ULR DX Season winding down.........


robert ross
 


On 2012-04-30, at 7:33 PM, RichardA wrote:

 

Rob:

I wouldn't worry much about me. My favorite time day for DXing is around sunrise, but it's about that time year when the sun is up before me. Usually at the end of the day I too tired to DX and fall asleep bu sunset. So until August I won't be doing much AM DXing until August. Hopefully their is lots of e-skip and tropo this year to fill the gap.

Good DX.

Richard.



Same here Richard............I won't be doing much AM BCB DXing with the ULRs as the FM/TV Season is just starting to get going here. Once the E-Skip and Tropo starts going Crazy......I find it hard to pry myself away from that!!

I don't use the ULRs for FM DXing however. With 2,154 FM Stations Logged to date...I just can't force myself to start from scratch with the ULRs. When things are hopping with E-Skip....you gotta bag 'em as quick as you can, and the RDS/HD Capabilities of the Big Rigs make it so much easier to ID Stations!! I have a 50 Foot Tower and a HUGE FM Beam, an APS-14, 14 Element FM Beam ...which also helps pull in the DX.

Looks like we may both be sitting stagnant on AM over the Summer....and we'll get back to the Dials in Late August or September........

Have Fun with the FM DX!!

73...ROB VA3SW

Robert S. Ross
London, Ontario CANADA


Gary DeBock
 

Richard and Rob,

You guys have both had phenomenal Ultralight DXing results recently,
and certainly are deserving of a break. With 1000 AM stations heard on
ULR's, you both are entitled to a leisurely, relaxing summer (and I
know that Rob shivered with me through the winter, too, chasing NDB's
outside in the freezing cold). But it may surprise you both that summer
is the most productive time for both AM and Longwave DXing here.

A weird quirk in propagation makes summer the best time to chase South
Pacific AM and Longwave DX on Pacific Ocean beaches, and I wish that
you could both experience the thrill of how the bands miraculously
change from static-filled wastelands into DXing paradises for a few
short hours around sunrise on high cliffs overlooking the Pacific surf.
If you hit it just right, Australia and New Zealand can both boom in
like locals, right in the middle of July and August.

When John Bryant first told me about this, it sounded like science
fiction... but if anything, he was understating the excitement. The new
FSL antennas (high gain and highly portable) have made Ultralight
radios pretty competitive DU-DXing machines on their frequency of
choice, and unlike multi-element arrays or beverages, they can be set
up on the highest of cliffs. Recently-developed models have the gain of
a 9-foot box loop crammed into one cubic foot of space, with a
"footprint" of only one cubic yard (on their 5' PVC bases). I wish that
both of you could enjoy at least one of these Summer Supercharged DXing
sessions... you might change your attitude about the season :-)

73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)

-----Original Message-----
From: Robert Ross <va3sw@...>
To: ultralightdx <ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Tue, May 1, 2012 8:05 am
Subject: [ultralightdx] ULR DX Season winding down.........








On 2012-04-30, at 7:33 PM, RichardA wrote:


 
Rob:

I wouldn't worry much about me. My favorite time day for DXing is
around sunrise, but it's about that time year when the sun is up before
me. Usually at the end of the day I too tired to DX and fall asleep bu
sunset. So until August I won't be doing much AM DXing until August.
Hopefully their is lots of e-skip and tropo this year to fill the gap.

Good DX.

Richard.






Same here Richard............I won't be doing much AM BCB DXing with
the ULRs as the FM/TV Season is just starting to get going here. Once
the E-Skip and Tropo starts going Crazy......I find it hard to pry
myself away from that!!


I don't use the ULRs for FM DXing however. With 2,154 FM Stations
Logged to date...I just can't force myself to start from scratch with
the ULRs. When things are hopping with E-Skip....you gotta bag 'em as
quick as you can, and the RDS/HD Capabilities of the Big Rigs make it
so much easier to ID Stations!! I have a 50 Foot Tower and a HUGE FM
Beam, an APS-14, 14 Element FM Beam ...which also helps pull in the DX.


Looks like we may both be sitting stagnant on AM over the Summer....and
we'll get back to the Dials in Late August or September........


Have Fun with the FM DX!!


