Date   

Re: fsl set up

rinus nienhuis <dridotcom3@...>
 

sorry Phil

what is PMFJI

thanks

rinus


Op 13 januari 2015 om 7:46 schreef "Phil Wheeler w7ox@... [ultralightdx]" <ultralightdx@...>:

 

PMFJI, Rinus, but I think it's "new" because they were just released. I believe all Skywaves will be "new", therefore. But if I'm wrong, I hope someone tells me!

I sure like my Skywave!

Phil W7OX

On 1/12/15 10:40 PM, 'Dridotcom3@ziggo Dridotcom3@...' dridotcom3@... [ultralightdx] wrote:
 


Hi again Gary

Unbelievable...
Thanks again for your time and help
This answers my questions.

Often is written about the cc skywave radio
about the “new” skywave radio
When i order it, do i automaticaly get the new one or can i see on certain marks that it is the new one?
Regards and again, i really appreciate your expertise and help

rinus


Op 13 januari 2015 om 5:53 schreef "D1028Gary@... [ultralightdx]" <ultralightdx@...>:

 
Hi Again Linus,
 
<<<   You wrote about the coil inductance , in pF, but i thought the coil inductance is in mH?
i am just a beginner and try to understand.   >>>
 
Yes, coil inductance is in uH (and sorry for the confusion). 381 pf is the variable capacitor capacitance used in an FSL antenna to tune the broadcast band frequencies when a 25-turn coil of 660/46 Litz wire is wrapped around 45 ferrite rods of 140mm x 8mm size, with the two coil leads connected to the variable capacitor.
 
<<<  Number of turns determines coilinductance and frequency
More turns is going lower in Frequency, more inductance also?   >>>
 
Yes, yes, and yes.
 
<<<   increasing litz wire , increase sensitivity of antenna.   >>>
 
Increasing the Litz wire diameter does increase the sensitivity of the FSL antenna.
 
<<<  what will be the result of increasing diameter of the coil to all of this?
and also with the length of the ferrites and thickness of them    >>>
 
Increasing the coil diameter (if the ferrite sleeve diameter is also increased) will increase the sensitivity of the FSL antenna. Increasing the length of the ferrite material will also increase the FSL antenna sensitivity. The thickness or shape of the ferrite material (rods or bars) doesn't make any difference. Please refer to http://www.mediafire.com/view/6oyoldllrbiwf91/FSL_Antenna_Design_Optimization.doc 
for full details.
 
<<<  when one needs large ferrites and when one needs thicker ferrites?    >>>
 
Thicker ferrites do not increase FSL antenna sensitivity, but they can help an FSL antenna survive rough accidents (like if the antenna is accidentally dropped during a DXpedition). Thin ferrite material like the Russian surplus ferrite bars will shatter quickly, in this situation.
 
<<<    it all comes to me that there is a relationship chart to this
say you will make a coil for a certain frequency area and then you look at the chart
et voila...
there is the diameter of the coil,so many turns, take that kind of ferrite and litze
and take that distance between the windings and there is the coil one needed
am i wrong?
where is the chart??   >>>
 
The chart and the design formula for FSL antenna sensitivity is posted in the article at http://www.mediafire.com/view/6oyoldllrbiwf91/FSL_Antenna_Design_Optimization.doc
Good luck!  :-)
 
73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)        
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: rinus nienhuis dridotcom3@... [ultralightdx] <ultralightdx@...>
To: ultralightdx <ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Mon, Jan 12, 2015 8:30 pm
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] fsl set up 

 

Dear Gary
Again thanks , you be of great help !
You wrote about the coil inductance , in pF, but i thought the coil inductance is in mH?
i am just a beginner and try to understand.
Number of turns determines coilinductance and frequency
More turns is going lower in Frequency, more inductance also?
increasing litz wire , increase sensitivity of antenna.
what will be the result of increasing diameter of the coil to all of this?
and also with the length of the ferrites and thickness of them
when one needs large ferrites and when one needs thicker ferrites?

it all comes to me that there is a relationship chart to this
say you will make a coil for a certain frequency area and then you look at the chart
et voila...
there is the diameter of the coil,so many turns, take that kind of ferrite and litze
and take that distance between the windings and there is the coil one needed
am i wrong?
where is the chart??
Hihi
Regards
rinus

Op 13 januari 2015 om 1:19 schreef " D1028Gary@... [ultralightdx]" < ultralightdx@...>:

 
Hello Rinus,
 
<<<   I have a further question to you
i am trying to understand the FSL theory as presented by mr.maynard.
Say, i make a FSL of 4 " and with 100x 10 mm rods, with 381 pF but only the litze of the coil differs
one with 24x0.2 mm
and one with 660-46 litze
what will be the difference in Frequency ?   >>>
 
In general, the number of turns of Litz wire on the ferrite rods (regardless of the Litz wire diameter) determines the inductance of the FSL coil, and the frequency coverage of the antenna. For example, if twenty turns of 660/46 Litz wire results in a coil inductance of 381 pf, twenty turns of smaller or larger diameter Litz wire (such as 330/46, or 1162/46) should also result in a coil inductance pretty close to 381 pf. However, increasing the Litz wire diameter will result in a sensitivity increase in the antenna-- so it's a good idea to use the largest Litz wire diameter that you can afford.
 
<<<   same with the amount of turns
one with 12 t
and one with 35 t
what will the difference?   >>>
 
Changing the number of Litz wire turns will make a very big difference in FSL coil inductance, and also the frequency coverage of the antenna. For example, if your 12 turns of Litz wire results in a frequency coverage of 700-1900 kHz, increasing the Litz wire turns to 35 will probably result in frequency coverage similar to 250-900 kHz. For example, for Medium Wave frequency coverage (from 460-1710 kHz), I designed a 5" Diameter FSL antenna with 25 turns of 660/46 Litz wire wrapped around 45 Russian surplus 140mm x 8mm ferrite rods. This antenna has been a good performer for many DXers, and has a variable capacitor of 381 pf ( http://www.mediafire.com/view/9ze98h293s85p86/5%20inch%20FSL.doc  )
 
73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)   
 
 
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: rinus nienhuis dridotcom3@... [ultralightdx] < ultralightdx@...>
To: ultralightdx < ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Sun, Jan 11, 2015 10:29 pm
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] fsl set up

 

Hello Gary
Thanks for extra explanation.

I have a further question to you
i am trying to understand the FSL theory as presented by mr.maynard.
Say, i make a FSL of 4 " and with 100x 10 mm rods, with 381 pF but only the litze of the coil differs
one with 24x0.2 mm
and one with 660-46 litze
what will be the difference in Frequency ?

same with the amount of turns
one with 12 t
and one with 35 t
what will the difference?
thanks in advance
rinus


Op 12 januari 2015 om 1:04 schreef " D1028Gary@... [ultralightdx]" < ultralightdx@...>:

 
Hello Broonsangle123 (and Rinus),
 
Every variable capacitor has two sections-- rotor plates (which are the ones that move, when you turn the shaft) and stator plates (which stay in place, and are connected to the variable cap chassis). You need to connect one side of the FSL coil to the rotor plates, and the other side of the FSL coil to the stator plates.
 
To accomplish this, connect one of the crocodile clips to the variable cap chassis, and the other clip to one of the terminals at the base of the variable cap (most of these terminals are connected to the rotor plates). If the first terminal doesn't make the FSL work properly try another one, until you have success. Also, keep in mind that the FSL antenna tunes much more sharply than an air core loop, making it a little tricky for beginners to know when they have the FSL's tuned frequency actually matched up with the receiver frequency. You can refer to the full FSL operating instructions posted at   http://dxer.ca/index.php/our-stuff/92-gary-debock if you need additional guidance.
 
73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
  
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: broonsangle123@... [ultralightdx] < ultralightdx@...>
To: ultralightdx < ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Sun, Jan 11, 2015 12:39 pm
Subject: [ultralightdx] fsl set up

 

Last year or the year before Graham Maynard kindly made me an fsl antenna as I am no good with my hands due to arthritis, have had no chance to use because of various circumstances. both wires are fitted with crocodile clips but where do I attatch them on the variable capacitor,help would be appreciated as I am technically very inept!!!!



 

 



 

 



 


 




 


 


Re: Ultralight Radio Class-- MW Sensitivity King Shootout

microcode@...
 

Hi Gary,

I should have know you were ahead of us on this. With all your experience
with these radios and others I guess there are some tests you just don't
need to do. Still, it might have been interesting to see if everything was
as expected or whether there are any surprises.

Thanks again for taking the time to discuss and explain all this.

If you get a chance would you let me know where you are hearing spurs or
other artifacts and where I might be able to see the effects of soft mute
getting in the way? I have not noticed these things at all but that should
not be surprising how much time you spend with them and how little time I
have for this interest of mine. That was the most surprising part of your
recent report.


Re: NEW STATION Logged ULR # 1083 ?..700 KHSE Wylie, TEXAS!!

microcode@...
 

On Tue, Jan 13, 2015 at 01:17:36AM -0800, keith1226@... [ultralightdx] wrote:
Hi microcode,

WLW 700 is a powerhouse MW station from Cincinnati, Ohio, normally heard across much of eastern North America at night.


Regards,


Keith Beesley
Seattle WA USA
Thanks Keith. I wish I had my old logbooks in front of me. I can't remember
this one at all and I used to do a lot of MW DXing back in the old
country. Thanks for reminding me, I thought he was using an acronym but as
soon as I hit "send" I realized it was probably call letters.


Re: LW/MW FSL For Sale

Rob Keeney
 


This antenna has been sold.  Thanks for the inquiries.

