Date   

8" Diameter FSL vs. 4' Sided PVC Air-core Loop Runoff

Gary DeBock
 

Hello Michael,

Thanks for your interest in Ferrite Sleeve Loop antennas, and for your
comments on my post.

<<<Would it be possible to do a three-fold
comparison, including LW, between
the 4' loop, the FSL and a single-ferrite
such as the 7½" loopstick, all inductively
coupled?
Cost unfortunately renders the FSL unfeasible,
and the big loop is unwieldy, so it would be
valuable/comforting to know to what degree
the basic single-ferrite would be inferior. >>>

Yes, it certainly would be possible to do such a comparison, although
because of limited experimental time here it's probably a little too
ambitious to consider for the near future. In general a 7.5" loopstick
(MW or LW) provides a quantum leap in DXing sensitivity over a stock
Tecsun loopstick, and a serious-sized FSL (8" or larger) or air core
tuned passive loop (4' side or larger) provides another quantum leap in
sensitivity over the 7.5" loopstick. Regarding the relative reception
capabilities of a 7.5" MW loopstick and a stock Tecsun-built model,
detailed TP-DXing records were kept during a November 2008 DXpedition
to Grayland, Washington, showing the huge sensitivity advantage
provided by a transplanted 7.5" loopstick in an Eton E100 model. This
"E100 Four Variant Shootout" article may be of interest to those who
have wondered about this sensitivity advantage
http://www.mediafire.com/?mjmn0xijxod . For those looking for an
additional signal boost, I've personally had very good results with
smaller air-core loops (2' and 3' sided) and FSL's (4" diameter),
either of which can provide some additional MW or LW sensitivity beyond
that of a 7.5" loopstick.

<<<There was mention of a basic FSL with fewer
ferrites spaced round the tube, but I have
not seen any further reference to this.
Not worth pursuing further?>>>

Both Steve and Kevin (among others) have done extensive FSL
experimentation before me, and I had a pretty late start because of a
need to finish up 7.5" Longwave loopstick testing. I did some limited
testing of a basic FSL with spacing between the ferrites, but was not
satisfied with the results. Others who have done such testing may have
other impressions, and I welcome their comments. In general (because of
limited time), my objective was to determine whether the FSL design
would provide a compact DXing breakthrough over existing antennas, and
devote the necessary resources to test out the most effective designs
as soon as possible. Presumably, the eBay sellers of surplus Russian
ferrite are extremely grateful for this kind of attitude, and for the
additional contributions of Steve and Kevin :-)

<<<What would happen if ferrites of different
origins, lengths and quality from old
radios were used in a compromise FSL?>>>

It's tough to give an accurate answer about this because nobody has yet
tried it, to my knowledge. The results would probably depend on the
size, quality and consistency in the ferrite rods, but it's doubtful
that any such composite FSL would be competitive with the larger,
standardized designs, in my opinion.

<<<As an off-shoot, I would like to have a
compact performing LW/MW receiver
with a genuinely portable antenna.
It would have to be either a single ferrite
or a small loop.>>>

This was the concept behind the recent development of the 7.5" MW and
LW loopsticks for the Tecsun DSP models, Michael. These loopsticks have
sensitive performance compared to the stock Tecsun antennas, and there
have been many positive comments about their DXing results.
Unfortunately there isn't much time here to make more of them in
quantity, but the MW version article is posted at
http://www.mediafire.com/?yummxhqeyjy , and the LW version article is
posted at http://www.mediafire.com/?845snah2h4ek9z9 . A PL-380 model
may be modified to accept either 7.5" loopstick (MW or LW) in a plug-in
design, or a stock PL-360 model will accept either loopstick without
the need for modification.

<<<I am also interested in phasing out local
interference from CFLs and digital sources
by using a second aerial and a canceling
circuit. Is there any information on this aspect
in the group?>>>

None that I am aware of, Michael. I know that this has been done
extensively in the amateur radio community with noise-canceling
antennas and phasing units, but not in relation to CFL's with
Ultralight radios.

73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)


Re: 8" Diameter FSL vs. 4' Sided PVC Air-core Loop Runoff

Gary DeBock
 

Hello Michael,

Thanks for your interest in Ferrite Sleeve Loop antennas, and for your
comments on my post.

