Affordable (?) 7" Diameter FSL Design


Gary DeBock
 

Hello All,

For those who have been interested in the new FSL antennas but not so
interested in paying many hundreds of dollars to build one, I have designed a relatively economic model which has effective DX
performance, but costs much less than the LW and MW models previously
made for the July DXpeditions (about $350 apiece). This smaller model
uses Russian surplus ferrite which can be purchased for about $90 at
current prices (including shipping), and uses the most effective 660/46
Litz wire. The cost to build this model (including a very high quality
8:1 vernier-drive variable capacitor from Crystal Radio Supply) is
under $150, and it provides a very effective inductive coupling boost
to stock Ultralight radios (or any other portables) on all frequencies
from 470-1710 kHz.

This was the compact FSL model that hometown buddy Guy Atkins recently
took during his recent Oregon coast vacation, where he managed to
receive several South Pacific 9-kHz split stations with it (and a
barefoot PL-380). A new photo of this model (showing the
specifications, and relative size) is posted at
http://www.mediafire.com/i/?pmqoacoftqgkpi1

Of course the concept of "affordable" means different things to
different people, and it's well understood that with the current poor
economy, even the cost mentioned above will be out of reach for many
DXers. That's very regrettable, and I'm sorry about this situation. The
FSL antennas really have the potential to revolutionize portable DXing,
however, and I wanted to design an effective FSL that could be built
for the absolute minimum cost (while still maintaining the high
performance standards that DXers deserve). Depending on the interest in
this 7" model, I'll write up the full DIY procedures for construction
sometime after the next short DXpedition trip to the Oregon coast
(August 13-16).

73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)


Michael <michael.setaazul@...>
 

----- Original Message -----
Subject: [ultralightdx] Affordable (?) 7" Diameter FSL Design


A new photo of this model (showing the
specifications, and relative size) is posted at
http://www.mediafire.com/i/?pmqoacoftqgkpi1


Gary, I get a "file not found message". Just me?

Michael UK


Gary DeBock
 

Hello All,

Sorry for the problems with Mediafire, making the photo link for this
picture unusable. I'l try to post the photo with this message.

73, Gary

-----Original Message-----
From: D1028Gary <D1028Gary@...>
To: ultralightdx <ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Mon, Aug 8, 2011 12:11 am
Subject: [ultralightdx] Affordable (?) 7" Diameter FSL Design

 
Hello All,

For those who have been interested in the new FSL antennas but not so
interested in paying many hundreds of dollars to build one, I have
designed a relatively economic model which has effective DX
performance, but costs much less than the LW and MW models previously
made for the July DXpeditions (about $350 apiece). This smaller model
uses Russian surplus ferrite which can be purchased for about $90 at
current prices (including shipping), and uses the most effective 660/46
Litz wire. The cost to build this model (including a very high quality
8:1 vernier-drive variable capacitor from Crystal Radio Supply) is
under $150, and it provides a very effective inductive coupling boost
to stock Ultralight radios (or any other portables) on all frequencies
from 470-1710 kHz.

This was the compact FSL model that hometown buddy Guy Atkins recently
took during his recent Oregon coast vacation, where he managed to
receive several South Pacific 9-kHz split stations with it (and a
barefoot PL-380). A new photo of this model (showing the
specifications, and relative size) is posted at
http://www.mediafire.com/i/?pmqoacoftqgkpi1

Of course the concept of "affordable" means different things to
different people, and it's well understood that with the current poor
economy, even the cost mentioned above will be out of reach for many
DXers. That's very regrettable, and I'm sorry about this situation. The
FSL antennas really have the potential to revolutionize portable DXing,
however, and I wanted to design an effective FSL that could be built
for the absolute minimum cost (while still maintaining the high
performance standards that DXers deserve). Depending on the interest in
this 7" model, I'll write up the full DIY procedures for construction
sometime after the next short DXpedition trip to the Oregon coast
(August 13-16).

73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)


Gary DeBock
 

Hello All,

Sorry for the MediaFire web site issue with the new 7" Medium Wave FSL
photo. It has been corrected, and the new link should show the design
and specification photo without problems
http://www.mediafire.com/i/?lq2ummbunzz5p3s

The "affordable" 7-inch FSL was designed to provide exciting DX
performance at a minimal cost (under $150), and weighs about 7.5
pounds. It has already proven itself to be a serious DXing performer,
providing inductive coupling boosts to a PL-380 to allow Guy Atkins to
receive several "DU" stations (from new Zealand and Tahiti) while on
the Oregon coast last month.

This relatively lightweight antenna is the first of new,
backback-capable FSL models suitable for setting up on high cliff sites
overlooking ocean beaches. The combination of FSL gain, salt water
propagation and a cliffside advantage may provide some exciting
transoceanic DX with stock Ultralights in the future.

73, Gary

-----Original Message-----
From: D1028Gary <D1028Gary@...>
To: ultralightdx <ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Mon, Aug 8, 2011 12:11 am
Subject: [ultralightdx] Affordable (?) 7" Diameter FSL Design

 
Hello All,

For those who have been interested in the new FSL antennas but not so
interested in paying many hundreds of dollars to build one, I have
designed a relatively economic model which has effective DX
performance, but costs much less than the LW and MW models previously
made for the July DXpeditions (about $350 apiece). This smaller model
uses Russian surplus ferrite which can be purchased for about $90 at
current prices (including shipping), and uses the most effective 660/46
Litz wire. The cost to build this model (including a very high quality
8:1 vernier-drive variable capacitor from Crystal Radio Supply) is
under $150, and it provides a very effective inductive coupling boost
to stock Ultralight radios (or any other portables) on all frequencies
from 470-1710 kHz.

