Tecsun PL-606 1 kHz DSP Ultralight-- More Information


Gary DeBock
 

Hello All,
 
     Tecsun's newest DSP Ultralight was taken for a "test drive" during TP-DXing this morning here on the west coast, primarily to check out the compact little radio's "soft mute" level, and MP3 audio recording quality. Asian signals weren't exactly booming in, but there was a fair signal around 1420 UTC (0720 PDT) from 738-BEL2, Taiwan's 100 kw "big gun."
     The new PL-606 was inductively coupled to the 9' PVC loop (which brought Taiwan's signal on the PL-606 up from inaudible to fair), and 1 kHz frequency offset tuning was used to check the radio's "soft mute" signal drop off. ULR transoceanic DXers frequently use this 1 kHz offset tuning to get further away from domestic splatter, so long as the DX signal drop off on their ULR is not too severe (as in the case of the PL-380, and the CFJ455K5 IF-filtered E100's and SWP's). In this morning's test, BEL2 was tuned in on its 738 kHz frequency on the PL-606 for the first 20 seconds of this MP3 (along with a 2 kHz heterodyne and 740-KCBS splatter), while the second 21 seconds were recorded on 737 kHz  http://www.mediafire.com/?p8kkulbnnpdhp2s . Although the 1 kHz offset tuning did remove the heterodyne and 740 splatter, it also removed most of Taiwan's signal, a result similar to the PL-310's "soft mute" behavior.
     Further testing against both the PL-310 and PL-380 confirmed that the PL-606's soft mute behavior is very similar to that of the PL-310, although because the new radio's AM sensitivity is significantly superior to that of the PL-380, even with its greater "soft mute" drop off, the new PL-606 can usually match the PL-380's TP-DX station signal quality when 1 kHz detuning is used. Surprisingly, the compact PL-606 has been matching the larger PL-310 in AM sensitivity on all frequencies from 530-1700 kHz.
     The lack of a direct-entry keypad on the PL-606 makes it necessary to rotate the thumb wheel multiple times in order to shift from the low band to high band, unless stations are already stored in memory. Another quirk (at least in my PL-606 review model) concerns accessing the LW band. In a PL-360-style mystery system, the PL-606 lacks any front-panel indication that it can even tune the LW band, nor does the current user manual tell you how to access the frequencies. The method is to turn off the radio, press the 9/10 kHz control down until "9 kHz" disappears (and the clock comes back), then press the "MW" control down until "LW On" disappears (and the clock comes back). Although that is the LW-band access procedure, in the case of my review model, the radio still has a quirk somewhere that is preventing LW reception.
     The PL-606 is noticeably smaller and lighter than either the PL-310 or PL-380, and probably shares a lot of compact circuitry with the tiny, vertical-form PL-360. The new model can be reasonably pictured as a horizontal form PL-360 with far superior AM sensitivity, and with all the Si4734 DSP filtering options. That's a very effective combination of sensitivity, selectivity and portability on the AM band-- with a pretty low price as a bonus.
 
73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock
 
(Photo below is also at  http://www.mediafire.com/?b2biy0s21zgo5dc )
 
                                                                                    
    
 


Rik
 

When the PL-606 tunes LW, does it tune AM BCB with it like the PL-360? [about 150-1620 KHz. in one band with 9 KHz. steps or 1 KHz. steps]-FARMERIK

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:

Hello All,

Tecsun's newest DSP Ultralight was taken for a "test drive" during
TP-DXing this morning here on the west coast, primarily to check out the
compact little radio's "soft mute" level, and MP3 audio recording quality.
Asian signals weren't exactly booming in, but there was a fair signal around
1420 UTC (0720 PDT) from 738-BEL2, Taiwan's 100 kw "big gun."
The new PL-606 was inductively coupled to the 9' PVC loop (which
brought Taiwan's signal on the PL-606 up from inaudible to fair), and 1 kHz
frequency offset tuning was used to check the radio's "soft mute" signal drop
off. ULR transoceanic DXers frequently use this 1 kHz offset tuning to get
further away from domestic splatter, so long as the DX signal drop off on
their ULR is not too severe (as in the case of the PL-380, and the CFJ455K5
IF-filtered E100's and SWP's). In this morning's test, BEL2 was tuned in on
its 738 kHz frequency on the PL-606 for the first 20 seconds of this MP3
(along with a 2 kHz heterodyne and 740-KCBS splatter), while the second 21
seconds were recorded on 737 kHz _http://www.mediafire.com/?p8kkulbnnpdhp2s_
(http://www.mediafire.com/?p8kkulbnnpdhp2s) . Although the 1 kHz offset
tuning did remove the heterodyne and 740 splatter, it also removed most of
Taiwan's signal, a result similar to the PL-310's "soft mute" behavior.
Further testing against both the PL-310 and PL-380 confirmed that the
PL-606's soft mute behavior is very similar to that of the PL-310,
although because the new radio's AM sensitivity is significantly superior to that
of the PL-380, even with its greater "soft mute" drop off, the new PL-606
can usually match the PL-380's TP-DX station signal quality when 1 kHz
detuning is used. Surprisingly, the compact PL-606 has been matching the larger
PL-310 in AM sensitivity on all frequencies from 530-1700 kHz.
The lack of a direct-entry keypad on the PL-606 makes it necessary to
rotate the thumb wheel multiple times in order to shift from the low band
to high band, unless stations are already stored in memory. Another quirk
(at least in my PL-606 review model) concerns accessing the LW band. In a
PL-360-style mystery system, the PL-606 lacks any front-panel indication that
it can even tune the LW band, nor does the current user manual tell you
how to access the frequencies. The method is to turn off the radio, press the
9/10 kHz control down until "9 kHz" disappears (and the clock comes back),
then press the "MW" control down until "LW On" disappears (and the clock
comes back). Although that is the LW-band access procedure, in the case of
my review model, the radio still has a quirk somewhere that is preventing LW
reception.
The PL-606 is noticeably smaller and lighter than either the PL-310
or PL-380, and probably shares a lot of compact circuitry with the tiny,
vertical-form PL-360. The new model can be reasonably pictured as a horizontal
form PL-360 with far superior AM sensitivity, and with all the Si4734 DSP
filtering options. That's a very effective combination of sensitivity,
selectivity and portability on the AM band-- with a pretty low price as a bonus.

73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock

(Photo below is also at _http://www.mediafire.com/?b2biy0s21zgo5dc_
(http://www.mediafire.com/?b2biy0s21zgo5dc) )


Gary DeBock
 

Hi Farmerik,
 
Yes, the new PL-606's LW operation is set up exactly like that of the PL-360. The LW frequencies are added to the MW frequencies, to make one large, single band from 150-- 1610 kHz. The radio tunes in 1 kHz steps on this "mega-band" if the tuning thumb wheel is rotated slowly, and in 9 kHz steps if the thumb wheel is speeded up.
 
73, Gary 
 

In a message dated 11/4/2010 9:51:28 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time, farmerik@... writes:
 

When the PL-606 tunes LW, does it tune AM BCB with it like the PL-360? [about 150-1620 KHz. in one band with 9 KHz. steps or 1 KHz. steps]-FARMERIK

