Date   

Re: October Rockwork 2 Ocean Cliff DXpedition Summary

Gary DeBock
 

On Tue, Oct 27, 2020 at 07:47 PM, Paul Blundell wrote:
I have a question: How did you first come across this spot? I ask as I am thinking of researching around Tasmania to see if we have anywhere which might offer the same sort of boast to signals as you experiance.

Paul
Paul,

If you would like long range DXing success across thousands of miles of ocean, the first step is to understand long range propagation.

1)  On Tasmania, you should try to set up on an ocean beach on the eastern coast of Tasmania around sunset for best results, and start listening two hours before sunset for long range DX signals from North and South America, Hawaii, the Pacific islands and New Zealand. Remember that Hawaiian, North and South American signals will be on a different frequency system (530, 540, 550 etc.).

2)  If you want to chase long range signals from the west, try sunrise DXing, ideally on the west coast of Tasmania.

3)  Look for an ocean side cliff that would offer easy access. The best place to chase DX is halfway up the slope, but you need to make sure that the cliff is facing the same direction as your desired DX signals.

3)  Your chances of long range DXing success vary greatly according to the season. North America is currently in its peak season for Asian DX, while August and September are our peak months for Australia and NZ reception. Other Oz DXers can give you more details on these seasonal changes in your local environment.

Gary

  



 


Expanded Band DXing

Paul Blundell
 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AM_expanded_band

Is used much around the world? Is it more of a US thing? 


Re: October Rockwork 2 Ocean Cliff DXpedition Summary

Paul Blundell
 

I have a question: How did you first come across this spot? I ask as I am thinking of researching around Tasmania to see if we have anywhere which might offer the same sort of boast to signals as you experiance.

Paul


Re: October Rockwork 2 Ocean Cliff DXpedition Summary

K7DWI Art
 

High on the Cliff ..... meant Hi. oooopps


Re: October Rockwork 2 Ocean Cliff DXpedition Summary

K7DWI Art
 

High Gary and all.
I won't be listening from a cliff, but from a resort room in Bandon OR soon...... on the Cheap and borrowed. 😁
I always enjoy watching and listening to your DXpeditions.
73 Art Jackson K7DWI in southern Oregon


Re: WHAS 50kW 840kHz maintenance outage

Paul S. in CT
 

Attatched are the target stations with nighttime TX allowed. Daytime only NOT included.

Regards
Paul S. in CT FN31nl


840 WHAS Louisville, KY [ OFF-AIR MAINTENANCE TONIGHT ]

Les Rayburn
 

With thanks to Paul in Connecticut and the WoR group, the Courtesy Program Committee is happy to pass along  the following notification: 



I just learned that 840 WHAS will go off the air again tonight for tower maintenance starting at midnight EDT (0400Z). The length of the outage was not announced.

Tune in just before a little B/4 midnight JIC.

Regards
Paul S. in CT FN31nl






WHAS 50kW 840kHz maintenance outage

Paul S. in CT
 

From the WoR io group the following DX notice...

From: Chris Gay <ku4a@XXXXXXX.com>
Date: Mon, 26 Oct 2020 20:33:19 EDT

I just learned that 840 WHAS will go off the air again tonight for tower maintenance starting at midnight EDT (0400Z). The length of the outage was not announced.

Tune in just before a little B/4 midnight JIC.

Regards
Paul S. in CT FN31nl


Re: October Rockwork 2 Ocean Cliff DXpedition Summary

C B
 

Hi Gary,

Thanks for the great report and recordings!

73,

Craig Barnes
Wheat Ridge, CO

On Monday, October 26, 2020, 05:54:52 PM MDT, Paul Blundell <tanger32au@...> wrote:


An excellent write up and great photos and video.

Paul

On Tue, Oct 27, 2020 at 10:38 AM Gary DeBock via groups.io <D1028Gary=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
From October 14-17 a special salt water DXpedition was conducted at the Rockwork 2 ocean cliff near Manzanita, Oregon, primarily to investigate whether the plunging cliff could provide enhancement of Asian transoceanic DX signals similar to how the adjacent Rockwork 4 ocean cliff enhances New Zealand signals in the summer (and which easily broke the west coast DXpedition record for such receptions).
 
