Date   

WBOB 600 FL Irma coverage

Dave Hascall
 

Thanks to KAZ, I added WBOB 600 FL to the ULR logbook. Nice signal on the PL-606 barefoot inside a noisy residence at 0505 ET. 

73,
Dave in Indy (Noblesville)


PL-360 + Litz/Ferrite + Ming Mak caps

Rik
 

Did some experiments with a pair of 390/20  Caps from Ming Mak. I tried connecting them in series with a 458 uH Litz sleeve over Ferrite loop and also in parellel with a 139 uH  Litz sleeve over the same Ferrite.

My PL-360 did have  peaks at both ends of MW on both loops within the tuning range of the caps. There was not an easily noticeable stronger signal strength with the higher inductance and more turns loop set up which I had expected.

 I did find connecting the PL-360 with a 2 turn pick up coil was MUCH better than letting the that radio tune the loop itself, or inductively coupling the little TECSUN ferrite loop which comes with the PL-360. . To me that suggests any one installing a much bigger ferrite on any DSP ULR might do better with a pick up coil and external cap.

There appears to be a big difference in Q with series and parallel cap connections. . The series connected caps with the 458 uH loop tuned quite broadly hearing stations 30 KHz on either side of a peaked frequency. The high selectivity of the DSP radio was able to select stations easily though in that little  bandwidth, and of course it was easy to tell when you approach resonance. Pattern is wide with sharp nulls.

The 139 uH loop tuned with caps in series tuned sharply to a single frequency. Pattern is sharp with wide nulls. [opposite of above]

The two loop set ups are from the files in this group by Everett Sharp. The core is stacked ferrite about 2X16 inches and the coil sleeves are both multi coil Litz  windings. The 458 uH has 4 coils and  was purchased from Everett and the 138 uh I made here with 3 coils.

FARMERIK



Interesting use of the venerable Sony 2001D/2010

Jordan Dobrikin <jjdobrikin@...>
 


Hi 
FYI
73 de jordan ve7jjd   

   
The Red Colonel   The ICF-2001D (aka ICF 2010)  as a spy tool  
 
Due to its small size, its high sensitivity and the fact that it was battery powered, the ICF-2001D was often the receiver of choice for East-European spies operating in West-European countries during the Cold War. In many cases, Eastern-Block espionage agencies, such as the KGB, the GRU and the Stasi, gave their western spies money in order to buy such a receiver in a local shop. 
The receiver was used by the spy to listen to the East-European number stations that operated on the Short-Wave band (SW). Hidden in the numbers were secret messages and instructions for the spy, that were encrypted with the unbreakable One-Time Pad. Once the spy had decoded his message, he would destroy it and carry out his mission. Messages were sent back to the spy control centre by means of a courier, dead letterboxes or a clandestine spy radio transmitter.   
An example of the use of this radio is the case of Guy Binet (1934-2000), a colonel of the Belgian Army, who was recruted in 1986 by the Soviet Military Intelligence Service, the GRU. On the first meeting in Vienna with his handler, GRU General Glazkov, he was given a Minox EC spy camera.  
He used the camera to photograph secret NATO documents and delivered the films to the Soviets in Vienna in January 1987. That same week he was trained in decrypting secret radio messages. He received a One-Time Pad cipher (hidden in black Snowman marker) and a frequency table.  
 ICF-2001D, Minox EC and one-time pad What is this? 
He was also given a large sum of cash and was instructed to buy a Sony ICF-2001D on his return to Belgium [1]. Every second and forth Tuesday of each month, Binet had to listen to the coded messages that were transmitted by the mysterious numbers stations on the SW radio bands. 
Sadly for Binet, the American Intelligence Agency CIA had photographed his first meeting with Glaskov in Vienna [1] and tipped-off their Belgian colleagues of the SDRA III, after which Binet was arrested. By that time however, Binet had been spying for the Soviets for more than two years. He became known as The Red Colonel [2] and was eventually sentenced to 20 years of forced labour and military degradation. After 5 years in prison he was released on parole and died in July 2000.  
➤ More about Binet's Minox EC camera  
Attencion!   Spying for the Cubans  
Another example of the use of the ICF-2001D in international espionage, is a series of cases against US citizens between 2001 and 2009. In each case, the subject(s) had been spying for Cuba, and the FBI found a Sony ICF-2010 (the US version of the ICF-2001D) in their homes.  
The first case is that of Ana Belén Montes (28 February 1957) who worked for the US Defence Intelligence Agency (DIA) as its most senior Cuban analyst [4]. She had been spying for Cuba since 1985 until her arrest in 2001, during which time she had passed numerous documents and sensitive military information to the Cubans.  
Prior to her arrest on 21 September 2001, the FBI had searched her appartment and found evidence of the use of One-Time Pade (OTP) messages on her laptop. Also present in the appartment was a functional Sony short-wave receiver that was used to receive OTP messages from the Cuban Numbers Station on 7887 kHz. 
Evidence for this was found on her Toshiba laptop. Although she had clearly been instructed by the Cuban Intelligence Service, the CuIS, to run a special program to wipe the data from her laptop after use, she had failed to do so [5][6]. As a result, the FBI was able to retrieve a large OTP message, consisting of 150 5-digit groups.  
Ana Belén Montes, FBI mugshot. 21 September 2001. What is this? 
According to author Keith Melton, who is a well-informed source on US intelligence matters, she used a Sony ICF-2010 [7], which is the US equivalent of the ICF-2001D. In a detailed paper of 2010, researcher Dirk Rijmenants explains how the FBI cracked the seemingly unbreakable OTP cipher, due to flaws in the Cuban procedures [6]. After pleading guilty to spying, Montes was sentenced in October 2002 to 25 years in prison without the chance of parole [A].  
Similar cases are those of Carlos and Elsa Alvarez (caught in 2006 after spying for 30 years), Marta Rita Velazquez, Gerardo Hernández (one of the Cuban Five) and Walter Kendall Myers and his wife Gwendolyn Steingraber Myers (arrested in 2009 after spying for nearly 30 years). In all cases, the ICF-2001D was used to receive the coded messages from Cuba's Attención Station. Interested in more stories? Check out the FBI 100 [8] or the website Cuba Confidential [9].  
➤ Dirk Rijmenents' paper about the Cuban cases   
------------------------------------==========================----------------------------=====================------------ 
REVIEW /OVERVIEW
Crypto  Spy radio aka Sony ICF 2001D 
© Crypto Museum. Created: Friday 07 November 2014. Last changed: Monday, 27 March 2017 - 09:29 CET.  Follow cryptomuseum on Twitter Watch cryptomuseum on YouTube  

