Date   

Re: Discovery of FSL Antenna Phasing for Front to Side Rejection

Max Italy
 

Good job Gary but now you have a problem bringing 2 FSL along on DX-peditions :D


Re: C.Crane Skywave Vs. XHDATA D-808... 1 kHz DSP Audio Shootout

Tom_D
 

XHDATA D-808 has a bit less intrusive QRM


Re: Discovery of FSL Antenna Phasing for Front to Side Rejection

radiojayallen
 

Gary,

That is very cool and your description with the picture makes perfect sense...great idea! I have tried similar things with some positive results in the past using two Twin Coil Antennas and it did work to some extent. 

Jay


Re: Discovery of FSL Antenna Phasing for Front to Side Rejection

a a
 

I have been using a fsl and a long wire to good effect on 1.8mhz to null nearby solar panel interference,its been a relevation i can use the band again...love the fsl. hail gary... de alec g8gon

On Wednesday, 23 September 2020, 23:20:08 BST, Gary DeBock via groups.io <d1028gary@...> wrote:


On Wed, Sep 23, 2020 at 09:38 AM, C B wrote:
Great work phasing the FSLs producing effective results! One DXer's pest nulled to receive another DXer's pest! :-) Well done.
Thanks Craig,
     That's true about one DXer's pest was nulled to receive another DXer's pest, but my pest is a 50 kW Mega Pest, while yours is only a 5 kW mini pest!

Gary


Re: Discovery of FSL Antenna Phasing for Front to Side Rejection

Gary DeBock
 

On Wed, Sep 23, 2020 at 09:38 AM, C B wrote:
Great work phasing the FSLs producing effective results! One DXer's pest nulled to receive another DXer's pest! :-) Well done.
Thanks Craig,
     That's true about one DXer's pest was nulled to receive another DXer's pest, but my pest is a 50 kW Mega Pest, while yours is only a 5 kW mini pest!

Gary


Re: Discovery of FSL Antenna Phasing for Front to Side Rejection

C B
 

Hi Gary,

Great work phasing the FSLs producing effective results! One DXer's pest nulled to receive another DXer's pest! :-) Well done.

73,

Craig Barnes
Wheat Ridge, CO

On Wednesday, September 23, 2020, 08:08:38 AM MDT, Sudipta Ghose VU2UT <oneghose@...> wrote:


Thanks Gary. Must keep a hard copy.
Regards,
Sudipta

On Wed, Sep 23, 2020 at 5:08 PM Gary DeBock via groups.io <D1028Gary=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
After many dual FSL antenna experiments I've finally determined how to effectively cancel out QRM from a local pest that is off to the side (90 degrees different) from a weak DX station, although I'm not quite sure of the theory behind this discovery.

This experiment was an attempt to cancel out QRM from a local pest, 950-KJR in Seattle, WA (35 miles/ 56 km to the north) and chase 950-KKSE in Parker, CO (1005 miles/ 1617 km to the southeast) during the early morning hours. The receiver was a basic (non-SSB) C.Crane Skywave, and two identical 5 inch ferrite rod FSL antennas were used. Please refer to the attached photo to follow this description.

Step 1)  Null out the pest station with the portable radio's loopstick (away from the FSL antennas). Set the radio down in this nulled position, so that the pest station is as weak as possible, while ensuring that there is space to set up the FSL antennas to the back and side (see photo).
Step 2)  Take the "Reception FSL" and use it to peak the pest station's frequency, setting it up parallel to the portable radio as shown, at the position providing the maximum inductive coupling gain. This will temporarily boost up the pest station, which previously was nulled.
Step 3)  Take the "Nulling FSL" and pretune the frequency to that of the pest station. You can do this either by adjusting the variable cap plates to match those of the "Reception FSL," or by temporarily peaking the pest station's signal in a position in front of the portable radio. After setting this frequency, set the "Nulling FSL" off to the side of the portable radio as shown, with the spacing identical to the spacing between the radio and the "Reception FSL."
Step 4)  Slowly and carefully tune the "Nulling FSL" until you hear the pest station's signal take a sharp drop. This setting will be very sharp, but once you find this position you will have nulled out the pest very effectively, and if another station is on the frequency, it may suddenly become dominant, even if it is far away (like 950-KKSE in Denver).