Because the "burden of proof" was on the cliff to demonstrate a convincing Asian signal boost, as part of the plan two very small (6 inch, or 15cm diameter) FSL antennas were purposely used for all DX signal reception, along with simple modified pocket radios. No major ocean coast DXpedition had ever been attempted with such humble gear, which was highly unlikely to track down anything other than the most common, big signal TP's unless the ocean cliff intervened with some serious gain enhancement.  The format would be live DXing during sunrise sessions over four days.
 
Prior to the cliff visit I knew that claims of a signal-boosting Asian cliff would probably ring hollow unless this very humble gear pulled off some astonishing receptions of very exotic Asian stations, which would be considered fine catches even during major ocean coast DXpeditions with state-of-the-art equipment. In other words, unless something like a DXing miracle occurred, the "Asia Cliff" concept would probably be written off by most observers. I had chosen four exotic Asian countries as DXing targets-- four countries which are tough catches during any Northwest DXpedition, and which would leave no doubt that the ocean cliff was providing some serious propagation magic if reception occurred on a tiny 6 inch/ 15cm antenna. These countries were Bangladesh, Cambodia, Myanmar and India.
 
During the four daily sessions I made serious attempts to go after all four of these exotic targets, and immediately noticed that the Rockwork 2 cliff boosted up all Asian signals to an astonishing degree-- almost too well, in some cases. My exotic targets on 693 (Bangladesh), 729 (Myanmar), 918 (Cambodia) and 927 (India) seemed to be managing weak signals on occasion, but they were getting swamped by daily S9 pests from Japan and China. The cliff was boosting up everything from Asia, and wild three-TP mixes were showing up on frequencies like 531, 648, 675, 684, 702, 738, 837 and others. On the first day (October 14) I did manage to find a relatively weak 576-NHK1 with a co-channel around 1435, though, which finally broke through by itself around 1445. My recording was posted on Real DX, and was determined by C.K. Raman to be Burmese from 576-Myanmar. The cliff had pulled off its first shocker! Two days later I was tracking 576-Myanmar's fairly good signal around the same time while checking 594-JOAK's signal for fades. During a JOAK fade at 1429 on 10-16 I recorded a parallel check from 576 to 594 kHz, and found that 576's Burmese male vocal music was showing up on 594 as well, under the faded JOAK. As far as I was concerned the "Asian Cliff" had already proved its point-- by tracking down an exotic Asian signal on a 6 inch antenna that was an apparent all-time west coast first (594-Myanmar).
 
Besides these receptions the cliff also provided some blowtorch recordings of more common Asians, as well as some freakish three-way frequency snarls. Some of these are linked below, in addition to the 576 and 594 Myanmar receptions. In summary, the "Asia Cliff" has been discovered, and is offering a powerful propagation boost to those with a serious sense of adventure!
 
Gary DeBock (DXing at the Rockwork 2 Ocean Cliff near Manzanita, OR from October 14-17)
DXpedition video posted at 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-tlrX_52shc

576-Myanmar at a good level (received at 1435 on October 17) 
576-Myanmar Burmese male vocal music + NHK1 talk (first 30 seconds) and parallel check with 594 kHz  (NHK1 talk + the same Burmese male vocal music from 31 seconds to 47 seconds) at 1429 on October 16 https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/zalj801tfpfc9w5ekesmm9pel7fsilfv
 
675-Nei Menggu "synchros" and NHK1 in a funny mix at 1415 on October 14  
https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/gk35zhwhbyrc01brkn1fbfntijtkjqr1

738-BEL2 (S9+) over HLKG, UnID-Chinese and the Rumbler at 1416 on October 14  
https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/1y9064ihhaz9fkd1f73prfnbkg6ax4j3

837-Harbin S9+ TOH routine and ID at 1400 on October 17 (with apparent weak Tagalog co-channel)  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/y3tqupjky81qh35k9mbs8q5i4eybkmz0

873-Pyongyang BS' music in a wild S9 mix with NHK2 (female voice in Portuguese) and another UnID Asian (female voice) at 1406 on October 17  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/wl0n0zmc52o942ypwew7g16b4b2shru3

918-Shandong's wacky "synchros" team up with Japan to cover apparent Kampuchean music at 1427 on October 16 
1035-HLCP in an S9 mix with the CNR1 synchros at 1312 on October 14  
https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/6ljn5phd1nu9frmlxke5ccflc290gavu



--
Paul


Re: October Rockwork 2 Ocean Cliff DXpedition Summary

Paul Blundell
 

An excellent write up and great photos and video.

