Update of World Distance Records 10 kw and 1 kw barefoot categories


Paul Logan
 

Hi John,

I had emailed you maybe a week ago with some updates from here but I guess it got lost in the ether - I will post any further updates to the group, I'm having email difficulties with both my addresses being flagged up as spam.

10 kw barefoot category:

1140    WQBA Miami FL    10kw    USA    07:10    16/09/2008    4119 miles    6628 km

and apologies for this one but...

1 kw barefoot category:

1700    KVNS, Brownsville, TX    1    USA    06:12    10/10/2008    4789 miles    7706 km

KVNS surprisingly is the most regular and often loudest X band signal here it was just a matter of time before it made it through barefoot. Logged playing oldies after a yl with id.

regards

Paul Logan,
Lisnaskea, N. Ireland

Listening Homepage: http://geocities.com/yogi540/
Photos: http://www.flickr.com/photos/radiofotos/
Video: http://www.youtube.com/user/yogi540

--- On Tue, 14/10/08, John H. Bryant wrote:
From: John H. Bryant Subject: [ultralightdx] Update of World Distance Records, Ultralight MW DX
To: "irca-hard-core-dx.com" , ultralightdx@...
Date: Tuesday, 14 October, 2008, 1:57 PM

We've had a chance to clean up some gaps/goofs, etc. in the overall World Record. Through some faulty communication with Dennis Vroom , I never got the specifics of his record breaking barefoot reception of VOA Thailand from Grayland back in April.  I'd also not yet received the details of Kevin's wonderful barefoot reception of 3LO in Melbourne from the Kenai Peninsula in Alaska last month.  Normally, in "Current Records" I'd only be listing the most recently set distance mark. However, since Dennis was never officially "in the book," I've shown both he and Kevin here as the Current World Record holder.

Mark C.'s recent analysis of record possibilities from the NE USA seem to indicate that both the overall Barefoot and Unlimited marks will stand, at least until next summer's  DU season from the Northwest... unless the South Africans or possibly the DU DXers get involved in Ultralighting. Here's hoping.

Oh, also, my recent reception of the 1 kW relay transmitter of Hokkaido Broadcasting Company, JOTS, Wakkanai, Japan on 1368//1287 was also a record in the 1 kW. category, beating Paul Logan's previous mark by a measly 116 miles. Frankly, I was shocked that the distance wasn't greater. It turns out that the JOTS transmitter is the CLOSEST Japanese MW transmitter to the USA. Wakkanai is on a peninsula that forms the very NW tip of the northern home island, Hokkaido.

Well, here are the current World Records. There have been no changes in the Western Hemisphere records in some time.... and a goodly number of them, especially in the Unlimited Category, are very vulnerable.  Its time to get to work!!! 
John Bryant

World Records
Longest Distance Reception -Worldwide Reception
   11758km/7306 miles Dennis Vroom, Grayland, WA VOA-1575 Ayutthaya,Thailand 4/18/2008 (E100)
   12372 km/7684 miles Kevin Schanilec, Kenai Pen., AK 3LO-774, Melbourne, Australia
                                                                                                                                             9/17//2008 (E100)  
  **13255 km/8230 miles John Bryant, Grayland, WA 5AN-891 Adelaide, SA 5/29/2008 (**E100)   
Longest Distance Reception @ 50 kW. -Worldwide Reception
      12372 km/7684 miles Kevin Schanilec, Kenai Pen., AK 3LO-774, Melbourne, Australia
                                                                                                                                             9/17//2008 (E100)  
   **13255 km/8230 miles John Bryant, Grayland, WA 5AN-891 Adelaide, SA 5/29/2008 (**E100)
Longest Distance Reception @ 10 kW. -Worldwide Reception
      3783 km/2351 miles Paul Logan, Lisnaskea, N. Ireland,  CBI-1140, Sydney NS, 3/24/2008 (Sony SRF-59)           
   **11777 km/7318 miles John Bryant, Grayland, WA Nat.R.-675, Christchurch, NZ 5/30/2008 (**E100)
Longest Distance Reception @ 5 kW. -Worldwide Reception
      9035 km/ 5614 miles Allen Willie, St. John’s, NF  R B. Nuevas-1610, Argentina 2/2/2008 (SRF-37V)
   **11483 km/7135 miles John Bryant, Grayland, WA 4TAB-891 Townsville, QLD 5/29/2008 (**E100)
Longest Distance Reception @ 1 kW. -Worldwide Reception
   6616 km/ 4111 miles Paul Logan, Lisnaskea, N. Ireland, WJCC-1700 Miami Springs FL
                                                                                                                                    04/06/2008 (SRF-59)
   **6802 km/4227 miles John Bryant, Grayland, WA, JOTS-1368  Wakkanai, Japan 10/8/2008 (**E100)
Longest Distance Reception @ 500 W. -Worldwide Reception
      1437 km/893 miles Kevin Schanilec, Bainbridge Is. WA, KLSQ, Whitney, NV 1/23/2008 (SRF-39FP)
   **1099km/683 miles John Bryant, Stillwater, OK, XEMF-780, Monclova, CO, MX 2/8/2008 (SRF-T516**)
Longest Distance Reception @ 250 W. -Worldwide Reception
   1540 km/957 miles John Callarman, Krum, TX, XEUACH-1610 Chapingo,TE, MX 1/6/2008 (SRF-37V) 
   **1609 km/1000 miles John Bryant, Stillwater, OK, XETI-750, Tempoal VC, MX 2/9/2008 (SRF-T615**)     
 


