Date   

Re: 3 Terminals on Recovered Ferrite Loopsticks - Which ones to use?

Michael <michael.setaazul@...>
 

Jerry,

A two-inch ferrite will do fine for the series-tuned trap;
for the parallel-tuned coupling winding, a longer ferrite
would be preferable, but even a short one would work.

Most older radios had a second smaller
winding to match the lower input impedance
of the junction transistor. Usual configuration:

()()()()() ()()()()()()()()()()()()()
I I I I
A B C D

Tuning capacitor between C and D;
B to base of transistor, A connected to C
(or : A to base, B to C - depending on
the sense of the windings).


Some, like the one you refer to, had a tap near the
cold end of a single winding :

()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()
I I I
C B D

Tuning capacitor between C-D,
base to B (or: B-D, base to C)

For our purpose, try C-D or B-D and see
if either gives better results. Leave the
unused end unconnected.

MIchael UK

----- Original Message -----
From: jerry_popiel
To: ultralightdx@...
Sent: 14 July 2011 22:43
Subject: [ultralightdx] 3 Terminals on Recovered Ferrite Loopsticks - Which ones to use?


Removed a Ferrite Loopstick from an old mini 6 Transistor AM radio likely from the 60's. The small 2
inch Loopstick has 2 Terminals at one end, and one Terminal at the other end. Does anyone know
which Terminal on the End with 2 Terminals to use, or does it matter? Also found an old adjustable
Ferrite Rod Loopstick and it has 3 Terminals on it as well!! What is the 3rd Terminal for, since as
far as I can tell you should only need an In and Out Terminal? Thanks.

Jerry



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: Sony SRF-T615: initial test drive

Jay Heyl
 

On Thu, Jul 14, 2011 at 15:00, greekandlatin <greekandlatin@...> wrote:

It's clear that the T615 is designed primarily to be used on the AM band.  No matter how many different pairs of headphones and earbuds I used, I could not get satisfactory reception on mid to difficult signals on FM.  This is a little baffling to me.  The SRF-S84, for instance, grabs things clearly and without interference that the T615 can't even hear.  The difference between those two radios on the FM band is like night and day.  Is this consistent with what other T615 owners have experienced?  FM is average - at best.

I've not spent much time listening to FM with it and certainly haven't gone digging for weak signals. I was impressed with what I did hear on FM. The sound quality was hard to believe from such a small device. (I was using audiophile earbuds, not the included ones.) 

I've never much cared for radios that use the headphone cord or a little pigtail as an antenna for FM. It's just too hard to keep the "antenna" oriented properly for good reception on fringe signals.

  -- Jay


Sony SRF-T615: initial test drive

greekandlatin <greekandlatin@...>
 

Hi everyone:


Today the T615 arrived in PA two days after having been shipped from Tokyo and only five business days after having been ordered from the Ebay seller joynetcafe. Nice! I will definitely do business with this seller again.

It's clear that the T615 is designed primarily to be used on the AM band. No matter how many different pairs of headphones and earbuds I used, I could not get satisfactory reception on mid to difficult signals on FM. This is a little baffling to me. The SRF-S84, for instance, grabs things clearly and without interference that the T615 can't even hear. The difference between those two radios on the FM band is like night and day. Is this consistent with what other T615 owners have experienced? FM is average - at best.

That being said, I have to admit that the AM band is exciting on the T615. I cannot believe that this little wunderkind is a sensitive during the day time as my Sangean PR-D5. The "noise cut" feature, whatever it is, is more effective than I expected it to be on difficult to hear signals. It can really clear things up.

All in all, at first glance, I'm satisfied with the radio. Is it really worth what I paid for it? Only time will tell.


Best to all,
A.C.