Paul

On Tue, Oct 27, 2020 at 10:38 AM Gary DeBock via groups.io <D1028Gary=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
From October 14-17 a special salt water DXpedition was conducted at the Rockwork 2 ocean cliff near Manzanita, Oregon, primarily to investigate whether the plunging cliff could provide enhancement of Asian transoceanic DX signals similar to how the adjacent Rockwork 4 ocean cliff enhances New Zealand signals in the summer (and which easily broke the west coast DXpedition record for such receptions).
 
Because the "burden of proof" was on the cliff to demonstrate a convincing Asian signal boost, as part of the plan two very small (6 inch, or 15cm diameter) FSL antennas were purposely used for all DX signal reception, along with simple modified pocket radios. No major ocean coast DXpedition had ever been attempted with such humble gear, which was highly unlikely to track down anything other than the most common, big signal TP's unless the ocean cliff intervened with some serious gain enhancement.  The format would be live DXing during sunrise sessions over four days.
 
Prior to the cliff visit I knew that claims of a signal-boosting Asian cliff would probably ring hollow unless this very humble gear pulled off some astonishing receptions of very exotic Asian stations, which would be considered fine catches even during major ocean coast DXpeditions with state-of-the-art equipment. In other words, unless something like a DXing miracle occurred, the "Asia Cliff" concept would probably be written off by most observers. I had chosen four exotic Asian countries as DXing targets-- four countries which are tough catches during any Northwest DXpedition, and which would leave no doubt that the ocean cliff was providing some serious propagation magic if reception occurred on a tiny 6 inch/ 15cm antenna. These countries were Bangladesh, Cambodia, Myanmar and India.
 
During the four daily sessions I made serious attempts to go after all four of these exotic targets, and immediately noticed that the Rockwork 2 cliff boosted up all Asian signals to an astonishing degree-- almost too well, in some cases. My exotic targets on 693 (Bangladesh), 729 (Myanmar), 918 (Cambodia) and 927 (India) seemed to be managing weak signals on occasion, but they were getting swamped by daily S9 pests from Japan and China. The cliff was boosting up everything from Asia, and wild three-TP mixes were showing up on frequencies like 531, 648, 675, 684, 702, 738, 837 and others. On the first day (October 14) I did manage to find a relatively weak 576-NHK1 with a co-channel around 1435, though, which finally broke through by itself around 1445. My recording was posted on Real DX, and was determined by C.K. Raman to be Burmese from 576-Myanmar. The cliff had pulled off its first shocker! Two days later I was tracking 576-Myanmar's fairly good signal around the same time while checking 594-JOAK's signal for fades. During a JOAK fade at 1429 on 10-16 I recorded a parallel check from 576 to 594 kHz, and found that 576's Burmese male vocal music was showing up on 594 as well, under the faded JOAK. As far as I was concerned the "Asian Cliff" had already proved its point-- by tracking down an exotic Asian signal on a 6 inch antenna that was an apparent all-time west coast first (594-Myanmar).
 
Besides these receptions the cliff also provided some blowtorch recordings of more common Asians, as well as some freakish three-way frequency snarls. Some of these are linked below, in addition to the 576 and 594 Myanmar receptions. In summary, the "Asia Cliff" has been discovered, and is offering a powerful propagation boost to those with a serious sense of adventure!
 
Gary DeBock (DXing at the Rockwork 2 Ocean Cliff near Manzanita, OR from October 14-17)
DXpedition video posted at 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-tlrX_52shc

576-Myanmar at a good level (received at 1435 on October 17) 
576-Myanmar Burmese male vocal music + NHK1 talk (first 30 seconds) and parallel check with 594 kHz  (NHK1 talk + the same Burmese male vocal music from 31 seconds to 47 seconds) at 1429 on October 16 https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/zalj801tfpfc9w5ekesmm9pel7fsilfv
 
675-Nei Menggu "synchros" and NHK1 in a funny mix at 1415 on October 14  
https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/gk35zhwhbyrc01brkn1fbfntijtkjqr1

738-BEL2 (S9+) over HLKG, UnID-Chinese and the Rumbler at 1416 on October 14  
https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/1y9064ihhaz9fkd1f73prfnbkg6ax4j3