Sony ICF-2001D/ CF-2010  Portable short-wave receiver 
  
The ICF-2001D was a portable solid-state LW, MW, SW and FM receiver, also known as a world receiver, made by Sony in Japan around 1980. Although it was a commercially available civil-class receiver, used by many people world-wide, it played an important role in international espionage.   
The ICF-2001D measures less than 29 x 16 x 5 cm and is powered by two AA-size cells and three D-size cells. It has a built-in telescopic antenna at the top and a digital readout at the front. The device is commonly operated on its back, tilted by a bracket at the rear. This gives the optimum viewing angle for the LCD display. 
The ICF-2001 can be powered by an external 4.5V DC adapter, or by the internal batteries. Alternatively, a 12V adapter cable was available to allow the radio to be used in a car. It was available in 3 different basic versions (types) [A].  
 Sont ICF-2001D 
Furthermore, there were at least five country-specific models, each with their own frequency ranges. The device fully covers the LW and MW broad­cast bands in AM, plus the VHF FM broad­cast band (87-108 MHz). But the actual purpose of this radio is the Short Wave band (SW), that is available as one contiguous range from 2250 kHz to 30 MHz (26.100 MHz on some models).  
The ICF-2001D was succeeded in 1983 by the ICF-7600D, and in 1986 by the slightly improved ICF-7600DS, both of which have a general coverage from 153 kHz to 30 MHz (except for the German version which stops at 26.100 MHz). They were also popular in the espionage tradecraft.  
 Sony ICF-2001D Sont ICF-2001D Operating the large tuning dial Operating the tuning dial with the index finger Close-up of the displays Tilt bracket at the rear Left side view Right side view   
World receiver 
Radio's like the Sony ICF-2001D and the Grundig Satellit 2000 were very popular in the 1980s. During the summer holidays in a far away country, it allowed people to listen to the international broadcasts of their home country. In those days, most countries operated such a service on the SW bands, for example the BBC World Service. From the early 2000s onwards, most countries have gradually phased out their SW broadcasts, although the BBC World Service has remained in operation on analogue and digital platforms, broadcasting 24 hours a day in 28 languages [3].  
FUNF, DREI, SIEBEN, ACHT, VIER... 
Radio amateurs and SW-listeners will probably remember the mysterious number stations on the SW bands. A female voice that was reading endless sequences of seemingly random numbers for 24 hours a day, often in German or Russian. During the Cold War, many such numbers stations were operated by the secret services of the former Eastern Block countries, such as Russia (USSR), East Germany (DDR), Hungary, Czechoslovakia and Romania. The numbers were actually coded messages for their secret agents and spies that operated undercover in the west. In many cases the agent used a commercial receiver like the ICF-2001D for the reception of such messages.   
Controls 
The ICF-2001D has a clear and well-organised control panel that is located at the front of the unit or actually at the top when it is placed horizontally on the table. The main power switch is at the left side, with an additional switch to the left of the display. It also allows timer operation. The display consists of three sections: the real-time clock (left), the frequency readout (centre) and a signal strength indicator (right). The frequency tuning dial is in the upper right corner. it can be operated from the top as well as from the right. A slider at the right edge controls the volume.  
 Controls and connections on the ICF-2001D 
The largest part of the control panel is taken by the keypad which roughly consists of five sections. The 32 black keys at the centre serve two purposes. They may be used to directly select one of the memory presets (8 presets divided over 4 banks). In combination with the blue shift button at the bottom left, these keys are also use to select the desired frequency band.  
Above the black preset buttons are the MODE selectors. They allow selection between the FM and AM bands. In AM mode, the remaining buttons are used to select the desired modulation type (wide, narrow, sync, USB, LSB and CW). The row of brown keys just below the display are used for timer operation. The three white buttons at the left are used to activate scanning. The 11 white keys at the right can be used to enter the desired frequency directly.   
Variants 
The ICF-2001D is a true general coverage receiver, which means that the entire frequency span is available as one contiguous range. Any frquency within its range can be entered directly on the keyboard or can be selected with the tuning dial. Depending on the model/country, the following variants are known. Check the front panel of your radio to see which one you have.   
AM 
150 kHz - 30 MHz
150 kHz - 26.100 MHz
150 - 285 kHz and 530 kHz - 26.100 MHz 
FM  
76 - 108 MHz
87.5 - 108 MHz 
AIR band (AM) 
116 - 136 MHz
Not available (button missing)

SSB   Single Side Band 
Available
Not available (USB LSB/SW buttons missing) 
External antenna 
Terminal available
Not available  
Broadcast bands 
The ICF-2001D covers most broadcast bands on Long Wave (LW), Medium Wave (MW), Short Wave (SW) and Ultra Short Wave (here called FM).1 On some models even the Air Band is available. Note that the gaps between the short-wave broadcast band are also covered by this receiver.   
LW 
150 - 285 kHz, in 3 kHz steps 
MW 
531 - 1620 kHz, in 9 kHz steps
530 - 1620 kHz, in 10 kHz steps 
SW 
120 m2250 - 2550 kHz
90 m3150 - 3450 kHz
75 m3850 - 4050 kHz
60 m4700 - 5110 kHz
49 m5900 - 6250 kHz
41 m7000 - 7400 kHz
31 m9400 kHz - 10 MHz
25 m11.500 - 12.150 MHz
21 m13.500 - 13.900 MHz
19 m15 - 15.700 MHz
16 m17.450 - 18 MHz
13 m21.350 - 21.950 MHz
11 m25.570 - 26.100 MHz 
FM 
76 - 108 MHz in 50 kHz steps (type 1)
87.5 - 108 MHz in 50 kHz (type 2) 
AIR 
116-136 MHz (AM) in 25 kHz steps 2 
The Ultra Short Wave band (76-108 MHz) is officially designated the Very High Frequency band (VHF), but is better known as FM (Frequency Modulation) after the wide-band modulation art that is commonly used in this broadcast band.
The AIR band is just above the FM broadcast band and is only available on certain models. AIR broadcasts are generally in AM (Amplitude Modulation).   
==========================----------------------------=====================-------------
The Red Colonel  
The ECF-2001D as a spy tool  
Due to its small size, its high sensitivity and the fact that it was battery powered, the ICF-2001D was often the receiver of choice for East-European spies operating in West-European countries during the Cold War. In many cases, Eastern-Block espionage agencies, such as the KGB, the GRU and the Stasi, gave their western spies money in order to buy such a receiver in a local shop. 
The receiver was used by the spy to listen to the East-European number stations that operated on the Short-Wave band (SW). Hidden in the numbers were secret messages and instructions for the spy, that were encrypted with the unbreakable One-Time Pad. Once the spy had decoded his message, he would destroy it and carry out his mission. Messages were sent back to the spy control centre by means of a courier, dead letterboxes or a clandestine spy radio transmitter.   
An example of the use of this radio is the case of Guy Binet (1934-2000), a colonel of the Belgian Army, who was recruted in 1986 by the Soviet Military Intelligence Service, the GRU. On the first meeting in Vienna with his handler, GRU General Glazkov, he was given a Minox EC spy camera.  
He used the camera to photograph secret NATO documents and delivered the films to the Soviets in Vienna in January 1987. That same week he was trained in decrypting secret radio messages. He received a One-Time Pad cipher (hidden in black Snowman marker) and a frequency table.  
 ICF-2001D, Minox EC and one-time pad What is this? 
He was also given a large sum of cash and was instructed to buy a Sony ICF-2001D on his return to Belgium [1]. Every second and forth Tuesday of each month, Binet had to listen to the coded messages that were transmitted by the mysterious numbers stations on the SW radio bands. 
Sadly for Binet, the American Intelligence Agency CIA had photographed his first meeting with Glaskov in Vienna [1] and tipped-off their Belgian colleagues of the SDRA III, after which Binet was arrested. By that time however, Binet had been spying for the Soviets for more than two years. He became known as The Red Colonel [2] and was eventually sentenced to 20 years of forced labour and military degradation. After 5 years in prison he was released on parole and died in July 2000.  
➤ More about Binet's Minox EC camera  
Attencion!   Spying for the Cubans  
Another example of the use of the ICF-2001D in international espionage, is a series of cases against US citizens between 2001 and 2009. In each case, the subject(s) had been spying for Cuba, and the FBI found a Sony ICF-2010 (the US version of the ICF-2001D) in their homes.  
The first case is that of Ana Belén Montes (28 February 1957) who worked for the US Defence Intelligence Agency (DIA) as its most senior Cuban analyst [4]. She had been spying for Cuba since 1985 until her arrest in 2001, during which time she had passed numerous documents and sensitive military information to the Cubans.  
Prior to her arrest on 21 September 2001, the FBI had searched her appartment and found evidence of the use of One-Time Pade (OTP) messages on her laptop. Also present in the appartment was a functional Sony short-wave receiver that was used to receive OTP messages from the Cuban Numbers Station on 7887 kHz. 
Evidence for this was found on her Toshiba laptop. Although she had clearly been instructed by the Cuban Intelligence Service, the CuIS, to run a special program to wipe the data from her laptop after use, she had failed to do so [5][6]. As a result, the FBI was able to retrieve a large OTP message, consisting of 150 5-digit groups.  
Ana Belén Montes, FBI mugshot. 21 September 2001. What is this? 
According to author Keith Melton, who is a well-informed source on US intelligence matters, she used a Sony ICF-2010 [7], which is the US equivalent of the ICF-2001D. In a detailed paper of 2010, researcher Dirk Rijmenants explains how the FBI cracked the seemingly unbreakable OTP cipher, due to flaws in the Cuban procedures [6]. After pleading guilty to spying, Montes was sentenced in October 2002 to 25 years in prison without the chance of parole [A].  
Similar cases are those of Carlos and Elsa Alvarez (caught in 2006 after spying for 30 years), Marta Rita Velazquez, Gerardo Hernández (one of the Cuban Five) and Walter Kendall Myers and his wife Gwendolyn Steingraber Myers (arrested in 2009 after spying for nearly 30 years). In all cases, the ICF-2001D was used to receive the coded messages from Cuba's Attención Station. Interested in more stories? Check out the FBI 100 [8] or the website Cuba Confidential [9].  
➤ Dirk Rijmenents' paper about the Cuban cases  
=========================---------------------------==========================---------- 
Successor  
In 1983, the ICF-2001D was succeeded by the much smaller ICF-7600D, and in 1986 by the slightly improved ICF-7600DS, both of which have a general coverage from 153 kHz to 30 MHz (except for the German version which stops at 26.100 MHz). In the image on the right the ICF-7600DS is shown in front of the ICF-2001D.  
Needless to say that these two models also became very popular items in the international espionage tradecraft.  
➤ More information  
 Sony ICF-7600DS in front of its predecessor  ICF-2001D  
Documentation  
Sony Corporation, ICF-2001D Operating instructions  1984.
Sony Corporation, ICF-2001D Service Manual  AEP, UK, EU, AUS, US and CAN models. April 1990.  
References 
Kristof Clerix, Spionage, Doelwit Brussel  ISBN 978-90-223-2771-5. September 2013. pp. 47-48.
Apache.be, De KGB in België (5): De Rode Kolonel  Website. 21 August 2011. Retrieved August 2014.
Wikipedia, BBC World Service  Retrieved November 2014.
Wikipedia, Ana Montes  Retrieved August 2015.
John (AE5X), 'Numbers Stations' Spies on 40 Meters  1 July 2012. Retrieved August 2014.
Dirk Rijmenants, Cuban Agent Communications, Failure of a Perfect System 2010. Edited 17 June 2013. Retrieved August 2015 from his website.
H. Keith Melton, Ultimate Spy  p. 70. Retrieved August 2015.
Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), FBI 100 - The Case of the Cuban Spy Ana Montes (and more). Retrieved August 2015.
Cuba Confidential,  Website. Retrieved August 2015.
Further information 
ICF-7600DS, the successor
Other Sony short-wave receivers
Other spy radio sets
Index of spy radio sets
More about number stations 
Any links shown in red are currently unavailable. If you like the information on this website, why not make a donation?
© Crypto Museum. Created: Friday 07 November 2014. Last changed: Monday, 27 March 2017 - 09:29 CET. 