This was the compact FSL model that hometown buddy Guy Atkins recently
took during his recent Oregon coast vacation, where he managed to
receive several South Pacific 9-kHz split stations with it (and a
barefoot PL-380). A new photo of this model (showing the
specifications, and relative size) is posted at
http://www.mediafire.com/i/?pmqoacoftqgkpi1

Of course the concept of "affordable" means different things to
different people, and it's well understood that with the current poor
economy, even the cost mentioned above will be out of reach for many
DXers. That's very regrettable, and I'm sorry about this situation. The
FSL antennas really have the potential to revolutionize portable DXing,
however, and I wanted to design an effective FSL that could be built
for the absolute minimum cost (while still maintaining the high
performance standards that DXers deserve). Depending on the interest in
this 7" model, I'll write up the full DIY procedures for construction
sometime after the next short DXpedition trip to the Oregon coast
(August 13-16).

73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)


jerry_popiel
 

Gary, when you have time, for those of us planning on building the 7.5 Ferrite Rod  connected to the PL 380 Radio:
 
1) Can the 7 inch FSL Design  be used with the 7.5 inch Ferrite Rod?   Or does it provide too much gain re overdriving concerns? If so, would this mean having to purchase a stand alone Pl 380 Radio for use with the 7 inch FSL?
 
2) In that 7.5 inch Ferrite Rod Antenna  photo you posted last week re the Back Edge of the Frame Tapered at  a 60 degree angle, it doesn't seem to show those 1/2 inch Black Vinyl Inserts? I can only make out the ends of the 7.5 inch Antenna which looks like the Ferrite Rod by itself. Or are they somehow inside the Rubber Mounting Supports?   Do you have any detailed photos of those 1/2 inch black or clear Vinyl  Inserts?
 
Thanks
 
Jerry  


Gary DeBock
 

Hi Jerry,

<<< 1) Can the 7 inch FSL Design be used with the 7.5 inch Ferrite
Rod? Or does it provide too much gain re overdriving concerns? If so,
would this mean having to purchase a stand alone Pl 380 Radio for use
with the 7 inch FSL? >>>

The 7 inch FSL can provide a powerful inductive coupling boost to any
loopstick-equipped portable on the planet, no matter what size of
loopstick the radio has. It will boost up a stock PL-380, a 7.5"
loopstick PL-380, an RF-2200, or even an 18" Stormwise PL-380 like
Guy's model. Some of the larger loopstick portables (like the RF-2200
or Sony ICF-S5W) get little if any boost from smaller loops like the
Select-a-Tenna or Terk Advantage, but they get a huge boost from a
sizable FSL. During the Oregon Beach DXpedition last month I recorded
the signal boost that a 6.5" Longwave FSL gave to a 7.5" LW loopstick
PL-380 in the reception of Alaskan 1 kw beacon 233-ALJ (1,400 miles)
and the Hawaiian 1 kw beacon 353-LLD (2,400 miles). The signal boost
was striking in both cases. The 233-ALJ recording is at
http://www.mediafire.com/?kan26xzeiyil3nd (first 3 ID's with only the
7.5" loopstick, last 3 ID's with the FSL boost) and the 353-LLD
recording is at http://www.mediafire.com/?jawtacwjzmjtj4n .

<<< 2) In that 7.5 inch Ferrite Rod Antenna photo you posted last
week re
the Back Edge of the Frame Tapered at a 60 degree angle, it doesn't
seem to show those 1/2 inch Black Vinyl Inserts? I can only make out
the ends of the 7.5 inch Antenna which looks like the Ferrite Rod by
itself. Or are they somehow inside the Rubber Mounting Supports? Do
you have any detailed photos of those 1/2 inch black or clear Vinyl
Inserts? >>>

The 1/2" black vinyl inserts are inside the 5/8" (inner diameter)
rubber shock mounts that are used to secure the loopstick to the
glued-on orange plastic frame. The black vinyl inserts may be replaced
by 1/2" clear vinyl inserts without any problem (the clear vinyl
inserts are much more common at the hardware stores here in the USA).
Photos of the black vinyl inserts are in the "PL-360 7.5" Plug-in
Loopstick" photo album in the Ultralightdx Photo Site, at the following
link
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ultralightdx/photos/album/290782821/pic/list



73, Gary

-----Original Message-----
From: Jerry Popiel <jerry_popiel@...>
To: ultralightdx <ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Mon, Aug 8, 2011 8:28 pm
Subject: [ultralightdx] Re: Affordable (?) 7" Diameter FSL Design

 
Gary, when you have time, for those of us planning on building the 7.5
Ferrite Rod  connected to the PL 380 Radio:
 
1) Can the 7 inch FSL Design  be used with the 7.5 inch Ferrite Rod?  
Or does it provide too much gain re overdriving concerns? If so, would
this mean having to purchase a stand alone Pl 380 Radio for use with
the 7 inch FSL?
 
2) In that 7.5 inch Ferrite Rod Antenna  photo you posted last week re
the Back Edge of the Frame Tapered at  a 60 degree angle, it doesn't
seem to show those 1/2 inch Black Vinyl Inserts? I can only make out
the ends of the 7.5 inch Antenna which looks like the Ferrite Rod by
itself. Or are they somehow inside the Rubber Mounting Supports?   Do
you have any detailed photos of those 1/2 inch black or clear Vinyl 
Inserts?
 