837-Harbin S9+ TOH routine and ID at 1400 on October 17 (with apparent weak Tagalog co-channel)  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/y3tqupjky81qh35k9mbs8q5i4eybkmz0

873-Pyongyang BS' music in a wild S9 mix with NHK2 (female voice in Portuguese) and another UnID Asian (female voice) at 1406 on October 17  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/wl0n0zmc52o942ypwew7g16b4b2shru3

918-Shandong's wacky "synchros" team up with Japan to cover apparent Kampuchean music at 1427 on October 16 
1035-HLCP in an S9 mix with the CNR1 synchros at 1312 on October 14  
https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/6ljn5phd1nu9frmlxke5ccflc290gavu



--
Paul


October Rockwork 2 Ocean Cliff DXpedition Summary

Gary DeBock
 

From October 14-17 a special salt water DXpedition was conducted at the Rockwork 2 ocean cliff near Manzanita, Oregon, primarily to investigate whether the plunging cliff could provide enhancement of Asian transoceanic DX signals similar to how the adjacent Rockwork 4 ocean cliff enhances New Zealand signals in the summer (and which easily broke the west coast DXpedition record for such receptions).
 
Because the "burden of proof" was on the cliff to demonstrate a convincing Asian signal boost, as part of the plan two very small (6 inch, or 15cm diameter) FSL antennas were purposely used for all DX signal reception, along with simple modified pocket radios. No major ocean coast DXpedition had ever been attempted with such humble gear, which was highly unlikely to track down anything other than the most common, big signal TP's unless the ocean cliff intervened with some serious gain enhancement.  The format would be live DXing during sunrise sessions over four days.
 
Prior to the cliff visit I knew that claims of a signal-boosting Asian cliff would probably ring hollow unless this very humble gear pulled off some astonishing receptions of very exotic Asian stations, which would be considered fine catches even during major ocean coast DXpeditions with state-of-the-art equipment. In other words, unless something like a DXing miracle occurred, the "Asia Cliff" concept would probably be written off by most observers. I had chosen four exotic Asian countries as DXing targets-- four countries which are tough catches during any Northwest DXpedition, and which would leave no doubt that the ocean cliff was providing some serious propagation magic if reception occurred on a tiny 6 inch/ 15cm antenna. These countries were Bangladesh, Cambodia, Myanmar and India.
 
During the four daily sessions I made serious attempts to go after all four of these exotic targets, and immediately noticed that the Rockwork 2 cliff boosted up all Asian signals to an astonishing degree-- almost too well, in some cases. My exotic targets on 693 (Bangladesh), 729 (Myanmar), 918 (Cambodia) and 927 (India) seemed to be managing weak signals on occasion, but they were getting swamped by daily S9 pests from Japan and China. The cliff was boosting up everything from Asia, and wild three-TP mixes were showing up on frequencies like 531, 648, 675, 684, 702, 738, 837 and others. On the first day (October 14) I did manage to find a relatively weak 576-NHK1 with a co-channel around 1435, though, which finally broke through by itself around 1445. My recording was posted on Real DX, and was determined by C.K. Raman to be Burmese from 576-Myanmar. The cliff had pulled off its first shocker! Two days later I was tracking 576-Myanmar's fairly good signal around the same time while checking 594-JOAK's signal for fades. During a JOAK fade at 1429 on 10-16 I recorded a parallel check from 576 to 594 kHz, and found that 576's Burmese male vocal music was showing up on 594 as well, under the faded JOAK. As far as I was concerned the "Asian Cliff" had already proved its point-- by tracking down an exotic Asian signal on a 6 inch antenna that was an apparent all-time west coast first (594-Myanmar).
 
Besides these receptions the cliff also provided some blowtorch recordings of more common Asians, as well as some freakish three-way frequency snarls. Some of these are linked below, in addition to the 576 and 594 Myanmar receptions. In summary, the "Asia Cliff" has been discovered, and is offering a powerful propagation boost to those with a serious sense of adventure!
 