 

Rob

Summerville SC


Re: NEW STATION Logged ULR # 1083 ?..700 KHSE Wylie, TEXAS!!

keith beesley
 

Hi microcode, 

WLW 700 is a powerhouse MW station from Cincinnati, Ohio, normally heard across much of eastern North America at night. 

Regards, 

Keith Beesley
Seattle WA USA

ps. thanks for your review, Gary! 


Re: Ultralight Radio Class-- MW Sensitivity King Shootout

Gary DeBock
 

Hi Again Microcode,
 
<<<   I was asking more about the shootout. Right now the PL-310ET is not looking
good based on all the radios only using their internal antennas. Since I
understand most of your DXing is done with your superduper external antennas
I wonder how much your shootout results would change when testing with
those.   >>>
 
Yes, I understand that almost nobody has access to as many fanatical ferrite gain boosters as me-- so all the "Shootout" MP3's are recorded with stock antennas only. Most of our Ultralight radio group is only interested in DXing with "barefoot," unmodified pocket radios, so the radio comparison posts are directed to that group.
 
In answer to your question, though, if I used a 15" or 17" FSL antenna to run a "Shootout" between the PL-310, Skywave and Traveller III, all the results would be pretty much meaningless. The "weak" daytime DX signals would all be boosted up to S9+++ levels on each radio-- testing only the "crunch resistance" of their front ends. If I tried running a "Shootout" with extremely weak TP-DX signals boosted by a monster FSL antenna, the PL-310 and Skywave signal results (with their 1 kHz DSP filtering)would probably sound almost identical to how they sounded in the daytime DX "Shootout," i.e. the Skywave would have somewhat better sensitivity and audio clarity. The Traveler III would probably travel right into some vicious domestic splatter, however, since its modest selectivity (in reference to the other two radios) would remind someone of a barn door. In TP-DXing I have frequently tried the 2 kHz DSP selection on my hot-rodded PL-380 in an attempt to get better audio quality during TP-DX recordings... but usually all I end up with is a nice recording of domestic splatter covering up the DX station. The Traveler III's single selectivity choice is very similar to this 2 kHz DSP filtering... meaning that Transoceanic DX would have a rough time traveling to the Traveler.
 
73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
 
     
  
 
 

-----Original Message-----
From: microcode@... [ultralightdx]
To: ultralightdx
Sent: Tue, Jan 13, 2015 12:06 am
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] Ultralight Radio Class-- MW Sensitivity King Shootout

 

On Tue, Jan 13, 2015 at 12:09:28AM -0500, D1028Gary@... [ultralightdx] wrote:

Hi Gary. Thanks for the link I hope to listen to it today.

I was asking more about the shootout. Right now the PL-310ET is not looking
good based on all the radios only using their internal antennas. Since I
understand most of your DXing is done with your superduper external antennas
I wonder how much your shootout results would change when testing with
those.

Of course most people will never have access to or be able to use specialist
antennas with these radios so the results you already posted certainly tell
the most important part of the story. I only wonder if other aspects of the
radios come out more or less differently with a good external antenna. For
example maybe other aspects of their performance are revealed differently
once they're not antenna limited.

Thanks a lot for all your helpful articles and sharing that information.


Re: Ultralight Radio Class-- MW Sensitivity King Shootout

microcode@...
 

On Tue, Jan 13, 2015 at 12:09:28AM -0500, D1028Gary@... [ultralightdx] wrote:

Hi Gary. Thanks for the link I hope to listen to it today.

I was asking more about the shootout. Right now the PL-310ET is not looking
good based on all the radios only using their internal antennas. Since I
understand most of your DXing is done with your superduper external antennas
I wonder how much your shootout results would change when testing with
those.

Of course most people will never have access to or be able to use specialist
antennas with these radios so the results you already posted certainly tell
the most important part of the story. I only wonder if other aspects of the
radios come out more or less differently with a good external antenna. For
example maybe other aspects of their performance are revealed differently
once they're not antenna limited.

Thanks a lot for all your helpful articles and sharing that information.


Re: NEW STATION Logged ULR # 1083 ?..700 KHSE Wylie, TEXAS!!

microcode@...
 

Very nice catch. Are you sure that distance is correct? Sounds like it ought
to be farther than what you wrote.

coming in so strong, there was no sign of WLW at all!!
What is WLW?


Re: Ultralight Radio Class-- MW Sensitivity King Shootout

Phil Wheeler <w7ox@...>
 

I assume you mean via the internet, Mark (or via the cellular connection of the phone).

While that works for me, the options are bit more limiting. And doing ultralight dx is a hobby, and I suspect using your phone and the internet doesn't count :-)

I do travel with an internet radio (I find the station options of the smartphone apps to be more limiting).

Sound quality hasn't been very important to me, since I welt deaf in my left year (Meniere's Syndrome) two weeks after building a 70 W stereo amplifier back in the late 1960s. Deaf in one ear and a hearing aid in the other has limited my need for high quality sound!

73, Phil W7OX

On 1/12/15 11:31 PM, 'R. Mark Barnett' orgelkraft@... [ultralightdx] wrote:

Phil, I hate to say it but I find myself listening to radio stations more and more on my Android phone when I run into noise and I NEED to hear something. I have a bunch of radio station presets and I can pull stations up pretty easy. When I listen to Spanish stations, if the signal isn't very stable I have a tough time understanding what is said. I love my PL-380, the DSP helps a great deal, but the digital sound quality on my phone is VERY hard to pass up when you have lightning crashing through your radio...
Mark B. N8PGV


And the prices are very attractive, too. We live in great times for the radio hobbyist -- except for the disappearance of so many SWBC services in the psst decade. 20 years ago I listened to BBC at nights in the Himalayas, and ten years ago in the Andes; I probably still could in those places but in the US or perhaps even most of Europe, internet access seems to be the game.

73, Phil W7OX



.





Re: Ultralight Radio Class-- MW Sensitivity King Shootout

R. Mark Barnett
 


 
Phil, I hate to say it but I find myself listening to radio stations more and more on my Android phone when I run into noise and I NEED to hear something. I have a bunch of radio station presets and I can pull stations up pretty easy. When I listen to Spanish stations, if the signal isn't very stable I have a tough time understanding what is said. I love my PL-380, the DSP helps a great deal, but the digital sound quality on my phone is VERY hard to pass up when you have lightning crashing through your radio... 
Mark B. N8PGV


And the prices are very attractive, too.  We live in great times for the radio hobbyist -- except for the disappearance of so many SWBC services in the psst decade. 20 years ago I listened to BBC at nights in the Himalayas, and ten years ago in the Andes; I probably still could in those places but in the US or perhaps even most of Europe, internet access seems to be the game.

73, Phil W7OX



.




Re: fsl set up

Phil Wheeler <w7ox@...>
 

PMFJI, Rinus, but I think it's "new" because they were just released. I believe all Skywaves will be "new", therefore. But if I'm wrong, I hope someone tells me!

I sure like my Skywave!

Phil W7OX

On 1/12/15 10:40 PM, 'Dridotcom3@ziggo Dridotcom3@...' dridotcom3@... [ultralightdx] wrote:

 

Hi again Gary

Unbelievable...
Thanks again for your time and help
This answers my questions.

Often is written about the cc skywave radio
about the “new” skywave radio
When i order it, do i automaticaly get the new one or can i see on certain marks that it is the new one?
Regards and again, i really appreciate your expertise and help

rinus


Op 13 januari 2015 om 5:53 schreef "D1028Gary@... [ultralightdx]" :

 
Hi Again Linus,
 
<<<   You wrote about the coil inductance , in pF, but i thought the coil inductance is in mH?
i am just a beginner and try to understand.   >>>
 
Yes, coil inductance is in uH (and sorry for the confusion). 381 pf is the variable capacitor capacitance used in an FSL antenna to tune the broadcast band frequencies when a 25-turn coil of 660/46 Litz wire is wrapped around 45 ferrite rods of 140mm x 8mm size, with the two coil leads connected to the variable capacitor.
 
<<<  Number of turns determines coilinductance and frequency
More turns is going lower in Frequency, more inductance also?   >>>
 
Yes, yes, and yes.
 
<<<   increasing litz wire , increase sensitivity of antenna.   >>>
 
Increasing the Litz wire diameter does increase the sensitivity of the FSL antenna.
 
<<<  what will be the result of increasing diameter of the coil to all of this?
and also with the length of the ferrites and thickness of them    >>>
 
Increasing the coil diameter (if the ferrite sleeve diameter is also increased) will increase the sensitivity of the FSL antenna. Increasing the length of the ferrite material will also increase the FSL antenna sensitivity. The thickness or shape of the ferrite material (rods or bars) doesn't make any difference. Please refer to http://www.mediafire.com/view/6oyoldllrbiwf91/FSL_Antenna_Design_Optimization.doc 
for full details.
 
<<<  when one needs large ferrites and when one needs thicker ferrites?    >>>
 
Thicker ferrites do not increase FSL antenna sensitivity, but they can help an FSL antenna survive rough accidents (like if the antenna is accidentally dropped during a DXpedition). Thin ferrite material like the Russian surplus ferrite bars will shatter quickly, in this situation.
 