558-Fiji-- Bottom of the Hour Song Medley ID

Gary DeBock
 

File review from last month's Rockwork 4 DXpedition has uncovered a 558-Radio Fiji One programming feature that may be helpful for those hoping to track down the exotic station-- a three song medley ID at 30 minutes past the hour. This song medley ID (followed by an apparent native language ID by the usual RF1 announcer) was noticed on both August 9th and August 19th at 1330 UTC at the Rockwork cliff.

Credit should be given for Bill Whitacre's assistance in determining this. During his San Souci DXpedition on August 9th (the same date at the MP3 linked below) he recorded an ID from 558-7BU at 1315, followed by the classic rock song "Urgent" by Foreigner. Although 558-Fiji was smothering the frequency 100% at 1315 at Rockwork 4, I was able to record one minute of the same "Urgent" song from 7BU at 1317, which was 13 minutes prior to the song medley ID on the MP3 below. Both 558-7BU and the 558-Fiji medley ID were recorded using a "backup" 15" FSL antenna at the ocean cliff-- unfortunately without a very accurate start time written down at the beginning. The following 558-Fiji medley ID (and island choral music song, at near S9 level) were recorded on a Tecsun PL-380 Ultralight and 15" FSL antenna at 1330 on August 9th.

73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)


Correction-- Huge 531 kHz R&B Signal was from More FM, Not PI

Gary DeBock
 

Detailed file review from last month's Rockwork 4 DXpedition continues to come up with some big surprises.

Originally an S9-level R&B music signal on the wild frequency of 531 kHz at 1227 on 8-6 was attributed to the 5 kW Samoan language station PI in Auckland, New Zealand, based on the presence of Samoan language voices at the conclusion of the song (in a mix with Kiwi English ones), the strength of the signal (common for PI, but never before heard from  the 2 kW More FM), and the R&B format (played by both stations, although More FM's format is all modern R&B, while PI plays classic R&B, in addition to Pacific Island music). After file review at the beginning of the R&B song, however, a female-voiced "More FM" ID was discovered at the 3 second point of the MP3 linked below. Just after the 2 minute point the rare 2 kW (Alexandra, NZ) station hits an S9 level, all alone on the frequency (an unprecedented level, even at the "Kiwi Cliff").

https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/h5qfd1alzhrsavlhheac6z9df7p832b3

Tom R. was with me at the time, so he may wish to check his Perseus-SDR files :-)

73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (back in the DU-DX dead zone of Puyallup, WA, USA)


Puyallup, WA Ultralight TP's for 9-6

Gary DeBock
 

Thanks to Craig and Dennis for their earlier reports.

Once again it was a very humbling experience to shift from chasing exotic DU's at enhanced ocean coast locations to chasing big gun Asians at a mediocre inland location. Several Asian big guns did manage decent audio during a short session from 1305-1330 (which was short because of the lack of extended sunrise enhancement at this dreary location). The best audio of the session (temporary good peaks) was from 747-JOIB, 972-HLCA and 1566-HLAZ, although there were also some poor to fair signals from 657-Pyongyang around 1315, 693-JOAB around 1322, 1134-JOQR around 1314 and 1503-JOUK at 1309. The main challenge was reducing expectations down to the point where chasing Asian big guns at this dreary inland location seemed like a productive activity :-)

747 JOIB Sapporo, Japan Japanese female speech at a temporary good level at 1318; strongest of the NHK stations this morning
https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/51kozaxdu7f2oahd4t3s51la80t0pyj0

972 HLCA Dangjin, S. Korea Korean pop music at a brief good level above "Freedom 970" at 1313
https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/8fha23d5ugkepi8fkzvgwnhrxa4xik1m

1566 HLAZ Jeju, S.Korea Japanese female speech at a good level at 1310; well above KZIZ splatter
https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/0fpmbzfytwazy0ngkfv0xbqo6f8m5szu

73 aand Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
7.5 inch loopstick CC Skywave +
15 inch FSL antenna


High count Litz better? - FARMERIK

Rik
 

My computer is finally letting me back into my Yahoo groups.

I noticed much higher count Litz is available now. I had used 660/46. I noticed Steve R's recommendation to stick with MKMAK as a Litz  supplier. Thanks.

#46 AWG is ideal in the middle of MW. For interchangeable coil sleeves, would trying  #44 and #48 for the ends of MW likely be worth while?

Thanks- FARMERIK






Re: August 2017 Rockwork 4 DXpedition Article

Gary DeBock
 

<<<    Gary this trip kills it

Congrats!
John   >>>

Thanks very much, John. I wish that you could have been with us on the cliff!