Thanks
 
Jerry


ne558p <clackc@...>
 

Hello Gary,

Where do you buy your 2" J & J Waterproof tape?

Thanks Dave

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:

Hello All,

For those who have been interested in the new FSL antennas but not so
interested in paying many hundreds of dollars to build one, I have
designed a relatively economic model which has effective DX
performance, but costs much less than the LW and MW models previously
made for the July DXpeditions (about $350 apiece). This smaller model
uses Russian surplus ferrite which can be purchased for about $90 at
current prices (including shipping), and uses the most effective 660/46
Litz wire. The cost to build this model (including a very high quality
8:1 vernier-drive variable capacitor from Crystal Radio Supply) is
under $150, and it provides a very effective inductive coupling boost
to stock Ultralight radios (or any other portables) on all frequencies
from 470-1710 kHz.

This was the compact FSL model that hometown buddy Guy Atkins recently
took during his recent Oregon coast vacation, where he managed to
receive several South Pacific 9-kHz split stations with it (and a
barefoot PL-380). A new photo of this model (showing the
specifications, and relative size) is posted at
http://www.mediafire.com/i/?pmqoacoftqgkpi1

Of course the concept of "affordable" means different things to
different people, and it's well understood that with the current poor
economy, even the cost mentioned above will be out of reach for many
DXers. That's very regrettable, and I'm sorry about this situation. The
FSL antennas really have the potential to revolutionize portable DXing,
however, and I wanted to design an effective FSL that could be built
for the absolute minimum cost (while still maintaining the high
performance standards that DXers deserve). Depending on the interest in
this 7" model, I'll write up the full DIY procedures for construction
sometime after the next short DXpedition trip to the Oregon coast
(August 13-16).

73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)


jerry_popiel
 

Thanks for the great info Gary, especially those vinyl insert pics.
 
Jerry


Gary DeBock
 

Hi Dave,

Unfortunately, the 2" J & J Waterproof tape seems to have been
discontinued by the manufacturer, and I can't seem to find any current
supplier on the Internet (if someone knows of a source, please let me
know).

My original supply was in a 6-roll package from a medical supply
company, which has now been almost exhausted. The J & J 1" Waterproof
tape can be substituted for the 2" tape in most projects, although in
the case of the 7.5" longwave loopsticks (with the long Litz wire coil
running practically the entire length of the ferrite bar), the 2"
waterproof tape is far preferable. If someone has an extra roll (or
even partial roll) of the J & J 2" Waterproof tape available, I'd sure
appreciate knowing about it (and feel free to name the antenna
hot-rodding project of your choice :-)

73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)

-----Original Message-----
From: ne558p <clackc@q.com>
To: ultralightdx <ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Tue, Aug 9, 2011 11:31 pm
Subject: [ultralightdx] Re: Affordable (?) 7" Diameter FSL Design

 


Hello Gary,

Where do you buy your 2" J & J Waterproof tape?

Thanks Dave

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:

Hello All,

For those who have been interested in the new FSL antennas but not
so
interested in paying many hundreds of dollars to build one, I have
designed a relatively economic model which has effective DX
performance, but costs much less than the LW and MW models
previously
made for the July DXpeditions (about $350 apiece). This smaller
model
uses Russian surplus ferrite which can be purchased for about $90
at
current prices (including shipping), and uses the most effective
660/46
Litz wire. The cost to build this model (including a very high
quality
8:1 vernier-drive variable capacitor from Crystal Radio Supply) is
under $150, and it provides a very effective inductive coupling
boost
to stock Ultralight radios (or any other portables) on all
frequencies
from 470-1710 kHz.

This was the compact FSL model that hometown buddy Guy Atkins
recently
took during his recent Oregon coast vacation, where he managed to
receive several South Pacific 9-kHz split stations with it (and a
barefoot PL-380). A new photo of this model (showing the
specifications, and relative size) is posted at
http://www.mediafire.com/i/?pmqoacoftqgkpi1

Of course the concept of "affordable" means different things to
different people, and it's well understood that with the current
poor
economy, even the cost mentioned above will be out of reach for
many
DXers. That's very regrettable, and I'm sorry about this
situation. The
FSL antennas really have the potential to revolutionize portable
DXing,
however, and I wanted to design an effective FSL that could be
built
for the absolute minimum cost (while still maintaining the high
performance standards that DXers deserve). Depending on the
interest in
this 7" model, I'll write up the full DIY procedures for
construction
sometime after the next short DXpedition trip to the Oregon coast
(August 13-16).

73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
&gt;


w4asz@bellsouth.net
 

I see Kendall Wet-Pruf and McKesson Redi-Pak tapes in two inch width are available. They may be as good.

The mp3s are most interesting.

This is sufficiently insane that I may be along in a couple of months.

Do continue, Sirs !

-Steve
W4ASZ

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:

Hi Dave,

Unfortunately, the 2" J & J Waterproof tape seems to have been
discontinued by the manufacturer, and I can't seem to find any current
supplier on the Internet (if someone knows of a source, please let me
know).

My original supply was in a 6-roll package from a medical supply
company, which has now been almost exhausted. The J & J 1" Waterproof
tape can be substituted for the 2" tape in most projects, although in
the case of the 7.5" longwave loopsticks (with the long Litz wire coil
running practically the entire length of the ferrite bar), the 2"
waterproof tape is far preferable. If someone has an extra roll (or
even partial roll) of the J & J 2" Waterproof tape available, I'd sure
appreciate knowing about it (and feel free to name the antenna
hot-rodding project of your choice :-)

73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)

-----Original Message-----
From: ne558p <clackc@...>
To: ultralightdx <ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Tue, Aug 9, 2011 11:31 pm
Subject: [ultralightdx] Re: Affordable (?) 7" Diameter FSL Design

 


Hello Gary,

Where do you buy your 2" J & J Waterproof tape?

