Date   

Re: Awards Program

Paul Blundell
 

Thanks for your email and the offer. Maybe it would be a good chance to look at what awards we offer and how they align with the hobby at the same time.


On Tue., 10 Nov. 2020, 21:03 Jorge Garzón via groups.io, <iberiaDX=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Gary and the rest of the group. 
I have read the lack of volunteers for the award program. I would like to share with you my goodwill to help if you decide to re-start the program. I am used to Photoshop environment and I have enough time to help without compromising my radio listening sessions, more now that we have re-structured our working schedules due to COVID-19. 

I have colaborated as editor with DX bulletins and even I helped RNE in Sevilla as a QSL manager just for a better developping of radio and DXing culture. I also sometimes design QSL cards for free radio stations (I include one of the QSL that I designed for Radio Merlin Int this past springtime, designed entirely with Adobe Photoshop). 

73!

Jorge Garzón (EB7EFA · EA1036 SWL) 
QTH: IN83ag / 43º15' N · 03º56' W
Urb. San Roque 95, casa 5 (Villasevil)
39698 Santiurde de Toranzo (ESPAÑA - SPAIN)
..................................................................................
Blog: IberiaDX  · Twitter: @IberiaDX


En martes, 10 de noviembre de 2020 04:43:41 CET, Gary DeBock via groups.io <d1028gary=aol.com@groups.io> escribió:


On Mon, Nov 9, 2020 at 02:47 PM, Paul Blundell wrote:
How much work would it involve? I am happy to help out with it. Do we need to look at "revamping" them a bit?
 
Paul
Paul,

The administration and preparation of the Award Certificates would require skill in Adobe photoshop software, since new certificates are made by altering previously awarded certificates (and master samples). In addition, a serious donation of time and effort would be involved, since multiple applications can be received at any time, the processing of which could seriously impact your DXing time (and other activities). It is not unusual to have a backlog of 15 or 20 certificates waiting to be prepared, with the applicants wondering why they have not yet received them (and sending emails to that effect). It is for these reasons that I reluctantly decided to stop taking these applications about 4 years ago, due to a lack of free hobby time.

Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)


 


Re: Planning a Portable Ultralight radio DXing Session – November 2020

Paul Blundell
 

Thanks for the reply.

This is the case I currently use. I mostly carry it by itself but do also put it in my backpack at times.

On Tue., 10 Nov. 2020, 20:39 Jorge Garzón via groups.io, <iberiaDX=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Thanks for this blog entry, Paul. I love to combine radio and walking and often I visit not crowded spots where the only living beings that I found are wild animals, cattle, shepherds or just casual walkers. I also carry my stuff in a rucksack. 

But, do you carry that yellow hard case in your backpack? It seems big and heavy, isn't it? 

I also chose selected spots in the wild where I can park safely and then carry my 'heavy stuff' which includes a folding camping chair, a small table a solid  tripod foot and a telescopic fishing rod to help with antennae. 

Some of these pictures are shown in my blog here: https://iberiadx.wordpress.com/ where last night I posted a reflection on the DXing hobby related to DXing at live and SDR (in Spanish, but easy to translate with Google translator) 

¡Saludos! 

Jorge Garzón (EB7EFA · EA1036 SWL) 
QTH: IN83ag / 43º15' N · 03º56' W
Urb. San Roque 95, casa 5 (Villasevil)
39698 Santiurde de Toranzo (ESPAÑA - SPAIN)
..................................................................................
Blog: IberiaDX  · Twitter: @IberiaDX


En martes, 10 de noviembre de 2020 04:25:52 CET, Paul Blundell <tanger32au@...> escribió:


Planning a Portable Ultralight radio DXing Session – November 2020

 

 

 

 

For some people this could be as easy as grabbing a radio as you head out the door; I have found that some more planning is required to get the most from my portable Ultralight radio DXing sessions. This is especially important now with COVID-19 restrictions in some areas and changes due to this. I am now making a point of keeping a good distance away from people and limiting how much time I am out and about in public. I am now focusing on more remote / less used areas. For those in areas with current COVID-19 restrictions, it is vital that all rules and guidelines are followed. Local health advice must be the overriding decider on what you are able to do. 

When I am planning a portable Ultralight radio DXing session, my first step is to arrange a suitable day and time. I am happily married and as we have a couple of young children, ensuring the domestic front is happy goes a long way to ensuring I can have a good time. I like to try and arrange my outings around times when my wife won't be home or is busy; this makes it easier to be away from home. Only you know your own domestic situation and can assess the best way to do this. All too often I hear of domestic situations where one person’s hobbies or interests have a negative effect on the household as a whole. Normally I aim to have at least one portable Ultralight radio DXing session a week if I can, normally a Saturday night or one night during the week, however this can change based on the above. Of late I have been taking my children for more walks and quite often I take an ultralight radio or two with me in case I find a suitable location, as they are now slightly older they will often be happy on the play equipment while I am doing some DXing.

Once a suitable day and time has been found the next step is to check the weather forecast for that day. In the past when I was involved in the amateur radio / radio scanning hobby, I used to undertake quite a bit of out and about scanning which involved sitting on hill tops, lookouts, mountains and so on, from doing this I learnt two VERY important lessons:
- Sitting in the sun for hours at a time is not fun and this reduces your enjoyment of the hobby.
- Sitting in the cold for hours at a time is not fun and this reduces your enjoyment hobby.