73...ROB VA3SW


Robert S. Ross
London, Ontario CANADA


Guy Atkins
 

Hi Gary,

You have a delightful and accurate way of describing the excitement of DU DXing!

Besides the potential for reception of Australia and New Zealand, summer time DXing from the Washington and Oregon coast has the advantage of much more pleasant weather. It makes up for the misery of the cold, drizzle, and sometimes sideways rain when DXing at Pacific Northwest beaches in the winter and spring.

I have DXed every month of the year multiple times at the coast since I started going on DXpeditions in 1987-88. In my opinion, every month has potential for DX; it's a non-stop "DX season". Even when the solar cycle is not favorable (like right now), there's always hope that an interesting or unusual DX catch will surface. If not, well, you can try antenna experiments, compare different receivers, or investigate other radio related pursuits.

BTW Gary, wish me luck next week as I return to Grayland on the 6th through the 9th.  Your 7-inch FSL antenna will be part of the DXpedition supplies  :^)

Guy Atkins
Puyallup, WA  USA



--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:

> A weird quirk in propagation makes summer the best time to chase South
> Pacific AM and Longwave DX on Pacific Ocean beaches, and I wish that
> you could both experience the thrill of how the bands miraculously
> change from static-filled wastelands into DXing paradises for a few
> short hours around sunrise on high cliffs overlooking the Pacific surf.
> If you hit it just right, Australia and New Zealand can both boom in
> like locals, right in the middle of July and August.
>
> When John Bryant first told me about this, it sounded like science
> fiction... but if anything, he was understating the excitement. The new
> FSL antennas (high gain and highly portable) have made Ultralight
> radios pretty competitive DU-DXing machines on their frequency of
> choice, and unlike multi-element arrays or beverages, they can be set
> up on the highest of cliffs. Recently-developed models have the gain of
> a 9-foot box loop crammed into one cubic foot of space, with a
> "footprint" of only one cubic yard (on their 5' PVC bases). I wish that
> both of you could enjoy at least one of these Summer Supercharged DXing
> sessions... you might change your attitude about the season :-)
>
> 73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)


Gary DeBock
 

Thanks Guy,

Yes, chasing South Pacific AM-DX in the middle of summer probably
sounds pretty weird-- at least until someone tries it out (and gets
hooked). Strangely enough, both the Ultralight AM-DXing distance record
(from North America) and the Ultralight NDB-DXing distance record
(worldwide) were set during this type of bizarre DXing on the west
coast-- right in the middle of summer.

<<< Besides the potential for reception of Australia and New Zealand,
summer time DXing from the Washington and Oregon coast has the
advantage of much more pleasant weather. It makes up for the misery of
the cold, drizzle, and sometimes sideways rain when DXing at Pacific
Northwest beaches in the winter and spring. >>>

Well, your dedication to set up in the Grayland yurts during all kinds
of foul weather probably gives you a unique perspective on coastal
DXing, Guy. As I recall, you even went through an earthquake in one of
the recent Grayland sessions. Fair-weather DXers (like me) could
probably learn a lot from your determination.

<<< I have DXed every month of the year multiple times at the coast
since I started going on DXpeditions in 1987-88. In my opinion, every
month has potential for DX; it's a non-stop "DX season". Even when the
solar cycle is not favorable (like right now), there's always hope that
an interesting or unusual DX catch will surface. If not, well, you can
try antenna experiments, compare different receivers, or investigate
other radio related pursuits. >>>

Yes, last year the Solar Cycle usually didn't cooperate very well with
our DXpedition agendas, did it? It's always been the luck of the draw,
but recently the deck seems stacked against us. Fortunately South
Pacific DX is less dependent on solar cooperation than Asiatic TP
propagation (according to Chuck, and other experts).

<<< BTW Gary, wish me luck next week as I return t o Grayland on the
6th through the 9th. Your 7-inch FSL antenna will be part of the
DXpedition supplies :^) >>>

Thanks for taking the 7" FSL along, and good luck in Grayland next
week, Guy. You certainly can't do any worse than we did in our May 2008
(one-night) Dxpedition, when we received nothing except curious stares
from the clam diggers :-)

73, Gary

-----Original Message-----
From: thinkdx <dx@...>
To: ultralightdx <ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Wed, May 2, 2012 11:04 am
Subject: [ultralightdx] Re: ULR DX Season winding down.........