3 Terminals on Recovered Ferrite Loopsticks - Which ones to use?

jerry_popiel
 

Removed a Ferrite Loopstick from an old mini 6 Transistor AM radio likely from the 60's. The small 2 inch Loopstick has 2 Terminals at one end, and one Terminal at the other end. Does anyone know which Terminal on the End with 2 Terminals to use, or does it matter? Also found an old adjustable Ferrite Rod Loopstick and it has 3 Terminals on it as well!! What is the 3rd Terminal for, since as far as I can tell you should only need an In and Out Terminal? Thanks.

Jerry


Everclear song "AM Radio"

Brian Miller
 

This song has probably been around for awhile but it was new to me when I watched it earlier. Check it out with this YouTube link....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JDiCJkITtes


Lincoln City, Oregon Ultralight DU's for 7-14

Gary DeBock
 

Hello All,

Another DU propagation washout came with the rain this morning on the
Oregon beach, as yesterday's favorable propagation seemed like a
distant memory.

738-Tahiti was the only South Pacific station with any strength, as the
New Zealand and Australia stations stayed at the weak heterodyne level.
The steady rain added to the mediocrity, making me wonder if this dicey
propagation will stick around, like it seemed to do earlier this month
for Walt in Masset. All the DX below was logged on a 7.5" LW loopstick
PL-380, which is relatively waterproof.

180 Radio Rossii Poor at 1153, // 279
279 Radio Rossii Very good at 1125
530 ADK Adak, Alaska Good at 1205
738 R.Tahiti Good at 1210

73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Lincoln City, OR)


Re: FSL Perks and Quirks (Reply to Jerry)

Gary DeBock
 

Hi Farmerik,

There were some limited experiments here with spaced ferrite bars in
FSL antennas, but to be honest the performance results were nothing to
shout about. My own impression was that the FSL's potential gain boost
fizzled out because of the gaps in the ferrite sleeve pattern. I found
that a 14-rod FSL with 1/2" gaps barely beat out a single 7.5"
loopstick in LW sensitivity, and was much weaker than a smaller
diameter, 14-rod FSL with no gaps in between the ferrite.

Although it's true that building an effective FSL requires a serious
financial outlay, my own recommendation for saving $$ would be to go
with fewer ferrite rods in a smaller diameter FSL, rather than trying
to build a large model with huge gaps between the ferrite. Also, try
shopping around on eBay for some of the smaller Russian surplus rods,
which can be much cheaper than the large ones. Combine a large number
of these smaller rods in a continuous cylindrical sleeve, and you
should have excellent DXing performance for the $$.

73, Gary

-----Original Message-----
From: farmerik <farmerik@...>
To: ultralightdx <ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Wed, Jul 13, 2011 11:40 am
Subject: [ultralightdx] Re: FSL Perks and Quirks (Reply to Jerry)

 
Gary - During experiments, did you find some improvement with say 1/2
as many ferrite rods or 1/4 evenly spaced? Does the number of rods need
to be an odd number? { I am thinking of the criss cross loops on the
back of old table radios].

- FARMERIK

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:
&gt; Hi Jerry,

Thanks for your comments on the FSL video, which was actually a
spur-of-the-moment idea of my fellow Puyallup, Washington DXing
buddy
Guy Atkins. Even though we are on vacation here in Lincoln City,
Oregon, yesterday morning's beach DX was nothing to shout about
(some
kind
of solar disturbance, I think), so there was a little time to
answer
your
questions last night.

The custom orange plastic 7.5" loopstick frames that I make for
the MW
and LW-optimized PL-380's has the back edge trimmed at an angle, to
allow free movement of the whip antenna for FM and SW operation.
The
plastic frames are attached with super glue to the top front
cabinet
surface (only) of the PL-380's, allowing separation of the front
and
back cabinets for maintenance.

<< 1) Would the pulsating reception on 610 Hz have been
clearer if you
would have adjusted the Variable Capacitor on the FSL Antenna?
The 8" FSL's variable cap was already adjusted to the optimal
position
for 610 kHz before the video was taken. The PL-380 (and all the
Tecsun
Si4734 DSP chip models) typically have this pulsating reception on
weaker AM-DX signals, as the DSP chip samples the station's signal
level every few seconds. As you can see on the video, the S/N
reading
cycled between about 12 and 24 (one short of the PL-380's maximum
S/N
reading) as the FSL provided its serious inductive coupling boost.