Thanks Dave

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@ wrote:

Hello All,

For those who have been interested in the new FSL antennas but not
so
interested in paying many hundreds of dollars to build one, I have
designed a relatively economic model which has effective DX
performance, but costs much less than the LW and MW models
previously
made for the July DXpeditions (about $350 apiece). This smaller
model
uses Russian surplus ferrite which can be purchased for about $90
at
current prices (including shipping), and uses the most effective
660/46
Litz wire. The cost to build this model (including a very high
quality
8:1 vernier-drive variable capacitor from Crystal Radio Supply) is
under $150, and it provides a very effective inductive coupling
boost
to stock Ultralight radios (or any other portables) on all
frequencies
from 470-1710 kHz.

This was the compact FSL model that hometown buddy Guy Atkins
recently
took during his recent Oregon coast vacation, where he managed to
receive several South Pacific 9-kHz split stations with it (and a
barefoot PL-380). A new photo of this model (showing the
specifications, and relative size) is posted at
http://www.mediafire.com/i/?pmqoacoftqgkpi1

Of course the concept of "affordable" means different things to
different people, and it's well understood that with the current
poor
economy, even the cost mentioned above will be out of reach for
many
DXers. That's very regrettable, and I'm sorry about this
situation. The
FSL antennas really have the potential to revolutionize portable
DXing,
&gt; however, and I wanted to design an effective FSL that could be
built
for the absolute minimum cost (while still maintaining the high
&gt; performance standards that DXers deserve). Depending on the
interest in
this 7" model, I'll write up the full DIY procedures for
construction
sometime after the next short DXpedition trip to the Oregon coast
(August 13-16).

73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)


w4asz@bellsouth.net
 

Make that McKesson Medi-Pak tape. I assume these are similar. Any good EMT would know.

--- In ultralightdx@..., "stevew4asz" <w4asz@...> wrote:

I see Kendall Wet-Pruf and McKesson Redi-Pak tapes in two inch width are available. They may be as good.

The mp3s are most interesting.

This is sufficiently insane that I may be along in a couple of months.

Do continue, Sirs !

-Steve
W4ASZ

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@ wrote:

Hi Dave,

Unfortunately, the 2" J & J Waterproof tape seems to have been
discontinued by the manufacturer, and I can't seem to find any current
supplier on the Internet (if someone knows of a source, please let me
know).

My original supply was in a 6-roll package from a medical supply
company, which has now been almost exhausted. The J & J 1" Waterproof
tape can be substituted for the 2" tape in most projects, although in
the case of the 7.5" longwave loopsticks (with the long Litz wire coil
running practically the entire length of the ferrite bar), the 2"
waterproof tape is far preferable. If someone has an extra roll (or
even partial roll) of the J & J 2" Waterproof tape available, I'd sure
appreciate knowing about it (and feel free to name the antenna
hot-rodding project of your choice :-)

73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)

-----Original Message-----
From: ne558p <clackc@>
To: ultralightdx <ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Tue, Aug 9, 2011 11:31 pm
Subject: [ultralightdx] Re: Affordable (?) 7" Diameter FSL Design

 


Hello Gary,

Where do you buy your 2" J & J Waterproof tape?

Thanks Dave

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@ wrote:

Hello All,

For those who have been interested in the new FSL antennas but not
so
interested in paying many hundreds of dollars to build one, I have
designed a relatively economic model which has effective DX
&gt; performance, but costs much less than the LW and MW models
previously
made for the July DXpeditions (about $350 apiece). This smaller
model
uses Russian surplus ferrite which can be purchased for about $90
at
current prices (including shipping), and uses the most effective
660/46
Litz wire. The cost to build this model (including a very high
quality
8:1 vernier-drive variable capacitor from Crystal Radio Supply) is
under $150, and it provides a very effective inductive coupling
boost
to stock Ultralight radios (or any other portables) on all
frequencies
from 470-1710 kHz.

This was the compact FSL model that hometown buddy Guy Atkins
recently
took during his recent Oregon coast vacation, where he managed to
receive several South Pacific 9-kHz split stations with it (and a
barefoot PL-380). A new photo of this model (showing the
specifications, and relative size) is posted at
http://www.mediafire.com/i/?pmqoacoftqgkpi1

Of course the concept of "affordable" means different things to
different people, and it's well understood that with the current
poor
economy, even the cost mentioned above will be out of reach for
many
DXers. That's very regrettable, and I'm sorry about this
situation. The
FSL antennas really have the potential to revolutionize portable
DXing,
however, and I wanted to design an effective FSL that could be
built
for the absolute minimum cost (while still maintaining the high
performance standards that DXers deserve). Depending on the
interest in
this 7" model, I'll write up the full DIY procedures for
construction
sometime after the next short DXpedition trip to the Oregon coast
(August 13-16).

73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)


Gary DeBock
 

Hi Steve,

Thanks for your suggested replacements for the J & J 2" Waterproof tape
(and thanks to all who have researched possible sources for the
original tape).