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john445 <john445@...>
 


John H. Bryant <bjohnorcas@...>
 

Great, John.....

Somehow, those got missed here!  Thanks for the Heads UP...

Yes, 75 Material and J Material is the same and works VERY well for chokes (refer to my article "Is your Lead-In an Antenna???"on dxing.info)

The only source that I know is Amidon.... and I think that they ship internationally, but I doubt that they Paypal.

John B.






At 05:41 PM 10/14/2008 +0000, you wrote:

Hi John,

I had emailed you maybe a week ago with some updates from here but I guess it got lost in the ether - I will post any further updates to the group, I'm having email difficulties with both my addresses being flagged up as spam.

10 kw barefoot category:

1140    WQBA Miami FL    10kw    USA    07:10    16/09/2008    4119 miles    6628 km

and apologies for this one but...

1 kw barefoot category:

1700    KVNS, Brownsville, TX    1    USA    06:12    10/10/2008    4789 miles    7706 km

KVNS surprisingly is the most regular and often loudest X band signal here it was just a matter of time before it made it through barefoot. Logged playing oldies after a yl with id.

regards

Paul Logan,
Lisnaskea, N. Ireland

Listening Homepage: http://geocities.com/yogi540/
Photos: http://www.flickr.com/photos/radiofotos/
Video: http://www.youtube.com/user/yogi540

--- On Tue, 14/10/08, John H. Bryant wrote:
From: John H. Bryant
Subject: [ultralightdx] Update of World Distance Records, Ultralight MW DX
To: "irca-hard-core-dx.com" , ultralightdx@...
Date: Tuesday, 14 October, 2008, 1:57 PM

We've had a chance to clean up some gaps/goofs, etc. in the overall World Record. Through some faulty communication with Dennis Vroom , I never got the specifics of his record breaking barefoot reception of VOA Thailand from Grayland back in April.  I'd also not yet received the details of Kevin's wonderful barefoot reception of 3LO in Melbourne from the Kenai Peninsula in Alaska last month.  Normally, in "Current Records" I'd only be listing the most recently set distance mark. However, since Dennis was never officially "in the book," I've shown both he and Kevin here as the Current World Record holder.

Mark C.'s recent analysis of record possibilities from the NE USA seem to indicate that both the overall Barefoot and Unlimited marks will stand, at least until next summer's  DU season from the Northwest... unless the South Africans or possibly the DU DXers get involved in Ultralighting. Here's hoping.

Oh, also, my recent reception of the 1 kW relay transmitter of Hokkaido Broadcasting Company, JOTS, Wakkanai, Japan on 1368//1287 was also a record in the 1 kW. category, beating Paul Logan's previous mark by a measly 116 miles. Frankly, I was shocked that the distance wasn't greater. It turns out that the JOTS transmitter is the CLOSEST Japanese MW transmitter to the USA. Wakkanai is on a peninsula that forms the very NW tip of the northern home island, Hokkaido.