<<<    it all comes to me that there is a relationship chart to this
say you will make a coil for a certain frequency area and then you look at the chart
et voila...
there is the diameter of the coil,so many turns, take that kind of ferrite and litze
and take that distance between the windings and there is the coil one needed
am i wrong?
where is the chart??   >>>
 
The chart and the design formula for FSL antenna sensitivity is posted in the article at http://www.mediafire.com/view/6oyoldllrbiwf91/FSL_Antenna_Design_Optimization.doc
Good luck!  :-)
 
73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)        
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: rinus nienhuis dridotcom3@... [ultralightdx]
To: ultralightdx
Sent: Mon, Jan 12, 2015 8:30 pm
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] fsl set up 

 

Dear Gary
Again thanks , you be of great help !
You wrote about the coil inductance , in pF, but i thought the coil inductance is in mH?
i am just a beginner and try to understand.
Number of turns determines coilinductance and frequency
More turns is going lower in Frequency, more inductance also?
increasing litz wire , increase sensitivity of antenna.
what will be the result of increasing diameter of the coil to all of this?
and also with the length of the ferrites and thickness of them
when one needs large ferrites and when one needs thicker ferrites?

it all comes to me that there is a relationship chart to this
say you will make a coil for a certain frequency area and then you look at the chart
et voila...
there is the diameter of the coil,so many turns, take that kind of ferrite and litze
and take that distance between the windings and there is the coil one needed
am i wrong?
where is the chart??
Hihi
Regards
rinus

Op 13 januari 2015 om 1:19 schreef " D1028Gary@... [ultralightdx]" < ultralightdx@...>:

 
Hello Rinus,
 
<<<   I have a further question to you
i am trying to understand the FSL theory as presented by mr.maynard.
Say, i make a FSL of 4 " and with 100x 10 mm rods, with 381 pF but only the litze of the coil differs
one with 24x0.2 mm
and one with 660-46 litze
what will be the difference in Frequency ?   >>>
 
In general, the number of turns of Litz wire on the ferrite rods (regardless of the Litz wire diameter) determines the inductance of the FSL coil, and the frequency coverage of the antenna. For example, if twenty turns of 660/46 Litz wire results in a coil inductance of 381 pf, twenty turns of smaller or larger diameter Litz wire (such as 330/46, or 1162/46) should also result in a coil inductance pretty close to 381 pf. However, increasing the Litz wire diameter will result in a sensitivity increase in the antenna-- so it's a good idea to use the largest Litz wire diameter that you can afford.
 
<<<   same with the amount of turns
one with 12 t
and one with 35 t
what will the difference?   >>>
 
Changing the number of Litz wire turns will make a very big difference in FSL coil inductance, and also the frequency coverage of the antenna. For example, if your 12 turns of Litz wire results in a frequency coverage of 700-1900 kHz, increasing the Litz wire turns to 35 will probably result in frequency coverage similar to 250-900 kHz. For example, for Medium Wave frequency coverage (from 460-1710 kHz), I designed a 5" Diameter FSL antenna with 25 turns of 660/46 Litz wire wrapped around 45 Russian surplus 140mm x 8mm ferrite rods. This antenna has been a good performer for many DXers, and has a variable capacitor of 381 pf ( http://www.mediafire.com/view/9ze98h293s85p86/5%20inch%20FSL.doc  )
 
73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)   
 
 
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: rinus nienhuis dridotcom3@... [ultralightdx] < ultralightdx@...>
To: ultralightdx < ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Sun, Jan 11, 2015 10:29 pm
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] fsl set up

 

Hello Gary
Thanks for extra explanation.

I have a further question to you
i am trying to understand the FSL theory as presented by mr.maynard.
Say, i make a FSL of 4 " and with 100x 10 mm rods, with 381 pF but only the litze of the coil differs
one with 24x0.2 mm
and one with 660-46 litze
what will be the difference in Frequency ?

same with the amount of turns
one with 12 t
and one with 35 t
what will the difference?
thanks in advance
rinus


Op 12 januari 2015 om 1:04 schreef " D1028Gary@... [ultralightdx]" < ultralightdx@...>:

 
Hello Broonsangle123 (and Rinus),
 
Every variable capacitor has two sections-- rotor plates (which are the ones that move, when you turn the shaft) and stator plates (which stay in place, and are connected to the variable cap chassis). You need to connect one side of the FSL coil to the rotor plates, and the other side of the FSL coil to the stator plates.
 
To accomplish this, connect one of the crocodile clips to the variable cap chassis, and the other clip to one of the terminals at the base of the variable cap (most of these terminals are connected to the rotor plates). If the first terminal doesn't make the FSL work properly try another one, until you have success. Also, keep in mind that the FSL antenna tunes much more sharply than an air core loop, making it a little tricky for beginners to know when they have the FSL's tuned frequency actually matched up with the receiver frequency. You can refer to the full FSL operating instructions posted at   http://dxer.ca/index.php/our-stuff/92-gary-debock if you need additional guidance.
 
73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
  
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: broonsangle123@... [ultralightdx] < ultralightdx@...>
To: ultralightdx < ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Sun, Jan 11, 2015 12:39 pm
Subject: [ultralightdx] fsl set up

 

Last year or the year before Graham Maynard kindly made me an fsl antenna as I am no good with my hands due to arthritis, have had no chance to use because of various circumstances. both wires are fitted with crocodile clips but where do I attatch them on the variable capacitor,help would be appreciated as I am technically very inept!!!!



 

 



 

 



 


 



Re: Ultralight Radio Class-- MW Sensitivity King Shootout

Phil Wheeler <w7ox@...>
 

Forgot to include: None of my Sonys have/had tuning knobs. That feature is so nice in the Tecsun radios and the Skywave -- though I'm not thrilled with the adaptive (or whatever) tuning in the PL-310et; far prefer the separate knob of the PL-880 or the "push to change" feature of the Skywave.

Phil W7OX

On 1/12/15 10:22 PM, Phil Wheeler w7ox@... [ultralightdx] wrote:

 

Hi, Gary --

I last visited the world of portable receivers probably 10-15 years ago. My favorite for travel in the 90s was the Sony SW-1, until in gave up the ghost last year. I still have an SW-100 but it's a real ergonomic challenge. My 7600GR is a nifty radio, but showing it's age and not really "ultralight".

So when I started looking into what's available *now*, I was really amazed. The DSP chips make a huge difference in radio performance; it's really a new world in that respect. I can pull out MW stations with the Skywave and PL-880 I can't really get with the Sonys I have -- and I can creep up 10 kHz from strong local stations (Torrance, CA in L.A. area) and listen to those adjacent stations, something I could never do with any of the three Sonys.

And the prices are very attractive, too.  We live in great times for the radio hobbyist -- except for the disappearance of so many SWBC services in the psst decade. 20 years ago I listened to BBC at nights in the Himalayas, and ten years ago in the Andes; I probably still could in those places but in the US or perhaps even most of Europe, internet access seems to be the game.

73, Phil W7OX

On 1/12/15 9:59 PM, D1028Gary@... [ultralightdx] wrote:
 

Hi Phil,
 
Thanks very much for your comment on the Shootout!
 
<<<    Compared to the PL-310et the Skywave wins in all respects, at least for my applications. I think the Traveler III, independent of performance(!), would be ergonomically annoying over time: No keypad for quick freq changes, the display, the size, no selectivity changes (if I read what is said below correctly), no fine tuning, etc. would not do it for me.   >>>
 
Your thinking is very similar to mine, Phil. An antenna fanatic can easily boost up MW sensitivity into the stratosphere, but if a portable's selectivity isn't suitable for split-frequency DX reception, you can pretty much write off TP-DXing. The new CC Skywave has 1 kHz DSP filtering, and it comes without the heterodyne and soft mute issues of the Tecsun DSP radios. It has already proven itself to be pretty competitive in Transoceanic DXing when inductively coupled to a large FSL antenna.
 
The Traveler III has selectivity roughly similar to the 2 kHz DSP choice of the CC Skywave, which unfortunately would allow excessive domestic station splatter on most of the 9 kHz split TP frequencies. Without a better selectivity option, the Traveler III would probably travel into a TP-DXer's storage cabinet.
 
73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
 
 
   
 
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Phil Wheeler w7ox@... [ultralightdx]
To: ultralightdx
Sent: Mon, Jan 12, 2015 10:12 am
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] Ultralight Radio Class-- MW Sensitivity King Shootout

 
Thanks for all that interesting data, Gary. Your results notwithstanding, the Skywave is still my favorite ultralight MW radio. My PL-880 is likely the better receiver (definitely is on SW/SSB/CW!). The Skywave lets me listen right up close to the 50kW station 2-3 miles away and I love the ergonomics, and having WX and aero bands available -- and that it takes only two AA cells.

In ways the Skywave is better than my PL-880 (like better MW selectivity) but on SW and FM (the audio!) the PL-880 wins. Funny thing is that I thought it was really dead one day last week. So I took it out to my hamshack and compared it on SSB to one of my proven ham transceivers with a ham antenna (vs. the little reel I usually use with my portable receivers). Turns out 20 meters was just dead that day and the PL-880 matched up well with the ham gear on receive.

Compared to the PL-310et the Skywave wins in all respects, at least for my applications. I think the Traveler III, independent of performance(!), would be ergonomically annoying over time: No keypad for quick freq changes, the display, the size, no selectivity changes (if I read what is said below correctly), no fine tuning, etc. would not do it for me.

Phil W7OX

On 1/11/15 8:29 PM, D1028Gary@... [ultralightdx] wrote:
 
Hello All,
 
The Super Bowl of pocket radio weak signal reception was held this afternoon here in Puyallup, Washington. The contestants were:
 
1) Tecsun PL-310ET ($49.99 with free shipping from Amazon)   The Ultralight radio class leader in MW sensitivity from 2009 until recently, this AM-LW-FM-SW model (along with the Tecsun PL-606) has the longest loopstick among the Tecsun DSP Ultralights. Although it has the odd heterodynes and "soft mute" drawback typical of the Tecsun DSP models, it also has multiple DSP selectivity choices from its Si4734 chip, including 1 kHz filtering. With a direct frequency entry keypad and a round, external tuning knob, this model has been one of the most popular Ultralight radios for quite a few years.
 