Gary DeBock (DXing at the Rockwork 2 Ocean Cliff near Manzanita, OR from October 14-17)
DXpedition video posted at 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-tlrX_52shc

576-Myanmar at a good level (received at 1435 on October 17) 
576-Myanmar Burmese male vocal music + NHK1 talk (first 30 seconds) and parallel check with 594 kHz  (NHK1 talk + the same Burmese male vocal music from 31 seconds to 47 seconds) at 1429 on October 16 https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/zalj801tfpfc9w5ekesmm9pel7fsilfv
 
675-Nei Menggu "synchros" and NHK1 in a funny mix at 1415 on October 14  
https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/gk35zhwhbyrc01brkn1fbfntijtkjqr1

738-BEL2 (S9+) over HLKG, UnID-Chinese and the Rumbler at 1416 on October 14  
https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/1y9064ihhaz9fkd1f73prfnbkg6ax4j3

837-Harbin S9+ TOH routine and ID at 1400 on October 17 (with apparent weak Tagalog co-channel)  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/y3tqupjky81qh35k9mbs8q5i4eybkmz0

873-Pyongyang BS' music in a wild S9 mix with NHK2 (female voice in Portuguese) and another UnID Asian (female voice) at 1406 on October 17  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/wl0n0zmc52o942ypwew7g16b4b2shru3

918-Shandong's wacky "synchros" team up with Japan to cover apparent Kampuchean music at 1427 on October 16 
1035-HLCP in an S9 mix with the CNR1 synchros at 1312 on October 14  
https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/6ljn5phd1nu9frmlxke5ccflc290gavu


Long Term DX Project - 25/10/2020

Paul Blundell
 

Date: 25/10/2020

 

Time: 19:45

Location: Home, Launceston Tasmania

Notes: A session just on sunset. Generally really good signals across the band with 3RN on 621kHz and 3LO on 774kHz hitting excellent signal levels.

 

FREQ

CALLSIGN

LOGGED

DATE

RADIO

AERIAL

531

3GG

GOOD

25/10/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL

549

2CR

GOOD

25/10/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL

594

3WV

GOOD

25/10/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL

621

3RN

EXCELLENT

25/10/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL

774

3LO

EXCELLENT

25/10/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL

1053

2CA

AVERAGE

25/10/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL

1179

3RPH

AVERAGE

25/10/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL

1341

HPON GEELONG

GOOD

25/10/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL

1422

HPON MELBOURNE

GOOD

25/10/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL

1503

3KND

WEAK

25/10/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL


Re: DX750 - Loggings

Paul Blundell
 

Thanks Dan.

Rather than my previous method of DXing everything at once, I focused on stations within 750km first. My next target will be those up to 1000km.

Paul

On Mon, Oct 26, 2020 at 1:38 PM Dan Merta <dnmerta0@...> wrote:
That's a good way to keep records of stations.
Here in Melb 3RN 990Khz comes in at night, low strength with rapid fading usually.



--
Paul


Re: DX750 - Loggings

Dan Merta
 

That's a good way to keep records of stations.
Here in Melb 3RN 990Khz comes in at night, low strength with rapid fading usually.


DX750 - Loggings

Paul Blundell
 

Over the past two weeks, I have been working on logging all stations within 750KM of my home.

To do this, I first exported all stations from the ACMA database and then sorted them in to three groups:
0 - 250KM: Blue
251 - 500KM: Green
501KM to 750KM: Red

Based on this, I have spent some time most nights targeting these stations. Below are the results. 3RN on 990kHz was not logged, this is a low power station and it sits close to the HPON station we have here locally on 1008kHz. The HPON station on 1413kHz was also not logged, this gets taken out by 2EA which runs 5kw.

 

 