Some web sites show the J & J 2" tape as available, but when an order
is placed (or a call is made) they admit that none of it is really in
stock. The tape was used in all 7.5" loopsticks (MW and LW, plug-in,
fixed and Slider) made here during the past 3 years, and is the solid
white tape used as a thin coil form in between the Litz wire coils and
the ferrite bar. The J & J 1" tape can be substituted in MW loopsticks
and in all FSL's, but the 2" tape is much more convenient for the 7.5"
LW loopsticks of all types. I still have enough of the J & J 2" tape to
make about 5 more LW loopsticks, but then I'll need to switch to some
other type (it's a matter of building a test loopstick with it, then
checking its performance against a J & J taped loopstick).

73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)

-----Original Message-----
From: stevew4asz <w4asz@...>
To: ultralightdx <ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Wed, Aug 10, 2011 6:22 pm
Subject: [ultralightdx] Re: Affordable (?) 7" Diameter FSL Design

 
Make that McKesson Medi-Pak tape. I assume these are similar. Any good
EMT would know.

--- In ultralightdx@..., "stevew4asz" <w4asz@...>
wrote:

I see Kendall Wet-Pruf and McKesson Redi-Pak tapes in two inch
width are available. They may be as good.

The mp3s are most interesting.

This is sufficiently insane that I may be along in a couple of
months.

Do continue, Sirs !

-Steve
W4ASZ

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@ wrote:

Hi Dave,

Unfortunately, the 2" J & J Waterproof tape seems to have
been
discontinued by the manufacturer, and I can't seem to find
any current
supplier on the Internet (if someone knows of a source,
please let me
know).

My original supply was in a 6-roll package from a medical
supply
company, which has now been almost exhausted. The J & J 1"
Waterproof
tape can be substituted for the 2" tape in most projects,
although in
the case of the 7.5" longwave loopsticks (with the long Litz
wire coil
running practically the entire length of the ferrite bar),
the 2"
waterproof tape is far preferable. If someone has an extra
roll (or
even partial roll) of the J & J 2" Waterproof tape available,
I'd sure
appreciate knowing about it (and feel free to name the
antenna
hot-rodding project of your choice :-)

73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)

-----Original Message-----
From: ne558p <clackc@>
To: ultralightdx <ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Tue, Aug 9, 2011 11:31 pm
Subject: [ultralightdx] Re: Affordable (?) 7" Diameter FSL
Design

 
&gt; >

Hello Gary,

Where do you buy your 2" J & J Waterproof tape?

Thanks Dave

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@ wrote:

Hello All,

For those who have been interested in the new FSL
antennas but not
so
&gt; > interested in paying many hundreds of dollars to build
one, I have
designed a relatively economic model which has effective
DX
performance, but costs much less than the LW and MW
models
previously
made for the July DXpeditions (about $350 apiece). This
smaller
model
uses Russian surplus ferrite which can be purchased for
about $90
at
&gt; current prices (including shipping), and uses the most
effective
660/46
Litz wire. The cost to build this model (including a
very high
quality
8:1 vernier-drive variable capacitor from Crystal Radio
Supply) is
under $150, and it provides a very effective inductive
coupling
boost
&gt; to stock Ultralight radios (or any other portables) on
all
frequencies
from 470-1710 kHz.

This was the compact FSL model that hometown buddy Guy
Atkins
recently
took during his recent Oregon coast vacation, where he
managed to
receive several South Pacific 9-kHz split stations with
it (and a
barefoot PL-380). A new photo of this model (showing the
specifications, and relative size) is posted at
http://www.mediafire.com/i/?pmqoacoftqgkpi1
&gt;
Of course the concept of "affordable" means different
things to
different people, and it's well understood that with the
current
poor
economy, even the cost mentioned above will be out of
reach for
many
DXers. That's very regrettable, and I'm sorry about this
situation. The
&gt; > > FSL antennas really have the potential to revolutionize
portable
DXing,
however, and I wanted to design an effective FSL that
could be
built
for the absolute minimum cost (while still maintaining
the high
performance standards that DXers deserve). Depending on
the
interest in
&gt; > this 7" model, I'll write up the full DIY procedures for
construction
sometime after the next short DXpedition trip to the
Oregon coast
(August 13-16).

73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
&gt; > >


w4asz@bellsouth.net
 

Gary -

What tape would Ernst Alexanderson have used ? :)

73,

Steve

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:

Hi Steve,

Thanks for your suggested replacements for the J & J 2" Waterproof tape
(and thanks to all who have researched possible sources for the
original tape).

Some web sites show the J & J 2" tape as available, but when an order
is placed (or a call is made) they admit that none of it is really in
stock. The tape was used in all 7.5" loopsticks (MW and LW, plug-in,
fixed and Slider) made here during the past 3 years, and is the solid
white tape used as a thin coil form in between the Litz wire coils and
the ferrite bar. The J & J 1" tape can be substituted in MW loopsticks
and in all FSL's, but the 2" tape is much more convenient for the 7.5"
LW loopsticks of all types. I still have enough of the J & J 2" tape to
make about 5 more LW loopsticks, but then I'll need to switch to some
other type (it's a matter of building a test loopstick with it, then
checking its performance against a J & J taped loopstick).

73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)

-----Original Message-----
From: stevew4asz <w4asz@...>
To: ultralightdx <ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Wed, Aug 10, 2011 6:22 pm
Subject: [ultralightdx] Re: Affordable (?) 7" Diameter FSL Design

 
Make that McKesson Medi-Pak tape. I assume these are similar. Any good
EMT would know.

--- In ultralightdx@..., "stevew4asz" w4asz@
wrote:

I see Kendall Wet-Pruf and McKesson Redi-Pak tapes in two inch
width are available. They may be as good.