2)  C.Crane "Skywave" ($89.95 plus shipping from C.Crane)   The first pocket radio found to use the new Si4736 DSP chip, this AM-FM-WX-AIR model has complete freedom from the Si4734 chip heterodynes troubling the Tecsun DSP Ultralights (as well as complete freedom from "soft mute" distractions). With the full range of DSP filtering options (6,4,3,2 and 1 kHz) and switchable audio tone, this new model has already attracted some significant interest among transoceanic DXers (despite its relatively high price).
 
3)  Eton Traveler III  ($59.14 with free shipping from Amazon)   The newest contestant among these radios, this AM-LW-FM-SW portable has a unique appearance, and functions which set it apart from the crowd. With only one selectivity option it is mainly designed for maximum sensitivity on MW, with excellent audio quality as a primary feature. Unlike the other contestants the model has no direct frequency entry keypad, and can only tune frequencies according to the 9 or 10 kHz band plans. A unique feature is a rotary control selecting world time zones, hidden behind an access door on the front panel.
 
Shootout Preparations:  All three models were tested in the reception of weak daytime DX signals in Puyallup, WA (30 miles south of Seattle) just after local noon on Sunday, January 11. The Tecsun PL-310ET and the C.Crane Skywave were set in their 1 kHz DSP selection, and the Skywave was set in its default "Music" tone option. In each weak-signal MP3 the Tecsun PL-310ET receives the fringe station for the first 15 seconds, the C.Crane Skywave then receives the same fringe station for 15-25 seconds, then finally the Eton Traveler III receives the same station for the last 15 seconds:
 
550  KARI   Blaine, WA   (5 kW at 127 miles)
 
620  KPOJ   Portland, OR   (25 kW at 117 miles)
   
690  CBU   Vancouver, BC   (50 kW at 148 miles)
 
750  KXTG   Portland, OR   (50 kW at 117 miles)
   
1070  CFAX   Victoria, BC   (10 kW at 100 miles)
 
1470  KELA   Centralia, WA  (5 kW at 46 miles)
 
1650  Vashon TIS, WA  (15 watts at 15 miles)
 
COMMENTS:  690-CBU was the weakest of all these fringe stations, and the PL-310ET was totally missing in action during the test-- maybe a victim of its "full-blown soft mute?" Its "reception" of 750-KXTG was nothing to shout about, either-- maybe Tecsun is cutting some corners on these new model PL-310ET's? The new Eton Traveler III's MW selectivity is roughly comparable to that of the 2 kHz DSP filtering in the PL-310 and Skywave models-- although if those two models are switched to their 2 KHz DSP setting, they both have an additional MW sensitivity reduction in reference to the Traveler III.
 
73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
 
 
 
.                 
 
 
          




Re: fsl set up

Dridotcom3@ziggo Dridotcom3@ziggo.nl <dridotcom3@...>
 

Hi again Gary

Unbelievable...
Thanks again for your time and help
This answers my questions.

Often is written about the cc skywave radio
about the “new” skywave radio
When i order it, do i automaticaly get the new one or can i see on certain marks that it is the new one?
Regards and again, i really appreciate your expertise and help

rinus


Op 13 januari 2015 om 5:53 schreef "D1028Gary@... [ultralightdx]" <ultralightdx@...>:

 
Hi Again Linus,
 
<<<   You wrote about the coil inductance , in pF, but i thought the coil inductance is in mH?
i am just a beginner and try to understand.   >>>
 
Yes, coil inductance is in uH (and sorry for the confusion). 381 pf is the variable capacitor capacitance used in an FSL antenna to tune the broadcast band frequencies when a 25-turn coil of 660/46 Litz wire is wrapped around 45 ferrite rods of 140mm x 8mm size, with the two coil leads connected to the variable capacitor.
 
<<<  Number of turns determines coilinductance and frequency
More turns is going lower in Frequency, more inductance also?   >>>
 
Yes, yes, and yes.
 
<<<   increasing litz wire , increase sensitivity of antenna.   >>>
 
Increasing the Litz wire diameter does increase the sensitivity of the FSL antenna.
 
<<<  what will be the result of increasing diameter of the coil to all of this?
and also with the length of the ferrites and thickness of them    >>>
 
Increasing the coil diameter (if the ferrite sleeve diameter is also increased) will increase the sensitivity of the FSL antenna. Increasing the length of the ferrite material will also increase the FSL antenna sensitivity. The thickness or shape of the ferrite material (rods or bars) doesn't make any difference. Please refer to http://www.mediafire.com/view/6oyoldllrbiwf91/FSL_Antenna_Design_Optimization.doc 
for full details.
 
<<<  when one needs large ferrites and when one needs thicker ferrites?    >>>
 
Thicker ferrites do not increase FSL antenna sensitivity, but they can help an FSL antenna survive rough accidents (like if the antenna is accidentally dropped during a DXpedition). Thin ferrite material like the Russian surplus ferrite bars will shatter quickly, in this situation.
 
<<<    it all comes to me that there is a relationship chart to this
say you will make a coil for a certain frequency area and then you look at the chart
et voila...
there is the diameter of the coil,so many turns, take that kind of ferrite and litze
and take that distance between the windings and there is the coil one needed
am i wrong?
where is the chart??   >>>
 
The chart and the design formula for FSL antenna sensitivity is posted in the article at http://www.mediafire.com/view/6oyoldllrbiwf91/FSL_Antenna_Design_Optimization.doc
Good luck!  :-)
 
73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)        
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: rinus nienhuis dridotcom3@... [ultralightdx] <ultralightdx@...>
To: ultralightdx <ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Mon, Jan 12, 2015 8:30 pm
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] fsl set up 

 

Dear Gary
Again thanks , you be of great help !
You wrote about the coil inductance , in pF, but i thought the coil inductance is in mH?
i am just a beginner and try to understand.
Number of turns determines coilinductance and frequency
More turns is going lower in Frequency, more inductance also?
increasing litz wire , increase sensitivity of antenna.
what will be the result of increasing diameter of the coil to all of this?
and also with the length of the ferrites and thickness of them
when one needs large ferrites and when one needs thicker ferrites?

it all comes to me that there is a relationship chart to this
say you will make a coil for a certain frequency area and then you look at the chart
et voila...
there is the diameter of the coil,so many turns, take that kind of ferrite and litze
and take that distance between the windings and there is the coil one needed
am i wrong?
where is the chart??
Hihi
Regards
rinus

Op 13 januari 2015 om 1:19 schreef " D1028Gary@... [ultralightdx]" < ultralightdx@...>:

 
Hello Rinus,
 
<<<   I have a further question to you
i am trying to understand the FSL theory as presented by mr.maynard.
Say, i make a FSL of 4 " and with 100x 10 mm rods, with 381 pF but only the litze of the coil differs
one with 24x0.2 mm
and one with 660-46 litze
what will be the difference in Frequency ?   >>>
 
In general, the number of turns of Litz wire on the ferrite rods (regardless of the Litz wire diameter) determines the inductance of the FSL coil, and the frequency coverage of the antenna. For example, if twenty turns of 660/46 Litz wire results in a coil inductance of 381 pf, twenty turns of smaller or larger diameter Litz wire (such as 330/46, or 1162/46) should also result in a coil inductance pretty close to 381 pf. However, increasing the Litz wire diameter will result in a sensitivity increase in the antenna-- so it's a good idea to use the largest Litz wire diameter that you can afford.
 
<<<   same with the amount of turns
one with 12 t
and one with 35 t
what will the difference?   >>>
 
Changing the number of Litz wire turns will make a very big difference in FSL coil inductance, and also the frequency coverage of the antenna. For example, if your 12 turns of Litz wire results in a frequency coverage of 700-1900 kHz, increasing the Litz wire turns to 35 will probably result in frequency coverage similar to 250-900 kHz. For example, for Medium Wave frequency coverage (from 460-1710 kHz), I designed a 5" Diameter FSL antenna with 25 turns of 660/46 Litz wire wrapped around 45 Russian surplus 140mm x 8mm ferrite rods. This antenna has been a good performer for many DXers, and has a variable capacitor of 381 pf ( http://www.mediafire.com/view/9ze98h293s85p86/5%20inch%20FSL.doc  )
 
73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)   
 
 
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: rinus nienhuis dridotcom3@... [ultralightdx] < ultralightdx@...>
To: ultralightdx < ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Sun, Jan 11, 2015 10:29 pm
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] fsl set up

 

Hello Gary
Thanks for extra explanation.

I have a further question to you
i am trying to understand the FSL theory as presented by mr.maynard.
Say, i make a FSL of 4 " and with 100x 10 mm rods, with 381 pF but only the litze of the coil differs
one with 24x0.2 mm
and one with 660-46 litze
what will be the difference in Frequency ?

same with the amount of turns
one with 12 t
and one with 35 t
what will the difference?
thanks in advance
rinus


Op 12 januari 2015 om 1:04 schreef " D1028Gary@... [ultralightdx]" < ultralightdx@...>:

 
Hello Broonsangle123 (and Rinus),
 
Every variable capacitor has two sections-- rotor plates (which are the ones that move, when you turn the shaft) and stator plates (which stay in place, and are connected to the variable cap chassis). You need to connect one side of the FSL coil to the rotor plates, and the other side of the FSL coil to the stator plates.
 