Some MP3's from this morning's experiments:

950-KJR in nulled position with the portable only  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/c2hkjl979oz12m3dcbcr9uz73ziid2y3
950-KKSE generally dominant over the local pest KJR when the "Nulling FSL" is peaked  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/5ctshbrf5tk9duwyruimgq85ml7ngn8c

More experiments will be conducted with identical FSL antennas in an attempt to provide a front-to-back ratio for the nulling of domestic splatter, and front to side nulling of the same splatter. If successful, this would dramatically increase the effectiveness of FSL antennas on flat ocean beaches, where domestic splatter from both the back and side is routine.

Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)   
    



--
One of those ... ...


Re: Discovery of FSL Antenna Phasing for Front to Side Rejection

Sudipta Ghose VU2UT
 

Thanks Gary. Must keep a hard copy.
Regards,
Sudipta


On Wed, Sep 23, 2020 at 5:08 PM Gary DeBock via groups.io <D1028Gary=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
After many dual FSL antenna experiments I've finally determined how to effectively cancel out QRM from a local pest that is off to the side (90 degrees different) from a weak DX station, although I'm not quite sure of the theory behind this discovery.

This experiment was an attempt to cancel out QRM from a local pest, 950-KJR in Seattle, WA (35 miles/ 56 km to the north) and chase 950-KKSE in Parker, CO (1005 miles/ 1617 km to the southeast) during the early morning hours. The receiver was a basic (non-SSB) C.Crane Skywave, and two identical 5 inch ferrite rod FSL antennas were used. Please refer to the attached photo to follow this description.

Step 1)  Null out the pest station with the portable radio's loopstick (away from the FSL antennas). Set the radio down in this nulled position, so that the pest station is as weak as possible, while ensuring that there is space to set up the FSL antennas to the back and side (see photo).
Step 2)  Take the "Reception FSL" and use it to peak the pest station's frequency, setting it up parallel to the portable radio as shown, at the position providing the maximum inductive coupling gain. This will temporarily boost up the pest station, which previously was nulled.
Step 3)  Take the "Nulling FSL" and pretune the frequency to that of the pest station. You can do this either by adjusting the variable cap plates to match those of the "Reception FSL," or by temporarily peaking the pest station's signal in a position in front of the portable radio. After setting this frequency, set the "Nulling FSL" off to the side of the portable radio as shown, with the spacing identical to the spacing between the radio and the "Reception FSL."
Step 4)  Slowly and carefully tune the "Nulling FSL" until you hear the pest station's signal take a sharp drop. This setting will be very sharp, but once you find this position you will have nulled out the pest very effectively, and if another station is on the frequency, it may suddenly become dominant, even if it is far away (like 950-KKSE in Denver).

Some MP3's from this morning's experiments:

950-KJR in nulled position with the portable only  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/c2hkjl979oz12m3dcbcr9uz73ziid2y3
950-KKSE generally dominant over the local pest KJR when the "Nulling FSL" is peaked  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/5ctshbrf5tk9duwyruimgq85ml7ngn8c

More experiments will be conducted with identical FSL antennas in an attempt to provide a front-to-back ratio for the nulling of domestic splatter, and front to side nulling of the same splatter. If successful, this would dramatically increase the effectiveness of FSL antennas on flat ocean beaches, where domestic splatter from both the back and side is routine.

Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)   
    



--
One of those ... ...


Re: Discovery of FSL Antenna Phasing for Front to Side Rejection

Michael.2E0IHW
 

Yep, this works.
I've been applying the same principle with an external ferrite rod to squash QRM and QRN for many years now.

Michael UK
.........................................................................................

On 23/09/2020 12:38, Gary DeBock via groups.io wrote:
After many dual FSL antenna experiments I've finally determined how to effectively cancel out QRM from a local pest that is off to the side (90 degrees different) from a weak DX station, although I'm not quite sure of the theory behind this discovery.