73 and Good DX,
Gary
  


-----Original Message-----
From: John Leonardelli ve3ips@... [ultralightdx]
To: ultralightdx
Sent: Sat, Sep 2, 2017 7:06 pm
Subject: [ultralightdx] Re: August 2017 Rockwork 4 DXpedition Article

 
Gary this trip kills it

Congrats!
John
--
Sent with a Palm Pilot. Ve3ips.wordpress.com
Radio: it's not just a hobby, it's a way of life
All content is personal and confidential


Re: August 2017 Rockwork 4 DXpedition Article

John
 

Gary this trip kills it

Congrats!
John
--
Sent with a Palm Pilot. Ve3ips.wordpress.com
Radio: it's not just a hobby, it's a way of life
All content is personal and confidential


August 2017 Rockwork 4 DXpedition Article

Gary DeBock
 

For those interested, the full article for the August 2017 Rockwork 4 Ocean Cliff DXpedition (8 pages, with 75 South Pacific MW-DX MP3 links) has been uploaded to http://www.mediafire.com/file/82wqp8k500354nd/August_2017_Rockwork_4_Ocean_Cliff_DXpedition.doc

This was far and away the most successful Rockwork 4 trip ever, with multiple West Australia MW loggings, 5 DU stations received on 531 kHz alone, 558-Fiji completely rejuvenated and hitting S9 levels, etc. It was a permanent cure for any hobby boredom!

73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)


August 2017 Rockwork 4 DXpedition Loggings & MP3's (Conclusion)

Gary DeBock
 

Overall this August 2017 DXpedition has been far and away the most productive Rockwork 4 trip ever, with two Western Australians (531-6DL and 558-6WA) received at decent levels, five stations received on 531 kHz alone (PI, More FM, 2PM, 4KZ and 6DL), 558-Fiji completely restored and reaching S9 levels, an S9 recording of 585-2WEB (confirmed by David Sharp), the best-ever signals from the Kiwis on 531 (More FM), 603, 657, 765, 936 and 1503, monster signals from 585-7RN and 639-5CK, multiple receptions of 1017-Tonga, etc. Even when we needed to dodge the "sleeping squatters" it was a lot of fun to share the cliff with my DXpedition partners Tom and Chuck, especially during the phenomenal August 4th session (when Tom and I both made out like bandits). I'm sure that both of us will remember that wild and wacky session for years to come!
     All of these and the other South Pacific loggings below were received with Ultralight radios and "airport unfriendly" FSL antennas (as in the photo posted at https://app.box.com/s/dqaag49l6uboqcfboq4b7fn5fy9dsr1f  ). Signals which reached an S9 level are listed with a double asterisk (**). Special thanks is in order for Theo Donnelly, Andrew Brade, James Niven, Todd Emslie, Bill Whitacre, David Sharp, Walt Salmaniw and any others who assisted in the identification of the following stations (and especially to my DXpedition partner Tom Rothlisberger, who researched parallel stations for the two Western Australia loggings). You guys rock! 

531  2PM  Kempsey, Australia,  5 kW   Good signal at 1242 on 8-8 with call-in talk format and mentions of SRN member station 2LM at :11 and 1:11 into the recording (thanks to Andrew Brade for listening)

531  4KZ   Innisfail, Australia, 10 kW   On top of the frequency at 1258 on 8-4 with "4KZ Regional News" ID at :08 into the recording. Usually was under PI during the week with its oldies and TOH news format (thanks to James Niven for listening)   https://app.box.com/s/jtq9cyi0te4bbri3tv7puzvt289fpsmx
  
531  6DL   Dalwallinu, Australia,  10 kW   ABC conversation format received once during exceptional conditions at 1253 on 8-4; content was matched by DXpedition partner Tom Rothlisberger (using Perseus-SDR recordings) to ABC LR network content on other frequencies. Very long range DX (9,050 miles/ 14,564 km)    https://app.box.com/s/688ujh8qu23t7jl5dfuvwzsc6iudsw0e
  
531  More FM   Alexandra, NZ,  2 kW   This was a breakout DXpedition for the low-powered urban rock station, which sometimes dominated over the Kiwi co-channel PI and the other four DU's received on this frequency. This local ad string was received at 1255 on 8-1, with a mention of "shoesunlimited.com.nz" at the 26 second point (thanks to Theo for deciphering)
Another good-strength Kiwi ad string at 1342 on 8-1 with mention of the FM affiliate frequency "99.4" at 58 seconds into the recording (thanks to Theo for deciphering)  https://app.box.com/s/8ieycxra98wzvt3b0prv4x24ba4xitrr
The usual super-short "More FM" ID (male voiced) is at the 28 second point of this recording featuring the station's typical modern rock format at 1313 on 8-6  https://app.box.com/s/r4mfi1dtjyonr47vtt88pdibwuedwydh
  
**531  PI   Auckland, NZ,  5 kW   The usual dominant station on the frequency, the Samoan (and other Pacific Island) language broadcaster was rocking at an S9 level with island music at 1248 on 8-8  https://app.box.com/s/b391cdrlt9s4c7y4gp3kt9q1dxbgpj4j
Another island music recording at a powerful level at 1303 on 8-19  https://app.box.com/s/ev4wupztu874jmrip7ffbwk1ypoinrtt

558  6WA   Wagin, Australia,  50 kW   Received during exceptional conditions at 1319 on 8-4 (the same morning as 531-6DL was received), this ABC-format speech was once again matched by DXpedition partner Tom Rothlisberger to ABC LR-network content on other frequencies. Received for the first time here in August of 2015, this reception matched the Ultralight radio DX distance record for reception in North America (at 9,138 miles, or 14,705 km) 
 
558  7BU   Burnie, Australia,  2 kW   This low-power classic rock station in Tasmania was giving the rejuvenated Fiji some competition at times on the morning of 8-9, but in general was losing out. This classic rock recording with Foreigner's "Urgent" was made at 1317 on 8-9; by fortunate coincidence Bill Whitacre had recorded the same song preceded by a "7BU" ID during his San Souci DXpedition down the coast on the same morning  https://app.box.com/s/78u9z9aogtsuf04c1xfawcnusxdqthpx
Another classic rock song ("So Lonely" by the Police) at 1303 on 8-9. At the end of the recording there may be a muffled partial ID according to Todd Emslie, but it's too tough for me to decipher (thanks to Todd Emslie)   https://app.box.com/s/fyync8y821ua6qx4js7rhrcmn3hcqipt
 
**558  Radio Fiji One   Suva, Fiji,  10 kW   One of the big surprises of the DXpedition, this formerly weak station is now a South Pacific powerhouse after transmitter and antenna improvements (which were entirely funded by the Japanese government). On most mornings it would reach a very strong level, as in this S9 recording of typical island music at 1318 on 8-8  https://app.box.com/s/6b2fxp2ai8p44t38fih4dn1meffzocxi
From the first day of the DXpedition (8-1), it was sounding pretty potent with its island choral music, as in this recording at 1307 on 8-1
On the second day (1302 on 8-2) this strong island choral music pretty much confirmed the station's rejuvenated status
Exceptional conditions on 8-4 further boosted up Fiji's island music recordings at 1307 and 1323
More exceptional conditions on 8-8 provided some of the strongest island choral music receptions of the DXpedition at 1313, 1323 and 1335
By the final day (8-9) Fiji had become somewhat of a pest. Here it is at 1315 smothering the frequency, until the 2 kW Tasmanian 7BU breaks through at 1317 with Foreigner's "Urgent" (for about a minute only)  https://app.box.com/s/eetboe8o71kohmuxxrqhg88uwecklnm4