To accomplish this, connect one of the crocodile clips to the variable cap chassis, and the other clip to one of the terminals at the base of the variable cap (most of these terminals are connected to the rotor plates). If the first terminal doesn't make the FSL work properly try another one, until you have success. Also, keep in mind that the FSL antenna tunes much more sharply than an air core loop, making it a little tricky for beginners to know when they have the FSL's tuned frequency actually matched up with the receiver frequency. You can refer to the full FSL operating instructions posted at   http://dxer.ca/index.php/our-stuff/92-gary-debock if you need additional guidance.
 
73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
  
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: broonsangle123@... [ultralightdx] < ultralightdx@...>
To: ultralightdx < ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Sun, Jan 11, 2015 12:39 pm
Subject: [ultralightdx] fsl set up

 

Last year or the year before Graham Maynard kindly made me an fsl antenna as I am no good with my hands due to arthritis, have had no chance to use because of various circumstances. both wires are fitted with crocodile clips but where do I attatch them on the variable capacitor,help would be appreciated as I am technically very inept!!!!



 

 



 

 



 


 


Re: Ultralight Radio Class-- MW Sensitivity King Shootout

Phil Wheeler <w7ox@...>
 

Hi, Gary --

I last visited the world of portable receivers probably 10-15 years ago. My favorite for travel in the 90s was the Sony SW-1, until in gave up the ghost last year. I still have an SW-100 but it's a real ergonomic challenge. My 7600GR is a nifty radio, but showing it's age and not really "ultralight".

So when I started looking into what's available *now*, I was really amazed. The DSP chips make a huge difference in radio performance; it's really a new world in that respect. I can pull out MW stations with the Skywave and PL-880 I can't really get with the Sonys I have -- and I can creep up 10 kHz from strong local stations (Torrance, CA in L.A. area) and listen to those adjacent stations, something I could never do with any of the three Sonys.

And the prices are very attractive, too.  We live in great times for the radio hobbyist -- except for the disappearance of so many SWBC services in the psst decade. 20 years ago I listened to BBC at nights in the Himalayas, and ten years ago in the Andes; I probably still could in those places but in the US or perhaps even most of Europe, internet access seems to be the game.

73, Phil W7OX

On 1/12/15 9:59 PM, D1028Gary@... [ultralightdx] wrote:

 

Hi Phil,
 
Thanks very much for your comment on the Shootout!
 
<<<    Compared to the PL-310et the Skywave wins in all respects, at least for my applications. I think the Traveler III, independent of performance(!), would be ergonomically annoying over time: No keypad for quick freq changes, the display, the size, no selectivity changes (if I read what is said below correctly), no fine tuning, etc. would not do it for me.   >>>
 
Your thinking is very similar to mine, Phil. An antenna fanatic can easily boost up MW sensitivity into the stratosphere, but if a portable's selectivity isn't suitable for split-frequency DX reception, you can pretty much write off TP-DXing. The new CC Skywave has 1 kHz DSP filtering, and it comes without the heterodyne and soft mute issues of the Tecsun DSP radios. It has already proven itself to be pretty competitive in Transoceanic DXing when inductively coupled to a large FSL antenna.
 
The Traveler III has selectivity roughly similar to the 2 kHz DSP choice of the CC Skywave, which unfortunately would allow excessive domestic station splatter on most of the 9 kHz split TP frequencies. Without a better selectivity option, the Traveler III would probably travel into a TP-DXer's storage cabinet.
 
73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
 
 
   
 
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Phil Wheeler w7ox@... [ultralightdx]
To: ultralightdx
Sent: Mon, Jan 12, 2015 10:12 am
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] Ultralight Radio Class-- MW Sensitivity King Shootout

 
Thanks for all that interesting data, Gary. Your results notwithstanding, the Skywave is still my favorite ultralight MW radio. My PL-880 is likely the better receiver (definitely is on SW/SSB/CW!). The Skywave lets me listen right up close to the 50kW station 2-3 miles away and I love the ergonomics, and having WX and aero bands available -- and that it takes only two AA cells.

In ways the Skywave is better than my PL-880 (like better MW selectivity) but on SW and FM (the audio!) the PL-880 wins. Funny thing is that I thought it was really dead one day last week. So I took it out to my hamshack and compared it on SSB to one of my proven ham transceivers with a ham antenna (vs. the little reel I usually use with my portable receivers). Turns out 20 meters was just dead that day and the PL-880 matched up well with the ham gear on receive.

Compared to the PL-310et the Skywave wins in all respects, at least for my applications. I think the Traveler III, independent of performance(!), would be ergonomically annoying over time: No keypad for quick freq changes, the display, the size, no selectivity changes (if I read what is said below correctly), no fine tuning, etc. would not do it for me.

Phil W7OX

On 1/11/15 8:29 PM, D1028Gary@... [ultralightdx] wrote:
 
Hello All,
 
The Super Bowl of pocket radio weak signal reception was held this afternoon here in Puyallup, Washington. The contestants were:
 
1) Tecsun PL-310ET ($49.99 with free shipping from Amazon)   The Ultralight radio class leader in MW sensitivity from 2009 until recently, this AM-LW-FM-SW model (along with the Tecsun PL-606) has the longest loopstick among the Tecsun DSP Ultralights. Although it has the odd heterodynes and "soft mute" drawback typical of the Tecsun DSP models, it also has multiple DSP selectivity choices from its Si4734 chip, including 1 kHz filtering. With a direct frequency entry keypad and a round, external tuning knob, this model has been one of the most popular Ultralight radios for quite a few years.
 
2)  C.Crane "Skywave" ($89.95 plus shipping from C.Crane)   The first pocket radio found to use the new Si4736 DSP chip, this AM-FM-WX-AIR model has complete freedom from the Si4734 chip heterodynes troubling the Tecsun DSP Ultralights (as well as complete freedom from "soft mute" distractions). With the full range of DSP filtering options (6,4,3,2 and 1 kHz) and switchable audio tone, this new model has already attracted some significant interest among transoceanic DXers (despite its relatively high price).
 
3)  Eton Traveler III  ($59.14 with free shipping from Amazon)   The newest contestant among these radios, this AM-LW-FM-SW portable has a unique appearance, and functions which set it apart from the crowd. With only one selectivity option it is mainly designed for maximum sensitivity on MW, with excellent audio quality as a primary feature. Unlike the other contestants the model has no direct frequency entry keypad, and can only tune frequencies according to the 9 or 10 kHz band plans. A unique feature is a rotary control selecting world time zones, hidden behind an access door on the front panel.
 
Shootout Preparations:  All three models were tested in the reception of weak daytime DX signals in Puyallup, WA (30 miles south of Seattle) just after local noon on Sunday, January 11. The Tecsun PL-310ET and the C.Crane Skywave were set in their 1 kHz DSP selection, and the Skywave was set in its default "Music" tone option. In each weak-signal MP3 the Tecsun PL-310ET receives the fringe station for the first 15 seconds, the C.Crane Skywave then receives the same fringe station for 15-25 seconds, then finally the Eton Traveler III receives the same station for the last 15 seconds:
 
550  KARI   Blaine, WA   (5 kW at 127 miles)
 
620  KPOJ   Portland, OR   (25 kW at 117 miles)
   
690  CBU   Vancouver, BC   (50 kW at 148 miles)
 
750  KXTG   Portland, OR   (50 kW at 117 miles)
   
1070  CFAX   Victoria, BC   (10 kW at 100 miles)
 
1470  KELA   Centralia, WA  (5 kW at 46 miles)
 
1650  Vashon TIS, WA  (15 watts at 15 miles)
 
COMMENTS:  690-CBU was the weakest of all these fringe stations, and the PL-310ET was totally missing in action during the test-- maybe a victim of its "full-blown soft mute?" Its "reception" of 750-KXTG was nothing to shout about, either-- maybe Tecsun is cutting some corners on these new model PL-310ET's? The new Eton Traveler III's MW selectivity is roughly comparable to that of the 2 kHz DSP filtering in the PL-310 and Skywave models-- although if those two models are switched to their 2 KHz DSP setting, they both have an additional MW sensitivity reduction in reference to the Traveler III.
 
73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
 
 
 
.                 
 
 
          



Re: Ultralight Radio Class-- MW Sensitivity King Shootout

Gary DeBock
 

Hi Phil,
 
Thanks very much for your comment on the Shootout!
 
<<<    Compared to the PL-310et the Skywave wins in all respects, at least for my applications. I think the Traveler III, independent of performance(!), would be ergonomically annoying over time: No keypad for quick freq changes, the display, the size, no selectivity changes (if I read what is said below correctly), no fine tuning, etc. would not do it for me.   >>>
 
Your thinking is very similar to mine, Phil. An antenna fanatic can easily boost up MW sensitivity into the stratosphere, but if a portable's selectivity isn't suitable for split-frequency DX reception, you can pretty much write off TP-DXing. The new CC Skywave has 1 kHz DSP filtering, and it comes without the heterodyne and soft mute issues of the Tecsun DSP radios. It has already proven itself to be pretty competitive in Transoceanic DXing when inductively coupled to a large FSL antenna.
 
The Traveler III has selectivity roughly similar to the 2 kHz DSP choice of the CC Skywave, which unfortunately would allow excessive domestic station splatter on most of the 9 kHz split TP frequencies. Without a better selectivity option, the Traveler III would probably travel into a TP-DXer's storage cabinet.
 