This experiment was an attempt to cancel out QRM from a local pest, 950-KJR in Seattle, WA (35 miles/ 56 km to the north) and chase 950-KKSE in Parker, CO (1005 miles/ 1617 km to the southeast) during the early morning hours. The receiver was a basic (non-SSB) C.Crane Skywave, and two identical 5 inch ferrite rod FSL antennas were used. Please refer to the attached photo to follow this description.

Step 1)  Null out the pest station with the portable radio's loopstick (away from the FSL antennas). Set the radio down in this nulled position, so that the pest station is as weak as possible, while ensuring that there is space to set up the FSL antennas to the back and side (see photo).
Step 2)  Take the "Reception FSL" and use it to peak the pest station's frequency, setting it up parallel to the portable radio as shown, at the position providing the maximum inductive coupling gain. This will temporarily boost up the pest station, which previously was nulled.
Step 3)  Take the "Nulling FSL" and pretune the frequency to that of the pest station. You can do this either by adjusting the variable cap plates to match those of the "Reception FSL," or by temporarily peaking the pest station's signal in a position in front of the portable radio. After setting this frequency, set the "Nulling FSL" off to the side of the portable radio as shown, with the spacing identical to the spacing between the radio and the "Reception FSL."
Step 4)  Slowly and carefully tune the "Nulling FSL" until you hear the pest station's signal take a sharp drop. This setting will be very sharp, but once you find this position you will have nulled out the pest very effectively, and if another station is on the frequency, it may suddenly become dominant, even if it is far away (like 950-KKSE in Denver).

Some MP3's from this morning's experiments:

950-KJR in nulled position with the portable only  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/c2hkjl979oz12m3dcbcr9uz73ziid2y3
950-KKSE generally dominant over the local pest KJR when the "Nulling FSL" is peaked  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/5ctshbrf5tk9duwyruimgq85ml7ngn8c

More experiments will be conducted with identical FSL antennas in an attempt to provide a front-to-back ratio for the nulling of domestic splatter, and front to side nulling of the same splatter. If successful, this would dramatically increase the effectiveness of FSL antennas on flat ocean beaches, where domestic splatter from both the back and side is routine.

Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)  


Discovery of FSL Antenna Phasing for Front to Side Rejection

Gary DeBock
 

After many dual FSL antenna experiments I've finally determined how to effectively cancel out QRM from a local pest that is off to the side (90 degrees different) from a weak DX station, although I'm not quite sure of the theory behind this discovery.

This experiment was an attempt to cancel out QRM from a local pest, 950-KJR in Seattle, WA (35 miles/ 56 km to the north) and chase 950-KKSE in Parker, CO (1005 miles/ 1617 km to the southeast) during the early morning hours. The receiver was a basic (non-SSB) C.Crane Skywave, and two identical 5 inch ferrite rod FSL antennas were used. Please refer to the attached photo to follow this description.

Step 1)  Null out the pest station with the portable radio's loopstick (away from the FSL antennas). Set the radio down in this nulled position, so that the pest station is as weak as possible, while ensuring that there is space to set up the FSL antennas to the back and side (see photo).
Step 2)  Take the "Reception FSL" and use it to peak the pest station's frequency, setting it up parallel to the portable radio as shown, at the position providing the maximum inductive coupling gain. This will temporarily boost up the pest station, which previously was nulled.
Step 3)  Take the "Nulling FSL" and pretune the frequency to that of the pest station. You can do this either by adjusting the variable cap plates to match those of the "Reception FSL," or by temporarily peaking the pest station's signal in a position in front of the portable radio. After setting this frequency, set the "Nulling FSL" off to the side of the portable radio as shown, with the spacing identical to the spacing between the radio and the "Reception FSL."
Step 4)  Slowly and carefully tune the "Nulling FSL" until you hear the pest station's signal take a sharp drop. This setting will be very sharp, but once you find this position you will have nulled out the pest very effectively, and if another station is on the frequency, it may suddenly become dominant, even if it is far away (like 950-KKSE in Denver).