**567  RNZ   Wellington, NZ,  50 kW   The ex-big gun has sounded relatively modest after the demolition of its old tower, but it could occasionally sound fairly strong, such as during this typical male-female conversation at 1239 on 8-6  https://app.box.com/s/uk0aochlroo67tm1x0lm435fkva6dwz8

**576  2RN   Sydney, Australia,  50 kW   This RN network big gun really pounded in during favorable Australian propagation (such as at 1315 on 8-9, during this music recording) but could lose out to the 2.5 kW Kiwi station Star during NZ-favored conditions https://app.box.com/s/3j0607fg6mzgidco3i3vz99ofuzl2cvi

576  Star   Hamilton, NZ,  2.5 kW   Buried by the Australian big gun 2RN until the 7th day of the DXpedition, the "dwarf Star" finally showed up at 1327 on 8-7 with Christian music // 657  https://app.box.com/s/e9ddentnlmrxkxlayqgql1di62w2ezhc
 
**585  2WEB   Bourke, Australia,  10 kW   One of the most amazing signals of the entire DXpedition, this rock music pounded in at an S9 level at 1335 on 8-8, soon after propagation had collapsed to most stations. Program Director David Sharp matched the song with his log, and in his e-QSL letter he noted that the recorded signal "is the strongest I have heard, to date, from the United States."  https://app.box.com/s/94b723294xp9i2chgdyznfnwixah3n4o
  
585  7RN   Hobart, Australia,  10 kW   In a snarl with co-channel 2WEB much of the time, it tended to have better performance overall than its 576 parallel. This typical ABC RN-network speech was received at 1243 on 8-3  https://app.box.com/s/aptynncjp3ll32d027s691rv82bau3m2

**594  3WV   Horsham, Australia,  50 kW   Usually dominant over the lower-powered Star co-channels, this LR network big gun could really pound in when conditions favored it, such as at 1245 on 8-2 with typical ABC talk program  https://app.box.com/s/m7d0fgnzxhzsg1hhxawzm1mtzct5zudw

594  Star   Timaru/ Wanganui, NZ   5 kW/ 2kW   Although the low powered Kiwi network was occasionally competitive with the Oz big gun 3WV, it rarely dominated the frequency. One of those unusual times was at 1302 on 8-6, when its "Star News" had the edge over Australia

603  2RN   Nowra, Australia,  10 kW   Never before decently received at the "Kiwi Cliff," exceptional Australian-slanted propagation at 1255 on 8-4 pushed this RN network female speech (// 576) far above the usual Kiwi big gun Radio Waatea. It was MIA on other days
   
**603  Radio Waatea   Auckland, NZ,  5 kW   Significantly stronger than in recent years (throughout the week), this Maori network powerhouse managed its best signal ever at 1303 on 8-8 with island music and Maori chants  https://app.box.com/s/wruaavle3k3s4x9my9armbxl4od0369s
Samoan island music at very strong level at 1256 on 8-1, and at 1312 on 8-6
Mixing with 2RN during unusual Australian-slanted propagation at 1254 on 8-4  https://app.box.com/s/i3mgrjxw0dwadrtc2c69x7f2f7h6qzua

612  4QR   Brisbane, Australia,  50 kW   Rare appearance here // 594 during unusual Australia-slanted conditions at 1312 on 8-4
 
639  2HC   Coff's Harbour, Australia,  5 kW   SRN format call-in talk program at good level (not // 891) at 1310 on 8-3, previously heard running commercial ads  https://app.box.com/s/8h3fcdmvzm2gslknf18r1f5z342ylxm9
 
**639  5CK   Port Pirie, Australia,  10 kW   A big surprise with huge ABC network signals // 891 at 1307 on 8-7, this South Australian station was occasionally heard mixing with Oz co-channel 2HC on the other days https://app.box.com/s/o0jujrozx7w0wf7t4dnqq5dn7g20j0tr

**657  Star   Wellington/ Tauranga, NZ,  50/ 10 kW   Another Kiwi blowtorch with its best-ever signals during this trip, the Christian hymn music broadcaster was pegging the S/N readout with this music and Irish-accented sermon at 1215 on 8-1  https://app.box.com/s/5hx8u4b0v4ivmd9wh40gkdk17utkb0fg
More powerful signals with "Star News" at 1304 on 8-1, and with Christian music at 1250 on 8-2 and at 1310 on 8-5

666  2CN   Canberra, Australia,  5 kW   Unusual appearance at the "Kiwi Cliff" during Australian-slanted propagation at 1320 on 8-6 // 594

675  RNZ   Christchurch, NZ,  10 kW   The strongest RNZ frequency overall during the trip, it has replaced 567 after the demise of the latter's old tower. This recording was at 1326 on 8-4

**702  2BL   Sydney, Australia,  50 kW   The Oz LR network big gun usually had the edge over the Kiwi big gun Magic, such as during this ABC talk program at 1310 on 8-8  https://app.box.com/s/ur43ihfmgka0d1p6bupbhch9ixc1nvrv

**702  Magic   Auckland, NZ,  10 kW   In a snarl with 2BL on most mornings, the Kiwi oldies broadcaster could occasionally take over the frequency completely when conditions strongly favored New Zealand (such as at 1309 on 8-19, on the way to Lincoln City)
 
**702  Magic-2BL Mix   When propagation favored both Oz and NZ (such as at 1320 on 8-4) the snarl between the Auckland oldies broadcaster and 2BL could turn catastrophic. Magic's "Peace Train" song was pretty ironic https://app.box.com/s/l1ad8kdp1d8ciupd7qivvc54nsknpbxl

738  2NR   Grafton, Australia,   50 kW   Barely getting through oppressive KCBS splatter at 1328 on 8-9, but strong enough to confirm 702 parallel; a very noisy frequency all week   https://app.box.com/s/ynmlgn3aj8vrb36yz4nb9dhpgs475o74

756  RNZ   Auckland, NZ,   10 kW   Sounding very clear (and // 675) at 1338 on 8-9 with a major assist from the solid rock cliff, which greatly limited splatter from 50 kW pest KXTG (75 miles and 6 kHz away)  https://app.box.com/s/anomc4qcr64ezmoe8aykin4podyah1w7
 
**765  Radio Kahungunu   Napier-Hastings, NZ,   2.5 kW   Although generally an underperformer throughout the week, freakishly good Kiwi propagation at 1258 on 8-4 propelled this Maori net 2.5 kW wonder to an overwhelming level with R&B music and a Maori net ID at the 1300 TOH (at 1:36 into the MP3). This meltdown-level recording was the strongest ever heard during 15 DXpeditions over 6 years  https://app.box.com/s/qvu2atw8b22qvi8xwkgp95riigd5mlca
Another potent signal at 1258 on 8-5 features lots of Maori-accented Kiwi English
    
**774  3LO   Melbourne, Australia,   50 kW   This huge ABC signal with female speech at 1332 on 8-6 was recorded using a 3.5 inch (89mm) "Frequent Flyer" FSL antenna, which proves once again that when propagation is good you can have a lot of fun with a modest aerial.  