FREQ

CALLSIGN

Area Served

Purpose

Power

DIST

531

3GG

Warragul

Commercial

5k

500

540

7SD

Scottsdale

Commercial

5k

250

585

7RN

Hobart

National

10k

250

594

3WV

Horsham

National

50k

750

621

3RN

Melbourne

National

50k

500

630

7RN

Queenstown

National

400

250

666

2CN

Canberra

National

5k

750

675

2CO

Corowa

National

10k

750

693

3AW

Melbourne

Commercial

5k

500

720

3MT

Omeo

National

2k

500

747

7PB

Hobart

National

3500

250

756

3RN

Wangaratta

National

10k

750

765

2EC

Bega

Commercial

5k

750

774

3LO

Melbourne

National

50k

500

810

2BA

Bega

National

10k

750

828

3GI

Sale

National

10k

500

846

2RN

Canberra

National

10k

750

855

3CR

Melbourne

Community

3500

500

864

7RPH

Hobart

Community

2k

250

882

3RPH

Warrnambool

Community

2k

750

927

3UZ

Melbourne

Commercial

5k

500

936

7ZR

Hobart

National

10k

250

945

HPON

Bendigo

HPON

2k

750

963

2RG

Griffith

Commercial

5k

750

981

3HA

Hamilton

Commercial

2k

750

#990

3RN

Albury/Wodonga

National

500

750

1008

HPON

Launceston

HPON

5k

250

1026

3PB

Melbourne

National

10k

500

1053

2CA

Canberra

Commercial

5k

750

1071

3EL

Maryborough (Vic)

Commercial

5k

750

1080

HPON

Hobart

HPON

5k

250

1089

3WM

Horsham

Commercial

5k

750

1116

3AK

Melbourne

Commercial

5k

500

1125

1RPH

Canberra

Community

2k

750

1134

3CS

Colac

Commercial

5k

500

1152

2WG

Wagga Wagga

Commercial

2k

750

1161

7FG

Fingal

National

1k

250

1179

3RPH

Melbourne

Community

5k

500

1206

2CC

Canberra

Commercial

5k

750

1224

3EA

Melbourne

National

5k

500

1242

3GV

Sale

Commercial

5k

500

1260

3SR

Shepparton

Commercial

2k

750

1278

3EE

Melbourne

Commercial

5k

500

1314

HPON

Wollongong

HPON

5k

750

1323

HPON

Canberra

HPON

400

750

1332

3SH

Swan Hill

Commercial

2k

750

1341

HPON GEELONG

Geelong

HPON

5k

500

1377

3MP

Melbourne

Commercial

5k

500

#1413

HPON

Shepparton

HPON

500

750

1422

HPON

Wagin

HPON

2k

500

1440

1EA

Canberra

National

2k

750

1476

5MG

Mount Gambier

National

1k

750

1494

2AY

Albury

Commercial

2k

750

1503

3KND

Melbourne

Community

5k

500

1521

2QN

Deniliquin

Commercial

2k

750

1566

3NE

Wangaratta

Commercial

5k

750

1584

7SH

St Helens

National

100

250

1593

HPON

Melbourne

HPON

5k

500

1602

3WL

Warrnambool

National

250

750

 


Re: Review - TEAC PR130 Portable AM/FM Radio

Paul Blundell
 

 
Updated - October 2020
 
“Handheld AM/FM Radio TEAC PR130 Compact and Portable Entertainment" 

"Enjoy entertainment on the go with the PR130 AM/FM handheld radio. With an extendable telescopic antenna for clear reception, this radio makes a great travel companion for camping, sporting events, and other outdoor adventures."

• Audio Power: 200mW
• Speakers: 1
• Accessories: User manual
 • Battery: 2 x AAA (not included)
• Unit Dimensions (WxDxH): 60 x 22 x 100mm
• Gift Box (WxDxH): 153 x 75 x 210mm

I recently purchased a new TEAC PR130 Portable AM/FM Radio to add to my ultralight radio DXing kit, the fact it has a digital frequency display (no fiddly dials to try and read in limited light) and runs off two AAA batteries sold it to me, for under $35 I hoped it would tick some boxes for me.

Physical:
It has 8 buttons on the front and 2 on the side. The front buttons are from left to right:
Power / Sleep, Band / Alarm, Volume down, Volume up
Stereo / mono (for FM band) / key lock, Memory / clock set, memory down, memory up
The side buttons control the tuning up and down, the location on the side means that they can easily be controlled with your right thumb.

This radio is large and light, but don’t let that fool you. It easily fits in your hand and is the perfect size for out and about listening or use anywhere. The battery cover easily opens when needed, allowing the installation of the two AAA batteries required to make it work. The screen is well designed with only the most important information shown, it has a orange backlight which allows easy night time use.

Build quality seems good, while I won’t be throwing it around it should stand up to daily use with no issues. 

Sound:
From my testing so far, both with the internal speaker and earphones, I can report the audio is good. It is of a level which allows long term listening without any struggle and the quality is more than acceptable for a radio at this price point. What I really like is the steps of the audio level, unlike some radios you can easily find a suitable volume level.