Based on this I like to make sure the weather will be suitable. While the cold can be overcome with extra clothes, being too hot is much harder to control and in extreme cases this can be quite bad for your health (dehydration, sun stroke and so on). Storms and other weather extremes are also not fun to be out in so I like to try and avoid these if possible. During our Australian summer, bush fires are a very real risk and given most locations are prime fire spots, the fire danger rating (FDR) and a safe access / escape are very important to consider. The local sunrise / sunset are also checked and this helps with planning a suitable time to leave home to be at the chosen location to maximise any advantage from these different times of the day.

Next you need to decide on a location, I like to have a mix of new locations and some proven ones. Some are quite close and others are quite a distance to drive. The things I consider when deciding on a location include:
- Distance to drive (The cost of fuel is a factor in this, as is the amount of time I have for my DXing session)
- Access (some areas are locked after hours)
- RF profile (Some locations are better due to distance from high power transmitters)
- Comforts (Shops, toilets, etc.)
- Personal Security / Safety (See notes below) 

All these points are fairly easy to assess except for personal security, yet this is the most important.

The city I live in is fairly safe and crime it is not always the first thing I think of, yet personal security and safety is very important. Sitting in your car or walking in the bush with multiple radios, by yourself, around and after dark, in locations such as lookouts or hill tops, beaches, parks or car parks can expose you to an increased risk to your personal safety. These locations at times can be used by people for a number of reasons which may not be legal or which may cause you to witness things you don't want to witness. Some of these locations are used for drug dealing, exchanges or people meeting others whom they are not married to in a "lover’s lane" type situation. Generally locations with a good level of passing traffic or close to houses are better than isolated spots.  Good lighting is also a benefit as is having multiple entry and exits points. The best advice is to keep your doors locked if in your car and to be aware of your surroundings both in your car and while on foot. If you feel unsafe or uneasy it is better to cut your session short than get caught up in somebody else's problems or risk your personal safety. Having a torch and a mobile phone plus telling somebody where you will be and when you will be home are all good safety tips. Some larger torches can be used as a weapon is the most serious of situations.

My planning really starts the night before or early in the morning when I prepare everything I am going to take, charge batteries and pack up my gear. My normal kit consists of this:
- Receivers (1, 2, 3 or more in my carry case)
- Batteries (Fully recharged and also some spare alkaline AA's and AAA’s)
- Head phones (I prefer the ear bud type and these are easier to carry)
- Log book / sheets and pen + spares
- Torch (Now using my phone / torch in my radio)
- List of all frequencies
- Multi-tool
- Blanket (if it is cold)
- Spare jacket / vest
- Digital camera (I am now using my phone)
- Food and drinks
- Band-Aids and a small towel
- Mobile phone
- Identification such as a driver’s licence (which you should be carrying anyway if you are driving)

In the past I have used digital camera bags and hard ABS type cases, these types of cases / bags each have advantages and disadvantages. ABS cases standout and make it look like you are carrying expensive equipment, which might not be a great idea in some remote locations. Soft cases on the other hand don’t provide enough protection in some circumstances. I have created a custom carry case which I can easily place inside a backpack if I need to or which I can just as easily carry by itself. This is the best of both worlds and provides a great level of protection to my radios and 3” FSL aerial.

Before leaving home, I check my kit and confirm I have everything I need. When I arrive onsite I do a quick recon of the area to make sure it is safe, no dodgy people around and I feel comfortable. Then I do a quick scan of the bands and check for the normal stations, now I can sit back, relax and get serious about logging. I also try to eat something and drink to keep my fluids up. I like to also get some photos each time I go out for the report on my blog. If I am going portable I like to try a few different spots and also interact with anybody I see, even if this is just a passing hello on a track. 

On returning home I make sure I spend some time with my wife and children before checking my loggings and entering these in to my frequency database.


Re: Awards Program

Jorge Garzón
 

Hi Gary and the rest of the group. 
I have read the lack of volunteers for the award program. I would like to share with you my goodwill to help if you decide to re-start the program. I am used to Photoshop environment and I have enough time to help without compromising my radio listening sessions, more now that we have re-structured our working schedules due to COVID-19. 

I have colaborated as editor with DX bulletins and even I helped RNE in Sevilla as a QSL manager just for a better developping of radio and DXing culture. I also sometimes design QSL cards for free radio stations (I include one of the QSL that I designed for Radio Merlin Int this past springtime, designed entirely with Adobe Photoshop). 

73!

Jorge Garzón (EB7EFA · EA1036 SWL) 
QTH: IN83ag / 43º15' N · 03º56' W
Urb. San Roque 95, casa 5 (Villasevil)
39698 Santiurde de Toranzo (ESPAÑA - SPAIN)
..................................................................................
Blog: IberiaDX  · Twitter: @IberiaDX


En martes, 10 de noviembre de 2020 04:43:41 CET, Gary DeBock via groups.io <d1028gary@...> escribió:


On Mon, Nov 9, 2020 at 02:47 PM, Paul Blundell wrote:
How much work would it involve? I am happy to help out with it. Do we need to look at "revamping" them a bit?
 
Paul
Paul,

The administration and preparation of the Award Certificates would require skill in Adobe photoshop software, since new certificates are made by altering previously awarded certificates (and master samples). In addition, a serious donation of time and effort would be involved, since multiple applications can be received at any time, the processing of which could seriously impact your DXing time (and other activities). It is not unusual to have a backlog of 15 or 20 certificates waiting to be prepared, with the applicants wondering why they have not yet received them (and sending emails to that effect). It is for these reasons that I reluctantly decided to stop taking these applications about 4 years ago, due to a lack of free hobby time.

Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)


 


Re: Planning a Portable Ultralight radio DXing Session – November 2020

Jorge Garzón
 

Thanks for this blog entry, Paul. I love to combine radio and walking and often I visit not crowded spots where the only living beings that I found are wild animals, cattle, shepherds or just casual walkers. I also carry my stuff in a rucksack. 