<< 2) How does the 7.5 inch loop compare in reception
quality to the
FSL Antenna? &gt;>

In general, Jerry, a 7.5" transplanted MW or LW loopstick (of
effective
design) will provide a quantum leap in DXing sensitivity over a
stock
Tecsun loopstick, while a serious-sized FSL (8" diameter or larger)
will provide an additional quantum leap in sensitivity over that
provided by a 7.5" loopstick.

<< 3) How expensive are all the Ferrite Rods for the FSL?
Well, Jerry, the FSL antenna is certainly not suitable for
everyone,
and it didn't get the nickname of the "Financial Sinkhole Loop" for
nothing. Each of the 63 ferrite rods in the video FSL cost $2 each,
plus another $2 each for shipping from Eastern Europe. When you
add the
cost of 660/46 Litz wire and a premium variable cap, you are
probably
getting beyond the reasonable purchasing range of many hobbyists.
On
the other hand, the availability of the surplus Russian ferrite is
probably important in keeping the cost within general reason. Use
of
American-made ferrite would likely push the antenna's cost into the
stratosphere.

73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (currently in Lincoln City, Oregon)


-----Original Message-----
From: Jerry Popiel <jerry_popiel@...>
To: ultralightdx <ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Mon, Jul 11, 2011 11:58 pm
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] Re: Ferrite Sleeve Loop (FSL) Antenna
Demonstration Video

&gt; Great video Gary & Guy- it gives us a good look at the size of the
FSL.
Wish you would do a Video on the 7.5 inch Loop on the PL 380. I'd
like to see what the back end looks like to keep clearance for the
whip
Antenna on the PL 380.

If your not on vacation could I ask:

1) Would the pulsating reception on 610 Hz have been clearer if you
would have adjusted the Variable Capacitor on the FSL Antenna?
&gt; 2) How does the 7.5 inch loop compare in reception quality to the
FSL
Antenna?
3) How expensive are all the Ferrite Rods for the FSL?
&gt;
Have a great vacation.

Jerry


Re: Ultralight South Pacific DX for 7-13

Gary DeBock
 

Hello Rob,

Well, there's nothing like becoming a Beach Boy to get some Good DXing
Vibrations going!

Just when the mid-summer MW conditions seem like the worst, you can
head for the ocean beach and make ridiculously easy loggings of
stations over 6,000 miles distant... on the Ultralight radios that
we've come to love. I'm sure glad that John B. taught me this South
Pacific DXing trick (although to be honest, I thought that he was
pulling my leg at the time).

This DU-DXing opportunity must be partial compensation for the isolated
position of west coast DXers--- who have no hope of logging over 900
stations on Ultralights (like some lucky DXers in the middle of the
action!!)

73, Gary

-----Original Message-----
From: Robert S.Ross VA3SW <va3sw@...>
To: ultralightdx <ultralightdx@...>
Cc: D1028Gary <D1028Gary@...>
Sent: Wed, Jul 13, 2011 7:22 pm
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] Ultralight South Pacific DX for 7-13

On 13/07/2011 10:47 AM, D1028Gary@... wrote:
 
Hello All,

Here in Lincoln City, Oregon the ocean beach DU propagation improved
dramatically this morning, providing the opportunity to
log an all-time
new Ultralight country from North America (666-Noumea in
New Caledonia,
French // 738-Tahiti). This was logged on a barefoot PL-380, no less,
although it did have a monster boost from the new 8" FSL
antenna (the
same one that Guy showed in the recent FSL video). New
Caledonia is an
Ultralight DX country that always eluded my DU-DXing mentor (John
Bryant), so I feel honored to receive it with a simple
PL-380 and
compact FSL antenna.