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:
>
> Hello All,
>
> Tecsun's newest DSP Ultralight was taken for a "test drive" during
> TP-DXing this morning here on the west coast, primarily to check out the
> compact little radio's "soft mute" level, and MP3 audio recording quality.
> Asian signals weren't exactly booming in, but there was a fair signal around
> 1420 UTC (0720 PDT) from 738-BEL2, Taiwan's 100 kw "big gun."
> The new PL-606 was inductively coupled to the 9' PVC loop (which
> brought Taiwan's signal on the PL-606 up from inaudible to fair), and 1 kHz
> frequency offset tuning was used to check the radio's "soft mute" signal drop
> off. ULR transoceanic DXers frequently use this 1 kHz offset tuning to get
> further away from domestic splatter, so long as the DX signal drop off on
> their ULR is not too severe (as in the case of the PL-380, and the CFJ455K5
> IF-filtered E100's and SWP's). In this morning's test, BEL2 was tuned in on
> its 738 kHz frequency on the PL-606 for the first 20 seconds of this MP3
> (along with a 2 kHz heterodyne and 740-KCBS splatter), while the second 21
> seconds were recorded on 737 kHz _http://www.mediafire.com/?p8kkulbnnpdhp2s_
> (http://www.mediafire.com/?p8kkulbnnpdhp2s) . Although the 1 kHz offset
> tuning did remove the heterodyne and 740 splatter, it also removed most of
> Taiwan's signal, a result similar to the PL-310's "soft mute" behavior.
> Further testing against both the PL-310 and PL-380 confirmed that the
> PL-606's soft mute behavior is very similar to that of the PL-310,
> although because the new radio's AM sensitivity is significantly superior to that
> of the PL-380, even with its greater "soft mute" drop off, the new PL-606
> can usually match the PL-380's TP-DX station signal quality when 1 kHz
> detuning is used. Surprisingly, the compact PL-606 has been matching the larger
> PL-310 in AM sensitivity on all frequencies from 530-1700 kHz.
> The lack of a direct-entry keypad on the PL-606 makes it necessary to
> rotate the thumb wheel multiple times in order to shift from the low band
> to high band, unless stations are already stored in memory. Another quirk
> (at least in my PL-606 review model) concerns accessing the LW band. In a
> PL-360-style mystery system, the PL-606 lacks any front-panel indication that
> it can even tune the LW band, nor does the current user manual tell you
> how to access the frequencies. The method is to turn off the radio, press the
> 9/10 kHz control down until "9 kHz" disappears (and the clock comes back),
> then press the "MW" control down until "LW On" disappears (and the clock
> comes back). Although that is the LW-band access procedure, in the case of
> my review model, the radio still has a quirk somewhere that is preventing LW
> reception.
> The PL-606 is noticeably smaller and lighter than either the PL-310
> or PL-380, and probably shares a lot of compact circuitry with the tiny,
> vertical-form PL-360. The new model can be reasonably pictured as a horizontal
> form PL-360 with far superior AM sensitivity, and with all the Si4734 DSP
> filtering options. That's a very effective combination of sensitivity,
> selectivity and portability on the AM band-- with a pretty low price as a bonus.
>
> 73 and Good DX,
> Gary DeBock
>
> (Photo below is also at _http://www.mediafire.com/?b2biy0s21zgo5dc_
> (http://www.mediafire.com/?b2biy0s21zgo5dc) )
>


Mark Roberts
 

Gary,
Thanks for letting us all know about yet another little Tecsun wonder.

You may have said this already, and I just missed it, but which AM
audio bandwidths are available on the '606 - or is it fixed? Thanks!


Gary DeBock
 

Hello,
 
The new Tecsun PL-606 does have all the Si4734 DSP chip filtering selections available-- 6, 4, 3, 2 and 1 kHz. This is Tecsun's third Ultralight radio to have all the DSP options accessible from the front panel, after the PL-310 and PL-380. But the new PL-606 is noticeably lighter and more compact, while just as sensitive (on AM) as the class-leading PL-310. As such, it should prove to be quite popular.
 
73, Gary 
 

In a message dated 11/4/2010 6:13:00 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, markrobt@... writes:
 

Gary,
Thanks for letting us all know about yet another little Tecsun wonder.

You may have said this already, and I just missed it, but which AM
audio bandwidths are available on the '606 - or is it fixed? Thanks!


m_a_schuster
 

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:

Hello All,

Tecsun's newest DSP Ultralight was taken for a "test drive" during
TP-DXing this morning here on the west coast, primarily to check out the
compact little radio's "soft mute" level, and MP3 audio recording quality.
[snip]
Further testing against both the PL-310 and PL-380 confirmed that the
PL-606's soft mute behavior is very similar to that of the PL-310,
although because the new radio's AM sensitivity is significantly superior to that
of the PL-380, even with its greater "soft mute" drop off, the new PL-606
can usually match the PL-380's TP-DX station signal quality when 1 kHz
detuning is used. Surprisingly, the compact PL-606 has been matching the larger
PL-310 in AM sensitivity on all frequencies from 530-1700 kHz.
Major bummer.

The annoyance value of the hair-trigger soft-mute on the PL-310 is te
reason why mine sits in the box, while the (less sensitive) PL-380 gets
regular use.

It's disappointing to see that each new generation of Tecsun models does
not show incremental design improvements. This soft-mute design decision
is yet another case of "2 steps forward, one step back".