Some MP3's from this morning's experiments:

950-KJR in nulled position with the portable only  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/c2hkjl979oz12m3dcbcr9uz73ziid2y3
950-KKSE generally dominant over the local pest KJR when the "Nulling FSL" is peaked  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/5ctshbrf5tk9duwyruimgq85ml7ngn8c

More experiments will be conducted with identical FSL antennas in an attempt to provide a front-to-back ratio for the nulling of domestic splatter, and front to side nulling of the same splatter. If successful, this would dramatically increase the effectiveness of FSL antennas on flat ocean beaches, where domestic splatter from both the back and side is routine.

Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)   
    


NRC/IRCA CPC HSFB & COVID-19 9-22-20

Les Rayburn
 


The Courtesy Program Committee (CPC) of the NRC and IRCA are tracking the impact of COVID-19 on high school football this year. We hope this spreadsheet aids you in logging some new stations. Many states have delayed the start of their season, which means HSFB will go later into the Fall this year than normal—meaning less competition from summer static. 

Go get ‘em! 

Thanks to CPC Members: 

Joseph Miller, KJ8O
Paul Walker




73,

Les Rayburn, N1LF
121 Mayfair Park
Maylene, AL 35114
EM63nf

NRC & IRCA Courtesy Program Committee Chairman
Member WTFDA, MWC

Perseus SDR, Elad FDM-S2 SDR, AirSpy + Discovery, SDRPlay RSP-2 Pro, Sony XDR-F1HD [XDR Guy Modified], Dennon TU-1500RD, Sangean HDT-1X, Ray Dees RDS Decoders, Korner 9.2 Antenna, FM-6 Antenna, Kitz Technologies KT-501 Pre-amps, Quantum Phaser, Wellbrook ALA1530 Loop, Wellbrook Flag, Clifton Labs Active Whip. 

“Nothing but blues and Elvis, and somebody else’s favorite song…” 


Re: C.Crane Skywave Vs. XHDATA D-808... 1 kHz DSP Audio Shootout

Gary DeBock
 

Thanks to all who have provided their opinion on the choice of 1 kHz DSP audio between the CC Skywave and XHDATA D-808 portables. Because the "voting" was done in two different Group.io sites (IRCA and Ultralight), for those interested, the final "score" was 5 in favor of the CC Skywave (Steve, Jim, Nick, Craig and yours truly) and 3 in favor of the XHDATA D-808 (Dave, Gord and Michael). The close voting confirms that these two portables have roughly similar performance in this aspect.

In the "extreme sport" of all-out transoceanic DXing with inexpensive portables, the odds are stacked against you, and you need every possible advantage from your modest radio and antenna. In a place like the Pacific Northwest there is strong domestic splatter next to almost every transoceanic DX frequency, and without effective 1 kHz DSP filtering (despite its "muffled" audio side effects) you are pretty much out of luck in chasing anything more than the "big gun" Asians. You are pretty much "stuck" in the 1 kHz DSP setting if you want to try out this "extreme sport," and also "stuck" with the audio that your portable provides in this setting. As such, you need to choose the radio that provides the best possible audio in an actual weak-signal transoceanic DXing situation-- which is why I set up this real-world comparison using the somewhat dicey 837-Harbin signal. Thanks again to all who participated!

73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA
     

   


Re: C.Crane Skywave Vs. XHDATA D-808... 1 kHz DSP Audio Shootout

Michael.2E0IHW
 

Not much between them, but adjacent QRM appears
slightly less intrusive on the
XHDATA D-808.

But I'd be happy if Santa delivered either...

Michael UK




Re: C.Crane Skywave Vs. XHDATA D-808... 1 kHz DSP Audio Shootout

Gord Seifert
 


   I have to agree with Dave Echelman, and for exactly the same reasons. The hash seems less intrusive on the 808 and it seems more stable. But my opinion it is probably based mainly on personal preference regarding the sound rather than intelligibility. I could not make out anything at all in either clip though. But then I have very little experience listening to signals that close to the noise and in a language I can't understand to begin with.  