Gary.........Congratulations on the New Caledonia Log on a ULR!!!!
John would be Proud!! Hope your Conditions improve for the rest of
the week........I wanna see what you can do with some decent
Conditions!!! Barring that...hey what the heck..You're at the
BEACH!!!! Have FUN!!

73.......ROB VA3SW

Robert S. Ross
London, ONTARIO CANADA


Re: Ultralight South Pacific DX for 7-13

robert ross
 

On 13/07/2011 10:47 AM, D1028Gary@... wrote:
 

Hello All,

Here in Lincoln City, Oregon the ocean beach DU propagation improved
dramatically this morning, providing the opportunity to log an all-time
new Ultralight country from North America (666-Noumea in New Caledonia,
French // 738-Tahiti). This was logged on a barefoot PL-380, no less,
although it did have a monster boost from the new 8" FSL antenna (the
same one that Guy showed in the recent FSL video). New Caledonia is an
Ultralight DX country that always eluded my DU-DXing mentor (John
Bryant), so I feel honored to receive it with a simple PL-380 and
compact FSL antenna.



Gary.........Congratulations on the New Caledonia Log on a ULR!!!! John would be Proud!! Hope your Conditions improve for the rest of the week........I wanna see what you can do with some decent Conditions!!! Barring that...hey what the heck..You're at the BEACH!!!! Have FUN!!

73.......ROB VA3SW

Robert S. Ross
London, ONTARIO CANADA


Re: PL-390 FM DX

just_rtfm
 

howdy!

with the PL-390 off, you press and hold "FM ST", until "OFF" is on the display. this keeps the back light off. there are no other lights. SSB is not necessary for MW, FM, or SW. it is for hams, utilities, etc. i like the 2 speakers, but mostly use earbuds. ETM is great on SW where programming changes by the hour. once in "VM" (memory) mode, you can recall memories using, for example, "3" ENTER or "003" or turn the tuning wheel.

regards,
phil :)


Re: Coupling a longwire antenna to a G3

jerry_popiel
 

Thanks Charly & Michael, got the Drawing, I need to look for a second Ferrite Rod Coil, but I'll find one from some other older Radios I have. I'll remove the MFJ Antenna Tuner off the Longwire Ant Coax connection from the Roof of my House.  I'll likely mount the 2 Loopsticks and 2 Variable Capacitors on a Plywood Board for now to see how it works. Great info, thanks.  
 
Jerry


Re: Buliding a Flag, Pennant or Split Delta ?

Rik
 

You may want to check with any local green house supply, some flexible fiberglass poles are used for row crop covers. They are bent to support a Quonset hut like arch, with both ends in the ground. - FARMERIK

--- In ultralightdx@..., "chuck_rippel" <Chuck.Rippel@...> wrote:

E-Bay seller has a number of non-metallic, fiberglass sectional poles for sale. Labled "tent poles," they were originally used to support cammo netting but are perfect as non-metallic supports for MW antennas. $7.50 + $20.97 S/H gets you 12 poles or enough for 48'.

Its my understanding that you can stack them approx 30' high when guyed at the top and middle.

http://cgi.ebay.com/12-Military-Fibreglass-Mast-Support-Poles-Ham-Radio-48-/160530378014?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item25605b2d1e

Chuck Rippel
Chesapeake, VA


Re: FSL Perks and Quirks (Reply to Jerry)

Rik
 

Gary - During experiments, did you find some improvement with say 1/2 as many ferrite rods or 1/4 evenly spaced? Does the number of rods need to be an odd number? { I am thinking of the criss cross loops on the back of old table radios].

- FARMERIK

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:

Hi Jerry,

Thanks for your comments on the FSL video, which was actually a
spur-of-the-moment idea of my fellow Puyallup, Washington DXing buddy
Guy Atkins. Even though we are on vacation here in Lincoln City,
Oregon, yesterday morning's beach DX was nothing to shout about (some
kind
of solar disturbance, I think), so there was a little time to answer
your
questions last night.

