing it on cars and tuk-tuks (of sorts) on a very "cheap way".
I do know China, Romania and (occasionally) BBC do make DRM broadcasts regularly.

// pedro andrade


On Tue, Jul 27, 2021 at 7:59 AM Jorge Garzón via groups.io <iberiaDX=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Paul, 
I think remote receivers in the WebSDR network are DRM decoding capable. In case they are, you could decode it directly. 

In my opinion DRM is senseless and just adds noise to our already 'overnoised' AM band. India was one of the nations supporting this and they decided to give it up abruptly some months back. 
¡Saludos! 
J


El mar., jul. 27, 2021 a 3:36, Richard Allen via groups.io
<dx747j=me.com@groups.io> escribió:
I agree.  They only reason I can hear DRM is because it was included in the software I use to listen to my WiNRADiO SDR.  

You can have a listen to the difference between DRM and AM by going to:  https://www.drm.org/what-can-i-hear/

It seems their is a push to put DRM receivers in automobiles in some countries.  Here in the USA a lot of modern car radios can receive digital signals (not DRM) which are piggy-backed on the existing channels in the FM (88-108 MHz) band.  The receiver in my Toyota Tacoma can receive them where available.  They have tried something similar on the AM (540-1700 kHz) band here but it has fizzled.

Richard.

On Jul 26, 2021, at 18:34, Paul Blundell <tanger32au@...> wrote:


Thanks Richard, I don't have anything that can decode it. I am not sure why they are doing this as I don't think many people would be able to hear it.


Paul Blundell
 

That's interesting. I wonder if it is part of a plan for it to be more common on the AM band.


On Tue, 27 Jul 2021, 16:59 Jorge Garzón via groups.io, <iberiaDX=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Paul, 
I think remote receivers in the WebSDR network are DRM decoding capable. In case they are, you could decode it directly. 

In my opinion DRM is senseless and just adds noise to our already 'overnoised' AM band. India was one of the nations supporting this and they decided to give it up abruptly some months back. 
¡Saludos! 
J


El mar., jul. 27, 2021 a 3:36, Richard Allen via groups.io
<dx747j=me.com@groups.io> escribió:
I agree.  They only reason I can hear DRM is because it was included in the software I use to listen to my WiNRADiO SDR.  

You can have a listen to the difference between DRM and AM by going to:  https://www.drm.org/what-can-i-hear/

It seems their is a push to put DRM receivers in automobiles in some countries.  Here in the USA a lot of modern car radios can receive digital signals (not DRM) which are piggy-backed on the existing channels in the FM (88-108 MHz) band.  The receiver in my Toyota Tacoma can receive them where available.  They have tried something similar on the AM (540-1700 kHz) band here but it has fizzled.

Richard.

On Jul 26, 2021, at 18:34, Paul Blundell <tanger32au@...> wrote:


Thanks Richard, I don't have anything that can decode it. I am not sure why they are doing this as I don't think many people would be able to hear it.


Jorge Garzón
 

Hi Paul, 
I think remote receivers in the WebSDR network are DRM decoding capable. In case they are, you could decode it directly. 

In my opinion DRM is senseless and just adds noise to our already 'overnoised' AM band. India was one of the nations supporting this and they decided to give it up abruptly some months back. 
¡Saludos! 

El mar., jul. 27, 2021 a 3:36, Richard Allen via groups.io
<dx747j@...> escribió:
I agree.  They only reason I can hear DRM is because it was included in the software I use to listen to my WiNRADiO SDR.  

You can have a listen to the difference between DRM and AM by going to:  https://www.drm.org/what-can-i-hear/

It seems their is a push to put DRM receivers in automobiles in some countries.  Here in the USA a lot of modern car radios can receive digital signals (not DRM) which are piggy-backed on the existing channels in the FM (88-108 MHz) band.  The receiver in my Toyota Tacoma can receive them where available.  They have tried something similar on the AM (540-1700 kHz) band here but it has fizzled.

Richard.

On Jul 26, 2021, at 18:34, Paul Blundell <tanger32au@...> wrote:


Thanks Richard, I don't have anything that can decode it. I am not sure why they are doing this as I don't think many people would be able to hear it.


Richard Allen
 

I agree.  They only reason I can hear DRM is because it was included in the software I use to listen to my WiNRADiO SDR.  

You can have a listen to the difference between DRM and AM by going to:  https://www.drm.org/what-can-i-hear/

It seems their is a push to put DRM receivers in automobiles in some countries.  Here in the USA a lot of modern car radios can receive digital signals (not DRM) which are piggy-backed on the existing channels in the FM (88-108 MHz) band.  The receiver in my Toyota Tacoma can receive them where available.  They have tried something similar on the AM (540-1700 kHz) band here but it has fizzled.

Richard.


On Jul 26, 2021, at 18:34, Paul Blundell <tanger32au@...> wrote:


Thanks Richard, I don't have anything that can decode it. I am not sure why they are doing this as I don't think many people would be able to hear it._._,_._,_


Paul Blundell
 

Thanks Richard, I don't have anything that can decode it. I am not sure why they are doing this as I don't think many people would be able to hear it.