The mp3s are most interesting.

This is sufficiently insane that I may be along in a couple of
months.

Do continue, Sirs !

-Steve
W4ASZ
&gt; --- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@ wrote:
&gt; > Hi Dave,

Unfortunately, the 2" J & J Waterproof tape seems to have
been
discontinued by the manufacturer, and I can't seem to find
any current
supplier on the Internet (if someone knows of a source,
please let me
know).
&gt; >
My original supply was in a 6-roll package from a medical
supply
company, which has now been almost exhausted. The J & J 1"
Waterproof
tape can be substituted for the 2" tape in most projects,
although in
the case of the 7.5" longwave loopsticks (with the long Litz
wire coil
running practically the entire length of the ferrite bar),
the 2"
waterproof tape is far preferable. If someone has an extra
roll (or
even partial roll) of the J & J 2" Waterproof tape available,
I'd sure
appreciate knowing about it (and feel free to name the
antenna
&gt; > hot-rodding project of your choice :-)

73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)

-----Original Message-----
From: ne558p <clackc@>
To: ultralightdx ultralightdx@...
Sent: Tue, Aug 9, 2011 11:31 pm
Subject: [ultralightdx] Re: Affordable (?) 7" Diameter FSL
Design

 

&gt; > Hello Gary,

Where do you buy your 2" J & J Waterproof tape?

Thanks Dave
&gt; --- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@ wrote:

Hello All,

For those who have been interested in the new FSL
antennas but not
so
interested in paying many hundreds of dollars to build
one, I have
designed a relatively economic model which has effective
DX
performance, but costs much less than the LW and MW
models
previously
made for the July DXpeditions (about $350 apiece). This
smaller
model
uses Russian surplus ferrite which can be purchased for
about $90
at
current prices (including shipping), and uses the most
effective
660/46
Litz wire. The cost to build this model (including a
very high
quality
8:1 vernier-drive variable capacitor from Crystal Radio
Supply) is
under $150, and it provides a very effective inductive
coupling
boost
to stock Ultralight radios (or any other portables) on
all
frequencies
from 470-1710 kHz.

This was the compact FSL model that hometown buddy Guy
Atkins
recently
took during his recent Oregon coast vacation, where he
managed to
receive several South Pacific 9-kHz split stations with
it (and a
barefoot PL-380). A new photo of this model (showing the
specifications, and relative size) is posted at
http://www.mediafire.com/i/?pmqoacoftqgkpi1
&gt; > >
Of course the concept of "affordable" means different
things to
different people, and it's well understood that with the
current
poor
economy, even the cost mentioned above will be out of
reach for
many
DXers. That's very regrettable, and I'm sorry about this
situation. The
FSL antennas really have the potential to revolutionize
portable
DXing,
however, and I wanted to design an effective FSL that
could be
built
for the absolute minimum cost (while still maintaining
the high
performance standards that DXers deserve). Depending on
the
interest in
this 7" model, I'll write up the full DIY procedures for
construction
sometime after the next short DXpedition trip to the
Oregon coast
(August 13-16).

73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
&gt; >


Phil Pasteur
 

Gary,
How much of the 660/46 Litz wire woiuld you estimat you used on the 7" FSL.
I am putting together the parts to try my hand at building one. There are also a few vendors on Ebay selling the wire, any recomendations, or is there some other place I should be looking?

As to the "funnoodle" thing. Where the heck would one look for that?

BTW. I hope that I am still on your list for a longwave ferrite for the PL-360..
:)

Phil


Gary DeBock
 

Hi Phil,

The 7" FSL (designed for MW coverage) uses 20 turns of the 660/46 Litz
wire, and each turn takes 23" of wire. Ordering 45 feet of the Litz wire should be more than sufficient, assuming that your padding
material does not make your FSL's final diameter much larger than my
model (just under 7"). Please note that my 7" (Affordable) FSL design
uses 660/46 Litz wire from the eBay seller "Mkmak222," and that all the
performance reports and MP3's were based on the use of that high
quality wire. Substitution of lower quality Litz wire may adversly
affect your FSL's performance.

Concerning the delayed completion of the 7.5" Longwave plug-in
loopsticks, I still do plan to complete construction of them all, as
time allows (there is an extreme shortage of free time here,
currently). That particular loopstick model requires both electronic
and power tool construction experience to complete, which is presumably
the reason why no other technician has volunteered to meet the surging
demand. Sorry for the delay, but your loopstick job has not been
forgotten, Phil.

73, Gary

-----Original Message-----
From: ppasteur <ppasteur@q.com>
To: ultralightdx <ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Fri, Sep 2, 2011 3:54 pm
Subject: [ultralightdx] Re: Affordable (?) 7" Diameter FSL Design






Gary,
How much of the 660/46 Litz wire woiuld you estimat you used on the 7"
FSL.
I am putting together the parts to try my hand at building one. There
are also a few vendors on Ebay selling the wire, any recomendations, or
is there some other place I should be looking?

As to the "funnoodle" thing. Where the heck would one look for that?