Hi Gary,


You have a delightful and accurate way of describing the excitement of
DU DXing!


Besides the potential for reception of Australia and New Zealand,
summer time DXing from the Washington and Oregon coast has the
advantage of much more pleasant weather. It makes up for the misery of
the cold, drizzle, and sometimes sideways rain when DXing at Pacific
Northwest beaches in the winter and spring.


I have DXed every month of the year multiple times at the coast since I
started going on DXpeditions in 1987-88. In my opinion, every month has
potential for DX; it's a non-stop "DX season". Even when the solar
cycle is not favorable (like right now), there's always hope that an
interesting or unusual DX catch will surface. If not, well, you can try
antenna experiments, compare different receivers, or investigate other
radio related pursuits.


BTW Gary, wish me luck next week as I return t o Grayland on the 6th
through the 9th.  Your 7-inch FSL antenna will be part of the
DXpedition supplies  :^)


Guy Atkins
Puyallup, WA  USA





--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:

A weird quirk in propagation makes summer the best time to chase
South
Pacific AM and Longwave DX on Pacific Ocean beaches, and I wish that
you could both experience the thrill of how the bands miraculously
change from static-filled wastelands into DXing paradises for a few
short hours around sunrise on high cliffs overlooking the Pacific
surf.
If you hit it just right, Australia and New Zealand can both boom in
like locals, right in the middle of July and August.

When John Bryant first told me about this, it sounded like science
fiction... but if anything, he was understating the excitement. The
new
FSL antennas (high gain and highly portable) have made Ultralight
radios pretty competitive DU-DXing machines on their frequency of
choice, and unlike multi-element arrays or beverages, they can be set
up on the highest of cliffs. Recently-developed models have the gain
of
a 9-foot box loop crammed into one cubic foot of space, with a
"footprint" of only one cubic yard (on their 5' PVC bases). I wish
that
both of you could enjoy at least one of these Summer Supercharged
DXing
sessions... you might change your attitude about the season :-)

73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)


Chris C.
 

Hi Gary,
Could you explain a bit what the 'quirk' in propagation actually is, that allows for TP receptions during the summer? Does it have anything to do with the winter conditions in the Southern Hemisphere?

AS far as summer conditions go, I still tune the MW band and see what's out there. I suppose there's less to hear, but I still try to hear whatever the propagatoin will allow....

Chris

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:

Richard and Rob,

You guys have both had phenomenal Ultralight DXing results recently,
and certainly are deserving of a break. With 1000 AM stations heard on
ULR's, you both are entitled to a leisurely, relaxing summer (and I
know that Rob shivered with me through the winter, too, chasing NDB's
outside in the freezing cold). But it may surprise you both that summer
is the most productive time for both AM and Longwave DXing here.

A weird quirk in propagation makes summer the best time to chase South
Pacific AM and Longwave DX on Pacific Ocean beaches, and I wish that
you could both experience the thrill of how the bands miraculously
change from static-filled wastelands into DXing paradises for a few
short hours around sunrise on high cliffs overlooking the Pacific surf.
If you hit it just right, Australia and New Zealand can both boom in
like locals, right in the middle of July and August.

When John Bryant first told me about this, it sounded like science
fiction... but if anything, he was understating the excitement. The new
FSL antennas (high gain and highly portable) have made Ultralight
radios pretty competitive DU-DXing machines on their frequency of
choice, and unlike multi-element arrays or beverages, they can be set
up on the highest of cliffs. Recently-developed models have the gain of
a 9-foot box loop crammed into one cubic foot of space, with a
"footprint" of only one cubic yard (on their 5' PVC bases). I wish that
both of you could enjoy at least one of these Summer Supercharged DXing
sessions... you might change your attitude about the season :-)

73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)




-----Original Message-----
From: Robert Ross <va3sw@...>
To: ultralightdx <ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Tue, May 1, 2012 8:05 am
Subject: [ultralightdx] ULR DX Season winding down.........








On 2012-04-30, at 7:33 PM, RichardA wrote:


 
Rob:

I wouldn't worry much about me. My favorite time day for DXing is
around sunrise, but it's about that time year when the sun is up before
me. Usually at the end of the day I too tired to DX and fall asleep bu
sunset. So until August I won't be doing much AM DXing until August.
Hopefully their is lots of e-skip and tropo this year to fill the gap.

