PL-380 earphone jack


ww0e@...
 

Anyone out there have problems with the head phone jack.
The plug has to be wiggled or pulled about half way out to hear from them.
A friend touched up the solder joints there, still does not work properly.
Tried another pair, same thing.

 
Jerry  WWØE




Michael <michael.setaazul@...>
 

Jerry, this not an uncommon problem with all sorts of
jack-sockets, not just in a PL-380 (although thus far mine
is ok). They don't make'em like they used to :-)

I always push the plug in with tenderness and hope
for longevity. Where possible, I leave the earphone plug
in most of the time. Sometimes you can unsolder it from
the PCB, cut the plastic away and bend the springy contacts
gently back, but this can be tricky and risky in modern radios...

Michael

----- Original Message -----
Subject: [ultralightdx] PL-380 earphone jack

Anyone out there have problems with the head phone jack.
The plug has to be wiggled or pulled about half way out to hear from them.
A friend touched up the solder joints there, still does not work properly.
Tried another pair, same thing.

Jerry WWØE


josephrot
 

I might add here that many receivers 1/8 inch and 1/4 inch headphone connectors can and usually eventually do get oxidized contacts, where you usually can not reach them to clean. polish and lightly lube them.

One "tool" we use is to lightly saturate a "Q Tip" like cotton applicator, with quality tuner cleaner/lube, where MOST but not ALL of the cotton at the tip is smashed to make tinier, or removed to leave a small amount cotton on these.

Making sure that the cotton comes back to you, you might CAREFULLY insert into the headphone jack and rotate a few times, circulating back and forth as well.

That will in many instances, clean-and-lube enough of the contacts that likely caused your initial problems.

Again, making sure no cotton is left inside the connector, you might have to repeat the above two or so times to really clean what can be.

You can also do the above after removing the chassis totally, thus exposing the connector more fully, possibly gaining you better access to perform the above.

As a final note, we have done the above for a great many years on receivers of all ages, many Sat 800's, Tecsun PL's, vintage Grundigs, and others.

Headphone jacks/plugs are a constant, somewhat chronic source of exciting problems, especially as they or the headphones being plugged in age and/or oxidation and dirty contacts set in.

Joe

--- In ultralightdx@..., "Michael" <michael.setaazul@...> wrote:

Jerry, this not an uncommon problem with all sorts of
jack-sockets, not just in a PL-380 (although thus far mine
is ok). They don't make'em like they used to :-)

I always push the plug in with tenderness and hope
for longevity. Where possible, I leave the earphone plug
in most of the time. Sometimes you can unsolder it from
the PCB, cut the plastic away and bend the springy contacts
gently back, but this can be tricky and risky in modern radios...

Michael


----- Original Message -----
Subject: [ultralightdx] PL-380 earphone jack

Anyone out there have problems with the head phone jack.
The plug has to be wiggled or pulled about half way out to hear from them.
A friend touched up the solder joints there, still does not work properly.
Tried another pair, same thing.

Jerry WWØE


mike z
 

GM Jerry - pulling them out a bit sounds more like an internal jack problem. Not sure if the jack is compatible with stereo and mono. I have a couple of "whips" that go between the phones and the radios. Some are ST to mono, mono to ST, and straight thrus. Plugging and unplugging wear is pretty much limited to the jacks on the "whips".
For cleaning - I'm hooked on de-oxit red.

Mike AD1OS


Michael <michael.setaazul@...>
 

Good suggestion, Joe.

I might add that I have had similar success by carefully inserting a
pencil refill-lead and very gently rubbing the contacts inside.

Michael

----- Original Message ----- From: josephrot

I might add here that many receivers 1/8 inch and 1/4 inch headphone connectors can and usually
eventually do get oxidized contacts, where you usually can not reach them to clean. polish and
lightly lube them.

One "tool" we use is to lightly saturate a "Q Tip" like cotton applicator, with quality tuner
cleaner/lube, where MOST but not ALL of the cotton at the tip is smashed to make tinier, or removed
to leave a small amount cotton on these.

Making sure that the cotton comes back to you, you might CAREFULLY insert into the headphone jack
and rotate a few times, circulating back and forth as well.

That will in many instances, clean-and-lube enough of the contacts that likely caused your initial
problems.

Again, making sure no cotton is left inside the connector, you might have to repeat the above two or
so times to really clean what can be.

You can also do the above after removing the chassis totally, thus exposing the connector more
fully, possibly gaining you better access to perform the above.

As a final note, we have done the above for a great many years on receivers of all ages, many Sat
800's, Tecsun PL's, vintage Grundigs, and others.

Headphone jacks/plugs are a constant, somewhat chronic source of exciting problems, especially as
they or the headphones being plugged in age and/or oxidation and dirty contacts set in.

Joe


Gary DeBock
 

Hi Michael, Joe, Mike and Jerry,
 
A professional technician tip to clear up these intermittent earphone jacks is to spray Caig De-Oxit on the earphone cord plug tip, plug it in to the jack, and rotate it around a few times. Repeat this procedure until all intermittent problems are cleared up, then wipe the earphone plug tip dry with a clean cloth, and re-insert the plug into the earphone jack a few times, continuing to dry the plug as necessary until the plug comes out of the socket in a relatively dry state. This procedure corrects the intermittent problem in about 99% of cases.
 