774  Radio Sport   New Plymouth, NZ,   5 kW   In a loud mix underneath 3LO with Yankee-accented Fox Sports News relay at 1305 on 8-7; it generally was losing out to the Australian big gun all week  https://app.box.com/s/ab5kderbjwe5635e9lufy3d2hei5vvxi

**792  4RN   Brisbane, Australia,   25 kW   Like its 576 parallel this RN network powerhouse could really blast in when conditions favored it, such as at 1305 on 8-7

792  Radio Sport   Hamilton, NZ,   5 kW   Losing out to 4RN all week, the best that the Fox Sports News relay could do was show up underneath the Oz big gun, such as at 1306 on 8-7  https://app.box.com/s/etciijdo5bq3xhkpwxyz9hibth5n6l4s

828  3GI   Sale, Australia,  10 kW   Not much of a horse race on this frequency as Radio Trackside failed to show up. The Oz big gun was usually around but fighting splatter, such as at 1325 on 8-8   https://app.box.com/s/axqyrphgqnmzpvachg1wlk6hp3qxoipk

837  RNZ   Whangarei/ Kaitaia, NZ,   2.5/ 2 kW   One of the voices in this mix was matched to 756, which was the last RNZ parallel available as propagation was collapsing at 1345 on 8-9. The low power relays were apparently in a mix with Australia, but everything quickly faded before this could be confirmed   https://app.box.com/s/612iqralz1ylq8rp5gvims19y00mjuhu

846  2RN   Canberra, Australia,   10 kW   Not one of the stronger Oz stations but occasionally at decent strength, fighting the IBOC noise from KHHO as at 1242 on 8-9, // 576  https://app.box.com/s/edp0neatndiqyzgs5e0ng1my6wtqg6e0

855  4QB/ 4QO   Pialba/ Eidsvold, Australia,   10/ 10 kW   Bad splatter at most times, such as at 1319 on 8-5 but still enough signal to confirm the 774 parallel

891  5AN   Adelaide, Australia,   50 kW   (presumed)   An 890 Spanish pest usually covered this, but a few seconds of audio would break through occasionally, such as at 1314 on 8-8  https://app.box.com/s/0pm1yk4tro2r8dyrz8wxh4ggs65zoig9

927  Newstalk ZB   Palmerston North, NZ,   2 kW   Low-powered Kiwi relay just strong enough to check parallel with 1035 at 1308 on 8-9

936  Chinese Voice   Auckland, NZ,  1 kW   The very low powered Kiwi ethnic station managed its best signal ever with Chinese male speech at 1304 on 8-9. Oddly enough it was dominant on the frequency over the Australian stations for most of the week
Chinese female speech at almost the same good level at 1320 on 8-7  https://app.box.com/s/k59fahu3g93b1cha02gyyas4co0endwq

936  UnID-Oz   Marginal DU English speech at 1330 on 8-8 but too noisy to check for LR network parallel

963  Star   Christchurch, NZ,   10 kW   Fairly good level Christian music // 657 at 1319 on 8-9; not a very good performer for most of the week

963   UnID-Oz   At least two Australian signals not // 657 in this mix at 1328 on 8-8, but way too wild to sort them out

1008  Newstalk ZB   Tauranga, NZ, 10 kW   Badly splattered by a domestic pest for most of the week, but enough of a talk format signal to confirm the 1035 parallel at 1324 on 8-7  https://app.box.com/s/pwb45sqzphb3zmpz49p63utt5l8t5ba9

1017  A3Z   Nuku'alofa, Tonga,  10 kW   Another major target of the DXpedition, this island station cooperated with decent signals most of the time, but its sign off times were all over the map. This strong reception of the usual male announcer was at 1127 on 8-3, which is past the "usual" sign off time of 1103  https://app.box.com/s/zjc64srpsqz6xplxlr2v8o2i667qrvrc
Island music at a fairly good level at 1036 on 8-1, during the "normal" broadcasting time
Island choral music (apparent National Anthem) during "normal" sign off routine at 1102 on 8-2
The male announcer apparently then decides it's too early to sign off at that time, and sounds fairly potent at 1310 on the same date. There is no special sports event or other reason that I can determine for him to keep broadcasting after the "sign off"

1017  Newstalk ZB   Christchurch, NZ,  2.5 kW   Marginal talk format signal barely strong enough to confirm 1035 parallel at 1319 on 8-8

1026  Newstalk ZB   Kaitaia, NZ,  2 kW   Despite low power, surprisingly good level female speech during call-in talk program at 1247 on 8-6, // 1035   https://app.box.com/s/u562952qyj0n4izhipoo4972062m0qlx

1026  UnID-Oz   Weak music station under Newstalk ZB at 1250 on 8-5, but too wispy to check identity

**1035  Newstalk ZB   Wellington, NZ,   20 kW   Broadcasting call-in talk and occasional music, this would have been one of the best Kiwi signals except for a new west coast IBOC pest (which splattered over both it and its 1044 parallel). Despite the noise this station's awesome strength usually was sufficient to break through, such as at 1321 on 8-8  https://app.box.com/s/tmwvuo6ljm43dgceuifepj9egcxjb356

**1386  Radio Tarana   Auckland, NZ,  10 kW   Pretty strong on most days with its Hindu ethnic programming, this potent signal with female speech was received at 1253 on 8-1. According to Walt this is English (although I can't really understand it) 

1503  Radio Sport   Wellington/ Christchurch, NZ   5/ 2.5 kW   This was the best signal ever from the upper band sports relay at 1315 on 8-1 (and also the easiest Kiwi signal to understand, with a relay of Yankee-accented Fox Sports News) https://app.box.com/s/x2qfq4vcsdq2f8jvsusob1cbfjdj51x8

73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (DXing at the Rockwork 4 ocean cliff near Manzanita, OR, USA from 8-1 to 8-9)


August 2017 Rockwork 4 DXpedition Loggings & MP3's (Part 1)

Gary DeBock
 

Overall this August 2017 DXpedition has been far and away the most productive Rockwork 4 trip ever, with two Western Australians (531-6DL and 558-6WA) received at decent levels, five stations received on 531 kHz alone (PI, More FM, 2PM, 4KZ and 6DL), 558-Fiji completely restored and reaching S9 levels, an S9 recording of 585-2WEB (confirmed by David Sharp), the best-ever signals from the Kiwis on 531 (More FM), 603, 657, 765, 936 and 1503, monster signals from 585-7RN and 639-5CK, multiple receptions of 1017-Tonga, etc. Even when we needed to dodge the "sleeping squatters" it was a lot of fun to share the cliff with my DXpedition partners Tom and Chuck, especially during the phenomenal August 4th session (when Tom and I both made out like bandits). I'm sure that both of us will remember that wild and wacky session for years to come!
     All of these and the other South Pacific loggings below were received with Ultralight radios and "airport unfriendly" FSL antennas (as in the photo posted at https://app.box.com/s/dqaag49l6uboqcfboq4b7fn5fy9dsr1f  ). Signals which reached an S9 level are listed with a double asterisk (**). Special thanks is in order for Theo Donnelly, Andrew Brade, James Niven, Todd Emslie, Bill Whitacre, David Sharp and any others who assisted in the identification of the following stations (and especially to my DXpedition partner Tom Rothlisberger, who researched parallel stations for the two Western Australia loggings). You guys rock! 

531  2PM  Kempsey, Australia,  5 kW   Good signal at 1242 on 8-8 with call-in talk format and mentions of SRN member station 2LM at :11 and 1:11 into the recording (thanks to Andrew Brade for listening)

531  4KZ   Innisfail, Australia, 10 kW   On top of the frequency at 1258 on 8-4 with "4KZ Regional News" ID at :08 into the recording. Usually was under PI during the week with its oldies and TOH news format (thanks to James Niven for listening)   https://app.box.com/s/jtq9cyi0te4bbri3tv7puzvt289fpsmx
  
531  6DL   Dalwallinu, Australia,  10 kW   ABC conversation format received once during exceptional conditions at 1253 on 8-4; content was matched by DXpedition partner Tom Rothlisberger (using Perseus-SDR recordings) to ABC LR network content on other frequencies. Very long range DX (9,050 miles/ 14,564 km)    https://app.box.com/s/688ujh8qu23t7jl5dfuvwzsc6iudsw0e
  