Another annoyance is the increasing economization of UI. Older models,
like the PL-200, had different "fast" and "slow" tuning methods which
worked very well. Now everything is integrated into a single, overworked
tuning knob/wheel. The reports that slewing works slightly differently on
each new model is continuing evidence that they still haven't gotten it
right. An especially unfortunately design choice for the PL-210. In the
case of the PL-606, which lacks direct frequency enttry, one wonders how
long the rotary encoder will last under moderate use.


ferrite61 <dxrx@...>
 

Gary... just curious about battery life in the PL-606... mind leaving it on till the radio shuts off?

This set works on 3VDC as opposed to the 4.5VDC of the PL-310... wondering if a 2x voltage multiplier is used as a shortcut. The PL-310 I have routinely lasts over 100 hours continuous at a volume setting of 6 or 7. I would hope for 72 hours or more considering the lower voltage.

Thanx
Paul S. in CT


Gary DeBock
 

Hi Paul,
 
Sure, I would be happy to run a battery life test in the new PL-606.
 
In my experience of testing various ULR's, however, I've noticed a significant difference in battery run time depending upon the quality of the AA batteries inserted. Previously, the Energizer alkaline AA batteries seemed to have the longest life, followed by the Duracell alkaline type, then the Costco "Kirkland" alkaline type, etc. When the battery run time varies according to the material type and quality from different brands, it's kind of tough to run an accurate "run time" test without specifying the company name and battery type for each individual experiment (which I will do, if there is a certain one you wish to test).
 
73, Gary   
 

In a message dated 11/5/2010 12:51:26 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, dxrx@... writes:
 

Gary... just curious about battery life in the PL-606... mind leaving it on till the radio shuts off?

This set works on 3VDC as opposed to the 4.5VDC of the PL-310... wondering if a 2x voltage multiplier is used as a shortcut. The PL-310 I have routinely lasts over 100 hours continuous at a volume setting of 6 or 7. I would hope for 72 hours or more considering the lower voltage.

Thanx
Paul S. in CT


Deane McIntyre <Deane@...>
 

*This message was transferred with a trial version of CommuniGate(tm) Pro*

On 2010-11-05, at 2:34 PM, D1028Gary@... wrote:



Hi Paul,

Sure, I would be happy to run a battery life test in the new PL-606.

In my experience of testing various ULR's, however, I've noticed a significant difference in battery run time depending upon the quality of the AA batteries inserted. Previously, the Energizer alkaline AA batteries seemed to have the longest life, followed by the Duracell alkaline type, then the Costco "Kirkland" alkaline type, etc. When the battery run time varies according to the material type and quality from different brands, it's kind of tough to run an accurate "run time" test without specifying the company name and battery type for each individual experiment (which I will do, if there is a certain one you wish to test).
What I do is to measure the actual current drain with a meter. Do this
for all my battery operated radios to get some idea what the battery life will
be. Good quality alkaline AA's are about 2000 mA-hr or so. With a current drain
of 20 mA will last about 100 hours (or longer, as light loads will allow one to get
a bit more out of a battery).

Saves wasting a set af batteries as well. Only problem with this approach is that
some radios will work OK at lower voltages than others.

73,

Deane McIntyre VE6BPO


ferrite61 <dxrx@...>
 

--- In ultralightdx@..., "m_a_schuster" <schuster@...> wrote:

"Major bummer.

The annoyance value of the hair-trigger soft-mute on the PL-310 is te
reason why mine sits in the box, while the (less sensitive) PL-380 gets
regular use.

It's disappointing to see that each new generation of Tecsun models does
not show incremental design improvements. This soft-mute design decision
is yet another case of "2 steps forward, one step back".

Another annoyance is the increasing economization of UI. Older models,
like the PL-200, had different "fast" and "slow" tuning methods which
worked very well. Now everything is integrated into a single, overworked
tuning knob/wheel. The reports that slewing works slightly differently on
each new model is continuing evidence that they still haven't gotten it
right. An especially unfortunately design choice for the PL-210. In the
case of the PL-606, which lacks direct frequency enttry, one wonders how
long the rotary encoder will last under moderate use."

Actually with the PL-310, setting the BW to 3kHz and tuning +/- 1kHz works VERY well when increasing the volume 1 or 2 notches. No soft-mute, and good volume. Very good at 2kHz BW setting. I actually prefer it to my PL-200 for DXing.