Good DX.

Richard.






Same here Richard............I won't be doing much AM BCB DXing with
the ULRs as the FM/TV Season is just starting to get going here. Once
the E-Skip and Tropo starts going Crazy......I find it hard to pry
myself away from that!!


I don't use the ULRs for FM DXing however. With 2,154 FM Stations
Logged to date...I just can't force myself to start from scratch with
the ULRs. When things are hopping with E-Skip....you gotta bag 'em as
quick as you can, and the RDS/HD Capabilities of the Big Rigs make it
so much easier to ID Stations!! I have a 50 Foot Tower and a HUGE FM
Beam, an APS-14, 14 Element FM Beam ...which also helps pull in the DX.


Looks like we may both be sitting stagnant on AM over the Summer....and
we'll get back to the Dials in Late August or September........


Have Fun with the FM DX!!


73...ROB VA3SW


Robert S. Ross
London, Ontario CANADA


Gary DeBock
 

Hi Chris,

<<< Could you explain a bit what the 'quirk' in propagation actually
is, that allows for TP receptions during the summer? Does it have
anything to do with the winter conditions in the Southern Hemisphere?
Thanks for your interest in summer season DXing of South Pacific
stations here on the west coast.

You are correct-- this propagation "quirk" occurs because of winter
conditions in the Southern Hemisphere during the time when we have our
local summer. Although here in the Northern Hemisphere the months of
June, July and August are typically a dreary time of static-filled AM
and Longwave bands, the opposite is going on in the Southern Hemisphere
areas of Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific islands at this time.
They have great AM and LW band conditions during our summer.The
propagation "quirk" occurs because during June, July and August, our
local sunrise times coincide exactly with the South Pacific sunset
times, and AM and LW propagation between the two very distant areas is
suddenly enhanced greatly (for about an hour). Because there is a
direct ocean path between the two distant areas, a west coast DXer can
get an even greater propagation boost to the South Pacific by heading
for a Pacific Ocean beach at this time (around 1200 UTC, or 0500 local
time) and enjoying an all-salt water path to these distant areas. This
combination of DXing advantages allows us to sort of "tap into" the
great winter DXing conditions in the Southern Hemisphere at the time,
and the signal strengths of these distant "DU" (or "down under")
stations around our local sunrise can be astonishing.

The same DXing phenomena can be experienced at West Coast inland
locations like Seattle, Renton and Puyallup during the months of July
and August, but the South Pacific station signal strengths are nowhere
near as strong as they are right on the ocean beaches. For example,
during a July 2010 trip to Lincoln City, OR (right on the beach), two
long-range South Pacific stations on 738 kHz (Tahiti in YL French, and
2NR in Grafton, Australia) were in an unforgettable battle, pegging the
PL380's signal-to-noise display at the maximum of 25 (MP3 posted at
http://www.mediafire.com/?eea954j14dmzalm ).

73 andGood DX,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)






-----Original Message-----
From: renton481 <renton481@...>
To: ultralightdx <ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Thu, May 3, 2012 7:27 pm
Subject: [ultralightdx] Re: ULR DX Season winding down.........





Hi Gary,
Could you explain a bit what the 'quirk' in propagation actually is,
that allows for TP receptions during the summer? Does it have anything
to do with the winter conditions in the Southern Hemisphere?

AS far as summer conditions go, I still tune the MW band and see what's
out there. I suppose there's less to hear, but I still try to hear
whatever the propagatoin will allow....

Chris

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:

Richard and Rob,

You guys have both had phenomenal Ultralight DXing results recently,
and certainly are deserving of a break. With 1000 AM stations heard
on
ULR's, you both are entitled to a leisurely, relaxing summer (and I
know that Rob shivered with me through the winter, too, chasing NDB's
outside in the freezing cold). But it may surprise you both that
summer
is the most productive time for both AM and Longwave DXing here.

A weird quirk in propagation makes summer the best time to chase
South
Pacific AM and Longwave DX on Pacific Ocean beaches, and I wish that
you could both experience the thrill of how the bands miraculously
change from static-filled wastelands into DXing paradises for a few
short hours around sunrise on high cliffs overlooking the Pacific
surf.
If you hit it just right, Australia and New Zealand can both boom in
like locals, right in the middle of July and August.