531  More FM   Alexandra, NZ,  2 kW   This was a breakout DXpedition for the low-powered urban rock station, which sometimes dominated over the Kiwi co-channel PI and the other four DU's received on this frequency. This local ad string was received at 1255 on 8-1, with a mention of "shoesunlimited.com.nz" at the 26 second point (thanks to Theo for deciphering)
Another good-strength Kiwi ad string at 1342 on 8-1 with mention of the FM affiliate frequency "99.4" at 58 seconds into the recording (thanks to Theo for deciphering)  https://app.box.com/s/8ieycxra98wzvt3b0prv4x24ba4xitrr
The usual super-short "More FM" ID (male voiced) is at the 28 second point of this recording featuring the station's typical modern rock format at 1313 on 8-6  https://app.box.com/s/r4mfi1dtjyonr47vtt88pdibwuedwydh
  
**531  PI   Auckland, NZ,  5 kW   The usual dominant station on the frequency, the Samoan (and other Pacific Island) language broadcaster was rocking at an S9 level with island music at 1248 on 8-8  https://app.box.com/s/b391cdrlt9s4c7y4gp3kt9q1dxbgpj4j
Another island music recording at a powerful level at 1303 on 8-19  https://app.box.com/s/ev4wupztu874jmrip7ffbwk1ypoinrtt

558  6WA   Wagin, Australia,  50 kW   Received during exceptional conditions at 1319 on 8-4 (the same morning as 531-6DL was received), this ABC-format speech was once again matched by DXpedition partner Tom Rothlisberger to ABC LR-network content on other frequencies. Received for the first time here in August of 2015, this reception matched the Ultralight radio DX distance record for reception in North America (at 9,138 miles, or 14,705 km) 
 
558  7BU   Burnie, Australia,  2 kW   This low-power classic rock station in Tasmania was giving the rejuvenated Fiji some competition at times on the morning of 8-9, but in general was losing out. This classic rock recording with Foreigner's "Urgent" was made at 1317 on 8-9; by fortunate coincidence Bill Whitacre had recorded the same song preceded by a "7BU" ID during his San Souci DXpedition down the coast on the same morning  https://app.box.com/s/78u9z9aogtsuf04c1xfawcnusxdqthpx
Another classic rock song ("So Lonely" by the Police) at 1303 on 8-9. At the end of the recording there may be a muffled partial ID according to Todd Emslie, but it's too tough for me to decipher (thanks to Todd Emslie)   https://app.box.com/s/fyync8y821ua6qx4js7rhrcmn3hcqipt
 
**558  Radio Fiji One   Suva, Fiji,  10 kW   One of the big surprises of the DXpedition, this formerly weak station is now a South Pacific powerhouse after transmitter and antenna improvements (which were entirely funded by the Japanese government). On most mornings it would reach a very strong level, as in this S9 recording of typical island music at 1318 on 8-8  https://app.box.com/s/6b2fxp2ai8p44t38fih4dn1meffzocxi
From the first day of the DXpedition (8-1), it was sounding pretty potent with its island choral music, as in this recording at 1307 on 8-1
On the second day (1302 on 8-2) this strong island choral music pretty much confirmed the station's rejuvenated status
Exceptional conditions on 8-4 further boosted up Fiji's island music recordings at 1307 and 1323
More exceptional conditions on 8-8 provided some of the strongest island choral music receptions of the DXpedition at 1313 and 1323
By the final day (8-9) Fiji had become somewhat of a pest. Here it is at 1315 smothering the frequency, until the 2 kW Tasmanian 7BU breaks through at 1317 with Foreigner's "Urgent" (for about a minute only)  https://app.box.com/s/eetboe8o71kohmuxxrqhg88uwecklnm4

**567  RNZ   Wellington, NZ,  50 kW   The ex-big gun has sounded relatively modest after the demolition of its old tower, but it could occasionally sound fairly strong, such as during this typical male-female conversation at 1239 on 8-6  https://app.box.com/s/uk0aochlroo67tm1x0lm435fkva6dwz8

**576  2RN   Sydney, Australia,  50 kW   This RN network big gun really pounded in during favorable Australian propagation (such as at 1315 on 8-9, during this music recording) but could lose out to the 2.5 kW Kiwi station Star during NZ-favored conditions https://app.box.com/s/3j0607fg6mzgidco3i3vz99ofuzl2cvi

576  Star   Hamilton, NZ,  2.5 kW   Buried by the Australian big gun 2RN until the 7th day of the DXpedition, the "dwarf Star" finally showed up at 1327 on 8-7 with Christian music // 657  https://app.box.com/s/e9ddentnlmrxkxlayqgql1di62w2ezhc
 
**585  2WEB   Bourke, Australia,  10 kW   One of the most amazing signals of the entire DXpedition, this rock music pounded in at an S9 level at 1335 on 8-8, soon after propagation had collapsed to most stations. Program Director David Sharp matched the song with his log, and in his e-QSL letter he noted that the recorded signal "is the strongest I have heard, to date, from the United States."  https://app.box.com/s/94b723294xp9i2chgdyznfnwixah3n4o
  
585  7RN   Hobart, Australia,  10 kW   In a snarl with co-channel 2WEB much of the time, it tended to have better performance overall than its 576 parallel. This typical ABC RN-network speech was received at 1243 on 8-3  https://app.box.com/s/aptynncjp3ll32d027s691rv82bau3m2

**594  3WV   Horsham, Australia,  50 kW   Usually dominant over the lower-powered Star co-channels, this LR network big gun could really pound in when conditions favored it, such as at 1245 on 8-2 with typical ABC talk program  https://app.box.com/s/m7d0fgnzxhzsg1hhxawzm1mtzct5zudw

594  Star   Timaru/ Wanganui, NZ   5 kW/ 2kW   Although the low powered Kiwi network was occasionally competitive with the Oz big gun 3WV, it rarely dominated the frequency. One of those unusual times was at 1302 on 8-6, when its "Star News" had the edge over Australia

603  2RN   Nowra, Australia,  10 kW   Never before decently received at the "Kiwi Cliff," exceptional Australian-slanted propagation at 1255 on 8-4 pushed this RN network female speech (// 576) far above the usual Kiwi big gun Radio Waatea. It was MIA on other days
   
**603  Radio Waatea   Auckland, NZ,  5 kW   Significantly stronger than in recent years (throughout the week), this Maori network powerhouse managed its best signal ever at 1303 on 8-8 with island music and Maori chants  https://app.box.com/s/wruaavle3k3s4x9my9armbxl4od0369s
Samoan island music at very strong level at 1256 on 8-1, and at 1312 on 8-6
Mixing with 2RN during unusual Australian-slanted propagation at 1254 on 8-4  https://app.box.com/s/i3mgrjxw0dwadrtc2c69x7f2f7h6qzua

612  4QR   Brisbane, Australia,  50 kW   Rare appearance here // 594 during unusual Australia-slanted conditions at 1312 on 8-4
 
639  2HC   Coff's Harbour, Australia,  5 kW   SRN format call-in talk program at good level (not // 891) at 1310 on 8-3, previously heard running commercial ads  https://app.box.com/s/8h3fcdmvzm2gslknf18r1f5z342ylxm9
 
**639  5CK   Port Pirie, Australia,  10 kW   A big surprise with huge ABC network signals // 891 at 1307 on 8-7, this South Australian station was occasionally heard mixing with Oz co-channel 2HC on the other days https://app.box.com/s/o0jujrozx7w0wf7t4dnqq5dn7g20j0tr

**657  Star   Wellington/ Tauranga, NZ,  50/ 10 kW   Another Kiwi blowtorch with its best-ever signals during this trip, the Christian hymn music broadcaster was pegging the S/N readout with this music and Irish-accented sermon at 1215 on 8-1  https://app.box.com/s/psfs64lczen4cfk137pijj0hpqc43dad
More powerful signals with "Star News" at 1304 on 8-1, and with Christian music at 1250 on 8-2 and at 1310 on 8-5