The custom orange plastic 7.5" loopstick frames that I make for the MW
and LW-optimized PL-380's has the back edge trimmed at an angle, to
allow free movement of the whip antenna for FM and SW operation. The
plastic frames are attached with super glue to the top front cabinet
surface (only) of the PL-380's, allowing separation of the front and
back cabinets for maintenance.

<< 1) Would the pulsating reception on 610 Hz have been clearer if you
would have adjusted the Variable Capacitor on the FSL Antenna? >>

The 8" FSL's variable cap was already adjusted to the optimal position
for 610 kHz before the video was taken. The PL-380 (and all the Tecsun
Si4734 DSP chip models) typically have this pulsating reception on
weaker AM-DX signals, as the DSP chip samples the station's signal
level every few seconds. As you can see on the video, the S/N reading
cycled between about 12 and 24 (one short of the PL-380's maximum S/N
reading) as the FSL provided its serious inductive coupling boost.

<< 2) How does the 7.5 inch loop compare in reception quality to the
FSL Antenna? >>

In general, Jerry, a 7.5" transplanted MW or LW loopstick (of effective
design) will provide a quantum leap in DXing sensitivity over a stock
Tecsun loopstick, while a serious-sized FSL (8" diameter or larger)
will provide an additional quantum leap in sensitivity over that
provided by a 7.5" loopstick.

<< 3) How expensive are all the Ferrite Rods for the FSL? >>

Well, Jerry, the FSL antenna is certainly not suitable for everyone,
and it didn't get the nickname of the "Financial Sinkhole Loop" for
nothing. Each of the 63 ferrite rods in the video FSL cost $2 each,
plus another $2 each for shipping from Eastern Europe. When you add the
cost of 660/46 Litz wire and a premium variable cap, you are probably
getting beyond the reasonable purchasing range of many hobbyists. On
the other hand, the availability of the surplus Russian ferrite is
probably important in keeping the cost within general reason. Use of
American-made ferrite would likely push the antenna's cost into the
stratosphere.

73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (currently in Lincoln City, Oregon)


-----Original Message-----
From: Jerry Popiel <jerry_popiel@...>
To: ultralightdx <ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Mon, Jul 11, 2011 11:58 pm
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] Re: Ferrite Sleeve Loop (FSL) Antenna
Demonstration Video


Great video Gary & Guy- it gives us a good look at the size of the FSL.
Wish you would do a Video on the 7.5 inch Loop on the PL 380. I'd
like to see what the back end looks like to keep clearance for the whip
Antenna on the PL 380.

If your not on vacation could I ask:

1) Would the pulsating reception on 610 Hz have been clearer if you
would have adjusted the Variable Capacitor on the FSL Antenna?
2) How does the 7.5 inch loop compare in reception quality to the FSL
Antenna?
3) How expensive are all the Ferrite Rods for the FSL?

Have a great vacation.

Jerry


Re: Buliding a Flag, Pennant or Split Delta ?

Gerald Wolczanski <jerrywolczanski@...>
 

These poles are nice; I use 8 of them for my TV antenna mount. It's
pinned to the peak of the roof at about the 18 - 20' height and easily
supports my 8-bay channel master antenna. I've pinned them all together
with screws so I can rotate it from the bottom (the famous "Armstrong"
rotor). The bottom section just sits in the dirt.

Jerry W
KI4IO
Warrenton, VA

On Wed, 2011-07-13 at 15:44 +0000, chuck_rippel wrote:
E-Bay seller has a number of non-metallic, fiberglass sectional poles for sale. Labled "tent poles," they were originally used to support cammo netting but are perfect as non-metallic supports for MW antennas. $7.50 + $20.97 S/H gets you 12 poles or enough for 48'.