But, do you carry that yellow hard case in your backpack? It seems big and heavy, isn't it? 

I also chose selected spots in the wild where I can park safely and then carry my 'heavy stuff' which includes a folding camping chair, a small table a solid  tripod foot and a telescopic fishing rod to help with antennae. 

Some of these pictures are shown in my blog here: https://iberiadx.wordpress.com/ where last night I posted a reflection on the DXing hobby related to DXing at live and SDR (in Spanish, but easy to translate with Google translator) 

¡Saludos! 

Jorge Garzón (EB7EFA · EA1036 SWL) 
QTH: IN83ag / 43º15' N · 03º56' W
Urb. San Roque 95, casa 5 (Villasevil)
39698 Santiurde de Toranzo (ESPAÑA - SPAIN)
..................................................................................
Blog: IberiaDX  · Twitter: @IberiaDX


En martes, 10 de noviembre de 2020 04:25:52 CET, Paul Blundell <tanger32au@...> escribió:


Planning a Portable Ultralight radio DXing Session – November 2020

 

 

 

 

For some people this could be as easy as grabbing a radio as you head out the door; I have found that some more planning is required to get the most from my portable Ultralight radio DXing sessions. This is especially important now with COVID-19 restrictions in some areas and changes due to this. I am now making a point of keeping a good distance away from people and limiting how much time I am out and about in public. I am now focusing on more remote / less used areas. For those in areas with current COVID-19 restrictions, it is vital that all rules and guidelines are followed. Local health advice must be the overriding decider on what you are able to do. 

When I am planning a portable Ultralight radio DXing session, my first step is to arrange a suitable day and time. I am happily married and as we have a couple of young children, ensuring the domestic front is happy goes a long way to ensuring I can have a good time. I like to try and arrange my outings around times when my wife won't be home or is busy; this makes it easier to be away from home. Only you know your own domestic situation and can assess the best way to do this. All too often I hear of domestic situations where one person’s hobbies or interests have a negative effect on the household as a whole. Normally I aim to have at least one portable Ultralight radio DXing session a week if I can, normally a Saturday night or one night during the week, however this can change based on the above. Of late I have been taking my children for more walks and quite often I take an ultralight radio or two with me in case I find a suitable location, as they are now slightly older they will often be happy on the play equipment while I am doing some DXing.

Once a suitable day and time has been found the next step is to check the weather forecast for that day. In the past when I was involved in the amateur radio / radio scanning hobby, I used to undertake quite a bit of out and about scanning which involved sitting on hill tops, lookouts, mountains and so on, from doing this I learnt two VERY important lessons:
- Sitting in the sun for hours at a time is not fun and this reduces your enjoyment of the hobby.
- Sitting in the cold for hours at a time is not fun and this reduces your enjoyment hobby.

Based on this I like to make sure the weather will be suitable. While the cold can be overcome with extra clothes, being too hot is much harder to control and in extreme cases this can be quite bad for your health (dehydration, sun stroke and so on). Storms and other weather extremes are also not fun to be out in so I like to try and avoid these if possible. During our Australian summer, bush fires are a very real risk and given most locations are prime fire spots, the fire danger rating (FDR) and a safe access / escape are very important to consider. The local sunrise / sunset are also checked and this helps with planning a suitable time to leave home to be at the chosen location to maximise any advantage from these different times of the day.

Next you need to decide on a location, I like to have a mix of new locations and some proven ones. Some are quite close and others are quite a distance to drive. The things I consider when deciding on a location include:
- Distance to drive (The cost of fuel is a factor in this, as is the amount of time I have for my DXing session)
- Access (some areas are locked after hours)
- RF profile (Some locations are better due to distance from high power transmitters)
- Comforts (Shops, toilets, etc.)
- Personal Security / Safety (See notes below) 

All these points are fairly easy to assess except for personal security, yet this is the most important.

The city I live in is fairly safe and crime it is not always the first thing I think of, yet personal security and safety is very important. Sitting in your car or walking in the bush with multiple radios, by yourself, around and after dark, in locations such as lookouts or hill tops, beaches, parks or car parks can expose you to an increased risk to your personal safety. These locations at times can be used by people for a number of reasons which may not be legal or which may cause you to witness things you don't want to witness. Some of these locations are used for drug dealing, exchanges or people meeting others whom they are not married to in a "lover’s lane" type situation. Generally locations with a good level of passing traffic or close to houses are better than isolated spots.  Good lighting is also a benefit as is having multiple entry and exits points. The best advice is to keep your doors locked if in your car and to be aware of your surroundings both in your car and while on foot. If you feel unsafe or uneasy it is better to cut your session short than get caught up in somebody else's problems or risk your personal safety. Having a torch and a mobile phone plus telling somebody where you will be and when you will be home are all good safety tips. Some larger torches can be used as a weapon is the most serious of situations.

My planning really starts the night before or early in the morning when I prepare everything I am going to take, charge batteries and pack up my gear. My normal kit consists of this:
- Receivers (1, 2, 3 or more in my carry case)
- Batteries (Fully recharged and also some spare alkaline AA's and AAA’s)
- Head phones (I prefer the ear bud type and these are easier to carry)
- Log book / sheets and pen + spares
- Torch (Now using my phone / torch in my radio)
- List of all frequencies
- Multi-tool
- Blanket (if it is cold)
- Spare jacket / vest
- Digital camera (I am now using my phone)
- Food and drinks
- Band-Aids and a small towel
- Mobile phone
- Identification such as a driver’s licence (which you should be carrying anyway if you are driving)

In the past I have used digital camera bags and hard ABS type cases, these types of cases / bags each have advantages and disadvantages. ABS cases standout and make it look like you are carrying expensive equipment, which might not be a great idea in some remote locations. Soft cases on the other hand don’t provide enough protection in some circumstances. I have created a custom carry case which I can easily place inside a backpack if I need to or which I can just as easily carry by itself. This is the best of both worlds and provides a great level of protection to my radios and 3” FSL aerial.