  Regards,
  Gord


Re: C.Crane Skywave Vs. XHDATA D-808... 1 kHz DSP Audio Shootout

Gary DeBock
 

Thanks Dave and Jim for your comments,

So now the "score" is 3 to 1 for the Skywave, after adding the preferences of Steve R. and myself (who had kept silent until now). My own comments to Steve were:

<<<   So, which do you prefer?   >>>
 
I prefer the Skywave, just like you. 
 
Although neither portable will ever win any audio awards, the 1 kHz DSP audio in the Skywave seems slightly better balanced between treble and bass, which makes intelligibility and copying easier. As you probably already know, switching to a wider DSP setting for better audio doesn't really work here in the Pacific Northwest, because there is almost always a loud domestic station ready to splatter all over your weak DX if you try it. So we find ourselves pretty much stuck in the 1 kHz DSP setting for serious transoceanic DXing, when using these portables.
 
73, Gary      
 


Re: C.Crane Skywave Vs. XHDATA D-808... 1 kHz DSP Audio Shootout

Jim Townley
 

Hi Gary, 
I thought the audio was more intelligible on the Skywave. I didn’t hear as much splatter with the Skywave. Toward the end of the recording, the splatter was more clear and pronounced on the 808. 

Jim T


Re: C.Crane Skywave Vs. XHDATA D-808... 1 kHz DSP Audio Shootout

daiche
 

Hi Gary, great comparison!

To me the D-808 wins. I think the Skywave has a bit 'sharper' sound, but there is more noise getting thru the filter and in certain types of fading, the Skywave has an almost raspy, hissy sound for short intervals. The D-808 sounds a bit more muffled, but steadier, with less noise getting thru the filter.....

I think both radios are great for portables, as is the Satellit Elite. The Sat doesn't have a 1Khz filter, but it pretty much matches the E5/G5/1103 in performance, as long as RF levels don't get high enough to mute it, which happens here in Grants Pass during the daytime. Those three are my current digital favorites. BTW, I think the Sangean DT-800 is a great radio for it's size too, with a good narrow bandwidth and no muting.

Dave Aichelman     N7NZH     Grants Pass, Oregon


C.Crane Skywave Vs. XHDATA D-808... 1 kHz DSP Audio Shootout

Gary DeBock
 

For those who have ever wondered what the difference is between the narrowest (1 kHz) DSP audio on the basic (non-SSB) C. Crane Skywave and the XHDATA D-808 during all out TP-DXing, here is your chance to find out! These two models cost about the same (around $90), and are currently the most popular radios for portable, split frequency DXing. 

A t 1307 UTC this morning I recorded the signal from 837-Harbin (which provided a nice "Harbin" ID at 1300) on both portables at exactly the same time, using the exact same 6" FSL antennas, with optimal inductive coupling at exactly the same distances.

The XHDATA D-808 audio is posted at https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/nri81cfsj8vjt5jg8o9qwjrc62vnd5g4
The C. Crane Skywave (non-SSB model) audio is posted at https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/ohir8dxsqt1jkgmk3dx9o2krndrccsxt

Although these audio clips may sound "muffled" to an SDR-DXer, this a congenital issue with the current state of the DSP art in inexpensive portables, especially in the 1 kHz (narrowest) setting. Between the two models, however, there is one with superior 1 kHz DSP audio, in my opinion. But I won't spoil your own assessment by telling you which one I prefer :-)

Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)


WNJC-1360 DX Test --- TONIGHT

Les Rayburn
 


Chief Engineer Duke Hamann is assuring a place on the Christmas card list of every DX’er by conducting another DX Test tonight. 

WNJC, 1360 kHz, in Washington Township, NJ, will conduct a DX test from 0000 EDT (0400 UTC) until 0100 EDT (0500 UTC) tonight. 

The station will transmit with a power of 800 watts and their normal night antenna pattern, which is directly primarily to the SSE. There is also a smaller lobe to the NNW. 

Program material will be a mix of voice identification, Morse Code IDS at 10 and 12 WPM, sweep tones, telephone off-hook sounders, etc. 