<<<Would it be possible to do a three-fold
comparison, including LW, between
the 4' loop, the FSL and a single-ferrite
such as the 7½" loopstick, all inductively
coupled?
Cost unfortunately renders the FSL unfeasible,
and the big loop is unwieldy, so it would be
valuable/comforting to know to what degree
the basic single-ferrite would be inferior. >>>

Yes, it certainly would be possible to do such a comparison, although
because of limited experimental time here it's probably a little too
ambitious to consider for the near future. In general a 7.5" loopstick
(MW or LW) provides a quantum leap in DXing sensitivity over a stock
Tecsun loopstick, and a serious-sized FSL (8" or larger) or air core
tuned passive loop (4' side or larger) provides another quantum leap in
sensitivity over the 7.5" loopstick. Regarding the relative reception
capabilities of a 7.5" MW loopstick and a stock Tecsun-built model,
detailed TP-DXing records were kept during a November 2008 DXpedition
to Grayland, Washington, showing the huge sensitivity advantage
provided by a transplanted 7.5" loopstick in an Eton E100 model. This
"E100 Four Variant Shootout" article may be of interest to those who
have wondered about this sensitivity advantage
http://www.mediafire.com/?mjmn0xijxod . For those looking for an
additional signal boost, I've personally had very good results with
smaller air-core loops (2' and 3' sided) and FSL's (4" diameter),
either of which can provide some additional MW or LW sensitivity beyond
that of a 7.5" loopstick.

<<<There was mention of a basic FSL with fewer
ferrites spaced round the tube, but I have
not seen any further reference to this.
Not worth pursuing further?>>>

Both Steve and Kevin (among others) have done extensive FSL
experimentation before me, and I had a pretty late start because of a
need to finish up 7.5" Longwave loopstick testing. I did some limited
testing of a basic FSL with spacing between the ferrites, but was not
satisfied with the results. Others who have done such testing may have
other impressions, and I welcome their comments. In general (because of
limited time), my objective was to determine whether the FSL design
would provide a compact DXing breakthrough over existing antennas, and
devote the necessary resources to test out the most effective designs
as soon as possible. Presumably, the eBay sellers of surplus Russian
ferrite are extremely grateful for this kind of attitude, and for the
additional contributions of Steve and Kevin :-)

<<<What would happen if ferrites of different
origins, lengths and quality from old
radios were used in a compromise FSL?>>>

It's tough to give an accurate answer about this because nobody has yet
tried it, to my knowledge. The results would probably depend on the
size, quality and consistency in the ferrite rods, but it's doubtful
that any such composite FSL would be competitive with the larger,
standardized designs, in my opinion.

<<<As an off-shoot, I would like to have a
compact performing LW/MW receiver
with a genuinely portable antenna.
It would have to be either a single ferrite
or a small loop.>>>

This was the concept behind the recent development of the 7.5" MW and
LW loopsticks for the Tecsun DSP models, Michael. These loopsticks have
sensitive performance compared to the stock Tecsun antennas, and there
have been many positive comments about their DXing results.
Unfortunately there isn't much time here to make more of them in
quantity, but the MW version article is posted at
http://www.mediafire.com/?yummxhqeyjy , and the LW version article is
posted at http://www.mediafire.com/?845snah2h4ek9z9 . A PL-380 model
may be modified to accept either 7.5" loopstick (MW or LW) in a plug-in
design, or a stock PL-360 model will accept either loopstick without
the need for modification.

<<<I am also interested in phasing out local
interference from CFLs and digital sources
by using a second aerial and a canceling
circuit. Is there any information on this aspect
in the group?>>>

None that I am aware of, Michael. I know that this has been done
extensively in the amateur radio community with noise-canceling
antennas and phasing units, but not in relation to CFL's with
Ultralight radios.

73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)

-----Original Message-----
From: Michael <michael.setaazul@...>
To: ultralightdx <ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Thu, Jul 7, 2011 12:42 am
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] 8" Diameter FSL vs. 4' Sided PVC Air-core
Loop Runoff

 
Thanks for the interesting, informative report, Gary!
Would it be possible to do a three-fold
comparison, including LW, between
the 4' loop, the FSL and a single-ferrite
such as the 7½" loopstick, all inductively
coupled?