Before leaving home, I check my kit and confirm I have everything I need. When I arrive onsite I do a quick recon of the area to make sure it is safe, no dodgy people around and I feel comfortable. Then I do a quick scan of the bands and check for the normal stations, now I can sit back, relax and get serious about logging. I also try to eat something and drink to keep my fluids up. I like to also get some photos each time I go out for the report on my blog. If I am going portable I like to try a few different spots and also interact with anybody I see, even if this is just a passing hello on a track. 

On returning home I make sure I spend some time with my wife and children before checking my loggings and entering these in to my frequency database.


Re: Awards Program

Paul Blundell
 

Thanks for the information.

Maybe in 2021, as a group we could look at finding a better way of preparing these, if enough interests exists for them.

Paul

On Tue, Nov 10, 2020 at 2:43 PM Gary DeBock via groups.io <D1028Gary=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
On Mon, Nov 9, 2020 at 02:47 PM, Paul Blundell wrote:
How much work would it involve? I am happy to help out with it. Do we need to look at "revamping" them a bit?
 
Paul
Paul,

The administration and preparation of the Award Certificates would require skill in Adobe photoshop software, since new certificates are made by altering previously awarded certificates (and master samples). In addition, a serious donation of time and effort would be involved, since multiple applications can be received at any time, the processing of which could seriously impact your DXing time (and other activities). It is not unusual to have a backlog of 15 or 20 certificates waiting to be prepared, with the applicants wondering why they have not yet received them (and sending emails to that effect). It is for these reasons that I reluctantly decided to stop taking these applications about 4 years ago, due to a lack of free hobby time.

Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)


 



--
Paul


Re: Awards Program

Gary DeBock
 

On Mon, Nov 9, 2020 at 02:47 PM, Paul Blundell wrote:
How much work would it involve? I am happy to help out with it. Do we need to look at "revamping" them a bit?
 
Paul
Paul,

The administration and preparation of the Award Certificates would require skill in Adobe photoshop software, since new certificates are made by altering previously awarded certificates (and master samples). In addition, a serious donation of time and effort would be involved, since multiple applications can be received at any time, the processing of which could seriously impact your DXing time (and other activities). It is not unusual to have a backlog of 15 or 20 certificates waiting to be prepared, with the applicants wondering why they have not yet received them (and sending emails to that effect). It is for these reasons that I reluctantly decided to stop taking these applications about 4 years ago, due to a lack of free hobby time.

Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)


 


Planning a Portable Ultralight radio DXing Session – November 2020

Paul Blundell
 

Planning a Portable Ultralight radio DXing Session – November 2020

 

 

 

 

For some people this could be as easy as grabbing a radio as you head out the door; I have found that some more planning is required to get the most from my portable Ultralight radio DXing sessions. This is especially important now with COVID-19 restrictions in some areas and changes due to this. I am now making a point of keeping a good distance away from people and limiting how much time I am out and about in public. I am now focusing on more remote / less used areas. For those in areas with current COVID-19 restrictions, it is vital that all rules and guidelines are followed. Local health advice must be the overriding decider on what you are able to do. 

When I am planning a portable Ultralight radio DXing session, my first step is to arrange a suitable day and time. I am happily married and as we have a couple of young children, ensuring the domestic front is happy goes a long way to ensuring I can have a good time. I like to try and arrange my outings around times when my wife won't be home or is busy; this makes it easier to be away from home. Only you know your own domestic situation and can assess the best way to do this. All too often I hear of domestic situations where one person’s hobbies or interests have a negative effect on the household as a whole. Normally I aim to have at least one portable Ultralight radio DXing session a week if I can, normally a Saturday night or one night during the week, however this can change based on the above. Of late I have been taking my children for more walks and quite often I take an ultralight radio or two with me in case I find a suitable location, as they are now slightly older they will often be happy on the play equipment while I am doing some DXing.

Once a suitable day and time has been found the next step is to check the weather forecast for that day. In the past when I was involved in the amateur radio / radio scanning hobby, I used to undertake quite a bit of out and about scanning which involved sitting on hill tops, lookouts, mountains and so on, from doing this I learnt two VERY important lessons:
- Sitting in the sun for hours at a time is not fun and this reduces your enjoyment of the hobby.
- Sitting in the cold for hours at a time is not fun and this reduces your enjoyment hobby.

Based on this I like to make sure the weather will be suitable. While the cold can be overcome with extra clothes, being too hot is much harder to control and in extreme cases this can be quite bad for your health (dehydration, sun stroke and so on). Storms and other weather extremes are also not fun to be out in so I like to try and avoid these if possible. During our Australian summer, bush fires are a very real risk and given most locations are prime fire spots, the fire danger rating (FDR) and a safe access / escape are very important to consider. The local sunrise / sunset are also checked and this helps with planning a suitable time to leave home to be at the chosen location to maximise any advantage from these different times of the day.