When John Bryant first told me about this, it sounded like science
fiction... but if anything, he was understating the excitement. The
new
FSL antennas (high gain and highly portable) have made Ultralight
radios pretty competitive DU-DXing machines on their frequency of
choice, and unlike multi-element arrays or beverages, they can be set
up on the highest of cliffs. Recently-developed models have the gain
of
a 9-foot box loop crammed into one cubic foot of space, with a
"footprint" of only one cubic yard (on their 5' PVC bases). I wish
that
both of you could enjoy at least one of these Summer Supercharged
DXing
sessions... you might change your attitude about the season :-)

73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)




-----Original Message-----
From: Robert Ross <va3sw@...>
To: ultralightdx <ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Tue, May 1, 2012 8:05 am
Subject: [ultralightdx] ULR DX Season winding down.........








On 2012-04-30, at 7:33 PM, RichardA wrote:


 
Rob:

I wouldn't worry much about me. My favorite time day for DXing is
around sunrise, but it's about that time year when the sun is up
before
me. Usually at the end of the day I too tired to DX and fall asleep
bu
sunset. So until August I won't be doing much AM DXing until August.
Hopefully their is lots of e-skip and tropo this year to fill the gap.

Good DX.

Richard.






Same here Richard............I won't be doing much AM BCB DXing with
the ULRs as the FM/TV Season is just starting to get going here. Once
the E-Skip and Tropo starts going Crazy......I find it hard to pry
myself away from that!!


I don't use the ULRs for FM DXing however. With 2,154 FM Stations
Logged to date...I just can't force myself to start from scratch with
the ULRs. When things are hopping with E-Skip....you gotta bag 'em as
quick as you can, and the RDS/HD Capabilities of the Big Rigs make it
so much easier to ID Stations!! I have a 50 Foot Tower and a HUGE FM
Beam, an APS-14, 14 Element FM Beam ...which also helps pull in the
DX.


Looks like we may both be sitting stagnant on AM over the
Summer....and
we'll get back to the Dials in Late August or September........


Have Fun with the FM DX!!


73...ROB VA3SW


Robert S. Ross
London, Ontario CANADA


ferrite61 <dxrx@...>
 

Chris :o)
Tuning around in the summer months does have its rewards. For some reason some local area stations on off-channels do better late at night. Early nite before 10PM EDT is a wash-out, but around midnight to 4AM things get better. MHO is that the local electric load decreases, and generally better propagation occurs.

Paul S. in CT


--- In ultralightdx@..., "renton481" <renton481@...> wrote:
[edited for reply to this general point]

AS far as summer conditions go, I still tune the MW band and see what's out there. I suppose there's less to hear, but I still try to hear whatever the propagatoin will allow....

Chris

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@ wrote:

Richard and Rob,

You guys have both had phenomenal Ultralight DXing results recently,
and certainly are deserving of a break. With 1000 AM stations heard on
ULR's, you both are entitled to a leisurely, relaxing summer (and I
know that Rob shivered with me through the winter, too, chasing NDB's
outside in the freezing cold). But it may surprise you both that summer
is the most productive time for both AM and Longwave DXing here.

A weird quirk in propagation makes summer the best time to chase South
Pacific AM and Longwave DX on Pacific Ocean beaches, and I wish that
you could both experience the thrill of how the bands miraculously
change from static-filled wastelands into DXing paradises for a few
short hours around sunrise on high cliffs overlooking the Pacific surf.
If you hit it just right, Australia and New Zealand can both boom in
like locals, right in the middle of July and August.

When John Bryant first told me about this, it sounded like science
fiction... but if anything, he was understating the excitement. The new
FSL antennas (high gain and highly portable) have made Ultralight
radios pretty competitive DU-DXing machines on their frequency of
choice, and unlike multi-element arrays or beverages, they can be set
up on the highest of cliffs. Recently-developed models have the gain of
a 9-foot box loop crammed into one cubic foot of space, with a
"footprint" of only one cubic yard (on their 5' PVC bases). I wish that
both of you could enjoy at least one of these Summer Supercharged DXing
sessions... you might change your attitude about the season :-)

73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)




-----Original Message-----
From: Robert Ross <va3sw@>
To: ultralightdx <ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Tue, May 1, 2012 8:05 am
Subject: [ultralightdx] ULR DX Season winding down.........








