What is DX !!


FurlX <dmcqdx@...>
 

Ive been a DX'er since 1949!!

DX is listening to Long distant Radio Signals, either LW, MW, SW, or VHF and UHF.

Ive loged over 120 Countries and got QSLS from over a 1,000 stations on SW and 103 Countries on MW with 600 QSL's received...(including several 1st Reports from NZ)

DX is the Radio Term (Ham)for "Long Distance".

I consider in my case Stations at least 1,500 miles or more from my QTH as DX, (even 0n the "Degen DE1125" with its whip I get many European and South American Stations)

Its all down to LISTENING.


Brian
 

Hi,
    
     Its all down to LISTENING.
Quite so !!!!!! 
In some quarters the art of listening is considered an old fashioned term
where the computer driven monitoring device is left running for the operator to return
from work, analyse the input ( often days / weeks later ) and total the score of
new stations ' heard ' up !!!!!!
                                       Good listening,
                                           72, Brian.
 

----- Original Message -----
From: FurlX
Sent: Thursday, November 04, 2010 10:23 PM
Subject: [ultralightdx] Re: What is DX !!


ferrite61 <dxrx@...>
 

Distance is always good... distance and low-power is better. I tend to be believe that 1kW at 1000 km is DX, 50kW at 1000km is distance, and 50 Watts at 300km or more is also DX. At some point km/Watt factors in, other times distance at lower power prevails and some times its all about distance, like hearing ABC radio on 9560kHz direct from Shepparton at 100kW over a distance of 11,000 miles (17,700km). All of my ULR's caught that recently (R-911, PL-200, PL-310) barefootin.

Formula(s) anyone?

Paul S. in CT

--- In ultralightdx@..., "FurlX" <dmcqdx@...> wrote:

Ive been a DX'er since 1949!!

DX is listening to Long distant Radio Signals, either LW, MW, SW, or VHF and UHF.

Ive loged over 120 Countries and got QSLS from over a 1,000 stations on SW and 103 Countries on MW with 600 QSL's received...(including several 1st Reports from NZ)

DX is the Radio Term (Ham)for "Long Distance".

I consider in my case Stations at least 1,500 miles or more from my QTH as DX, (even 0n the "Degen DE1125" with its whip I get many European and South American Stations)

Its all down to LISTENING.


Jackie <buzzygirl@...>
 

I really like this description of what DX was to the early radio
amateurs of the 1920s; it’s still a great description nowadays. This is
from page 60 the book “The Portable Radio in American Life” (I highly
recommend this book to those interested in the history of the portable
radio):


“The enthusiast usually sat transfixed before the radio apparatus, ears
enclosed by phones, fingers slowly turning the knobs. Once a promising
station was distinguished in the cacophony of hisses and squeals, other
controls were adjusted to improve reception. This could take some time
(some one-tubers had nine knobs). The radio maniac listened until­
perhaps what seemed an eternity-an announcer finally disclosed the
station's call letters and location. These were dutifully recorded on a
log. Ironically, it was not the program that was of interest but the
station identification. Sometimes the station faded out or was
overwhelmed by static before its identity could be learned, and so a new
search was be­gun. This activity is called Dx, the search for distant
stations.

Radio Broadcast ran ‘How Far’ contests, rewarding especially talented
(and lucky) Dxers with new equipment. In July of 1924, Eva L. Rhodes, of
Utica, New York, won first prize in the ‘Ready Made Receivers’ divi­sion
for an aggregate distance of 85,510 miles. She had logged 140 differ­ent
stations, including one 2,480 miles away. This was real radio.

“Howard Vincent O'Brien reflected on the Dx enterprise in Collier's
after breathing life into his first radio, a one-tuber: I snapped the
switch and out of this maze of wires of my own contriving came the soft
Southern voice of Atlanta!

I do not know what the soft voice said, because I was immediately
seeking ‘something else.’ Some day, perhaps, I shall take an interest in
radio programs. But at my present stage they are merely the tedium be­
tween call letters. To me no sounds are sweeter than ‘this is Station
Soandso.’

"In radio, it is not the substance of communication without wires, but
the fact of it that enthralls. It is a sport, in which your wits,
learning, and resourcefulness are matched against the endless perversity
of the elements.”


Kevin Schanilec
 

I like that! To me Ultralights bring out the wit, learning and resourcefulness more than hooking up a Perseus SDR to a big antenna array and reviewing the hard drive capture the next day. To each his own, though!

Kevin

--- In ultralightdx@..., Jackie <buzzygirl@...> wrote:

In radio, it is not the substance of communication without wires, but
the fact of it that enthralls. It is a sport, in which your wits,
learning, and resourcefulness are matched against the endless
perversity of the elements.


ferrite61 <dxrx@...>
 

One does wonder at times why the broadcasting CO's are dumping millions into 50kW OTA broadcasts, when theres an internet with streaming. But then again, the former is a priviledge, and the latter is a right, and the latter has waaaaay more competition for one's attention. As I like to say, " Can we have a Coast-to-Coast network contest (re: highest number of C2C stations received wins)?" Jeez, there must be 20 of them on a bad nite around here. ;o)

Paul S. in CT

--- In ultralightdx@..., "dhsatyadhana" <dhsatyadhana@...> wrote:

I like that! To me Ultralights bring out the wit, learning and resourcefulness more than hooking up a Perseus SDR to a big antenna array and reviewing the hard drive capture the next day. To each his own, though!

Kevin

--- In ultralightdx@..., Jackie <buzzygirl@> wrote:

In radio, it is not the substance of communication without wires, but
the fact of it that enthralls. It is a sport, in which your wits,
learning, and resourcefulness are matched against the endless
perversity of the elements.


Kevin Schanilec
 

IMO, until we get internet reliably in our cars, there likely will be more $$$ put into transmitters, since drivers seem to be a major focus for radio execs.

For example, IBOC tried to get HD radios installed in cars in order to get their market share up, but thankfully Ibiquity has not had much success (whew!). There was an interesting story about an engineer from WOR in New York that tried to get a new car fitted with an HD radio, and if I recall correctly, nobody know what he was talking about; since WOR is a major IBOC broadcaster, I think it tempered his opinion on IBOC's future.

Ah yes, here it is:
http://www.radioworld.com/article/104712
Delicious reading...


Kevin

--- In ultralightdx@..., "ferrite61" <dxrx@...> wrote:

One does wonder at times why the broadcasting CO's are dumping millions into 50kW OTA broadcasts, when theres an internet with streaming. But then again, the former is a priviledge, and the latter is a right, and the latter has waaaaay more competition for one's attention. As I like to say, " Can we have a Coast-to-Coast network contest (re: highest number of C2C stations received wins)?" Jeez, there must be 20 of them on a bad nite around here. ;o)

Paul S. in CT


--- In ultralightdx@..., "dhsatyadhana" <dhsatyadhana@> wrote:

I like that! To me Ultralights bring out the wit, learning and resourcefulness more than hooking up a Perseus SDR to a big antenna array and reviewing the hard drive capture the next day. To each his own, though!

Kevin

--- In ultralightdx@..., Jackie <buzzygirl@> wrote:

In radio, it is not the substance of communication without wires, but
the fact of it that enthralls. It is a sport, in which your wits,
learning, and resourcefulness are matched against the endless
perversity of the elements.