For those on the East Coast of the United States, the test begins tonight at Midnight. 
It is possible that the test will run longer than one hour—but the first hour is guaranteed. If you don’t happen to log it by 0500 UTC, keep trying—and watch e-mail and real-time reflectors for reports that the test is continuing. 

According to CE Duke Hamann  if all goes well with this test, he plans to conduct additional DX tests during each of the three following Sundays.  Reception reports and notes of appreciation for conducting these tests may be sent to Duke at kc2dux@....

Thanks to Duke, the owners of WNJC, the IRCA/NRC Courtesy Program Committee, Bruce Wickert and Steve Howe for all their help in arranging this test, coordinating with the station, producing test materials, etc. 


Antenna Pattern for WNJC (Nighttime) 
_._,_._,_



73,

Les Rayburn, N1LF
121 Mayfair Park
Maylene, AL 35114
EM63nf

NRC & IRCA Courtesy Program Committee Chairman
Member WTFDA, MWC




NRC/IRCA CPC High School Football & COVID-19 [ SEP. 17, 20 ]

Les Rayburn
 

The Courtesy Program Committee (CPC) of the National Radio Club and the International Radio Club of America are tracking the status of high school football in all 50 states during the 2020 DX season. 

COVID-19 has impacted sports at all levels. Some states have opted to delay their seasons until later in the fall or even the spring. Many have delayed the start of the season, and some have cancelled. 

This means a lot of unique opportunities for DX’ers this Fall and Winter. You may also want to check individual station websites if you’re targeting a particular station. For example, here in Alabama HSFB is being played, but individual cancellations due to COVID-19 are common.

A school may be forced to forfeit one or two games in a row due to a coronavirus outbreak on their team. This too means a cancellation of the local radio broadcast. 

The CPC hopes this aids DX’ers in their pursuit to log new ones this year. 




73,

Les Rayburn, N1LF
121 Mayfair Park
Maylene, AL 35114
EM63nf

NRC & IRCA Courtesy Program Committee Chairman
Member WTFDA, MWC

Perseus SDR, Elad FDM-S2 SDR, AirSpy + Discovery, SDRPlay RSP-2 Pro, Sony XDR-F1HD [XDR Guy Modified], Dennon TU-1500RD, Sangean HDT-1X, Ray Dees RDS Decoders, Korner 9.2 Antenna, FM-6 Antenna, Kitz Technologies KT-501 Pre-amps, Quantum Phaser, Wellbrook ALA1530 Loop, Wellbrook Flag, Clifton Labs Active Whip. 

“Nothing but blues and Elvis, and somebody else’s favorite song…” 


New Weekly DX Test from WNJC 1360 in Washington Township, NJ

Les Rayburn
 

Steve Howe relayed a message from WNJC Chief Engineer Duke Hamann:

"I am planning on doing another DX Test this Sunday at midnight EDT (0400 UTC) for one hour at our nighttime power and pattern. If all goes well, I am planning on doing it over the next 4 Sundays to give people something to listen for :)”

CPC NOTE: This is late night Saturday night-early Sunday on the East Coast of the United States and Europe. WNJC’s normal night power is 800 watts, with an antenna pattern that favors the SSE. There is also a smaller lobe towards the NNW. 






73,

Les Rayburn, N1LF
121 Mayfair Park
Maylene, AL 35114
EM63nf

NRC & IRCA Courtesy Program Committee Chairman
Member WTFDA, MWC

Perseus SDR, Elad FDM-S2 SDR, AirSpy + Discovery, SDRPlay RSP-2 Pro, Sony XDR-F1HD [XDR Guy Modified], Dennon TU-1500RD, Sangean HDT-1X, Ray Dees RDS Decoders, Korner 9.2 Antenna, FM-6 Antenna, Kitz Technologies KT-501 Pre-amps, Quantum Phaser, Wellbrook ALA1530 Loop, Wellbrook Flag, Clifton Labs Active Whip. 

“Nothing but blues and Elvis, and somebody else’s favorite song…” 

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