Next you need to decide on a location, I like to have a mix of new locations and some proven ones. Some are quite close and others are quite a distance to drive. The things I consider when deciding on a location include:
- Distance to drive (The cost of fuel is a factor in this, as is the amount of time I have for my DXing session)
- Access (some areas are locked after hours)
- RF profile (Some locations are better due to distance from high power transmitters)
- Comforts (Shops, toilets, etc.)
- Personal Security / Safety (See notes below) 

All these points are fairly easy to assess except for personal security, yet this is the most important.

The city I live in is fairly safe and crime it is not always the first thing I think of, yet personal security and safety is very important. Sitting in your car or walking in the bush with multiple radios, by yourself, around and after dark, in locations such as lookouts or hill tops, beaches, parks or car parks can expose you to an increased risk to your personal safety. These locations at times can be used by people for a number of reasons which may not be legal or which may cause you to witness things you don't want to witness. Some of these locations are used for drug dealing, exchanges or people meeting others whom they are not married to in a "lover’s lane" type situation. Generally locations with a good level of passing traffic or close to houses are better than isolated spots.  Good lighting is also a benefit as is having multiple entry and exits points. The best advice is to keep your doors locked if in your car and to be aware of your surroundings both in your car and while on foot. If you feel unsafe or uneasy it is better to cut your session short than get caught up in somebody else's problems or risk your personal safety. Having a torch and a mobile phone plus telling somebody where you will be and when you will be home are all good safety tips. Some larger torches can be used as a weapon is the most serious of situations.

My planning really starts the night before or early in the morning when I prepare everything I am going to take, charge batteries and pack up my gear. My normal kit consists of this:
- Receivers (1, 2, 3 or more in my carry case)
- Batteries (Fully recharged and also some spare alkaline AA's and AAA’s)
- Head phones (I prefer the ear bud type and these are easier to carry)
- Log book / sheets and pen + spares
- Torch (Now using my phone / torch in my radio)
- List of all frequencies
- Multi-tool
- Blanket (if it is cold)
- Spare jacket / vest
- Digital camera (I am now using my phone)
- Food and drinks
- Band-Aids and a small towel
- Mobile phone
- Identification such as a driver’s licence (which you should be carrying anyway if you are driving)

In the past I have used digital camera bags and hard ABS type cases, these types of cases / bags each have advantages and disadvantages. ABS cases standout and make it look like you are carrying expensive equipment, which might not be a great idea in some remote locations. Soft cases on the other hand don’t provide enough protection in some circumstances. I have created a custom carry case which I can easily place inside a backpack if I need to or which I can just as easily carry by itself. This is the best of both worlds and provides a great level of protection to my radios and 3” FSL aerial.

Before leaving home, I check my kit and confirm I have everything I need. When I arrive onsite I do a quick recon of the area to make sure it is safe, no dodgy people around and I feel comfortable. Then I do a quick scan of the bands and check for the normal stations, now I can sit back, relax and get serious about logging. I also try to eat something and drink to keep my fluids up. I like to also get some photos each time I go out for the report on my blog. If I am going portable I like to try a few different spots and also interact with anybody I see, even if this is just a passing hello on a track. 

On returning home I make sure I spend some time with my wife and children before checking my loggings and entering these in to my frequency database.


Re: Awards Program

Paul Blundell
 

Thanks for that information, I was not aware of this.

How much work would it involve? I am happy to help out with it. Do we need to look at "revamping" them a bit?

Paul

On Tue, Nov 10, 2020 at 8:26 AM Gary DeBock via groups.io <D1028Gary=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Paul, Jorge and All,

The Ultralight Radio Awards program is temporarily inactive because of no volunteers to administer the program, and prepare the Award Certificates (which requires skill in the Adobe Photoshop software). Previously I had performed both functions, but unfortunately no longer have time to do so.

Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
 



--
Paul


Re: What to Log

Jorge Garzón
 

Paul, 
The web address is: https://rxx.classaxe.com/en/reu/signals

I forgot first letters in the sequence. 

Sorry for that! 

Jorge Garzón (EB7EFA · EA1036 SWL) 
QTH: IN83ag / 43º15' N · 03º56' W
Urb. San Roque 95, casa 5 (Villasevil)
39698 Santiurde de Toranzo (ESPAÑA - SPAIN)
..................................................................................
Blog: IberiaDX  · Twitter: @IberiaDX


En lunes, 9 de noviembre de 2020 23:10:38 CET, Paul Blundell <tanger32au@...> escribió:


Thanks for the information. I will check out that site.


On Tue, Nov 10, 2020 at 2:12 AM Jorge Garzón via groups.io <iberiaDX=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Paul,
I keep my MW logs in MWLIST and periodically I download the .csv files in my computer. Same with FM logs. For NDB DXing I keep my logs in WWSU logger and also int he NDB Cluster (classaxe.com) run by Martin and others. However I also keep excel files for stations logged from 1.700 > 30.000 kHz. For them I have:

QRG (in kHz)
Date
UTC/z
QRA/Call
ITU/IARU
Rec/Antenna
QSL
Notes

I have the excel with title fields marking the spectrum. For it I am following the ECA Table (EU table of frequency allocations and applications in the frequency range 8,3 kHz to 3.000 GHz).

Hope this helps!

Jorge Garzón (EB7EFA · EA1036 SWL) 
QTH: IN83ag / 43º15' N · 03º56' W
Urb. San Roque 95, casa 5 (Villasevil)
39698 Santiurde de Toranzo (ESPAÑA - SPAIN)
..................................................................................
Blog: IberiaDX  · Twitter: @IberiaDX


En lunes, 9 de noviembre de 2020 6:05:28 CET, Paul Blundell <tanger32au@...> escribió:


 I am in the process of sorting / updating my loggings with a view to in 2010, having a better / easier to use system.

What information do you log yourself?