BTW. I hope that I am still on your list for a longwave ferrite for the
PL-360..
:)

Phil


Gary DeBock
 

Phil,

The "Funnoodle" floating tube (actually a swimming aide for kids) is
the inner core material used for all my FSL's, and provides the perfect
combination of resilience and stiffness, even for very heavy FSL's (up
to 25 pounds). It has a convenient hole through the middle, to exactly
fit a 3/4" diameter PVC pipe section for your FSL's horizontal hanging
frame. A photo of the "Funnoodle" (and other FSL core materials) is
posted at http://www.mediafire.com/i/?sb60cm5c31e8tw4

The "Funnoodle" flolating tube is available here locally at both
Walmart and Fred Meyer stores, and costs only about $4 for a 6-foot
long tube. That should be long enough for you to make about 15 FSL's
with it :-)

73, Gary

-----Original Message-----
From: D1028Gary <D1028Gary@...>
To: ultralightdx <ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Sat, Sep 3, 2011 12:33 pm
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] Re: Affordable (?) 7" Diameter FSL Design




Hi Phil,

The 7" FSL (designed for MW coverage) uses 20 turns of the 660/46 Litz
wire, and each turn takes 23" of wire. Ordering 45 feet of the Litz
wire should be more than sufficient, assuming that your padding
material does not make your FSL's final diameter much larger than my
model (just under 7"). Please note that my 7" (Affordable) FSL design
uses 660/46 Litz wire from the eBay seller "Mkmak222," and that all the
performance reports and MP3's were based on the use of that high
quality wire. Substitution of lower quality Litz wire may adversly
affect your FSL's performance.

Concerning the delayed completion of the 7.5" Longwave plug-in
loopsticks, I still do plan to complete construction of them all, as
time allows (there is an extreme shortage of free time here,
currently). That particular loopstick model requires both electronic
and power tool construction experience to complete, which is presumably
the reason why no other technician has volunteered to meet the surging
demand. Sorry for the delay, but your loopstick job has not been
forgotten, Phil.

73, Gary

-----Original Message-----
From: ppasteur <ppasteur@q.com>
To: ultralightdx <ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Fri, Sep 2, 2011 3:54 pm
Subject: [ultralightdx] Re: Affordable (?) 7" Diameter FSL Design

Gary,
How much of the 660/46 Litz wire woiuld you estimat you used on the 7"
FSL.
I am putting together the parts to try my hand at building one. There
are also a few vendors on Ebay selling the wire, any recomendations, or
is there some other place I should be looking?

As to the "funnoodle" thing. Where the heck would one look for that?

BTW. I hope that I am still on your list for a longwave ferrite for the
PL-360..
:)

Phil


Phil Pasteur
 

Ok,
Thanks for the info. I got the variable cap, Litz, and ferrite rods all on order. Going to Walmart in search of a funnoodle. Will visit my local Home Depot to see about the rest of the pieces.

This should be interesting. I haven't wound a coil in 20 some years...
:)

Phil

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:

Phil,

The "Funnoodle" floating tube (actually a swimming aide for kids) is
the inner core material used for all my FSL's, and provides the perfect
combination of resilience and stiffness, even for very heavy FSL's (up
to 25 pounds). It has a convenient hole through the middle, to exactly
fit a 3/4" diameter PVC pipe section for your FSL's horizontal hanging
frame. A photo of the "Funnoodle" (and other FSL core materials) is
posted at http://www.mediafire.com/i/?sb60cm5c31e8tw4

The "Funnoodle" flolating tube is available here locally at both
Walmart and Fred Meyer stores, and costs only about $4 for a 6-foot
long tube. That should be long enough for you to make about 15 FSL's
with it :-)

73, Gary


-----Original Message-----
From: D1028Gary <D1028Gary@...>
To: ultralightdx <ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Sat, Sep 3, 2011 12:33 pm
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] Re: Affordable (?) 7" Diameter FSL Design




Hi Phil,

The 7" FSL (designed for MW coverage) uses 20 turns of the 660/46 Litz
wire, and each turn takes 23" of wire. Ordering 45 feet of the Litz
wire should be more than sufficient, assuming that your padding
material does not make your FSL's final diameter much larger than my
model (just under 7"). Please note that my 7" (Affordable) FSL design
uses 660/46 Litz wire from the eBay seller "Mkmak222," and that all the
performance reports and MP3's were based on the use of that high
quality wire. Substitution of lower quality Litz wire may adversly
affect your FSL's performance.

Concerning the delayed completion of the 7.5" Longwave plug-in
loopsticks, I still do plan to complete construction of them all, as
time allows (there is an extreme shortage of free time here,
currently). That particular loopstick model requires both electronic
and power tool construction experience to complete, which is presumably
the reason why no other technician has volunteered to meet the surging
demand. Sorry for the delay, but your loopstick job has not been
forgotten, Phil.


Phil Pasteur
 

Well, I am striking out on finding the Funnoodle Monster swimming aid. It seems that it is the wrong season to find them in my area. I called no fewer than 8 local Walmart, Target, and Ace Hardware stores that claim that they carry them. All were sold out and probably will not get any until next spring. Even Amazon lists them as not available.

I wrote Gary off list to see if he may have a length sufficient for a couple of FSLs that he could sell me. I thought I would throw that out to the list as well.

I would be happy to pay whatever the seller thingthe material is worht plus shipping and something for the time required to get it done. Please contact me off list.

Alternatively, If anyone knows where I could buy one of the Funnoodle Monsters online, pleae let me know.

Thanks all,

Phil

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:

Phil,

The "Funnoodle" floating tube (actually a swimming aide for kids) is
the inner core material used for all my FSL's, and provides the perfect
combination of resilience and stiffness, even for very heavy FSL's (up
to 25 pounds). It has a convenient hole through the middle, to exactly
fit a 3/4" diameter PVC pipe section for your FSL's horizontal hanging
frame. A photo of the "Funnoodle" (and other FSL core materials) is
posted at http://www.mediafire.com/i/?sb60cm5c31e8tw4

The "Funnoodle" flolating tube is available here locally at both
Walmart and Fred Meyer stores, and costs only about $4 for a 6-foot
long tube. That should be long enough for you to make about 15 FSL's
with it :-)

73, Gary


kevin asato <kc6pob@...>
 

Check out a home improvement store for pipe insulation. One of the sizes (based on pipe diameter) is probably close to what you need.