Well, here are the current World Records. There have been no changes in the Western Hemisphere records in some time.... and a goodly number of them, especially in the Unlimited Category, are very vulnerable.  Its time to get to work!!! 
John Bryant

World Records
Longest Distance Reception -Worldwide Reception
   11758km/7306 miles Dennis Vroom, Grayland, WA VOA-1575 Ayutthaya,Thailand 4/18/2008 (E100)
   12372 km/7684 miles Kevin Schanilec, Kenai Pen., AK 3LO-774, Melbourne, Australia
                                                                                                                                             9/17//2008 (E100)  
  **13255 km/8230 miles John Bryant, Grayland, WA 5AN-891 Adelaide, SA 5/29/2008 (**E100)   
Longest Distance Reception @ 50 kW. -Worldwide Reception
      12372 km/7684 miles Kevin Schanilec, Kenai Pen., AK 3LO-774, Melbourne, Australia
                                                                                                                                             9/17//2008 (E100)  
   **13255 km/8230 miles John Bryant, Grayland, WA 5AN-891 Adelaide, SA 5/29/2008 (**E100)
Longest Distance Reception @ 10 kW. -Worldwide Reception
      3783 km/2351 miles Paul Logan, Lisnaskea, N. Ireland,  CBI-1140, Sydney NS, 3/24/2008 (Sony SRF-59)           
   **11777 km/7318 miles John Bryant, Grayland, WA Nat.R.-675, Christchurch, NZ 5/30/2008 (**E100)
Longest Distance Reception @ 5 kW. -Worldwide Reception
      9035 km/ 5614 miles Allen Willie, St. John’s, NF  R B. Nuevas-1610, Argentina 2/2/2008 (SRF-37V)
   **11483 km/7135 miles John Bryant, Grayland, WA 4TAB-891 Townsville, QLD 5/29/2008 (**E100)
Longest Distance Reception @ 1 kW. -Worldwide Reception
   6616 km/ 4111 miles Paul Logan, Lisnaskea, N. Ireland, WJCC-1700 Miami Springs FL
                                                                                                                                    04/06/2008 (SRF-59)
   **6802 km/4227 miles John Bryant, Grayland, WA, JOTS-1368  Wakkanai, Japan 10/8/2008 (**E100)
Longest Distance Reception @ 500 W. -Worldwide Reception
      1437 km/893 miles Kevin Schanilec, Bainbridge Is. WA, KLSQ, Whitney, NV 1/23/2008 (SRF-39FP)
   **1099km/683 miles John Bryant, Stillwater, OK, XEMF-780, Monclova, CO, MX 2/8/2008 (SRF-T516**)
Longest Distance Reception @ 250 W. -Worldwide Reception
   1540 km/957 miles John Callarman, Krum, TX, XEUACH-1610 Chapingo,TE, MX 1/6/2008 (SRF-37V) 
   **1609 km/1000 miles John Bryant, Stillwater, OK, XETI-750, Tempoal VC, MX 2/9/2008 (SRF-T615**)     
 


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Jay Heyl
 


Paul Logan
 

Hi Jay,

for some reason they come in well here - but so do WTNI on 1640 - I cant explain it - often I will hear KVNS mixing with several stations but often times it is dominating. Its not way above others here but does seem to get out very well, I wonder what their pattern is.

Paul Logan,
Lisnaskea, N. Ireland

Listening Homepage: http://geocities.com/yogi540/
Photos: http://www.flickr.com/photos/radiofotos/
Video: http://www.youtube.com/user/yogi540

--- On Tue, 14/10/08, Jay Heyl wrote:
From: Jay Heyl
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] Update of World Distance Records 10 kw and 1 kw barefoot categories
To: ultralightdx@...
Date: Tuesday, 14 October, 2008, 9:35 PM

On Tue, Oct 14, 2008 at 1:41 PM, Paul Logan <paulloganradio@ yahoo.ie> wrote:

1 kw barefoot category:

1700    KVNS, Brownsville, TX    1    USA    06:12    10/10/2008    4789 miles    7706 km

KVNS surprisingly is the most regular and often loudest X band signal here it was just a matter of time before it made it through barefoot. Logged playing oldies after a yl with id.