Cost unfortunately renders the FSL unfeasible,
and the big loop is unwieldy, so it would be
valuable/comforting to know to what degree
the basic single-ferrite would be inferior.

There was mention of a basic FSL with fewer
ferrites spaced round the tube, but I have
not seen any further reference to this.
Not worth pursuing further?

What would happen if ferrites of different
origins, lengths and quality from old
radios were used in a compromise FSL?

As an off-shoot, I would like to have a
compact performing LW/MW receiver
with a genuinely portable antenna.
It would have to be either a single ferrite
or a small loop.

I am also interested in phasing out local
interference from CFLs and digital sources
by using a second aerial and a canceling
circuit. Is there any information on this aspect
in the group?

Michael UK


Re: 8" Diameter FSL vs. 4' Sided PVC Air-core Loop Runoff

Rik
 

Gary - Thanks for all your experimenting and reporting of test results. You and several others are doing a huge service to improve ULR DXing results for all members.

Because I am a computer idiot, I could not hear the media clips, and explaining to me how to do that would probably be a challenge. Could you briefly describe the results or post the RSSI numbers if you recorded them?

I am guessing the FSL did very well, but wonder if it would be able to be used anywhere near a computer or other home electronics? With my 4 foot air core loop or even my 2 footer, I can usually null out electronics in the room, and still hear some signals, but of course the ones the antenna pattern points to are much better than the ones in the null for interference. The ferrite rod antennas you made for my PL 360 have a much tighter pattern than the air cores.

-FARMERIK

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:

Hello All,

With a DXpedition trip scheduled to the Oregon coast in about a week
(with the family) and only enough space to pack a relatively compact
antenna, it was time to choose the best performer for DU-chasing this
summer.

The 4' sided portable PVC Loop had performed very well in the August
20-22 DXpedition to Lincoln City last year, receiving over 30 South
Pacific stations when inductively coupled to to a C.Crane SWP Slider
model (as described in the article posted at
http://www.mediafire.com/?9tjd0pqpa4ld2f0 ). But recently there has
been a lot of experimentation with Ferrite Sleeve Loop antennas,
indicating that these compact ferrite-based antennas provide a real
DXing breakthrough for hobbyists with limited setup space. As such, it
was time to see if one of the new FSL's could really compete on MW with
a proven DXpedition performer like the 4' portable PVC Loop.

An 8" diameter FSL was constructed w/ 63 Russian surplus 100mm x 10mm
ferrite rods, purchased on eBay from an Eastern European seller (who,
presumably, is amazed at his recent financial bonanza). The ferrite rod
assembly was secured on soft rubber form filled with padding material,
then wrapped with 18 turns of 660/46 Litz wire from the eBay seller
"Mingmak222." A 381 pf variable capacitor from Crystal Radio Supply
(part # N50P) was used to tune the compact loop, providing frequency
coverage from 450-1700 kHz. The design and construction of this FSL was
chosen based on extensive A/B testing with another 8" diameter FSL
control model, and a photo of the FSL twins is posted at
http://www.mediafire.com/i/?pp9sa4pl56dm4kf (with the DXpedition model
on the right, before MW frequency conversion).

At local noon here in Puyallup, WA four fringe stations were chosen to
test the two compact loop systems, most of which were well over 100
miles distant. 550-KARI and 550-KOAC are fringe stations in the
Vancouver, BC and Portland, Oregon market, while 1040-CKST is a station
in Vancouver, BC. 1070-CFAX is in Victoria, BC, and 1110-KWDB is in
Whitbey Island, northwest of Seattle. In all four MP3's the reception
on the 4' sided PVC air core loop is first (about 15 seconds), then the
reception on the 8" diameter FSL:

550-KARI-KOAC mix http://www.mediafire.com/?akf4xkx3sjwlwp3
1040-CKST http://www.mediafire.com/?jvcps6shc99i0q7
1070-CFAX http://www.mediafire.com/?bn16gdvoa2bdcnn
1110-KWDB http://www.mediafire.com/?ea3zczjet3mw1cj