IMHO, the PL-210 is quite good tuning-wise, the tuning slew is much better than the PL-310, and PL-200's button = fast and rather non-fluid fine-tune. The PL-210 spins like a DE1103/E5/G5, "Its about right, IMHO". My rant is the battery-life, a horrible 36 hours compared to the PL-200/310 at 100+ hours. And I noticed more adjacent-channel volume, so the filters are dirt cheap and wide. Tecsun is losing enthusiast votes rather quickly, and gaining consumer votes.

It brings to mind an older advertising saying, " New and improved is a yes/no proposition... yes, its new." Rather much like that guitar amp that goes to 11. ;o)

Paul S. in CT


Powell
 

Good Alkaline AA's should be closer to 3000 mA. There are a lot of NiMh ones
that will be 2500 mA. But they are nominally 1.2 volts instead of the 1.6 volts
a new alkaline battery is. If the alkaline battery measures 1.5 volts it is
STALE !!


D Alkaline batteries are 18000 mA !!


Powell

NNNN
POP email is powell at backroads DOT net

----- Original Message ----
From: Deane McIntyre <Deane@...>



What I do is to measure the actual current drain with a meter. Do this
for all my battery operated radios to get some idea what the battery life will
be. Good quality alkaline AA's are about 2000 mA-hr or so. With a current drain
of 20 mA will last about 100 hours (or longer, as light loads will allow one to
get
a bit more out of a battery).

Saves wasting a set af batteries as well. Only problem with this approach is
that
some radios will work OK at lower voltages than others.

73,

Deane McIntyre VE6BPO



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


ferrite61 <dxrx@...>
 

Gary:
My personal choice is Rayovac Alk. AA's. Its important to use the same brand when testing any set in this way, to eliminate the variables. I do agree that different manufacturers have different recipes and quality. I find that the Rayovacs average 2800 mahr at a 30 ma drain. Most every time I buy some they rate 1.58 to 1.59 V each.

A note here about this kind of test... these radios do not drain down to 0.9 Volts. Most Tecsun radios quit at 1.05 Volts. The analog R-911 will quit at 1.00 Volts with a death tone. The Eton G6 I owned quit at 1.22 Volts, thats half the expected life. The higher current-drain of my PL-210 causes the mahr rating to be lowered from 2800 to 2700.

My opinion is use whats best or best-known to you. And it helps to note the battery voltage when the radio quits. Frankly, IMHO the Rayovacs are cheaper at 30/$10 at W-Mart, and just as good as the Ever-ready/ Duracell's. Can't have too many LOL.

Paul S. in CT

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:

Hi Paul,

Sure, I would be happy to run a battery life test in the new PL-606.

In my experience of testing various ULR's, however, I've noticed a
significant difference in battery run time depending upon the quality of the AA
batteries inserted. Previously, the Energizer alkaline AA batteries seemed to
have the longest life, followed by the Duracell alkaline type, then the
Costco "Kirkland" alkaline type, etc. When the battery run time varies
according to the material type and quality from different brands, it's kind of
tough to run an accurate "run time" test without specifying the company name
and battery type for each individual experiment (which I will do, if there
is a certain one you wish to test).

73, Gary


In a message dated 11/5/2010 12:51:26 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
dxrx@... writes:




Gary... just curious about battery life in the PL-606... mind leaving it on
till the radio shuts off?

This set works on 3VDC as opposed to the 4.5VDC of the PL-310... wondering
if a 2x voltage multiplier is used as a shortcut. The PL-310 I have
routinely lasts over 100 hours continuous at a volume setting of 6 or 7. I would
hope for 72 hours or more considering the lower voltage.

Thanx
Paul S. in CT


Kevin Schanilec
 

I'm with Paul - staying a khz or two off-frequency and bumping up the volume cures the soft-mute problem, to the point that there is little difference between the PL-310 and PL-380 when DXing, since I rarely if ever am directly on-frequency anyway.

Fortunately, the audio section on the PL-310 is powerful enough to pull this off, whereas other soft-mute models (the woeful Kchibo D92L especially comes to mind, and the PL-300WT to some extent) don't have the audio section oomph to make it palatable, and instead distort or introduce noise.

Gary - does the PL-606 have a sufficiently robust audio section to make this doable? Please give me a reason not to have to have one...

Kevin

--- In ultralightdx@..., "ferrite61" <dxrx@...> wrote:

Actually with the PL-310, setting the BW to 3kHz and tuning +/- 1kHz works VERY well when increasing the volume 1 or 2 notches. No soft-mute, and good volume. Very good at 2kHz BW setting. I actually prefer it to my PL-200 for DXing.