I'm not accusing anyone of anything or trying to taint any records, but I don't think I'd be the first to suspect KVNS might, on rare occasion, "forget" to switch to night power. They often dominate here in Orlando despite being five times further away than WJCC and allegedly running 880W vs WJCC's 1000W.  Admittedly, about 900 of the 1000 miles between KVNS and my house are over water, but that's still quite a distance for them to so clearly pummel WJCC into the noise.

  -- Jay

Send instant messages to your online friends http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com


John H. Bryant <bjohnorcas@...>
 






At 05:35 PM 10/14/2008 -0400, you wrote:

On Tue, Oct 14, 2008 at 1:41 PM, Paul Logan <paulloganradio@... > wrote:

1 kw barefoot category:

1700    KVNS, Brownsville, TX    1    USA    06:12    10/10/2008    4789 miles    7706 km

KVNS surprisingly is the most regular and often loudest X band signal here it was just a matter of time before it made it through barefoot. Logged playing oldies after a yl with id.



Jay then noted:

I'm not accusing anyone of anything or trying to taint any records, but I don't think I'd be the first to suspect KVNS might, on rare occasion, "forget" to switch to night power. They often dominate here in Orlando despite being five times further away than WJCC and allegedly running 880W vs WJCC's 1000W.  Admittedly, about 900 of the 1000 miles between KVNS and my house are over water, but that's still quite a distance for them to so clearly pummel WJCC into the noise.

  -- Jay


You make a good point, Jay.... I think that a couple of the other records in the low power Western Hemisphere area are from stations that may be running more than their authorized power.... just a personal opinion, though (they are records with my own name attached.) 

In my experience with Pacific and Far East stations, I'd guess that KVNS may be cheating, or alternatively, the antenna may be very fortunately situated (in a salt marsh, etc.) or there may be a semi-permanent bubble in the ionosphere that is perfectly situated to act as an amplifier.

A couple of examples:  For several years, 4BC in Brisbane suddenly became the most prominent station on the DU band for those of us in the NW.... really odd, since their frequency was mid-band (1116) and they are a lower powered commercial station (as opposed to the Big Gun ABC government stations.)  We finally found out that they had remodelled and upgraded their antenna/ground system at just the time when they became so prominent. On the other hand, this past summer, two stations in Christchurch, NZ on the South Island were suddenly the most prominent Kiwis by far... very unusual for South Island stations to do that... they are so much farther away. What is more, their prominence was VERY pronounced and lasted all season. I was convinced that both had either boosted power or also redone their antenna and ground systems.  I've now heard from the technical staffs at both stations.... neither have made any changes in recent years. I don't really have an explanation for what we heard this summer.... except I keep thinking about the Giant Red Spot on Jupiter.... its a huge storm or wind system that has been stable for decades, if not centuries, even though it is part of a gaseous atmosphere.  Besides the waves (ripples) in the ionosphere that we know to exist, I wonder if there aren't other structures that could form week-long or even season-long ducts..... 

So, yeah, KVNS may be cheating, but they may not be.... Jay, what do you suggest as an alternative to just accepting their published power as far running an awards or distance record program????  Should we vote on whether we think a particular station is running their legal power or not? Or should we ask for volunteers to go to the stations that we suspect and ask to perform an inspection? Surely neither of those are workable ideas.

I've always assumed that the only choice is to either accept an imperfect system or not have a records or award program at all....  Seriously, I'm not very happy with the current situation... in fact, it is a sore point with me as is probably apparent.  If there is some way to determine actual transmitted power for our use, I'd sure like to hear about it.

Thanks for the comment, Jay.... I'll take my soapbox and steal away into the night!


John B.