73,
kevin
kc6pob


From: ppasteur
To: ultralightdx@...
Sent: Sunday, September 4, 2011 10:31 AM
Subject: [ultralightdx] Re: Affordable (?) 7" Diameter FSL Design

 
Well, I am striking out on finding the Funnoodle Monster swimming aid. It seems that it is the wrong season to find them in my area. I called no fewer than 8 local Walmart, Target, and Ace Hardware stores that claim that they carry them. All were sold out and probably will not get any until next spring. Even Amazon lists them as not available.

I wrote Gary off list to see if he may have a length sufficient for a couple of FSLs that he could sell me. I thought I would throw that out to the list as well.

I would be happy to pay whatever the seller thingthe material is worht plus shipping and something for the time required to get it done. Please contact me off list.

Alternatively, If anyone knows where I could buy one of the Funnoodle Monsters online, pleae let me know.

Thanks all,

Phil
--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:
>
> Phil,
>
> The "Funnoodle" floating tube (actually a swimming aide for kids) is
> the inner core material used for all my FSL's, and provides the perfect
> combination of resilience and stiffness, even for very heavy FSL's (up
> to 25 pounds). It has a convenient hole through the middle, to exactly
> fit a 3/4" diameter PVC pipe section for your FSL's horizontal hanging
> frame. A photo of the "Funnoodle" (and other FSL core materials) is
> posted at http://www.mediafire.com/i/?sb60cm5c31e8tw4
>
> The "Funnoodle" flolating tube is available here locally at both
> Walmart and Fred Meyer stores, and costs only about $4 for a 6-foot
> long tube. That should be long enough for you to make about 15 FSL's
> with it :-)
>
> 73, Gary
>




Gary DeBock
 

Hi Phil,

Well, you are in luck (as long as you like the color green)!

I have enough "Funn" on hand for your two 7" FSL projects, assuming
that you wish to make them in the same "Affordable" design that was
described earlier. I recommend a 6" long section of the Funnoodle
floating tube, to use as an inner core of the "Affordable" FSL (with a
3/4" PVC pipe running through it, as a horizontal hanging frame
section). This provides an extra 2" or so of Funnoodle length to mount
the recommended "N50P" 381 pf variable capacitor (from
http://www.crystalradiosupply.com , with 8:1 vernier drive) as shown in
the photo.

There seems to be a lot of interest in the "Affordable" 7" FSL design,
so I'll try to publish step-by-step construction procedures for it very
soon. Glad to hear that you are considering a Longwave version of it--
an "Affordable" Longwave FSL is also one of the impending projects here
(along with about 10 others :-) My latest Longwave-optimized FSL (an
8", 12-pound model) was completed just 4 days ago, and it has already
received 5 new NDB beacons for me. A design photo of the new LW antenna
is posted at http://www.mediafire.com/i/?3ihi7a9d924prhg .

73, Gary

-----Original Message-----
From: ppasteur <ppasteur@q.com>
To: ultralightdx <ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Sun, Sep 4, 2011 10:31 am
Subject: [ultralightdx] Re: Affordable (?) 7" Diameter FSL Design

Hello Gary,



I am striking out on finding the funnoodle monster. I checked with
about 8 Walmart and Target stores locally. They are all sold out having
put them on clearance as the season for those types of products is over
here.



I understand that Ace hardware had them, I will call a couple of those
stores today, but I am not hopeful. Even Amazon lists them as not
currently available as do several other online sources.



Would you have enough material around that you could sell me enough
length to construct one or two of the 7” FSL antennas. I am think of
making a LW model as well.



I would be happy to pay what you think the material is worth, shipping,
and your time to do it.



Thanks,



Phil Pasteur



Well, I am striking out on finding the Funnoodle Monster swimming aid.
It seems that it is the wrong season to find them in my area. I called
no fewer than 8 local Walmart, Target, and Ace Hardware stores that
claim that they carry them. All were sold out and probably will not get
any until next spring. Even Amazon lists them as not available.

I wrote Gary off list to see if he may have a length sufficient for a
couple of FSLs that he could sell me. I thought I would throw that out
to the list as well.

I would be happy to pay whatever the seller thingthe material is worht
plus shipping and something for the time required to get it done.
Please contact me off list.

Alternatively, If anyone knows where I could buy one of the Funnoodle
Monsters online, pleae let me know.

Thanks all,

Phil
--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:

Phil,

The "Funnoodle" floating tube (actually a swimming aide for kids) is
the inner core material used for all my FSL's, and provides the
perfect
combination of resilience and stiffness, even for very heavy FSL's (up
to 25 pounds). It has a convenient hole through the middle, to exactly
fit a 3/4" diameter PVC pipe section for your FSL's horizontal hanging
frame. A photo of the "Funnoodle" (and other FSL core materials) is
posted at http://www.mediafire.com/i/?sb60cm5c31e8tw4

The "Funnoodle" flolating tube is available here locally at both
Walmart and Fred Meyer stores, and costs only about $4 for a 6-foot
long tube. That should be long enough for you to make about 15 FSL's
with it :-)

73, Gary