666  2CN   Canberra, Australia,  5 kW   Unusual appearance at the "Kiwi Cliff" during Australian-slanted propagation at 1320 on 8-6 // 594

675  RNZ   Christchurch, NZ,  10 kW   The strongest RNZ frequency overall during the trip, it has replaced 567 after the demise of the latter's old tower. This recording was at 1326 on 8-4

**702  2BL   Sydney, Australia,  50 kW   The Oz LR network big gun usually had the edge over the Kiwi big gun Magic, such as during this ABC talk program at 1310 on 8-8  https://app.box.com/s/ur43ihfmgka0d1p6bupbhch9ixc1nvrv

**702  Magic   Auckland, NZ,  10 kW   In a snarl with 2BL on most mornings, the Kiwi oldies broadcaster could occasionally take over the frequency completely when conditions strongly favored New Zealand (such as at 1309 on 8-19, on the way to Lincoln City)
 
**702  Magic-2BL Mix   When propagation favored both Oz and NZ (such as at 1320 on 8-4) the snarl between the Auckland oldies broadcaster and 2BL could turn catastrophic. Magic's "Peace Train" song was pretty ironic https://app.box.com/s/l1ad8kdp1d8ciupd7qivvc54nsknpbxl

(TO BE CONTINUED)


Re: 4KZ

Gary DeBock
 

<<<   You may be aware that 4KZ will be also on SW 5055 kHz sometime this year.   >>>

Yes, Tony, we heard that news a few months back. The 5055 kHz frequency might even make it to our west coast during the sunrise DXing period, for a quick parallel check when needed. When it starts up, it will be one of the very rare new SWBC stations for the past few years (when even Radio Australia is going dark).

Gary
   


-----Original Message-----
From: tonyzl@... [ultralightdx]
To: ultralightdx
Sent: Sun, Aug 27, 2017 8:50 pm
Subject: [ultralightdx] 4KZ

 
You may be aware that 4KZ will be also on SW 5055 kHz sometime this year.

Tony K


ABC Website Podcast Audio Vs. 9,126 mile DX Audio (558-6WA)

Gary DeBock
 

With the ABC website deleting Podcast audio for LR Network episodes earlier and earlier, I thought it would be a good idea to record the ABC Podcast audio matching a surprisingly strong reception of 558-6WA made on a modest 8" FSL antenna at the new "Oz Hill" DXing hotspot in Lincoln City, Oregon (9,126 miles, or 14,687 km). The "full episode" Podcast audio for two earlier receptions made by Tom R. and I during the Rockwork 4 DXpedition on August 4th (531-6DL and 558-6WA) has already been deleted from the ABC website.

Fortunately, this reception was made less than a week ago, so I was still able to record the Podcast audio matching the 558-6WA reception content. Any DXer who receives a long-range ABC station should record the Podcast content matching their reception content ASAP, before the website deletes it.

558-6WA   Wagin, West Australia (received on a CC Skywave Ultralight and 8" FSL antenna in Lincoln City, OR at 1325z August 22, 2017-- 9,126 miles)
Matching content from the ABC website Podcast (concerning Jerry Lee Lewis), 1325z August 22, 2017

Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)


4KZ

tonyzl@...
 

You may be aware that 4KZ will be also on SW 5055 kHz sometime this year.


Tony K


Re: 531 kHz UnID DU English Recordings

Gary DeBock
 

Thanks very much, Tony!

The 1259 clip was probably 4KZ, but no definite evidence showed up in the recording. After posting the 1258 clip James Niven dug out a "4KZ regional news" ID for me at the 8 second point. So that really made my day-- definite evidence of 5 different stations received on 531 during the DXpedition (PI, More FM, 2PM, 4KZ and 6DL). Cheers!

Gary




-----Original Message-----
From: Tony King tonyzl@... [ultralightdx]
To: ultralightdx <ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Sat, Aug 26, 2017 11:22 pm
Subject: [ultralightdx] Re: 531 kHz UnID DU English Recordings

 
1259 clip sounds more like a US accent/Australian
1307 Mentions One Card and Fuelcard so if its not in Aus as card brands it will be the NZer.

73,
Tony K


Re: 531 kHz UnID DU English Recordings

Tony King <tonyzl@...>
 

1259 clip sounds more like a US accent/Australian
1307 Mentions One Card and Fuelcard so if its not in Aus as card brands it will be the NZer.

73,
Tony K


531 kHz UnID DU English Recordings

Gary DeBock
 

For anyone skillful in deciphering DU English (Theo?) or who may be skillful in listening, several strong DU English mystery recordings were made on 531 kHz during the recent Rockwork 4 DXpedition near Manzanita, Oregon. Signal strength wasn't the problem--  my inability to "translate" the unusual English tripped me up with these. There are three possibilities with each recording-- the 10 kW station 4KZ in Innisfail, Queensland, Australia, the 5 kW station 2PM in Kempsey, NSW, Australia, and the 2 kW station More FM in Alexandra (South Island), New Zealand. 531 kHz was a real circus on the ocean cliff almost every morning-- this is just a sample of the free-for-all. Any deciphering which might indicate station identity would be greatly appreciated!

1259 UT August 19, 2017 (at Rockwork 4 en route to Lincoln City)

1258 UT August 4, 2017

1307 August 6, 2017

73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)


558-6WA on the Warpath (Until Silenced by Fiji)

Gary DeBock
 

For those interested, this was the overwhelming signal from the extreme long-range Australian 558-6WA (9,126 miles/ 14,687 km) from 1325-1328 on August 22nd at the new "Oz Hill" DU-DXing hotspot in Lincoln City, OR. The "Nightlife" ABC programming content (matched to the ABC website) is regarding Jerry Lee Lewis. 6WA does great until 558-Fiji shows up toward the end of the recording to silence it. This freakishly strong recording was made with a hot-rodded CC Skywave Ultralight and an 8 inch (20 cm) diameter FSL antenna (the "Richard Allen FSL" model). Such modest gear obviously is getting a turbo boost from the ocean side hill location.

https://app.box.com/s/2rc1wlt6p8uhvpszfbunce75g2ul51f2

73, Gary DeBock (DXing in Lincoln City, OR)


Re: [IRCA] The ABC Website Archives Really Do Work- Sometimes

Gary DeBock
 

Richard:

<<<  Downloading an ABC podcast was the same process I used to confirm my reception of a very weak signal from 774-3LO here last fall. Again, it was also a humble 8-inch FSL being used. However your location was superior to mine.   >>>

Well, any DXer that can receive 774-3LO in Oklahoma on an 8" FSL antenna definitely has an above average location! You have proven this over and over with multiple receptions of long-range TP's and DU's-- more than anyone else that I know of so far inland. Repeated success in such great DXing challenges (especially while using Ultralight radios and FSL's) also indicates an above average DXer.

<<<   Congratulation on hearing 6WA.   >>>

Thanks, Richard, it was a lot of fun-- especially while using an 8" FSL, identical to yours. But to be honest, there are quite a few DXers who have received 558-6WA here on the west coast (although almost all of them have used large wire antennas or beverages). As for reception of audio from 774-3LO in Oklahoma, I haven't heard of anybody else but you. Your reception was the real DU-DXing breakthrough!

Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
 
      
 


-----Original Message-----
From: Richard N Allen richarda@... [ultralightdx]
To: Mailing list for the International Radio Club of America <irca@...>; ultralightdx Sent: Thu, Aug 24, 2017 4:51 am
Subject: [ultralightdx] Re: [IRCA] The ABC Website Archives Really Do Work- Sometimes

 
Gary:

Downloading an ABC podcast was the same process I used to confirm my reception of a very weak signal from 774-3LO here last fall. Again, it was also a humble 8-inch FSL being used. However your location was superior to mine.

Congratulation on hearing 6WA.

Richard Allen,
near Perry OK USA.



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