Performance:
Clearly this radio is not in the same league as my 7.5” lookstick equipped PL-380, however for a barefoot radio it pulls in signals at a level that I was not expecting. I have undertaken some testing, during day time listening I have been able to log stations from the Eastern Australian states with ease. 
 
Mating this with my 3" FSL, it really comes alive and provides excellent signals across the band. Even "barefoot", I find it to be able to pull in signals very well. My main use for the TEAC PR130 is bed time listening and in this role, it performs very well.

Focusing on single station frequencies (that is frequencies with only one active station on them) has shown it to be able to pull in some signals at a level which is much above what I would expect from a $35 radio of this size. Sensitivity and selectivity are better than I was expecting, I have a 5KW station around 11 km from my home, except for the fainest traces above and below this does not cause any issues, a much better performance than what I can say about some other “low cost” radios I have used in the past.

FM Radio:
While my focus is not on the FM broadcast band, the times I have switched over to this has shown that the TEAC PR130 is more than capable on this band, audio is nice and clean. It pulls in the stations I would expect it to and works as I would expect.

Battery Life:

As I have only had this radio for a short period of time, I am unable to pass comment on battery life, so far it seems to be acceptable. As this uses AAA batteries, I have found this to be on the lower side of acceptable.

Overall:
Looking at what radios are available around this price point, the TEAC PR130 stands out both for its performance and also value for money. Getting an AM /FM radio for under $35 with a digital frequency display and this level of performance would be unthinkable even just a few years ago.


Re: File /9kHz_LogSheet_October2020_A5.pdf uploaded #file-notice

Paul Blundell
 

That is a great idea, I might do the same for our stations. What do the different classes mean?

Paul

On Sun, Oct 25, 2020 at 8:15 AM Peter Laws <plaws0@...> wrote:
I did something like that but with the "clear channel" stations
listed.  And the classes.


https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1viufJPvMNFZNrGZ_-7otN12y4ntbXyqnC2OMixfCg6A/edit?usp=sharing

On Fri, Oct 23, 2020 at 4:00 PM Paul Blundell <tanger32au@...> wrote:
>
> Thanks Paul.
>
> I am happy to update / modify this with extra fields or a different layout if others have suggestions for it.
>
> Paul
>
> On Fri, 23 Oct 2020, 18:22 Paul S. in CT, <dxrx@...> wrote:
>>
>> I would also like to attatch/add that with a bit of spreadsheet, one can be more detailed.
>> This attatchment shows the basic form I use here to submit for the previous award certs that were earned. For our US/CA members there are resources that make filling this form possible, notably the FCC database and a Great Circle mapper. IIRC the CRTC also has a location function. And there is at least one source still active for international RX that breaks down the world by region and 9/10 kHz spacing.
>>
>> Regards
>> Paul S. in CT FN31nl
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>



--
Peter Laws | N5UWY | plaws plaws net | Travel by Train!







--
Paul


Re: October 2020 Rockwork 2 TP-DXpedition Video

Paul Blundell
 

I have just watched your latest video. 

It is great you have such an amazing DX location and that you've been able to produce such an amazing results from using your fsl aerials.

Paul


WNJC 1360 DX Test Tonight --- DX TEST TONIGHT -----

Les Rayburn
 

Passing along this information from Duke Hamann, CE of WNJC

————————————————



Sorry for getting this out so late but here is the information for tonight's WNJC 1360 AM DX Test. 

Once again I will be starting 2 hours early, but will be starting with the Audio DX test at 02:00 UTC 10/25 (10:00pm 10/24 EDT). We will be operating our regular 2 tower, 800 watt nighttime pattern to the SSE. 

At 04:00 UTC (Midnight EDT) a 2 hour FT-8 test will begin and will continue using our nighttime pattern for the first hour.

At 0500 UTC (1:00 AM EDT) I will be switching to our daytime pattern at 5kw using 4 towers directional to SSE with the FT-8 test concluding at 0600 UTC (2:00 AM EDT). 

From 0600 - 1000 UTC (02:00 - 06:00 AM EDT) I will be leaving the transmitter in daytime mode and be playing a combination of DX Audio Test and Halloween Music.  Listen for the sweepers between songs of movie & tv show clips along with our voice-over guy.

Reception reports are greatly appreciated and can be emailed to kc2dux@... or snail mailed with at least a 4x6 SASE to PO Box 84 Dennisville, NJ 08214. Look forward to having another fun weekend with the DXs out there!