73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
 
 
   
 
 
 

-----Original Message-----
From: Phil Wheeler w7ox@... [ultralightdx]
To: ultralightdx
Sent: Mon, Jan 12, 2015 10:12 am
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] Ultralight Radio Class-- MW Sensitivity King Shootout

 
Thanks for all that interesting data, Gary. Your results notwithstanding, the Skywave is still my favorite ultralight MW radio. My PL-880 is likely the better receiver (definitely is on SW/SSB/CW!). The Skywave lets me listen right up close to the 50kW station 2-3 miles away and I love the ergonomics, and having WX and aero bands available -- and that it takes only two AA cells.

In ways the Skywave is better than my PL-880 (like better MW selectivity) but on SW and FM (the audio!) the PL-880 wins. Funny thing is that I thought it was really dead one day last week. So I took it out to my hamshack and compared it on SSB to one of my proven ham transceivers with a ham antenna (vs. the little reel I usually use with my portable receivers). Turns out 20 meters was just dead that day and the PL-880 matched up well with the ham gear on receive.

Compared to the PL-310et the Skywave wins in all respects, at least for my applications. I think the Traveler III, independent of performance(!), would be ergonomically annoying over time: No keypad for quick freq changes, the display, the size, no selectivity changes (if I read what is said below correctly), no fine tuning, etc. would not do it for me.

Phil W7OX

On 1/11/15 8:29 PM, D1028Gary@... [ultralightdx] wrote:
 
Hello All,
 
The Super Bowl of pocket radio weak signal reception was held this afternoon here in Puyallup, Washington. The contestants were:
 
1) Tecsun PL-310ET ($49.99 with free shipping from Amazon)   The Ultralight radio class leader in MW sensitivity from 2009 until recently, this AM-LW-FM-SW model (along with the Tecsun PL-606) has the longest loopstick among the Tecsun DSP Ultralights. Although it has the odd heterodynes and "soft mute" drawback typical of the Tecsun DSP models, it also has multiple DSP selectivity choices from its Si4734 chip, including 1 kHz filtering. With a direct frequency entry keypad and a round, external tuning knob, this model has been one of the most popular Ultralight radios for quite a few years.
 
2)  C.Crane "Skywave" ($89.95 plus shipping from C.Crane)   The first pocket radio found to use the new Si4736 DSP chip, this AM-FM-WX-AIR model has complete freedom from the Si4734 chip heterodynes troubling the Tecsun DSP Ultralights (as well as complete freedom from "soft mute" distractions). With the full range of DSP filtering options (6,4,3,2 and 1 kHz) and switchable audio tone, this new model has already attracted some significant interest among transoceanic DXers (despite its relatively high price).
 
3)  Eton Traveler III  ($59.14 with free shipping from Amazon)   The newest contestant among these radios, this AM-LW-FM-SW portable has a unique appearance, and functions which set it apart from the crowd. With only one selectivity option it is mainly designed for maximum sensitivity on MW, with excellent audio quality as a primary feature. Unlike the other contestants the model has no direct frequency entry keypad, and can only tune frequencies according to the 9 or 10 kHz band plans. A unique feature is a rotary control selecting world time zones, hidden behind an access door on the front panel.
 
Shootout Preparations:  All three models were tested in the reception of weak daytime DX signals in Puyallup, WA (30 miles south of Seattle) just after local noon on Sunday, January 11. The Tecsun PL-310ET and the C.Crane Skywave were set in their 1 kHz DSP selection, and the Skywave was set in its default "Music" tone option. In each weak-signal MP3 the Tecsun PL-310ET receives the fringe station for the first 15 seconds, the C.Crane Skywave then receives the same fringe station for 15-25 seconds, then finally the Eton Traveler III receives the same station for the last 15 seconds:
 
550  KARI   Blaine, WA   (5 kW at 127 miles)
 
620  KPOJ   Portland, OR   (25 kW at 117 miles)
   
690  CBU   Vancouver, BC   (50 kW at 148 miles)
 
750  KXTG   Portland, OR   (50 kW at 117 miles)
   
1070  CFAX   Victoria, BC   (10 kW at 100 miles)
 
1470  KELA   Centralia, WA  (5 kW at 46 miles)
 
1650  Vashon TIS, WA  (15 watts at 15 miles)
 
COMMENTS:  690-CBU was the weakest of all these fringe stations, and the PL-310ET was totally missing in action during the test-- maybe a victim of its "full-blown soft mute?" Its "reception" of 750-KXTG was nothing to shout about, either-- maybe Tecsun is cutting some corners on these new model PL-310ET's? The new Eton Traveler III's MW selectivity is roughly comparable to that of the 2 kHz DSP filtering in the PL-310 and Skywave models-- although if those two models are switched to their 2 KHz DSP setting, they both have an additional MW sensitivity reduction in reference to the Traveler III.
 
73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
 
 
 
.                 
 
 
          


Re: fsl set up

Phil Wheeler <w7ox@...>
 

Well, we mustn't stumble over all those minor details, Gary. Did he catch all the little tests you left for the reader? :-)

73, Phil W7OX

On 1/12/15 8:53 PM, D1028Gary@... [ultralightdx] wrote:

 

Hi Again Linus,
 
<<<   You wrote about the coil inductance , in pF, but i thought the coil inductance is in mH?
i am just a beginner and try to understand.   >>>
 
Yes, coil inductance is in uH (and sorry for the confusion). 381 pf is the variable capacitor capacitance used in an FSL antenna to tune the broadcast band frequencies when a 25-turn coil of 660/46 Litz wire is wrapped around 45 ferrite rods of 140mm x 8mm size, with the two coil leads connected to the variable capacitor.
 
<<<  Number of turns determines coilinductance and frequency
More turns is going lower in Frequency, more inductance also?   >>>
 
Yes, yes, and yes.
 
<<<   increasing litz wire , increase sensitivity of antenna.   >>>
 
Increasing the Litz wire diameter does increase the sensitivity of the FSL antenna.
 
<<<  what will be the result of increasing diameter of the coil to all of this?
and also with the length of the ferrites and thickness of them    >>>
 
Increasing the coil diameter (if the ferrite sleeve diameter is also increased) will increase the sensitivity of the FSL antenna. Increasing the length of the ferrite material will also increase the FSL antenna sensitivity. The thickness or shape of the ferrite material (rods or bars) doesn't make any difference. Please refer to http://www.mediafire.com/view/6oyoldllrbiwf91/FSL_Antenna_Design_Optimization.doc 
for full details.
 
<<<  when one needs large ferrites and when one needs thicker ferrites?    >>>
 
Thicker ferrites do not increase FSL antenna sensitivity, but they can help an FSL antenna survive rough accidents (like if the antenna is accidentally dropped during a DXpedition). Thin ferrite material like the Russian surplus ferrite bars will shatter quickly, in this situation.
 
<<<    it all comes to me that there is a relationship chart to this
say you will make a coil for a certain frequency area and then you look at the chart
et voila...
there is the diameter of the coil,so many turns, take that kind of ferrite and litze
and take that distance between the windings and there is the coil one needed
am i wrong?
where is the chart??   >>>
 
The chart and the design formula for FSL antenna sensitivity is posted in the article at http://www.mediafire.com/view/6oyoldllrbiwf91/FSL_Antenna_Design_Optimization.doc
Good luck!  :-)
 
73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)        
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: rinus nienhuis dridotcom3@... [ultralightdx]
To: ultralightdx
Sent: Mon, Jan 12, 2015 8:30 pm
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] fsl set up 

 
Dear Gary
Again thanks , you be of great help !
You wrote about the coil inductance , in pF, but i thought the coil inductance is in mH?
i am just a beginner and try to understand.
Number of turns determines coilinductance and frequency
More turns is going lower in Frequency, more inductance also?
increasing litz wire , increase sensitivity of antenna.
what will be the result of increasing diameter of the coil to all of this?
and also with the length of the ferrites and thickness of them
when one needs large ferrites and when one needs thicker ferrites?

it all comes to me that there is a relationship chart to this
say you will make a coil for a certain frequency area and then you look at the chart
et voila...
there is the diameter of the coil,so many turns, take that kind of ferrite and litze
and take that distance between the windings and there is the coil one needed
am i wrong?
where is the chart??
Hihi
Regards
rinus

Op 13 januari 2015 om 1:19 schreef "D1028Gary@... [ultralightdx]" <ultralightdx@...>:

 
Hello Rinus,
 
<<<   I have a further question to you
i am trying to understand the FSL theory as presented by mr.maynard.
Say, i make a FSL of 4 " and with 100x 10 mm rods, with 381 pF but only the litze of the coil differs
one with 24x0.2 mm
and one with 660-46 litze
what will be the difference in Frequency ?   >>>
 
In general, the number of turns of Litz wire on the ferrite rods (regardless of the Litz wire diameter) determines the inductance of the FSL coil, and the frequency coverage of the antenna. For example, if twenty turns of 660/46 Litz wire results in a coil inductance of 381 pf, twenty turns of smaller or larger diameter Litz wire (such as 330/46, or 1162/46) should also result in a coil inductance pretty close to 381 pf. However, increasing the Litz wire diameter will result in a sensitivity increase in the antenna-- so it's a good idea to use the largest Litz wire diameter that you can afford.
 
<<<   same with the amount of turns
one with 12 t
and one with 35 t
what will the difference?   >>>
 
Changing the number of Litz wire turns will make a very big difference in FSL coil inductance, and also the frequency coverage of the antenna. For example, if your 12 turns of Litz wire results in a frequency coverage of 700-1900 kHz, increasing the Litz wire turns to 35 will probably result in frequency coverage similar to 250-900 kHz. For example, for Medium Wave frequency coverage (from 460-1710 kHz), I designed a 5" Diameter FSL antenna with 25 turns of 660/46 Litz wire wrapped around 45 Russian surplus 140mm x 8mm ferrite rods. This antenna has been a good performer for many DXers, and has a variable capacitor of 381 pf ( http://www.mediafire.com/view/9ze98h293s85p86/5%20inch%20FSL.doc  )
 
73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)   
 
 
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: rinus nienhuis dridotcom3@... [ultralightdx] <ultralightdx@...>
To: ultralightdx <ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Sun, Jan 11, 2015 10:29 pm
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] fsl set up

 

Hello Gary
Thanks for extra explanation.