Paul S. in CT


Jackie <buzzygirl@...>
 

I agree with Kevin and Paul -- I generally tune my PL-310 a KHz or two
off frequency for best audio results.

Jackie

On Fri, 2010-11-05 at 22:42 +0000, dhsatyadhana wrote:

I'm with Paul - staying a khz or two off-frequency and bumping up the
volume cures the soft-mute problem, to the point that there is little
difference between the PL-310 and PL-380 when DXing, since I rarely if
ever am directly on-frequency anyway.

Fortunately, the audio section on the PL-310 is powerful enough to
pull this off, whereas other soft-mute models (the woeful Kchibo D92L
especially comes to mind, and the PL-300WT to some extent) don't have
the audio section oomph to make it palatable, and instead distort or
introduce noise.


pianoplayer88key
 

I currently use Sanyo ENELOOP rechargeable AAs (they are 2000mAh with a slow self-discharge rate and are supposed to retain 85% of their charge after a year on the shelf) with a Maha MH-C808M charger, both purchased at thomasdistributing.com and maybe still available.

This gives me an idea... I should run a near-worst-case-scenario battery life test on my PL-380 (and some other radios, maybe). So I wouldn't have to sit there and monitor it, the audio output would be recorded with a Zoom H2 so I wouldn't have to be near a computer. I would use the H2's AC adapter, due to its 5 to 6 hour battery life. The PL-380 would be set at maximum volume, backlight stuck on, but I'm not sure whether I should use a wide or narrow bandwidth, or use a local signal, distant signal that's being desensed by a local, or distant signal that's in the clear.

--- In ultralightdx@..., "ferrite61" <dxrx@...> wrote:

Gary:
My personal choice is Rayovac Alk. AA's. Its important to use the same brand when testing any set in this way, to eliminate the variables. I do agree that different manufacturers have different recipes and quality. I find that the Rayovacs average 2800 mahr at a 30 ma drain. Most every time I buy some they rate 1.58 to 1.59 V each.

A note here about this kind of test... these radios do not drain down to 0.9 Volts. Most Tecsun radios quit at 1.05 Volts. The analog R-911 will quit at 1.00 Volts with a death tone. The Eton G6 I owned quit at 1.22 Volts, thats half the expected life. The higher current-drain of my PL-210 causes the mahr rating to be lowered from 2800 to 2700.

My opinion is use whats best or best-known to you. And it helps to note the battery voltage when the radio quits. Frankly, IMHO the Rayovacs are cheaper at 30/$10 at W-Mart, and just as good as the Ever-ready/ Duracell's. Can't have too many LOL.

Paul S. in CT


--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@ wrote:

Hi Paul,

Sure, I would be happy to run a battery life test in the new PL-606.

In my experience of testing various ULR's, however, I've noticed a
significant difference in battery run time depending upon the quality of the AA
batteries inserted. Previously, the Energizer alkaline AA batteries seemed to
have the longest life, followed by the Duracell alkaline type, then the
Costco "Kirkland" alkaline type, etc. When the battery run time varies
according to the material type and quality from different brands, it's kind of
tough to run an accurate "run time" test without specifying the company name
and battery type for each individual experiment (which I will do, if there
is a certain one you wish to test).

73, Gary


In a message dated 11/5/2010 12:51:26 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
dxrx@ writes:




Gary... just curious about battery life in the PL-606... mind leaving it on
till the radio shuts off?

This set works on 3VDC as opposed to the 4.5VDC of the PL-310... wondering
if a 2x voltage multiplier is used as a shortcut. The PL-310 I have
routinely lasts over 100 hours continuous at a volume setting of 6 or 7. I would
hope for 72 hours or more considering the lower voltage.

Thanx
Paul S. in CT


pianoplayer88key
 

I currently use Sanyo ENELOOP rechargeable AAs (they are 2000mAh with a slow self-discharge rate and are supposed to retain 85% of their charge after a year on the shelf) with a Maha MH-C808M charger, both purchased at thomasdistributing.com and maybe still available.