Although the antenna testing was done with a completely open mind, it
soon became quite clear which antenna provided a low-noise signal
advantage, especially on the weaker stations! The above recordings were
all made on a stock PL-606 model, which was inductively coupled to both
loop antennas at the optimum range. The new 8" FSL can easily be
converted to an "LW Optimized" antenna by switching in about 700 pf of
capacitance in parallel with the N50P variable cap, providing the best
of both DXing worlds in a compact system taking up only one cubic foot
of space. A photo of the relative size of these two antenna systems is
also posted at http://www.mediafire.com/i/?yr7grir83488ii3 , which
hopefully will be of interest to picnic-table DXers like me!

73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)


Re: 8" Diameter FSL vs. 4' Sided PVC Air-core Loop Runoff

Michael <michael.setaazul@...>
 

Thanks for the nteresting, informative report, Gary!
Would it be possible to do a three-fold
comparison, including LW, between
the 4' loop, the FSL and a single-ferrite
such as the 7" loopstick, all inductively
coupled?

Cost unfortunately renders the FSL unfeasible,
and the big loop is unwieldy, so it would be
valuable/comforting to know to what degree
the basic single-ferrite would be inferior.

There was mention of a basic FSL with fewer
ferrites spaced round the tube, but I have
not seen any further reference to this.
Not worth persuing further?

What would happen if ferrites of different
origins, lengths and quality from old
radios were used in a compromise FSL?

As an off-shoot, I would like to have a
compact performing LW/MW receiver
with a genuinely portable antenna.
It would have to be either a single ferrite
or a small loop.

I am also interested in phasing out local
interference from CFLs and digital sources
by using a second aerial and a cancelling
circuit. Is there any information on this aspect
in the group?

Michael UK


8" Diameter FSL vs. 4' Sided PVC Air-core Loop Runoff

Gary DeBock
 

Hello All,

With a DXpedition trip scheduled to the Oregon coast in about a week
(with the family) and only enough space to pack a relatively compact
antenna, it was time to choose the best performer for DU-chasing this
summer.

The 4' sided portable PVC Loop had performed very well in the August
20-22 DXpedition to Lincoln City last year, receiving over 30 South
Pacific stations when inductively coupled to to a C.Crane SWP Slider
model (as described in the article posted at
http://www.mediafire.com/?9tjd0pqpa4ld2f0 ). But recently there has
been a lot of experimentation with Ferrite Sleeve Loop antennas,
indicating that these compact ferrite-based antennas provide a real
DXing breakthrough for hobbyists with limited setup space. As such, it
was time to see if one of the new FSL's could really compete on MW with
a proven DXpedition performer like the 4' portable PVC Loop.

An 8" diameter FSL was constructed w/ 63 Russian surplus 100mm x 10mm
ferrite rods, purchased on eBay from an Eastern European seller (who,
presumably, is amazed at his recent financial bonanza). The ferrite rod
assembly was secured on soft rubber form filled with padding material,
then wrapped with 18 turns of 660/46 Litz wire from the eBay seller
"Mingmak222." A 381 pf variable capacitor from Crystal Radio Supply
(part # N50P) was used to tune the compact loop, providing frequency
coverage from 450-1700 kHz. The design and construction of this FSL was
chosen based on extensive A/B testing with another 8" diameter FSL
control model, and a photo of the FSL twins is posted at
http://www.mediafire.com/i/?pp9sa4pl56dm4kf (with the DXpedition model
on the right, before MW frequency conversion).

At local noon here in Puyallup, WA four fringe stations were chosen to
test the two compact loop systems, most of which were well over 100
miles distant. 550-KARI and 550-KOAC are fringe stations in the
Vancouver, BC and Portland, Oregon market, while 1040-CKST is a station
in Vancouver, BC. 1070-CFAX is in Victoria, BC, and 1110-KWDB is in
Whitbey Island, northwest of Seattle. In all four MP3's the reception
on the 4' sided PVC air core loop is first (about 15 seconds), then the
reception on the 8" diameter FSL:

550-KARI-KOAC mix http://www.mediafire.com/?akf4xkx3sjwlwp3
1040-CKST http://www.mediafire.com/?jvcps6shc99i0q7
1070-CFAX http://www.mediafire.com/?bn16gdvoa2bdcnn
1110-KWDB http://www.mediafire.com/?ea3zczjet3mw1cj

Although the antenna testing was done with a completely open mind, it
soon became quite clear which antenna provided a low-noise signal
advantage, especially on the weaker stations! The above recordings were
all made on a stock PL-606 model, which was inductively coupled to both
loop antennas at the optimum range. The new 8" FSL can easily be
converted to an "LW Optimized" antenna by switching in about 700 pf of
capacitance in parallel with the N50P variable cap, providing the best
of both DXing worlds in a compact system taking up only one cubic foot
of space. A photo of the relative size of these two antenna systems is
also posted at http://www.mediafire.com/i/?yr7grir83488ii3 , which
hopefully will be of interest to picnic-table DXers like me!

73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)


Tecsun DSP DR777

Tony King <tonyzl@...>
 

Hi John,
Are you sure the MW steps are not selectable ?  At 9 khz its evidently intended for the domestic CC market.
Presume at that price the DSP setting is preset. Any info as to what that might be ?  3 kHz ?

Regards 
Tony King



Re: NEW Tecsun Pocket Radio DSP Model DR-777

Joshua Everett
 

--- In ultralightdx@..., "texnote" <texnote@...> wrote:

Available on Ebay for US buyers:

http://cgi.ebay.com/270710168487

http://cgi.ebay.com/380317267089

Paul


--- In ultralightdx@..., "Aussiejon" <aussiejon@> wrote:

Hi all,
John here Australia. Have just noticed a new Model Tecsun DSP AM-FM Stereo Pocket Radio -- Model DR-777. Being sold via ebay Australia. Only drawback for US and Canada is that its 9kHz only channel spacing--NO 10kHz. Size 9cm x 5.5cm x 1.5cm 200 channel pre sets , ATS, Sleep Function, Alarm Clock, Built in Speaker, Built in Li-ion battery .

Regards John from downunder


Re: Crawling up to 800 Stations Logged

John Cereghin <jcereghin@...>
 

Good job Kirk.  I'm at 784 right now after adding WENI-1450 Corning NY to the log last week.  I hope to be at 800 stations by the end of the year.

I'm in Greenwood, Nova Scotia for the week (4th of July in Canada and all that) so I'll be trying to add to my 115 ULR stations in my Canada UL log.  The AM band is dead here with just a handful of stations, and I'm not sure I'll be able to do much TA or Newfoundland DXing this week.  I'm concentrating on the FM band this week as it's more interesting up here.

On Mon, Jul 4, 2011 at 2:20 AM, Kirk <billybobhuxley@...> wrote:
 

I've just one more new station to report on the uphill journey to log 800 different stations on ULR's. Hrd this one on the Sony T-615 w/ SAT. Also audible at equal listenability on my Eton E-100 Slider w/ SAT.

760, WURL, Moody, AL,1950 UTC, 7/2/11, hrd some rel tlk followed by lcl anmts and ads with mentions of southern Alabama and other AL business/QTH's. Also hrd a program promo hosted by Carl Richardson aired in the mornings I think. Seemed to be using the slogan "Love Radio." VG sig during sig peaks. ULR Sta #766-

It's snooze time here. I'm getting up before SR for some bass fishing. Look out largemouths, here we come ready or not!

73,

Kirk Allen
Ponca City, OK




--
John Cereghin WDX3IAO  KB3LYP
Smyrna, Delaware
My radio page http://wdx3iao.wordpress.com/ (please note NEW site!)
The Ultralight Scoreboard  www.pilgrimway.org/ulradio


Crawling up to 800 Stations Logged

Kirk
 

I've just one more new station to report on the uphill journey to log 800 different stations on ULR's. Hrd this one on the Sony T-615 w/ SAT. Also audible at equal listenability on my Eton E-100 Slider w/ SAT.

760, WURL, Moody, AL,1950 UTC, 7/2/11, hrd some rel tlk followed by lcl anmts and ads with mentions of southern Alabama and other AL business/QTH's. Also hrd a program promo hosted by Carl Richardson aired in the mornings I think. Seemed to be using the slogan "Love Radio." VG sig during sig peaks. ULR Sta #766-

It's snooze time here. I'm getting up before SR for some bass fishing. Look out largemouths, here we come ready or not!