So far I have:
Frequency
Callsign
Area
Power
Type
Receiver Used
Confirmed (stays)
Notes

Any do you log / keep a record of?

Thanks
Paul



--
Paul


Re: What to Log

Paul Blundell
 

Thanks for the information. I will check out that site.


On Tue, Nov 10, 2020 at 2:12 AM Jorge Garzón via groups.io <iberiaDX=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Paul,
I keep my MW logs in MWLIST and periodically I download the .csv files in my computer. Same with FM logs. For NDB DXing I keep my logs in WWSU logger and also int he NDB Cluster (classaxe.com) run by Martin and others. However I also keep excel files for stations logged from 1.700 > 30.000 kHz. For them I have:

QRG (in kHz)
Date
UTC/z
QRA/Call
ITU/IARU
Rec/Antenna
QSL
Notes

I have the excel with title fields marking the spectrum. For it I am following the ECA Table (EU table of frequency allocations and applications in the frequency range 8,3 kHz to 3.000 GHz).

Hope this helps!

Jorge Garzón (EB7EFA · EA1036 SWL) 
QTH: IN83ag / 43º15' N · 03º56' W
Urb. San Roque 95, casa 5 (Villasevil)
39698 Santiurde de Toranzo (ESPAÑA - SPAIN)
..................................................................................
Blog: IberiaDX  · Twitter: @IberiaDX


En lunes, 9 de noviembre de 2020 6:05:28 CET, Paul Blundell <tanger32au@...> escribió:


 I am in the process of sorting / updating my loggings with a view to in 2010, having a better / easier to use system.

What information do you log yourself?


So far I have:
Frequency
Callsign
Area
Power
Type
Receiver Used
Confirmed (stays)
Notes

Any do you log / keep a record of?

Thanks
Paul



--
Paul


Re: Long Term DX Project - 8/11/2020

Paul Blundell
 

Hi Jorge.

This has been going for a few months now. I monitor the same 10 frequencies at different times and places and post my results to my blog and on here. 
My goal is to build up a long term picture of the band and compare different locations and times. I see this being done over quite a few years.

This is only one part of my hobby and I also undertake quite a few portable sessions and also spend time most nights searching the bands, this is often barefoot with my TEAC PR130.

Paul

On Tue, Nov 10, 2020 at 1:34 AM Jorge Garzón via groups.io <iberiaDX=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Paul,
Sorry to ask this as perhaps you already explained here. I browsed your webpage but I could not find the first post regarding your long-term project.

What's the main goal and for how long areyou monitoring the fxs?

Thank you!

Jorge Garzón (EB7EFA · EA1036 SWL) 
QTH: IN83ag / 43º15' N · 03º56' W
Urb. San Roque 95, casa 5 (Villasevil)
39698 Santiurde de Toranzo (ESPAÑA - SPAIN)
..................................................................................
Blog: IberiaDX  · Twitter: @IberiaDX


En domingo, 8 de noviembre de 2020 4:06:26 CET, Paul Blundell <tanger32au@...> escribió:


Date: 8/11/2020

 

Time: 1:30pm

Location: Home, Launceston Tasmania

Notes: A mid afternoon session at home. Signals were generally the same as yesterday with only HPON Melbourne on 1422kHz and 3KND on 1503kHz showing any improvements, from weak to average and poor to weak. I did notice some slight fading of 3GG on 531kHz, this required some retuning.

 

FREQ

CALLSIGN

LOGGED

DATE

RADIO

AERIAL

531

3GG

EXCELLENT

8/11/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL

549

2CR

UNLOGGED

8/11/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL

594

3WV

EXCELLENT

8/11/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL

621

3RN

EXCELLENT

8/11/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL

774

3LO

EXCELLENT

8/11/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL

1053

2CA

UNLOGGED

8/11/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL

1179

3RPH

UNLOGGED

8/11/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL

1341

HPON GEELONG

AVERAGE

8/11/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL

1422

HPON MELBOURNE

AVERAGE

8/11/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL

1503

3KND

WEAK

8/11/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL

 



--
Paul


Re: Awards Program

Gary DeBock
 

Paul, Jorge and All,

The Ultralight Radio Awards program is temporarily inactive because of no volunteers to administer the program, and prepare the Award Certificates (which requires skill in the Adobe Photoshop software). Previously I had performed both functions, but unfortunately no longer have time to do so.

Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
 


Re: Newcomer from Spain

Richard Allen
 

Welcome to our group Jorge.  I look forward to reading your posts.

Good DX.

Richard Allen,
near Perry, Oklahoma, USA.

,_._,_


Re: Awards Program

Jorge Garzón
 

It sounds interesting. Which are the rules to get them? I mean list of receivers allowed. I saw a list but it seems to be an old one (Tecsun PL-330, Sangean HDR-14, and other recent seems to lack, or maybe I did not get the right list.
Saludos

Jorge Garzón (EB7EFA · EA1036 SWL) 
QTH: IN83ag / 43º15' N · 03º56' W
Urb. San Roque 95, casa 5 (Villasevil)
39698 Santiurde de Toranzo (ESPAÑA - SPAIN)
..................................................................................
Blog: IberiaDX  · Twitter: @IberiaDX


En lunes, 9 de noviembre de 2020 6:58:29 CET, Paul Blundell <tanger32au@...> escribió:


Some members might not be aware of this program, please check out the link below. It might give you some ideas on the awards we offer and give you something to aim for.

https://ultralightdx.groups.io/g/main/files/2%20General%20Information/Ultralight%20General%20Awards%20Program%20January%2015,%202010.pdf


Re: What to Log

Jorge Garzón
 

Hi Paul,
I keep my MW logs in MWLIST and periodically I download the .csv files in my computer. Same with FM logs. For NDB DXing I keep my logs in WWSU logger and also int he NDB Cluster (classaxe.com) run by Martin and others. However I also keep excel files for stations logged from 1.700 > 30.000 kHz. For them I have:

QRG (in kHz)
Date
UTC/z
QRA/Call
ITU/IARU
Rec/Antenna
QSL
Notes

I have the excel with title fields marking the spectrum. For it I am following the ECA Table (EU table of frequency allocations and applications in the frequency range 8,3 kHz to 3.000 GHz).

