What do you class as 'DX"?


Paul Blundell
 

What is the measure / point that you use to class a signal as DX or not?




--
Paul - Moderator
UltralightDX


Russ Edmunds
 

If a station is not commonly heard, it is DX.  Distance isn't a condition.



Russ Edmunds

WB2BJH

Blue Bell, PA

Grid FN20id


From: main@UltralightDX.groups.io <main@UltralightDX.groups.io> on behalf of Paul Blundell via Groups.Io <tanger32au@...>
Sent: Wednesday, July 17, 2019 8:59:14 PM
To: main@UltralightDX.groups.io
Subject: [UltralightDX] What do you class as 'DX"?
 
What is the measure / point that you use to class a signal as DX or not?




--
Paul - Moderator
UltralightDX


Paul S. in CT
 

Rather tricky, and unique answers abound. Since you didn't post ANY information, there are two basic ways... by distance, or a formula that factors distance and TX power. Some folks think a 50kW station at 500km is NOT the same as 1kW at 500km. Thats why formulas abound. Theres a measure of sensitivity using a formula. But I would also state catching R. Australia in the North East USA is DX no matter what. (And I have using a barefoot Tecsun R911 and R9012, a distance of 16750 km 10400 mi)

Regardless of choice, the easy way by distance is to take the total number of receptions, divide by 19, then multiply by 3. Thats what "qualifies" by statistics as being outside of the main body of RX. So, the furthest 3/19 ths of all your RX is DX.

Regards
Paul S. in CT FN31nl


Paul Blundell
 

Thanks for the excellent reply.

I am focusing on the FM BCB and have been getting some interesting results. I need to spend more time logging what is "normal" to know what is abnormal. 

On Fri, Jul 19, 2019 at 5:41 AM Paul S. in CT via Groups.Io <ferrite61=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Rather tricky, and unique answers abound. Since you didn't post ANY information, there are two basic ways... by distance, or a formula that factors distance and TX power. Some folks think a 50kW station at 500km is NOT the same as 1kW at 500km. Thats why formulas abound. Theres a measure of sensitivity using a formula. But I would also state catching R. Australia in the North East USA is DX no matter what. (And I have using a barefoot Tecsun R911 and R9012, a distance of 16750 km 10400 mi)

Regardless of choice, the easy way by distance is to take the total number of receptions, divide by 19, then multiply by 3. Thats what "qualifies" by statistics as being outside of the main body of RX. So, the furthest 3/19 ths of all your RX is DX.

Regards
Paul S. in CT FN31nl





--
Paul


--
Paul - Moderator
UltralightDX


Andy ZL3AG
 

After having a wee think about this...

For AM - anything that you can't hear every night of the year.
For FM - anything that you can't hear 24/7/365.

Andy
CHCH NZ
Life Member, NZRDXL


K7DWI Art
 

Replying to Andy's comment....
In 1961, I heard on my 6-Traansistor radio from my front yard in Houston Texas clear channels WHO, WMAQ, WLS, WLW, WSM, KDKA and many others.
It was DX for me :)
It is, what it is for you.
73 Art
K7DWI ex-KA5DWI Oregon 


Nick Hall-Patch
 

and with medium wave and shortwave, it is dependent on the time of day, and the season, and even the strength that it is heard,  so "anything that you can't hear every night of the year" can be subdivided into "anything you don't normally hear at this strength, at this time of day, or this month", or even "this point in the solar cycle".

Examples:  CBK-540 from Saskatchewan can be pretty regularly heard here on the Canadian west coast at night, particularly in the winter.   But it has also been heard here at 2pm on a July afternoon; that's DX.  But perhaps I'm wrong....I haven't listened for it every July afternoon ever since, but when I have, it hasn't been there.

Hearing JOUB-774 from Japan at this location is also DX, but not really if it is around sunrise on a fall or spring morning.   Around sunrise on a summer morning, particularly at good strength, that's DX, but not quite so much during the last couple of summers at the bottom of the solar cycle.

It gets complicated....

best wishes,

Nick


Paul Blundell
 

Thanks.

As I am focusing more on the FM band this makes sense. 

On Fri, 19 Jul 2019, 3:07 p.m. Andy ZL3AG via Groups.Io, <zl3ag=radioengineering.com@groups.io> wrote:

After having a wee think about this...

For AM - anything that you can't hear every night of the year.
For FM - anything that you can't hear 24/7/365.

Andy
CHCH NZ
Life Member, NZRDXL




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Paul - Moderator
UltralightDX


Peter Laws
 

On Fri, Jul 19, 2019 at 12:07 AM Andy ZL3AG via Groups.Io
<zl3ag@...> wrote:


After having a wee think about this...

For AM - anything that you can't hear every night of the year.
For FM - anything that you can't hear 24/7/365.
I look at everything as a ham and broadcast DXer (and any other band -
i.e. FDNY on 154 MHz when I lived in Boston in the 80s). I think what
is above is a good, succinct description. For amateur stuff, it's
always distance for me (DX being very early telegraphy shortcut for
that word) but it's distance modulated by what Andy says - I am more
excited to work a station 1000 km away on 144 MHz than I am to work a
station 10000 km away on 14 MHz. The former is rare while the latter
is .. pretty much every day.



--
Peter Laws | N5UWY | plaws plaws net | Travel by Train!


Paul S. in CT
 

On my Vite VT111 (Dirt-Cheap DSP) or Tecsun R9012 any/all 5 from Chicago at 775 Miles, WSB Atlanta at 820 miles, KMOX St. Louis at 920 miles or WHO Des Moines at 1050 miles. These are Clear and 50Kw at night. About twice or 3 times each winter, KPNW "the mighty KP" from Eugene, OR. A real transcontinental from Oregon to Connecticut at 2500 miles. Skip happens!

Regards
Paul S.in CT FN31nl