73,

Kirk Allen
Ponca City, OK


Re: Not Beach Loggings, But...

Michael <michael.setaazul@...>
 

Gosh - I didn´t imagine graveyards would be so exciting; thanks, all, for the info!

Michael UK

----- Original Message -----

From: Jeffrey Fritz
To: Robert S.Ross VA3SW
Cc: ultralightdx@...
Sent: 02 July 2011 16:20
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] Re: Not Beach Loggings, But...


Robert is generally correct about the "Graveyard" nighttime power limit increase to 1 KW. (Thanks
for correcting my correction, Robert!) FCC rule changes did indeed raise the nighttime power limit
to 1,000 watts for most, but not all Class C (formerly Class IV) stations.

This isn't completely across the board as there are exceptions for some Class C stations. To quote
FCC § 73.182 - Engineering standards of allocation (Revised as of October 1, 2010):

"...stations under § 73.26(b) shall not be authorized to increase power to levels that would
increase the nighttime interference-free limit of co-channel Class C stations in the conterminous
United States... Such stations are normally protected to the daytime 0.5 mV/m contour. On local
channels the separation required for the daytime protection shall also determine the nighttime
separation...The actual nighttime (power) limitation will be calculated. For nighttime protection
purposes, Class C stations in the 48 contiguous United States may assume that stations in Alaska,
Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands operating on 1230, 1240, 1340, 1400, 1450, and 1490 kHz
are Class C stations."

Thanks again, Robert!

Jeff

------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: Not Beach Loggings, But...

Jeffrey Fritz <jnfritz07@...>
 

Robert is generally correct about the "Graveyard" nighttime power limit increase to 1 KW. (Thanks for correcting my correction, Robert!) FCC rule changes did indeed raise the nighttime power limit to 1,000 watts for most, but not all Class C (formerly Class IV) stations.

This isn't completely across the board as there are exceptions for some Class C stations. To quote FCC § 73.182 - Engineering standards of allocation (Revised as of October 1, 2010):

"...stations under § 73.26(b) shall not be authorized to increase power to levels that would increase the nighttime interference-free limit of co-channel Class C stations in the conterminous United States... Such stations are normally protected to the daytime 0.5 mV/m contour. On local channels the separation required for the daytime protection shall also determine the nighttime separation...The actual nighttime (power) limitation will be calculated. For nighttime protection purposes, Class C stations in the 48 contiguous United States may assume that stations in Alaska, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands operating on 1230, 1240, 1340, 1400, 1450, and 1490 kHz are Class C stations."

Thanks again, Robert!

Jeff


Re: Not Beach Loggings, But...

robert ross
 

On 02/07/2011 9:48 AM, Jeffrey Fritz wrote:
 

If I may--a slight correction.

I worked as a Chief Engineer at two "graveyard frequency" stations. Unless the FCC has made a rule change, AM nighttime power (roughly dusk to dawn) on the "graveyard" frequencies is limited to 250 watts non-directional. The 1 KW limit non-directional is allowed only during daylight (dawn to dusk) hours.

So if you are a "graveyard" frequency fan, you are really listening to some low powered, non-directional AM stations at night.

Jeff



Hi Jeff:

  Nope...it's 1 KW around the clock now!!! been that way for many years!!

Regards........ROB VA3SW

Robert S. Ross
London, Ontario CANADA


Re: Not Beach Loggings, But...

Jeffrey Fritz <jnfritz07@...>
 

If I may--a slight correction.

I worked as a Chief Engineer at two "graveyard frequency" stations. Unless the FCC has made a rule change, AM nighttime power (roughly dusk to dawn) on the "graveyard" frequencies is limited to 250 watts non-directional. The 1 KW limit non-directional is allowed only during daylight (dawn to dusk) hours.

So if you are a "graveyard" frequency fan, you are really listening to some low powered, non-directional AM stations at night.

Jeff


Re: Inductance Meter(s) to measure 7.5 Longwave Loopstick Inductance - Where to get?