Hope this helps!

Jorge Garzón (EB7EFA · EA1036 SWL) 
QTH: IN83ag / 43º15' N · 03º56' W
Urb. San Roque 95, casa 5 (Villasevil)
39698 Santiurde de Toranzo (ESPAÑA - SPAIN)
..................................................................................
Blog: IberiaDX  · Twitter: @IberiaDX


En lunes, 9 de noviembre de 2020 6:05:28 CET, Paul Blundell <tanger32au@...> escribió:


 I am in the process of sorting / updating my loggings with a view to in 2010, having a better / easier to use system.

What information do you log yourself?


So far I have:
Frequency
Callsign
Area
Power
Type
Receiver Used
Confirmed (stays)
Notes

Any do you log / keep a record of?

Thanks
Paul


Re: Tecsun PL330 from Radiwow.com

Jorge Garzón
 

You are right Gary!
I also own a Sony ICF-2010, a Lowe HF150 and an ICOM R75 and no doubt about their performances (with good antennas, for sure!

My former comment was more on the side of that 'cascade' of Tecsum portables in the PL-### series. I have run comparatives carefully sharing the same antenna and trying to corroborate or refuting the 'obvious'. I have been shocked to discover how a result of a non-serious testing can spread the community as the real truth. Of course most of the times would depend on the chosen external conditions and real balance in between the receiver itself, the antenna and othr units (tuner, balun, ...).
Saludos

Jorge Garzón (EB7EFA · EA1036 SWL) 
QTH: IN83ag / 43º15' N · 03º56' W
Urb. San Roque 95, casa 5 (Villasevil)
39698 Santiurde de Toranzo (ESPAÑA - SPAIN)
..................................................................................
Blog: IberiaDX  · Twitter: @IberiaDX


En lunes, 9 de noviembre de 2020 11:34:27 CET, Gary Sargent <garysargent@...> escribió:


Jorge

I have an Eton E1 and have had (and sold) a Sony 2010. So I have experience with what is arguably two of the best portable SW receivers. But they don't (or didn't) get much use. I'm more of a casual listener of these types of radios. A more of a true DXer type of person would surely more likely benefit from a larger, higher quality, feature rich and better performing receiver. I like the PL330 because its relatively inexpensive for what it does, lots of features and performance in a small package and it gives me SSB capability when I take it along on my daily neighborhood walk.

Gary KE8WO


Re: Long Term DX Project - 8/11/2020

Jorge Garzón
 

Hi Paul,
Sorry to ask this as perhaps you already explained here. I browsed your webpage but I could not find the first post regarding your long-term project.

What's the main goal and for how long areyou monitoring the fxs?

Thank you!

Jorge Garzón (EB7EFA · EA1036 SWL) 
QTH: IN83ag / 43º15' N · 03º56' W
Urb. San Roque 95, casa 5 (Villasevil)
39698 Santiurde de Toranzo (ESPAÑA - SPAIN)
..................................................................................
Blog: IberiaDX  · Twitter: @IberiaDX


En domingo, 8 de noviembre de 2020 4:06:26 CET, Paul Blundell <tanger32au@...> escribió:


Date: 8/11/2020

 

Time: 1:30pm

Location: Home, Launceston Tasmania

Notes: A mid afternoon session at home. Signals were generally the same as yesterday with only HPON Melbourne on 1422kHz and 3KND on 1503kHz showing any improvements, from weak to average and poor to weak. I did notice some slight fading of 3GG on 531kHz, this required some retuning.

 

FREQ

CALLSIGN

LOGGED

DATE

RADIO

AERIAL

531

3GG

EXCELLENT

8/11/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL

549

2CR

UNLOGGED

8/11/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL

594

3WV

EXCELLENT

8/11/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL

621

3RN

EXCELLENT

8/11/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL

774

3LO

EXCELLENT

8/11/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL

1053

2CA

UNLOGGED

8/11/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL

1179

3RPH

UNLOGGED

8/11/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL

1341

HPON GEELONG

AVERAGE

8/11/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL

1422

HPON MELBOURNE

AVERAGE

8/11/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL

1503

3KND

WEAK

8/11/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL

 


Re: Newcomer from Spain

Jorge Garzón
 

Thanks to all folks!

73!

Jorge Garzón (EB7EFA · EA1036 SWL) 
QTH: IN83ag / 43º15' N · 03º56' W
Urb. San Roque 95, casa 5 (Villasevil)
39698 Santiurde de Toranzo (ESPAÑA - SPAIN)
..................................................................................
Blog: IberiaDX  · Twitter: @IberiaDX


En domingo, 8 de noviembre de 2020 16:09:08 CET, C B via groups.io <bevdxer@...> escribió:


Bienvenido Jorge!