This gives me an idea... I should run a near-worst-case-scenario battery life test on my PL-380 (and some other radios, maybe). So I wouldn't have to sit there and monitor it, the audio output would be recorded with a Zoom H2 so I wouldn't have to be near a computer. I would use the H2's AC adapter, due to its 5 to 6 hour battery life. The PL-380 would be set at maximum volume, backlight stuck on, but I'm not sure whether I should use a wide or narrow bandwidth, or use a local signal, distant signal that's being desensed by a local, or distant signal that's in the clear.

--- In ultralightdx@..., "ferrite61" <dxrx@...> wrote:

Gary:
My personal choice is Rayovac Alk. AA's. Its important to use the same brand when testing any set in this way, to eliminate the variables. I do agree that different manufacturers have different recipes and quality. I find that the Rayovacs average 2800 mahr at a 30 ma drain. Most every time I buy some they rate 1.58 to 1.59 V each.

A note here about this kind of test... these radios do not drain down to 0.9 Volts. Most Tecsun radios quit at 1.05 Volts. The analog R-911 will quit at 1.00 Volts with a death tone. The Eton G6 I owned quit at 1.22 Volts, thats half the expected life. The higher current-drain of my PL-210 causes the mahr rating to be lowered from 2800 to 2700.

My opinion is use whats best or best-known to you. And it helps to note the battery voltage when the radio quits. Frankly, IMHO the Rayovacs are cheaper at 30/$10 at W-Mart, and just as good as the Ever-ready/ Duracell's. Can't have too many LOL.

Paul S. in CT


--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@ wrote:

Hi Paul,

Sure, I would be happy to run a battery life test in the new PL-606.

In my experience of testing various ULR's, however, I've noticed a
significant difference in battery run time depending upon the quality of the AA
batteries inserted. Previously, the Energizer alkaline AA batteries seemed to
have the longest life, followed by the Duracell alkaline type, then the
Costco "Kirkland" alkaline type, etc. When the battery run time varies
according to the material type and quality from different brands, it's kind of
tough to run an accurate "run time" test without specifying the company name
and battery type for each individual experiment (which I will do, if there
is a certain one you wish to test).

73, Gary


In a message dated 11/5/2010 12:51:26 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
dxrx@ writes:




Gary... just curious about battery life in the PL-606... mind leaving it on
till the radio shuts off?

This set works on 3VDC as opposed to the 4.5VDC of the PL-310... wondering
if a 2x voltage multiplier is used as a shortcut. The PL-310 I have
routinely lasts over 100 hours continuous at a volume setting of 6 or 7. I would
hope for 72 hours or more considering the lower voltage.

Thanx
Paul S. in CT


gww_hoehne
 

concerning the LW on PL 606,

when you've set the LW on after the procedure you wrote about, please push the MW button twice and there you are, starting with 153 khz.
The sensitivity is much better than on all other Tecsun models with embedded LW.

Best DX

Gerhard


Gary DeBock
 

Hello Gerhard,

Thanks for the sharing the new PL-606 LW-band accessing procedure, and your comments on the PL-606's improved LW sensitivity. Both of your comments are very helpful.

In the PL-606's LW coverage system, despite initial impressions that it followed the PL-360's LW + MW one-band system, it actually tunes from 153-513 kHz in one distinct LW band after following the procedure described by Gerhard. When both the 9 kHz tuning system and the "LW On" options are selected, pressing the "MW" button twice selects this LW band. Pressing the "MW" button once again will return you to the MW (522-1620 kHz) band, in 9 kHz (fast-rate) tuning steps.

My PL-606 review model's LW sensitivity also seems improved over that of all previous Tecsun stock ULR models, in agreement with Gerhard's comment. The LW sensitivity on my model seems best on the upper beacon frequencies (300-513 kHz), perhaps because of the loopstick's design for excellent MW band sensitivity.

73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)

--- In ultralightdx@..., "gww_hoehne" <gerhard.hoehne@...> wrote:



concerning the LW on PL 606,

when you've set the LW on after the procedure you wrote about, please push the MW button twice and there you are, starting with 153 khz.
The sensitivity is much better than on all other Tecsun models with embedded LW.

Best DX

Gerhard


bbwrwy
 

I like what I've read thus far about the PL-606. It appears it's similar to the earlier PL-360. I like that it has the switchable bandwidths of the PL-310 and 380. That's where the 360 failed. I will be interested to see if it can be adapted to the 7.5-inch loopstick.

Take care and good DX.

Richard Allen
36°22'51"N / 97°26'35"W
(near Perry OK USA)