Steve McDonald
 

Steve, after a detailed look I'm not so sure that the DM 4070 will measure down to 2000 uh? The posted ranges for inductance are: 200 uh, 2 mh, 20 mh, 200 mh, 2h, and 20h. Do you know if the DM 4070 will in fact measure down to 2000 uh which is the range we need to measure the Inductance of 122 turns of Litz wire on a 7.5 inch Ferrite Rod?

no problem Jerry....2000uH = 2.0mH so you could easily measure this on the second or third range (2mH or 20mH)

Steve


WEB - "The VE7SL Radio Notebook": http://members.shaw.ca/ve7sl


Re: Inductance Meter(s) to measure 7.5 Longwave Loopstick Inductance - Where to get?

jerry_popiel
 

--- In ultralightdx@..., <ve7sl@...> wrote:

Found the DM 4070 on ebay, but unfortunately it looks like it only ships to
USA but Not to Canada where I reside.
Jerry - read his description page further down. He ships to Canada for $8.

Steve



WEB - "The VE7SL Radio Notebook": http://members.shaw.ca/ve7sl
Steve, after a detailed look I'm not so sure that the DM 4070 will measure down to 2000 uh? The posted ranges for inductance are: 200 uh, 2 mh, 20 mh, 200 mh, 2h, and 20h. Do you know if the DM 4070 will in fact measure down to 2000 uh which is the range we need to measure the Inductance of 122 turns of Litz wire on a 7.5 inch Ferrite Rod?


Published Mexican Log

Phil Bytheway <phil_tekno@...>
 

The IRCA publishes a Mexican Log which is updated every September.

IRCA Mexican Log, 15th Edition (Winter 2010)
The IRCA MEXICAN LOG lists all AM stations in Mexico by frequency, including call letters, state, city, day/night power, slogans, schedule in UTC/GMT, formats, networks and notes. The call letter index gives call, frequency, city and state. The city index (listed by state, then city) includes frequency, call and day/night power. The transmitter site index (listed by state, then city) tabulates the latitude and longitude of transmitter sites. This is an indispensable reference for anyone who hears Mexican radio stations. Size is 8 1/2" x 11".
Prices: IRCA members – $9.50 (US/Canada/Mexico/sea mail), $12.00 (rest of the Americas/Europe airmail), $12.50 (Australia/Japan/New Zealand airmail). Non-IRCA members – add $2.00.

Pay electronically with PayPal-add $1 to all prices above. Go to www.PayPal.com, then send your funds to fokker_d8@... (Phil Bytheway).


Phil Bytheway
IRCA Bookstore

9705 Mary Ave NW

Seattle WA 98117-2334
Drake R-7 / KIWA Loop


Re: Not Beach Loggings, But...

Gary DeBock
 

Hi Michael,

Thanks for your question. In the American AM frequency allocation
system the "Graveyard" frequencies are 1230, 1240, 1340, 1400, 1450 and
1490 kHz. Stations on these frequencies are supposedly limited to 1 kW
power, and there are so many of them broadcasting on the same
frequencies that they typically mix with each other in a ghostly kind
of way every night here in North America.

Although it isn't my particular cup of tea, some DXers specialize on
listening to these Graveyard frequencies for hours on end, hoping that
a new logging will raise up out of the mush. Graveyard frequency
loggings from the USA tend to be particularly challenging for TA-DXers
in the UK and other parts of Europe, making them a prime DXing target
when conditions are good. If you check the peak season TA loggings of
UK DXers listed in Medium Wave Circle's MWN you will usually find
several USA Graveyard loggings, complete with the enthusiastic comments
of the DXers who have logged them.

To my knowledge nobody has accomplished this using an Ultralight radio
in Europe, although Allen Willie in Newfoundland has received a few
very distant Graveyarders using barefoot ULR's at his ideal location on
the Atlantic coast.

73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)

-----Original Message-----
From: Michael <michael.setaazul@...>
To: ultralightdx <ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Fri, Jul 1, 2011 3:28 pm
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] Not Beach Loggings, But...

 
Excuse my ignorance, but what are "graveyards" in uldx-speak?

Michael UK

----- Original Message -----

From: D1028Gary@...