On Tue, Jul 27, 2021 at 8:24 AM Richard Allen via groups.io <dx747j=me.com@groups.io> wrote:
You need a special receiver capable of decoding DRM (Digital Radio Mondiale).  Or, special decoding software if using a SDR.  I used to listen to DRM transmissions from Radio New Zealand using a WiNRADiO G313 SDR.  A decade or so ago DRM broadcasts were quite common.  As the plug has been pulled on most shortwave transmissions it has became rare.  RNZ is one of the few still using DRM on some of their broadcasts to the Pacific islands.  When properly decoded, the sound can sound almost FM quality, sometimes in stereo. Fading will cause occasional signal drop out.  It sometimes tricky.

The only DRM signal received regularly here now is data transmission from Radio Marti, Greenville NC.  

Richard Allen


On Jul 26, 2021, at 17:00, Paul Blundell <tanger32au@...> wrote:


What equipment do you need to decode this?

Paul



--
Paul


Richard Allen
 

You need a special receiver capable of decoding DRM (Digital Radio Mondiale).  Or, special decoding software if using a SDR.  I used to listen to DRM transmissions from Radio New Zealand using a WiNRADiO G313 SDR.  A decade or so ago DRM broadcasts were quite common.  As the plug has been pulled on most shortwave transmissions it has became rare.  RNZ is one of the few still using DRM on some of their broadcasts to the Pacific islands.  When properly decoded, the sound can sound almost FM quality, sometimes in stereo. Fading will cause occasional signal drop out.  It sometimes tricky.

The only DRM signal received regularly here now is data transmission from Radio Marti, Greenville NC.  

Richard Allen


On Jul 26, 2021, at 17:00, Paul Blundell <tanger32au@...> wrote:


What equipment do you need to decode this?

Paul_._,_._,_


Paul Blundell
 

What equipment do you need to decode this?

Paul

On Mon, 26 Jul 2021, 22:49 Jorge Garzón via groups.io, <iberiaDX=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
[bdxc-news] DRM test on MW in Austral
  • Alan Pennington via groups.io
  • 26 jul. a las 14:02

    Australia: ABC Radio National (RN) is testing DRM on 747 kHz MW.

    This is reported to be from Wangaratta VIC (re griffinboi on YouTube and Twitter, who reported receiving it in Melbourne 21 July)
    (747 kHz is not on an existing RN frequency from this site, but 747 is a frequency used by 4 other stations in Australia).

    Was decodable yesterday evening with some drop outs using the Kiwi SDR in Croydon VIC 25 July at 2030 UTC (0630 AEST).
    Carrying RN programming with texts:

    "ABC Radio National"

    "ABC is testing the future of radio"

    "You're listening to the ABC DRM demonstration"

    "ABC is looking to the future of radio"

    "Today is 2021-7-25"

    "Now it is 6:30 AEST"

    (also a short thread on this at: https://www.reddit.com/r/amateurradio/comments/opvol1/new_abc_drm_test/ )

    (as posted on BDXC e-group). Jorge
Jorge Garzón Gutiérrez "IberiaDX" 
(EB7EFA · EA1036 SWL · BDXC Member 1409) 
QTH: IN83ag / 43º15' N · 03º56' W
Urb. San Roque 95, casa 5 (Villasevil)
39698 Santiurde de Toranzo (ESPAÑA - SPAIN)
..................................................................................
Blog: IberiaDX  · Twitter: @IberiaDX


Jorge Garzón
 

[bdxc-news] DRM test on MW in Austral
  • Alan Pennington via groups.io
  • Parabdxc-news@groups.io
    26 jul. a las 14:02

    Australia: ABC Radio National (RN) is testing DRM on 747 kHz MW.

    This is reported to be from Wangaratta VIC (re griffinboi on YouTube and Twitter, who reported receiving it in Melbourne 21 July)
    (747 kHz is not on an existing RN frequency from this site, but 747 is a frequency used by 4 other stations in Australia).

    Was decodable yesterday evening with some drop outs using the Kiwi SDR in Croydon VIC 25 July at 2030 UTC (0630 AEST).
    Carrying RN programming with texts:

    "ABC Radio National"

    "ABC is testing the future of radio"

    "You're listening to the ABC DRM demonstration"

    "ABC is looking to the future of radio"

    "Today is 2021-7-25"

    "Now it is 6:30 AEST"

    (also a short thread on this at: https://www.reddit.com/r/amateurradio/comments/opvol1/new_abc_drm_test/ )

    (as posted on BDXC e-group). Jorge
Jorge Garzón Gutiérrez "IberiaDX" 
(EB7EFA · EA1036 SWL · BDXC Member 1409) 
QTH: IN83ag / 43º15' N · 03º56' W
Urb. San Roque 95, casa 5 (Villasevil)
39698 Santiurde de Toranzo (ESPAÑA - SPAIN)
..................................................................................
Blog: IberiaDX  · Twitter: @IberiaDX