Craig Barnes
Wheat Ridge, CO, USA




On Nov 8, 2020, at 7:13 AM, Mike Sanburn <mikesanburn@...> wrote:


Welcome Jorge!
Mike Sanburn KG6LJU
Lakewood Cailfornia USA 


From: main@UltralightDX.groups.io <main@UltralightDX.groups.io> on behalf of Jorge Garzón via groups.io <iberiaDX@...>
Sent: Saturday, November 7, 2020 11:31 PM
To: main@ultralightdx.groups.io <main@ultralightdx.groups.io>
Subject: [UltralightDX] Newcomer from Spain
 
Hi, 
My name is Jorge and I write you from Northern Spain, region of Cantabria. I live in a quiet rural area where I have a lovely countryside, a beautiful landscape and something very important for a radiolistener and DXer: low to very low QRM and noise. In the past I lived in Australia, New Zealand and France. I am a ham operator with call EB7EFA and SWL EA1036. 

I will try to express myself in English, so I apologize for any written misleading that I make, and PSE tell me in case of this happens. 

I am involved in radiolistening since 1980 mainly devoted to LW (Utilities and NDB) and MW broadcasting and maritime comms. Now that I already have 35 yr as a DXer, I remember when I started in 1999 to run LW/MW DXP to the Coast of Portugal that after a long discontinued period, I started them again in 2019. 

Would be extremely long and maybe boring to bring here my different times as a DXer but I will highlight my first receiver in 1980 offered by my parents, an analog Grundig YB300 which one I discovered the (radio)world. Years later I got a Sony ICF-2010, an after an ICOM R71A and a smaller SONY SW55 (this one much better to fit in my rucksack as I often go walking and I am a keen bycicle tourer). Unfortunately, these two latests were lost when I moved in 2006 to Granada, as the moving services lost one of my boxes with these stuff and part of my QSL collection. A real loss!! 

Later on SDR arrived, and the technology overwhelmed the planet and changed our hobby forever. Recalling the song "Video killed the radio star" by The Buggles, I often say that "Tech killed the hobby of DX" because the challenge of hearing distant and weak signals counting on the propagation and antennae has been dramatically changed to constantly try new software solutions and more powerful computers. If I need a computer and a screen to hear, that's not radio for me, but a signal processing instead, which obviously it's not the same.

In a real sense the hobby has now exceed our own human capacity to store and analyse thing in the right dimension (in a way seems to me a self-lying). I see my external HD with several Gb of recorded I/Q and think.. Uhhhmmm, what for? Is this a kind of storing obsession? So, as I love the simplicity and managing my own time and capabilities, I started looking back to the essentials. 

Years back, when I travelled to Southern Spain where my family's home is, I used to listen in some spots by the coastal cliffs (not far from where my diving club is) and tested that I heard better African MW stations and NDB signals. One day, searching the web I found an article by Gary deBock describing a similar effectbut with stunning results, so actually that's why I am here! 

I am re-thinking now my DXing techniques to come back exclusively to portable and start to re-design my goals after have been able to hear hundreds of countries, much of them on MW and also on VHF Band II. 

I have now a DEGEN 1103 (non DSP) portable and a Sangean HDR-14. I am waiting a Tecsun PL-330 to arrive in a few days. 

I would like to build a FSL antenna and I probably have some question to share with you. I am also here to help (if requested) to collaborate with some areas of the group. 

Thank you very much for having created this DXing corner. 

¡Saludos desde España! 

Jorge Garzón (EB7EFA · EA1036 SWL) 
QTH: IN83ag / 43º15' N · 03º56' W
Urb. San Roque 95, casa 5 (Villasevil)
39698 Santiurde de Toranzo (ESPAÑA - SPAIN)
..................................................................................
Blog: IberiaDX  · Twitter: @IberiaDX


Re: Tecsun PL330 from Radiwow.com

Gary Sargent
 

Jorge

I have an Eton E1 and have had (and sold) a Sony 2010. So I have experience with what is arguably two of the best portable SW receivers. But they don't (or didn't) get much use. I'm more of a casual listener of these types of radios. A more of a true DXer type of person would surely more likely benefit from a larger, higher quality, feature rich and better performing receiver. I like the PL330 because its relatively inexpensive for what it does, lots of features and performance in a small package and it gives me SSB capability when I take it along on my daily neighborhood walk.

Gary KE8WO


Re: Tecsun PL330 from Radiwow.com

Jorge Garzón
 

Hi Gary, 
I am still waiting for it as I ordered a few days ago. 

Sometimes I wonder to myself whether it worth buying a greater and more expensive model when most of the features are already implemented in smaller ones. I am thinking on the Tecsun wide portable collection in the market. Often overall result is a tie, as shown.

¡Saludos! (73!)

Jorge Garzón (EB7EFA · EA1036 SWL) 
QTH: IN83ag / 43º15' N · 03º56' W
Urb. San Roque 95, casa 5 (Villasevil)
39698 Santiurde de Toranzo (ESPAÑA - SPAIN)
..................................................................................
Blog: IberiaDX  · Twitter: @IberiaDX


En lunes, 9 de noviembre de 2020 00:46:39 CET, Gary Sargent <garysargent@...> escribió:


I received my new Tecsun PL330 from Radiwow.com in two weeks after ordering it for under $70. I have used it for the last couple of days and I am very satisfied with its build quality and performance on all bands. It looks to be a solid little radio that packs quite a lot of features. The speaker sounds very good for it being on the very small side. A casual comparison of it with my Eton / Grundig Executive Satellit radio on a few SW BCB and ham SSB stations was pretty much a tie. Typical of a DSP based design, FM performance is very good. AM BCB performance is ok for a small radio and comes alive at night. The operation of the PL330 is reasonably straightforward for such a full featured radio. All-in-all I think it is a very good value if you are in the market for tiny all band radio with a full set of modern features.

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