73, Gary DeBock (in Puytallup, WA, USA)
Ex- U.S. Navy Sonar Technician
 
 
 
 

-----Original Message-----
From: Michael
To: ultralightdx
Sent: Thu, May 16, 2013 6:09 am
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] Re: PL-380 earphone jack

 
Good suggestion, Joe.

I might add that I have had similar success by carefully inserting a
pencil refill-lead and very gently rubbing the contacts inside.

Michael

----- Original Message ----- From: josephrot

I might add here that many receivers 1/8 inch and 1/4 inch headphone connectors can and usually
eventually do get oxidized contacts, where you usually can not reach them to clean. polish and
lightly lube them.

One "tool" we use is to lightly saturate a "Q Tip" like cotton applicator, with quality tuner
cleaner/lube, where MOST but not ALL of the cotton at the tip is smashed to make tinier, or removed
to leave a small amount cotton on these.

Making sure that the cotton comes back to you, you might CAREFULLY insert into the headphone jack
and rotate a few times, circulating back and forth as well.

That will in many instances, clean-and-lube enough of the contacts that likely caused your initial
problems.

Again, making sure no cotton is left inside the connector, you might have to repeat the above two or
so times to really clean what can be.

You can also do the above after removing the chassis totally, thus exposing the connector more
fully, possibly gaining you better access to perform the above.

As a final note, we have done the above for a great many years on receivers of all ages, many Sat
800's, Tecsun PL's, vintage Grundigs, and others.

Headphone jacks/plugs are a constant, somewhat chronic source of exciting problems, especially as
they or the headphones being plugged in age and/or oxidation and dirty contacts set in.

Joe


Michael <michael.setaazul@...>
 

Useful tip, Gary. But does anybody know of an
equivalent to Caig De-Oxit right of The Pond ???

I have used Servisol Super 10 switch-cleaning lubricant,
but am not sure of its credentials...

Michael

----- Original Message ----- From: Gary

Hi Michael, Joe, Mike and Jerry,

A professional technician tip to clear up these intermittent earphone jacks is to spray Caig De-Oxit
on the earphone cord plug tip, plug it in to the jack, and rotate it around a few times. Repeat this
procedure until all intermittent problems are cleared up, then wipe the earphone plug tip dry with a
clean cloth, and re-insert the plug into the earphone jack a few times, continuing to dry the plug
as necessary until the plug comes out of the socket in a relatively dry state. This procedure
corrects the intermittent problem in about 99% of cases.

73, Gary DeBock (in Puytallup, WA, USA)
Ex- U.S. Navy Sonar Technician


ww0e@...
 

It appears the two springy contacts might be spread apart?





Anyone out there have problems with the head phone jack.
The plug has to be wiggled or pulled about half way out to hear from them.
A friend touched up the solder joints there, still does not work properly.
Tried another pair, same thing.

Jerry WWØE




ww0e@...
 

thanks Michael,
so is the PL-380 take a mono or stereo phono plug adapter?

Jerry



From: "Michael"
To: ultralightdx@...
Sent: Thursday, May 16, 2013 8:14:28 AM
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] Re: PL-380  earphone jack

 

Good suggestion, Joe.

I might add that I have had similar success by carefully inserting a
pencil refill-lead and very gently rubbing the contacts inside.

Michael

----- Original Message ----- From: josephrot

I might add here that many receivers 1/8 inch and 1/4 inch headphone connectors can and usually
eventually do get oxidized contacts, where you usually can not reach them to clean. polish and
lightly lube them.

One "tool" we use is to lightly saturate a "Q Tip" like cotton applicator, with quality tuner
cleaner/lube, where MOST but not ALL of the cotton at the tip is smashed to make tinier, or removed
to leave a small amount cotton on these.

Making sure that the cotton comes back to you, you might CAREFULLY insert into the headphone jack
and rotate a few times, circulating back and forth as well.

That will in many instances, clean-and-lube enough of the contacts that likely caused your initial
problems.

Again, making sure no cotton is left inside the connector, you might have to repeat the above two or
so times to really clean what can be.

You can also do the above after removing the chassis totally, thus exposing the connector more
fully, possibly gaining you better access to perform the above.

As a final note, we have done the above for a great many years on receivers of all ages, many Sat
800's, Tecsun PL's, vintage Grundigs, and others.

Headphone jacks/plugs are a constant, somewhat chronic source of exciting problems, especially as
they or the headphones being plugged in age and/or oxidation and dirty contacts set in.

Joe



--
Jerry  WWØE
 
"Dots and Dashes"  -
the original digital mode.




mike z
 

Jerry - mine is stereo. Some mono plugs may give you a ring-to-sleeve short, so I would avoid sticking any mono plug in the phone jack. My stereo to mono whip ties the tip and ring to the tip in the mono jack. So far I haven't destroyed anything.
Mike AD1OS


Michael <michael.setaazul@...>
 

Yep, stereo it is. Jerry, but sometimes
the music would sound better on " mute" :-)

Michael

----- Original Message ----- From: mzya

Jerry - mine is stereo. Some mono plugs may give you a ring-to-sleeve short,
so I would avoid sticking any mono plug in the phone jack. My stereo to mono whip
ties the tip and ring to the tip in the mono jack. So far I haven't destroyed anything.
Mike AD1OS