I have a further question to you
i am trying to understand the FSL theory as presented by mr.maynard.
Say, i make a FSL of 4 " and with 100x 10 mm rods, with 381 pF but only the litze of the coil differs
one with 24x0.2 mm
and one with 660-46 litze
what will be the difference in Frequency ?

same with the amount of turns
one with 12 t
and one with 35 t
what will the difference?
thanks in advance
rinus


Op 12 januari 2015 om 1:04 schreef " D1028Gary@... [ultralightdx]" < ultralightdx@...>:

 
Hello Broonsangle123 (and Rinus),
 
Every variable capacitor has two sections-- rotor plates (which are the ones that move, when you turn the shaft) and stator plates (which stay in place, and are connected to the variable cap chassis). You need to connect one side of the FSL coil to the rotor plates, and the other side of the FSL coil to the stator plates.
 
To accomplish this, connect one of the crocodile clips to the variable cap chassis, and the other clip to one of the terminals at the base of the variable cap (most of these terminals are connected to the rotor plates). If the first terminal doesn't make the FSL work properly try another one, until you have success. Also, keep in mind that the FSL antenna tunes much more sharply than an air core loop, making it a little tricky for beginners to know when they have the FSL's tuned frequency actually matched up with the receiver frequency. You can refer to the full FSL operating instructions posted at   http://dxer.ca/index.php/our-stuff/92-gary-debock if you need additional guidance.
 
73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
  
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: broonsangle123@... [ultralightdx] < ultralightdx@...>
To: ultralightdx < ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Sun, Jan 11, 2015 12:39 pm
Subject: [ultralightdx] fsl set up

 

Last year or the year before Graham Maynard kindly made me an fsl antenna as I am no good with my hands due to arthritis, have had no chance to use because of various circumstances. both wires are fitted with crocodile clips but where do I attatch them on the variable capacitor,help would be appreciated as I am technically very inept!!!!



 

 



 

 


Re: Ultralight Radio Class-- MW Sensitivity King Shootout

Gary DeBock
 

Thanks for your comment, Microcode!
 
<<<  Did you test with your killer antennas or only the stock ferrites?   >>>
 
I've done some TP-DXing with the new CC Skywave and a 15" FSL antenna. Most of my DXing activity is to chase Trans-Pacific signals, and signals have been pretty lean recently. But there was a nice signal from 1566-HLAZ (Jeju, South Korea) on January 6th with the CC Skywave and 15" FSL antenna
 
73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
 
 
 
 
 

-----Original Message-----
From: microcode@... [ultralightdx] To: ultralightdx
Sent: Mon, Jan 12, 2015 8:30 am
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] Ultralight Radio Class-- MW Sensitivity King Shootout

 
Thanks, good info. Glad I didn't buy my 310ET for MW DXing!

Did you test with your killer antennas or only the stock ferrites?


Re: fsl set up

Gary DeBock
 

Hi Again Linus,
 
<<<   You wrote about the coil inductance , in pF, but i thought the coil inductance is in mH?
i am just a beginner and try to understand.   >>>
 
Yes, coil inductance is in uH (and sorry for the confusion). 381 pf is the variable capacitor capacitance used in an FSL antenna to tune the broadcast band frequencies when a 25-turn coil of 660/46 Litz wire is wrapped around 45 ferrite rods of 140mm x 8mm size, with the two coil leads connected to the variable capacitor.
 
<<<  Number of turns determines coilinductance and frequency
More turns is going lower in Frequency, more inductance also?   >>>
 
Yes, yes, and yes.
 
<<<   increasing litz wire , increase sensitivity of antenna.   >>>
 
Increasing the Litz wire diameter does increase the sensitivity of the FSL antenna.
 
<<<  what will be the result of increasing diameter of the coil to all of this?
and also with the length of the ferrites and thickness of them    >>>
 
Increasing the coil diameter (if the ferrite sleeve diameter is also increased) will increase the sensitivity of the FSL antenna. Increasing the length of the ferrite material will also increase the FSL antenna sensitivity. The thickness or shape of the ferrite material (rods or bars) doesn't make any difference. Please refer to http://www.mediafire.com/view/6oyoldllrbiwf91/FSL_Antenna_Design_Optimization.doc 
for full details.
 
<<<  when one needs large ferrites and when one needs thicker ferrites?    >>>
 
Thicker ferrites do not increase FSL antenna sensitivity, but they can help an FSL antenna survive rough accidents (like if the antenna is accidentally dropped during a DXpedition). Thin ferrite material like the Russian surplus ferrite bars will shatter quickly, in this situation.
 
<<<    it all comes to me that there is a relationship chart to this
say you will make a coil for a certain frequency area and then you look at the chart
et voila...
there is the diameter of the coil,so many turns, take that kind of ferrite and litze
and take that distance between the windings and there is the coil one needed
am i wrong?
where is the chart??   >>>
 
The chart and the design formula for FSL antenna sensitivity is posted in the article at http://www.mediafire.com/view/6oyoldllrbiwf91/FSL_Antenna_Design_Optimization.doc
Good luck!  :-)
 
73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)        
 
 

-----Original Message-----
From: rinus nienhuis dridotcom3@... [ultralightdx]
To: ultralightdx
Sent: Mon, Jan 12, 2015 8:30 pm
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] fsl set up 

 
Dear Gary
Again thanks , you be of great help !
You wrote about the coil inductance , in pF, but i thought the coil inductance is in mH?
i am just a beginner and try to understand.
Number of turns determines coilinductance and frequency
More turns is going lower in Frequency, more inductance also?
increasing litz wire , increase sensitivity of antenna.
what will be the result of increasing diameter of the coil to all of this?
and also with the length of the ferrites and thickness of them
when one needs large ferrites and when one needs thicker ferrites?

it all comes to me that there is a relationship chart to this
say you will make a coil for a certain frequency area and then you look at the chart
et voila...
there is the diameter of the coil,so many turns, take that kind of ferrite and litze
and take that distance between the windings and there is the coil one needed
am i wrong?
where is the chart??
Hihi
Regards
rinus

Op 13 januari 2015 om 1:19 schreef "D1028Gary@... [ultralightdx]" <ultralightdx@...>:

 
Hello Rinus,
 
<<<   I have a further question to you
i am trying to understand the FSL theory as presented by mr.maynard.
Say, i make a FSL of 4 " and with 100x 10 mm rods, with 381 pF but only the litze of the coil differs
one with 24x0.2 mm
and one with 660-46 litze
what will be the difference in Frequency ?   >>>
 
In general, the number of turns of Litz wire on the ferrite rods (regardless of the Litz wire diameter) determines the inductance of the FSL coil, and the frequency coverage of the antenna. For example, if twenty turns of 660/46 Litz wire results in a coil inductance of 381 pf, twenty turns of smaller or larger diameter Litz wire (such as 330/46, or 1162/46) should also result in a coil inductance pretty close to 381 pf. However, increasing the Litz wire diameter will result in a sensitivity increase in the antenna-- so it's a good idea to use the largest Litz wire diameter that you can afford.
 
<<<   same with the amount of turns
one with 12 t
and one with 35 t
what will the difference?   >>>
 
Changing the number of Litz wire turns will make a very big difference in FSL coil inductance, and also the frequency coverage of the antenna. For example, if your 12 turns of Litz wire results in a frequency coverage of 700-1900 kHz, increasing the Litz wire turns to 35 will probably result in frequency coverage similar to 250-900 kHz. For example, for Medium Wave frequency coverage (from 460-1710 kHz), I designed a 5" Diameter FSL antenna with 25 turns of 660/46 Litz wire wrapped around 45 Russian surplus 140mm x 8mm ferrite rods. This antenna has been a good performer for many DXers, and has a variable capacitor of 381 pf ( http://www.mediafire.com/view/9ze98h293s85p86/5%20inch%20FSL.doc  )
 
73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)   
 
 
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: rinus nienhuis dridotcom3@... [ultralightdx] <ultralightdx@...>
To: ultralightdx <ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Sun, Jan 11, 2015 10:29 pm
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] fsl set up

 

Hello Gary
Thanks for extra explanation.

I have a further question to you
i am trying to understand the FSL theory as presented by mr.maynard.
Say, i make a FSL of 4 " and with 100x 10 mm rods, with 381 pF but only the litze of the coil differs
one with 24x0.2 mm
and one with 660-46 litze
what will be the difference in Frequency ?

same with the amount of turns
one with 12 t
and one with 35 t
what will the difference?
thanks in advance
rinus


Op 12 januari 2015 om 1:04 schreef " D1028Gary@... [ultralightdx]" < ultralightdx@...>:

 
Hello Broonsangle123 (and Rinus),
 
Every variable capacitor has two sections-- rotor plates (which are the ones that move, when you turn the shaft) and stator plates (which stay in place, and are connected to the variable cap chassis). You need to connect one side of the FSL coil to the rotor plates, and the other side of the FSL coil to the stator plates.
 
