What is best method for recording DX from an ULR?


bbwrwy
 

I have a question or two on recording DX from a ULR.

I realize the recorder has to share the receiver's audio output with
the headphones. But how do you handle the impedance mismatch between
the receiver and recorder?

In keeping with our ultralight theme, do you prefer a mini-disc or
solid-state digital recorders over cassette tape? Does anyone have
any recommendations in this area? Thus far I leaning toward a
mini-disc recorder which I understand is already obsolete.

Thanks for the help.

Richard N. Allen,
DXing since 1960.


Russ Edmunds <wb2bjh@...>
 

--- On Sun, 7/20/08, bbwrwy <richarda@perryisp.net> wrote:


I have a question or two on recording DX from a ULR.

I realize the recorder has to share the receiver's audio output with
the headphones. But how do you handle the impedance mismatch between
the receiver and recorder?

In keeping with our ultralight theme, do you prefer a mini-disc or
solid-state digital recorders over cassette tape? Does anyone have
any recommendations in this area? Thus far I leaning toward a
mini-disc recorder which I understand is already obsolete.

Thanks for the help.

_________________

Ordinarily, I use an impedance matching transformer to match from most radios. Your typical headphone output is 4-8 ohms; your typical computer sound card wants to see something in the 5000-10000 ohm range ideally. I've found that 100, 2000 or 2500 ohms output is usually sufficient.

HOWEVER, there's another issue with ULR's which doesn't seem to exist even with my Sony 2010, and that's transmission of both monitor and CPU noise. Even with a 6 or 10' extender to get the ULR physically away from the computer so as to eliminate radiated noise, I still have way too much of it getting through, even using both my matching transformer and also a RS ground loop attenuator.

I haven't managed to correct this so far...

Russ Edmunds
Blue Bell, PA ( 360' ASL )
[15 mi NNW of Philadelphia]
40:08:45N; 75:16:04W, Grid FN20id
<wb2bjh@yahoo.com>
FM: Yamaha T-80 & Onkyo T-450RDS w/ APS9B @15'
AM: Modified Sony ICF 2010 barefoot


satya@...
 

Hi Richard:

I use an Olympus WS-300 flash drive (solid state) recorder and love it,
since it's samll, runs about 20 hours on a single AAA battery, and can
immediattely be loaded onto the computer for editing and archiving.

How I solved the impedance and overload problem (some of you may laugh...)
was:
- take a patch cord with 1/8" stereo male plugs and cut it in half
- on both resulting pieces, strip the leads and tie the two insulated
"positive" leads together on each, leaving a single combined "positive"
lead plus the braid as the negative. Monophonic is fine for my DXing
purposes, but the recorder needs to see a stereo plug.
- Recombine the two pieces into a single cable, putting a 0-10K resistor
in series between the positive leads. The two negative braids are
directly tied together.
- I put a 25 ohm resistor across the positive and negative, which
apparently allows the recorder to "see" an impedance it likes. Plus, it
absorbs a lot of energy which otherwise distorts the recording: just the
10K pot was too iffy on finding a good recording level.

I plug one end into the receiver and the other into the MIC jack of the
recorder. I then plug my headphones into the recorder so I can listen as
I record. The Olympus has an LCD "VU meter", which helps, although my
ears are very good at telling if I'm overloading or underdriving the
recorder. Underdriving produces digital artifacts which sound like a
light (and annoying) wind chime when you play it back.

Hope this helps!

73 - Kevin S
Bainbridge Island, WA

I have a question or two on recording DX from a ULR.

I realize the recorder has to share the receiver's audio output with
the headphones. But how do you handle the impedance mismatch between
the receiver and recorder?

In keeping with our ultralight theme, do you prefer a mini-disc or
solid-state digital recorders over cassette tape? Does anyone have
any recommendations in this area? Thus far I leaning toward a
mini-disc recorder which I understand is already obsolete.

Thanks for the help.

Richard N. Allen,
DXing since 1960.


Brett Saylor <bds2@...>
 


satya@...
 

Hi Brett:

On the Olympus model I use, if I go from the highest quality setting to
the medium quality settings, the emitted noise disappears, and at around
44,000 kbps, the fidelity still far exceeds what I need for DXing. Plus,
the files take up about a third of the room on the old hard drive and are
easier to edit.

It's good to know models don't need impedance matching - when the Olympus
dies, hello Sony!

73 - Kevin S
Bainbridge Island, WA


The Sony introduces a little noise on AM but if I separate it from the
radio
by a foot or two of cable, and
move it with respect to the antenna, the noise drops to almost nothing.