John B.
Orcas Island, WA, USA
Rcvrs: WiNRADiO 313e, Eton e1, Ultralights
Antennas: Wellbrook Phased Array SE/NW
Two 70' x 100' Conti Super Loops, West and Northwest


Jay Heyl
 

On Tue, Oct 14, 2008 at 8:20 PM, John H. Bryant
<bjohnorcas@...> wrote:

In my experience with Pacific and Far East stations, I'd guess that KVNS may
be cheating, or alternatively, the antenna may be very fortunately situated
(in a salt marsh, etc.) or there may be a semi-permanent bubble in the
ionosphere that is perfectly situated to act as an amplifier.
The KVNS situation became a subject of great contention in another
group I'm in. Several very experienced DXers suggested there might be
something odd going on and one fellow who knew someone at the station
swore up and down that his friend insisted everything was 100%
according to the book. The fact that his friend was in sales, not
engineering, and would be rather unlikely to admit to violations even
if he was aware of them didn't seem to make an impression on this
fellow. (I wasn't involved in that discussion. I just observed the
flames from a distance.)

I'm not a radio engineer and have no personal knowledge of what might
be going on at KVNS. I do know that if they are strictly following the
rules, they're getting exceptional value out of that 880W they're
pumping out at night.

I only brought the whole thing up because Paul commented on KVNS being
a regular visitor at such a great distance.

I've always assumed that the only choice is to either accept an imperfect
system or not have a records or award program at all.... Seriously, I'm not
If we're voting, I'll cast my vote against anything that purports to
be an official record book. There are quite a few reasons I don't
think it's a good idea, not the least of which is it can serve to
discourage those who aren't blessed with living in or near prime DXing
locations. It's a hobby, not a competition. Each person's performance
should be measured against their own past performance, not against
some near-impossible reception made by someone in a highly advantaged
location. It's one thing to report receptions and distances to the
list. It's something else to have them carved in stone on a monument.

I also think it's a bit dubious to claim "world records" that come
almost exclusively from a group comprised of only 97 members (as of
this writing). I don't mean that as a slam to the group, just that in
the overall population of people listening to pocket radios, 97 people
is a pretty tiny percentage to draw from for establishing world
records.

I'm told DXing is far more popular in Japan than it is in Europe or
the Americas. Yet, in all the groups in which I participate, I don't
recall seeing any postings from any permanent resident of Japan.
Certainly DXers in Japan must be hearing stations from similar
distances to those reported in this group, but it would seem their
receptions wouldn't be considered for records simply because they
don't speak English or belong to this group.

Awards programs are cool as long as there are awards to recognize
various levels of achievement and progression in the hobby. Something
that encourages participation, not something that's used to foster
competition other than with one's self. I like the awards certificates
made available through the NDB List for various levels of achievement.
They're structured so both beginners and very experienced DXers can
qualify. They're also suitable for framing. ;-)

-- Jay


Jay Heyl
 

On Tue, Oct 14, 2008 at 7:18 PM, Paul Logan <paulloganradio@...> wrote:

for some reason they come in well here - but so do WTNI on 1640 - I cant
explain it - often I will hear KVNS mixing with several stations but often
times it is dominating. Its not way above others here but does seem to get
out very well, I wonder what their pattern is.
The KVNS pattern is supposed to be non-directional, but it pushes way
out to the east due to the Gulf of Mexico being so close to the
transmitter.

They don't dominate here every night, but fairly often they come in so
strong you can't hear much but a slight rumbling in the background
from the other stations.

-- Jay


MarkWA1ION
 

KVNS and WTNI are both right on the Gulf of Mexico, so very high
ground conductivity comes into play.

Also, because these stations are quite southerly (along with some of
the often-heard Florida stations), they are "sitting pretty" and "in
the clear" during auroral disruptions that knock out stations from
the northeastern states, the midwest, the prairies, and the Pacific
Northwest.

Mark Connelly, WA1ION - Billerica, MA

<<
On Tue, Oct 14, 2008 at 7:18 PM, Paul Logan <paulloganradio@...>
wrote:

for some reason they come in well here - but so do WTNI on 1640 - I
cant
explain it - often I will hear KVNS mixing with several stations
but often
times it is dominating. Its not way above others here but does seem
to get
out very well, I wonder what their pattern is.
The KVNS pattern is supposed to be non-directional, but it pushes way
out to the east due to the Gulf of Mexico being so close to the
transmitter.

They don't dominate here every night, but fairly often they come in so
strong you can't hear much but a slight rumbling in the background
from the other stations.

-- Jay