To accomplish this, connect one of the crocodile clips to the variable cap chassis, and the other clip to one of the terminals at the base of the variable cap (most of these terminals are connected to the rotor plates). If the first terminal doesn't make the FSL work properly try another one, until you have success. Also, keep in mind that the FSL antenna tunes much more sharply than an air core loop, making it a little tricky for beginners to know when they have the FSL's tuned frequency actually matched up with the receiver frequency. You can refer to the full FSL operating instructions posted at   http://dxer.ca/index.php/our-stuff/92-gary-debock if you need additional guidance.
 
73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
  
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: broonsangle123@... [ultralightdx] < ultralightdx@...>
To: ultralightdx < ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Sun, Jan 11, 2015 12:39 pm
Subject: [ultralightdx] fsl set up

 

Last year or the year before Graham Maynard kindly made me an fsl antenna as I am no good with my hands due to arthritis, have had no chance to use because of various circumstances. both wires are fitted with crocodile clips but where do I attatch them on the variable capacitor,help would be appreciated as I am technically very inept!!!!



 

 



 

 


Re: fsl set up

rinus nienhuis <dridotcom3@...>
 

Dear Gary

Again thanks , you be of great help !
You wrote about the coil inductance , in pF, but i thought the coil inductance is in mH?
i am just a beginner and try to understand.

Number of turns determines coilinductance and frequency
More turns is going lower in Frequency, more inductance also?

increasing litz wire , increase sensitivity of antenna.

what will be the result of increasing diameter of the coil to all of this?
and also with the length of the ferrites and thickness of them

when one needs large ferrites and when one needs thicker ferrites?


it all comes to me that there is a relationship chart to this
say you will make a coil for a certain frequency area and then you look at the chart
et voila...
there is the diameter of the coil,so many turns, take that kind of ferrite and litze
and take that distance between the windings and there is the coil one needed
am i wrong?
where is the chart??

Hihi

Regards
rinus


Op 13 januari 2015 om 1:19 schreef "D1028Gary@... [ultralightdx]" <ultralightdx@...>:

 
Hello Rinus,
 
<<<   I have a further question to you
i am trying to understand the FSL theory as presented by mr.maynard.
Say, i make a FSL of 4 " and with 100x 10 mm rods, with 381 pF but only the litze of the coil differs
one with 24x0.2 mm
and one with 660-46 litze
what will be the difference in Frequency ?   >>>
 
In general, the number of turns of Litz wire on the ferrite rods (regardless of the Litz wire diameter) determines the inductance of the FSL coil, and the frequency coverage of the antenna. For example, if twenty turns of 660/46 Litz wire results in a coil inductance of 381 pf, twenty turns of smaller or larger diameter Litz wire (such as 330/46, or 1162/46) should also result in a coil inductance pretty close to 381 pf. However, increasing the Litz wire diameter will result in a sensitivity increase in the antenna-- so it's a good idea to use the largest Litz wire diameter that you can afford.
 
<<<   same with the amount of turns
one with 12 t
and one with 35 t
what will the difference?   >>>
 
Changing the number of Litz wire turns will make a very big difference in FSL coil inductance, and also the frequency coverage of the antenna. For example, if your 12 turns of Litz wire results in a frequency coverage of 700-1900 kHz, increasing the Litz wire turns to 35 will probably result in frequency coverage similar to 250-900 kHz. For example, for Medium Wave frequency coverage (from 460-1710 kHz), I designed a 5" Diameter FSL antenna with 25 turns of 660/46 Litz wire wrapped around 45 Russian surplus 140mm x 8mm ferrite rods. This antenna has been a good performer for many DXers, and has a variable capacitor of 381 pf ( http://www.mediafire.com/view/9ze98h293s85p86/5%20inch%20FSL.doc  )
 
73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)   
 
 
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: rinus nienhuis dridotcom3@... [ultralightdx] <ultralightdx@...>
To: ultralightdx <ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Sun, Jan 11, 2015 10:29 pm
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] fsl set up

 

Hello Gary
Thanks for extra explanation.

I have a further question to you
i am trying to understand the FSL theory as presented by mr.maynard.
Say, i make a FSL of 4 " and with 100x 10 mm rods, with 381 pF but only the litze of the coil differs
one with 24x0.2 mm
and one with 660-46 litze
what will be the difference in Frequency ?

same with the amount of turns
one with 12 t
and one with 35 t
what will the difference?
thanks in advance
rinus


Op 12 januari 2015 om 1:04 schreef " D1028Gary@... [ultralightdx]" < ultralightdx@...>:

 
Hello Broonsangle123 (and Rinus),
 
Every variable capacitor has two sections-- rotor plates (which are the ones that move, when you turn the shaft) and stator plates (which stay in place, and are connected to the variable cap chassis). You need to connect one side of the FSL coil to the rotor plates, and the other side of the FSL coil to the stator plates.
 
To accomplish this, connect one of the crocodile clips to the variable cap chassis, and the other clip to one of the terminals at the base of the variable cap (most of these terminals are connected to the rotor plates). If the first terminal doesn't make the FSL work properly try another one, until you have success. Also, keep in mind that the FSL antenna tunes much more sharply than an air core loop, making it a little tricky for beginners to know when they have the FSL's tuned frequency actually matched up with the receiver frequency. You can refer to the full FSL operating instructions posted at   http://dxer.ca/index.php/our-stuff/92-gary-debock if you need additional guidance.
 
73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
  
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: broonsangle123@... [ultralightdx] < ultralightdx@...>
To: ultralightdx < ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Sun, Jan 11, 2015 12:39 pm
Subject: [ultralightdx] fsl set up

 

Last year or the year before Graham Maynard kindly made me an fsl antenna as I am no good with my hands due to arthritis, have had no chance to use because of various circumstances. both wires are fitted with crocodile clips but where do I attatch them on the variable capacitor,help would be appreciated as I am technically very inept!!!!



 

 



 


 


Re: fsl set up

Gary DeBock
 

Hello Rinus,
 
<<<   I have a further question to you
i am trying to understand the FSL theory as presented by mr.maynard.
Say, i make a FSL of 4 " and with 100x 10 mm rods, with 381 pF but only the litze of the coil differs
one with 24x0.2 mm
and one with 660-46 litze
what will be the difference in Frequency ?   >>>
 
In general, the number of turns of Litz wire on the ferrite rods (regardless of the Litz wire diameter) determines the inductance of the FSL coil, and the frequency coverage of the antenna. For example, if twenty turns of 660/46 Litz wire results in a coil inductance of 381 pf, twenty turns of smaller or larger diameter Litz wire (such as 330/46, or 1162/46) should also result in a coil inductance pretty close to 381 pf. However, increasing the Litz wire diameter will result in a sensitivity increase in the antenna-- so it's a good idea to use the largest Litz wire diameter that you can afford.
 
<<<   same with the amount of turns
one with 12 t
and one with 35 t
what will the difference?   >>>
 
Changing the number of Litz wire turns will make a very big difference in FSL coil inductance, and also the frequency coverage of the antenna. For example, if your 12 turns of Litz wire results in a frequency coverage of 700-1900 kHz, increasing the Litz wire turns to 35 will probably result in frequency coverage similar to 250-900 kHz. For example, for Medium Wave frequency coverage (from 460-1710 kHz), I designed a 5" Diameter FSL antenna with 25 turns of 660/46 Litz wire wrapped around 45 Russian surplus 140mm x 8mm ferrite rods. This antenna has been a good performer for many DXers, and has a variable capacitor of 381 pf ( http://www.mediafire.com/view/9ze98h293s85p86/5%20inch%20FSL.doc  )
 
73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)   
 
 
 
 

-----Original Message-----
From: rinus nienhuis dridotcom3@... [ultralightdx]
To: ultralightdx
Sent: Sun, Jan 11, 2015 10:29 pm
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] fsl set up

 
Hello Gary
Thanks for extra explanation.

I have a further question to you
i am trying to understand the FSL theory as presented by mr.maynard.
Say, i make a FSL of 4 " and with 100x 10 mm rods, with 381 pF but only the litze of the coil differs
one with 24x0.2 mm
and one with 660-46 litze
what will be the difference in Frequency ?

same with the amount of turns
one with 12 t
and one with 35 t
what will the difference?
thanks in advance
rinus


Op 12 januari 2015 om 1:04 schreef "D1028Gary@... [ultralightdx]" <ultralightdx@...>:

 
Hello Broonsangle123 (and Rinus),
 
Every variable capacitor has two sections-- rotor plates (which are the ones that move, when you turn the shaft) and stator plates (which stay in place, and are connected to the variable cap chassis). You need to connect one side of the FSL coil to the rotor plates, and the other side of the FSL coil to the stator plates.
 
To accomplish this, connect one of the crocodile clips to the variable cap chassis, and the other clip to one of the terminals at the base of the variable cap (most of these terminals are connected to the rotor plates). If the first terminal doesn't make the FSL work properly try another one, until you have success. Also, keep in mind that the FSL antenna tunes much more sharply than an air core loop, making it a little tricky for beginners to know when they have the FSL's tuned frequency actually matched up with the receiver frequency. You can refer to the full FSL operating instructions posted at   http://dxer.ca/index.php/our-stuff/92-gary-debock if you need additional guidance.
 
73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
  
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: broonsangle123@... [ultralightdx] <ultralightdx@...>
To: ultralightdx <ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Sun, Jan 11, 2015 12:39 pm
Subject: [ultralightdx] fsl set up

 

Last year or the year before Graham Maynard kindly made me an fsl antenna as I am no good with my hands due to arthritis, have had no chance to use because of various circumstances. both wires are fitted with crocodile clips but where do I attatch them on the variable capacitor,help would be appreciated as I am technically very inept!!!!



 

 

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