On 2012-04-30, at 7:33 PM, RichardA wrote:


 
Rob:

I wouldn't worry much about me. My favorite time day for DXing is
around sunrise, but it's about that time year when the sun is up before
me. Usually at the end of the day I too tired to DX and fall asleep bu
sunset. So until August I won't be doing much AM DXing until August.
Hopefully their is lots of e-skip and tropo this year to fill the gap.

Good DX.

Richard.






Same here Richard............I won't be doing much AM BCB DXing with
the ULRs as the FM/TV Season is just starting to get going here. Once
the E-Skip and Tropo starts going Crazy......I find it hard to pry
myself away from that!!


I don't use the ULRs for FM DXing however. With 2,154 FM Stations
Logged to date...I just can't force myself to start from scratch with
the ULRs. When things are hopping with E-Skip....you gotta bag 'em as
quick as you can, and the RDS/HD Capabilities of the Big Rigs make it
so much easier to ID Stations!! I have a 50 Foot Tower and a HUGE FM
Beam, an APS-14, 14 Element FM Beam ...which also helps pull in the DX.


Looks like we may both be sitting stagnant on AM over the Summer....and
we'll get back to the Dials in Late August or September........


Have Fun with the FM DX!!


73...ROB VA3SW


Robert S. Ross
London, Ontario CANADA


Chris C.
 

Hi Gary,
Thanks for the info. I was aware that late winter / early spring was supposed to be a good time to catch DU's, but wasn't aware of the summertime phenomenon. I haven't heard a DU on any of my MW rigs (still dusting off some of the equipment, and just got into this ultralight thing), but I did catch KORL in Hawaii during the summer once a long time ago (on my DX 160), so I'm sure it's possible to get TP DX that time of year.

Chris

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:

Hi Chris,

<<< Could you explain a bit what the 'quirk' in propagation actually
is, that allows for TP receptions during the summer? Does it have
anything to do with the winter conditions in the Southern Hemisphere?
Thanks for your interest in summer season DXing of South Pacific
stations here on the west coast.

You are correct-- this propagation "quirk" occurs because of winter
conditions in the Southern Hemisphere during the time when we have our
local summer. Although here in the Northern Hemisphere the months of
June, July and August are typically a dreary time of static-filled AM
and Longwave bands, the opposite is going on in the Southern Hemisphere
areas of Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific islands at this time.
They have great AM and LW band conditions during our summer.The
propagation "quirk" occurs because during June, July and August, our
local sunrise times coincide exactly with the South Pacific sunset
times, and AM and LW propagation between the two very distant areas is
suddenly enhanced greatly (for about an hour). Because there is a
direct ocean path between the two distant areas, a west coast DXer can
get an even greater propagation boost to the South Pacific by heading
for a Pacific Ocean beach at this time (around 1200 UTC, or 0500 local
time) and enjoying an all-salt water path to these distant areas. This
combination of DXing advantages allows us to sort of "tap into" the
great winter DXing conditions in the Southern Hemisphere at the time,
and the signal strengths of these distant "DU" (or "down under")
stations around our local sunrise can be astonishing.

The same DXing phenomena can be experienced at West Coast inland
locations like Seattle, Renton and Puyallup during the months of July
and August, but the South Pacific station signal strengths are nowhere
near as strong as they are right on the ocean beaches. For example,
during a July 2010 trip to Lincoln City, OR (right on the beach), two
long-range South Pacific stations on 738 kHz (Tahiti in YL French, and
2NR in Grafton, Australia) were in an unforgettable battle, pegging the
PL380's signal-to-noise display at the maximum of 25 (MP3 posted at
http://www.mediafire.com/?eea954j14dmzalm ).

73 andGood DX,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)






-----Original Message-----
From: renton481 <renton481@...>
To: ultralightdx <ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Thu, May 3, 2012 7:27 pm
Subject: [ultralightdx] Re: ULR DX Season winding down.........





Hi Gary,
Could you explain a bit what the 'quirk' in propagation actually is,
that allows for TP receptions during the summer? Does it have anything
to do with the winter conditions in the Southern Hemisphere?