The Graveyards are pretty dead here on the West Coast, though, and not
even the SRF-T615 can dig up many new loggings.


update

Paul V Birke PEng <nonlinear@...>
 

Dear Michael

have received the US Plastics container, a little big-I will keep this one the side for now

purchased two yellow 10 quart pails (US quart) with flat bottoms and slight angle

just contact glued  the two pails together after roughing up both surfaces

have received my second order of 100 * 20 * 3 mm bars from Lithuiania

have purchased double sided tape

the bars will be on a nice ~10 degree slop on each side

will use the Polodoroff winding method with Litz I have here so split contra winding as I originally proposed after finding this good patent

need to decide whether to start the bars right at the lip on the outer edges of the form or further  to close the large air gap between the two ferrite sleeve disposition of the bars


the rf magnetic flux lines may pop out a bit but this would be nice mechanically

I will decide that shortly

need to buy some small bubble bubble wrap to obtain teh ~ 5mm before winding

the Polydoroff winding will be resonated with a closed in variable cap  a fancy Yaesu tuning cap with multiple sections that will be connected in parallel

ends of the contral winding grounded and connected to ground side of variable cap
middle connection to the internal vanes of the variable cap


the pickup with be two turns each side of the centre joining area, again a contra winding

I may or may not use a special Dallas Lankford/Chris Trask   JFET follower -P and N channel

also will try with simply my Kaito 1103 placed inside the volume of the open pail

I think the double pail idea is good as is cheap and provides and sloped surface to grab a few more flux lines at the extremes


hoping at least all this makes sense to you


best wishes
Paul in the Northern Colony

VE3PVB


Re: Not Beach Loggings, But...

Michael <michael.setaazul@...>
 

Excuse my ignorance, but what are "graveyards" in uldx-speak?

Michael UK

----- Original Message -----


From: D1028Gary@...

The Graveyards are pretty dead here on the West Coast, though, and not
even the SRF-T615 can dig up many new loggings.


Re: Not Beach Loggings, But...

Gary DeBock
 

Hello Kirk,

Congratulations on your two new loggings of 1340-KRHC and 1340-KDTD
this morning on the SRF-T615! It's always amazing to hear what that tiny radio can pull in on the Graveyard frequencies-- just look what
Rob has done with it in Ontario. That Japanese-market model is an
Undertaker's dream!

The Graveyards are pretty dead here on the West Coast, though, and not
even the SRF-T615 can dig up many new loggings. Weaker signals get
buried under the morbid chatter of the West Coast locals, and Sunset
Skip dies out early with only the ocean to the west. TP-DXing provides
a quick resurrection of hobby excitement, though.

73, Gary

-----Original Message-----
From: Kirk <billybobhuxley@...>
To: ultralightdx <ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Fri, Jul 1, 2011 5:59 am
Subject: [ultralightdx] Not Beach Loggings, But...

 
Hi Gang,

Gary, I really enjoyed the posting about MW DXing from the North
American ocean beaches! That's just a pipe-dream for us landlocked
DXers of Oklahoma. Of course I don't have any TA or TP loggings to
report this morning, but I did luck into TWO new stations in less than
an hour this morning after work, both on the productive frequency of
1340 khz!

1340, KRHC, Burnet, Texas, 1101 UTC, 7/1/11, tuned in to one of the
Texas News Newtworks w/ nx headlines. Hrd a quick call letter ID and
some talk, but soon lost to the station below. I called the station,
and they confirmed I was hearing them. ULR Sta #764.

1340, KDTD, Kansas City, KS, 1111 UTC, 7/1/11, Suddenly covered KRHC w/
back to back ranchera mx. All SS pgm'g w/ call ltr ID and "La Gran D"
slogans hrd (which sounds just like "La Grande" of course.) Been trying
for this one for around a year now. ULR Sta #765.

Wow, this was a nice surprise this morning for sure. My 4 day weekend
has certainly started on a positive note! Logged these stations on my
Sony T-615 rcvr w/ a SAT antenna. Incidentally, these stations were the
17th and 18th stations hrd on 1340 khz! I believe that's my most
productive freq out of them all.

Wishing good DX to all and 73!

Kirk Allen
Ponca City, OK

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