Brett Saylor


On Sun, Jul 20, 2008 at 11:53 AM, bbwrwy <richarda@perryisp.net> wrote:

I have a question or two on recording DX from a ULR.

I realize the recorder has to share the receiver's audio output with
the headphones. But how do you handle the impedance mismatch between
the receiver and recorder?

In keeping with our ultralight theme, do you prefer a mini-disc or
solid-state digital recorders over cassette tape? Does anyone have
any recommendations in this area? Thus far I leaning toward a
mini-disc recorder which I understand is already obsolete.

Thanks for the help.

Richard N. Allen,
DXing since 1960.


Brett Saylor <bds2@...>
 


MarkWA1ION
 

How is the Sony ICD-UX70 MP3 stereo recorder on batteries ? Also how
is Kevin's Olympus recorder (model # ?) in this respect ?

Short battery life has been a complaint with the Pogo Radio YourWay
and Edirol recorders popular among DXpeditioners.

Mark Connelly, WA1ION - Billerica, MA

<<

Hi Richard,

I've gone the minidisc route in the past. I've pretty much gotten
away from it due to the noise that
all my MD recorders create on AM. This year, I'm trying a combination
of the Sangean DT-200VX ultralight radio and Sony ICD-UX70 MP3 stereo
recorder. The Sony recorder weighs less than 2 oz., has 1GB memory,
records at 128 kbps stereo and has a line-in jack that can
intelligently take either an external microphone or the line out
direct from the radio - no transformers or impedance adapters needed.
I plug a stereo splitter from Radio Shack into the headphone jack of
the radio and run my headphones out of one side and a stereo patch
cable to the Sony out of the other.


The Sony is absolutely the perfect mini-DX recorder - it auto-names
the files including the date, and has a USB
plug to transfer the recorded MP3 files to the computer directly from
the recorder. All I have to do is
write down the order of the recordings and I can match the times and
frequencies up later.


The Sony introduces a little noise on AM but if I separate it from
the radio by a foot or two of cable, and
move it with respect to the antenna, the noise drops to almost
nothing.


Brett Saylor

On Sun, Jul 20, 2008 at 11:53 AM, bbwrwy <richarda@...> wrote:

I have a question or two on recording DX from a ULR.

I realize the recorder has to share the receiver's audio output with
the headphones. But how do you handle the impedance mismatch between
the receiver and recorder?

In keeping with our ultralight theme, do you prefer a mini-disc or
solid-state digital recorders over cassette tape? Does anyone have
any recommendations in this area? Thus far I leaning toward a
mini-disc recorder which I understand is already obsolete.

Thanks for the help.

Richard N. Allen,
DXing since 1960.


Brett Saylor <bds2@...>
 


satya@...
 

The Olympus seems to get 15-20 hours on a single AAA battery - I usually
just let it run for an hour or so at a time and get quite a few sessions
out of it.

73 - Kevin S
Bainbridge Island, WA

I've been using it for several months, off and on, with the original
single
AAA battery. Not sure of the total record time on it, I would estimate
two-three hours (there are ~ 45 files, each one 2-5 minutes long). Seems
pretty energy thrifty,


Brett


On Wed, Jul 23, 2008 at 8:44 AM, MarkWA1ION <MarkWA1ION@aol.com> wrote:

How is the Sony ICD-UX70 MP3 stereo recorder on batteries ? Also how
is Kevin's Olympus recorder (model # ?) in this respect ?

Short battery life has been a complaint with the Pogo Radio YourWay
and Edirol recorders popular among DXpeditioners.

Mark Connelly, WA1ION - Billerica, MA


bbwrwy
 

Kevin & Brett:

I discovered yesterday that I'd purchased an Olympus Digital Voice
Recorder WS100 a couple of years ago to record meeting notes. Because
it didn't do well I put in a drawer and forgot it. I'm going to try
it out this evening with my SRF-T615.

I'm also going to check out the Sony ICD-UX70 MP3 stereo recorder.

Thanks for the information.

Richard Allen.

P.S. for John Bryant: Be thankful you are in Washington state. I
just left Stillwater and it was 100°. According to KOSU, it was 102°
yesterday. -30-


bbwrwy
 

I checked out the Olympus WS100 recorder with a SRF-T615 and E100, and
am not totally satisfied with the results.

It seemed a normal listening volume overloaded the recorder a bit.

While recording R. Rebelde 1180 I noticed the recorder emitted noise
near that frequency. It wasn't noted on the other frequencies I
recorded (530, 670, 710 and 890 kHz). Some of the noise was eliminated
by increasing the distance between the receiver and recorder but it
was still evident at 1.2 meters (4 feet).

Richard Allen