Thanks for listening!
John "Duke" Hamann, CE WNJC 1360 AM



73,

Les Rayburn, N1LF
121 Mayfair Park
Maylene, AL 35114
EM63nf

NRC & IRCA Courtesy Program Committee Chairman
Member WTFDA, MWC

Perseus SDR, Elad FDM-S2 SDR, AirSpy + Discovery, SDRPlay RSP-2 Pro, Sony XDR-F1HD [XDR Guy Modified], Dennon TU-1500RD, Sangean HDT-1X, Ray Dees RDS Decoders, Korner 9.2 Antenna, FM-6 Antenna, Kitz Technologies KT-501 Pre-amps, Quantum Phaser, Wellbrook ALA1530 Loop, Wellbrook Flag, Clifton Labs Active Whip. 

“Nothing but blues and Elvis, and somebody else’s favorite song…” 


October 2020 Rockwork 2 TP-DXpedition Video

Gary DeBock
 

About 85 years ago the decision was made to blast an ocean coast route on the side of a towering mountain right on the Oregon coast, in order to allow Highway 101 motorists to stay close to the ocean during their travels. Serious dynamite was used to blast through solid rock 500 feet (150m) above the salt water, with an additional group of turnoffs engineered so that motorists could stop and enjoy the awesome ocean scenery during their travels.     

For the past 9 years Mount Neahkahnie on the Oregon coast has offered west coast DXers the chance to chase superb DU-DX in the summer from these turnoffs, breaking New Zealand and South Pacific NDB DXpedition records, as well as becoming an ideal testing ground for compact broadband and FSL antennas. The Rockwork turnoffs have always been identified with DU-DXing in summer weather, since the ocean cliff environment was thought to be too risky for DXing in other seasons, and since all the cliffs seemed to be facing toward the South Pacific. Or are they?
 
As it turns out Mount Neahkahnie does have a western face, and one of the largest Rockwork turnoffs is located right at the point where the cliff's southwestern face becomes a western face (see photo). When you view the salt water beach below this turnoff, however, you will see that it has an ideally shaped cove facing due west toward the Asian direction-- exactly how how the most popular DU-DXing turnoff (Rockwork 4) has an ideally shaped cove facing in the South Pacific direction. But serious Asian DXing had never been attempted at the Asia-oriented Rockwork 2 turnoff. Was this another transoceanic signal-boosting venue waiting to be discovered, offering TP-DXers the chance to enjoy cliff-boosted Asian signals far stronger than what would seem likely with their small antennas?
 
To answer this question I decided to visit this Asia-oriented Rockwork 2 turnoff with a tiny antenna indeed-- a 6 inch (15cm) diameter FSL that can be held in one hand. As for the receiver, a modified pocket radio (7.5 inch loopstick C.Crane Skywave) would be used in a live DXing format, and a Sony ICD-SX57 digital recorder would keep a record of any interesting catches. As for the "Asia Cliff" investigative mission, I knew that simple reception of only Japanese, Korean and Chinese signals wouldn't impress anybody, since all these can easily be received at most TP-DXers' home locations. "Big gun" reception of stations like 738-Taiwan and 1575-Thailand also wouldn't convince anyone that the cliff was boosting Asian signals, even with a 6 inch antenna. In my opinion, what would be some pretty convincing evidence would be the reception of any MW station from Bangladesh, Cambodia, Myanmar or India. The concept of a 6 inch antenna tracking any of these down would seem to border on science fiction, and had never been seriously attempted or completed on the west coast of the continental U.S. So why not give the Asia-oriented Rockwork 2 cliff this "acid test," and see if it could pull off such a shocker?

Well, the Rockwork 2 cliff did indeed pull off such a shocker last week, tracking down not only a couple of stations from the "exotic" category, but many other astonishing Asian receptions as well. A DXpedition video showing the ridiculously small gear is posted at the following link, offering convincing evidence that such humble equipment had no hope of tracking down such exotic DX without a freakish cliff boost . The "Asian Cliff" has been discovered-- and offers some serious excitement in the future!  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-tlrX_52shc&feature=youtu.be

Gary DeBock (DXing at the Rockwork 2 ocean cliff near Manzanita, Oregon from October 12-17)   


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