Its my understanding that you can stack them approx 30' high when guyed at the top and middle.

http://cgi.ebay.com/12-Military-Fibreglass-Mast-Support-Poles-Ham-Radio-48-/160530378014?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item25605b2d1e

Chuck Rippel
Chesapeake, VA



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links



Re: Buliding a Flag, Pennant or Split Delta ?

maurits van driessche <mauritsvandriessche@...>
 

Im using this fiberglass  poles for my Super Kaz antennas .Its very very strong material
73,
Maurits Van Driessche
Belgium

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, July 13, 2011 5:44 PM
Subject: [ultralightdx] Buliding a Flag, Pennant or Split Delta ?

 

E-Bay seller has a number of non-metallic, fiberglass sectional poles for sale. Labled "tent poles," they were originally used to support cammo netting but are perfect as non-metallic supports for MW antennas. $7.50 + $20.97 S/H gets you 12 poles or enough for 48'.

Its my understanding that you can stack them approx 30' high when guyed at the top and middle.

http://cgi.ebay.com/12-Military-Fibreglass-Mast-Support-Poles-Ham-Radio-48-/160530378014?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item25605b2d1e

Chuck Rippel
Chesapeake, VA


Buliding a Flag, Pennant or Split Delta ?

chuck_rippel <Chuck.Rippel@...>
 

E-Bay seller has a number of non-metallic, fiberglass sectional poles for sale. Labled "tent poles," they were originally used to support cammo netting but are perfect as non-metallic supports for MW antennas. $7.50 + $20.97 S/H gets you 12 poles or enough for 48'.

Its my understanding that you can stack them approx 30' high when guyed at the top and middle.

http://cgi.ebay.com/12-Military-Fibreglass-Mast-Support-Poles-Ham-Radio-48-/160530378014?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item25605b2d1e

Chuck Rippel
Chesapeake, VA


Ultralight South Pacific DX for 7-13

Gary DeBock
 

Hello All,

Here in Lincoln City, Oregon the ocean beach DU propagation improved
dramatically this morning, providing the opportunity to log an all-time
new Ultralight country from North America (666-Noumea in New Caledonia,
French // 738-Tahiti). This was logged on a barefoot PL-380, no less,
although it did have a monster boost from the new 8" FSL antenna (the
same one that Guy showed in the recent FSL video). New Caledonia is an
Ultralight DX country that always eluded my DU-DXing mentor (John
Bryant), so I feel honored to receive it with a simple PL-380 and
compact FSL antenna.

Besides 666-Noumea there were strong signals from 567-2YA, 603-Waatea,
639-Fiji, 738-Tahiti and 891-5AN this morning, as well as various
Longwave NDB's from Alaska and Hawaii. The two new Ferrite Sleeve Loop
antennas taken along during this DXpedition (8" MW model and 6.5" LW
model) are performing like a DXer's dream, providing enough of an
inductive coupling boost to boost very weak signals into a powerful
state (just like in the 610-KONA video). It seems like science fiction
that such DXing gain can be provided by a one cubic foot antenna, but
the reality is sinking in fast!

73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Lincoln City, OR)


FSL Perks and Quirks (Reply to Jerry)

Gary DeBock
 

Hi Jerry,

Thanks for your comments on the FSL video, which was actually a
spur-of-the-moment idea of my fellow Puyallup, Washington DXing buddy
Guy Atkins. Even though we are on vacation here in Lincoln City,
Oregon, yesterday morning's beach DX was nothing to shout about (some
kind
of solar disturbance, I think), so there was a little time to answer
your
questions last night.

The custom orange plastic 7.5" loopstick frames that I make for the MW
and LW-optimized PL-380's has the back edge trimmed at an angle, to
allow free movement of the whip antenna for FM and SW operation. The
plastic frames are attached with super glue to the top front cabinet
surface (only) of the PL-380's, allowing separation of the front and
back cabinets for maintenance.

<< 1) Would the pulsating reception on 610 Hz have been clearer if you
would have adjusted the Variable Capacitor on the FSL Antenna? >>

The 8" FSL's variable cap was already adjusted to the optimal position
for 610 kHz before the video was taken. The PL-380 (and all the Tecsun
Si4734 DSP chip models) typically have this pulsating reception on
weaker AM-DX signals, as the DSP chip samples the station's signal
level every few seconds. As you can see on the video, the S/N reading
cycled between about 12 and 24 (one short of the PL-380's maximum S/N
reading) as the FSL provided its serious inductive coupling boost.

<< 2) How does the 7.5 inch loop compare in reception quality to the
FSL Antenna? >>

In general, Jerry, a 7.5" transplanted MW or LW loopstick (of effective
design) will provide a quantum leap in DXing sensitivity over a stock
Tecsun loopstick, while a serious-sized FSL (8" diameter or larger)
will provide an additional quantum leap in sensitivity over that
provided by a 7.5" loopstick.

<< 3) How expensive are all the Ferrite Rods for the FSL? >>

Well, Jerry, the FSL antenna is certainly not suitable for everyone,
and it didn't get the nickname of the "Financial Sinkhole Loop" for
nothing. Each of the 63 ferrite rods in the video FSL cost $2 each,
plus another $2 each for shipping from Eastern Europe. When you add the
cost of 660/46 Litz wire and a premium variable cap, you are probably
getting beyond the reasonable purchasing range of many hobbyists. On
the other hand, the availability of the surplus Russian ferrite is
probably important in keeping the cost within general reason. Use of
American-made ferrite would likely push the antenna's cost into the
stratosphere.

73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (currently in Lincoln City, Oregon)

-----Original Message-----
From: Jerry Popiel <jerry_popiel@...>
To: ultralightdx <ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Mon, Jul 11, 2011 11:58 pm
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] Re: Ferrite Sleeve Loop (FSL) Antenna
Demonstration Video


Great video Gary & Guy- it gives us a good look at the size of the FSL.
Wish you would do a Video on the 7.5 inch Loop on the PL 380. I'd
like to see what the back end looks like to keep clearance for the whip
Antenna on the PL 380.

If your not on vacation could I ask:

1) Would the pulsating reception on 610 Hz have been clearer if you
would have adjusted the Variable Capacitor on the FSL Antenna?
2) How does the 7.5 inch loop compare in reception quality to the FSL
Antenna?
3) How expensive are all the Ferrite Rods for the FSL?

Have a great vacation.

Jerry


Re: Coupling a longwire antenna to a G3

Charly <calpublic@...>
 

Hi group,

With Michael's agreement, I've uploaded a PDF version if his previous email about coupling a long wire to the G3.

The file can be found in the "Files > 5 Antennas and Equipment" section of the group (direct link : http://tinyurl.com/6jwpyuo).

Hope this can help people who got a scrambled diagram.

Charly


Re: Coupling a longwire antenna to a G3

Michael <michael.setaazul@...>
 

Jerry, the MFJ 16010 is designed for frequencies above
the AM band, so would probably not perform optimally on AM.
It is designed to connect directly to a longwire, not through a balun.
Also, it would provide a direct connection between the longwire
and the receiver, increasing overload and risk of surge damage.

If you can experiment with the principle suggested instead, you will
probably have greater success as you will be able to reduce
the unwanted local signal, peak wanted signals and vary the coupling
distance to the receiver to optimise reception - and minimise risk of
surge damage to the receiver. The MFJ would not be needed.

Michael UK

----- Original Message ------------------------------------------------

From: Jerry Popiel
To: ultralightdx@...
Sent: 13 July 2011 07:39
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] Coupling a longwire antenna to a G3


Thanks a lot for the great advice Michael. Does the MFJ 16010 Antenna Tuner (with the Earth Ground
now connected to it) which the Longwire Antenna is in series with my G3 radio provide me with any
Isolation re Overload? That is, would I still use the MFJ 16010 Tuner if I build the Circuit that
you are proposing?