Date   

Re: [loopantennas] Loop ant amp at loop? important?

Jordan Dobrikin <jjdobrikin@...>
 

hi
The Amplifier at the antenna allows a simple Coax feed to the receiver. A simple Insertion T brings dc power to the amplifier via the coax.  

A five-foot diameter Loop is great but you have a/the problem of choosing the single best direction. 
I suggest a smaller loop on a lightweight panel that can be rotated 360 degrees ie an interior hollow frame interior door. 
 
Also, consider two Loops at right angles to each other on a large cardboard box ie 5' x3' x3' Moovers Wardrobe Box. Also, consider a single loop and a rotator on the Wardrobe Box 

Why not a low cost, amplified, rotating, HDTV/FM/VHF Yagi from eBay or Amazon  


   



Hi




Thanx
73 de Jordan ve7jjd

On Sun, Dec 3, 2017 at 5:26 PM, farmerik@... [loopantennas] <loopantennas@...> wrote:
 

How important is it for an RF broadband amp to be located at the loop it self?

I am planning to use the DXengineering 0.3-35 MHz.  amp on a loop perhaps about 5 feet in diameter for attic mounting.

 Also a full wave FM BCB loop with a 20 dB Blonder Tongue VHF  amp.

-FARMERIK




Re: Noise Free Power

Jordan Dobrikin <jjdobrikin@...>
 

Hi

The key is a/the TRANSFOMER or lack of one. You want a Transformer based power supply.
 A transformer based Wallwart is heavier and a small magnet will be attracted to the large heavy iron core.  

I suggest you check out Value Village, Sally Anne and other charities recycle stores for a Wallwart.

Also, check out newer Lithium-Ion batteries that recharge via a USB cable. AA format with AA to D plastic Battery Adapters
thanx 
73 de jordan ve7jjd


Hi




Thanx
73 de Jordan ve7jjd

On Sun, Dec 3, 2017 at 7:50 AM, John Fisher <jfisher8@...> wrote:
Hi Jordan,
 
Interested in your comments about low noise power supplies.
 
How do I tell if my wallwart is transformer based? I have a radio shack multi-voltage unit that I was planning to use with 220 V in Europe to power a Perseus and PA0RDT mini antenna.
 
 
Cheers,
 
John
Kingston, ON

Sent: Sunday, December 03, 2017 12:00 AM
Subject: [ultralightdx] Noise Free Power

 


Hi 
The best IMHO is still Low Self Discharge (LSD) Rechargeable Batteries Alkaline or NiMh. 
However, transformer based Wallwarts are OK.  
thanx
73 de jordan ve7jjd 


Conclusion: The Skywave SSB will definitely appeal to people who love small marvels of technology. Back in its heyday, Sony offered a few high quality, miniature multi-band radios at extremely high prices which sold very well– radios like the popular ICF-SW100S and ICF-SW07. I bought the ‘SW07 in 1999 and paid about $400 for it (which was a discounted price) – that would equate to $589.22 as I write this in 2017. Considering that the Skywave SSB offers superior RF performance, more bandwidth options and better audio along with Air Band and Weather Band, along with far better FM reception, the price seems like a bargain. And if you’re on a budget and don’t need SSB, the original Skywave will continue to be available at lower cost. Either one is a great item to pack in your travel kit.

Special Note About the Optional Skywave AC Adapter

Get one. The Skywave AC Adapter is very special and is a valuable accessory. Many of today’s radios, like the Skywave and Skywave SSB require a USB Mini plug AC adapter to charge their batteries if you decide to use rechargeables. Almost all such power supplies are of the lightweight, switching variety, such as the type commonly used to charge cell phones and other devices. These power supplies are fine for charging purposes but generate so much noise that the radio can’t be listened to while connected to AC power…the noise just obliterates most AM/SW reception (although FM is mostly OK). Computer USB ports are just as noisy…again, fine for charging internal batteries but useless for powering the radio directly. It seems that low-noise transformer-based AC Adapters have almost totally vanished from the scene…virtually every supply you can find is a switching type and useless for listening to AM or SW…the give-away is their lightweight which means there is no power transformer used – such switching power supplies are great for cell phones but not for AM/SW radios.

Leave it to C. Crane to produce a high quality, transformer-based power supply for the Skywave. This power supply seems to be completely quiet. I tested it on my Skywave SSB and could not detect any added noise from the Skywave AC Adapter. I tuned the radio to several very weak AM and SW signals while on battery power, then plugged in the AC Adapter and heard absolutely no increase in noise level. For the first time I can listen to these radios if needed powered directly by AC…this is great if you inadvertently find yourself with dead batteries when you want to use your radio.

The Skywave AC Adapter is well-made and has a standard USB 5 volt 300 ma output, which is fine for the Skywave and most smaller radios. It is a bargain at $14.95 and I recommend it highly. This seems to be a one-of-a-kind product at a ridiculously low price of $14.99 so I bought two just to have a spare.

By the way, if you want a similar, totally quiet USB AC Adapter for radios which need more than 300 ma current, the C. Crane Witness Plus AC Adapter is another bargain. At $39.99 it will charge or directly power your larger radios such as the Tecsun S-8800 and PL-880 without adding any noise to their AM/SW reception and will charge them faster than most small USB chargers. It is only available as part of an accessory pack for the CC Witness Plus radio but even if you don’t need the other parts of it, the adapter is the only noise-free 900 ma USB charger I’ve seen – another one-of-a-kind product and is easily worth the price…I use mine with all my larger USB-equipped radios.

Skywave AC Adapter (300 ma) – Highly Recommended. $14.99  See it on Amazon  

Witness Plus Accessory Pack with 900 ma USB Charger – $39.99  See It on Amazon  

See the Skywave SSB At C.Crane:  See the Original Skywave On Amazon:  

Jay Allen 



Re: 846-Kiribati Back on Air

David Sharp <ddsradio@...>
 

By contrast, 846 may prove a challenge but 1440 is usually an easy catch here. Having said that, I’ve noted 1440 absent on several recent attempts, or much weaker than this time last year. Did not sound like 10kW.

Sent from David Sharp's iPhone

On 3 Dec 2017, at 08:50, D1028Gary@... [ultralightdx] <ultralightdx@...> wrote:

Hi David,

<<<   Has 846 replaced 1440 or are both active?   >>>

According to noted Finnish DXer Mauno Ritola, 846 and 1440-Kiribati are both active and parallel. The rejuvenated 846 seems to be a fairly easy catch here on the North American west coast, but 1440 has always been very tough to track down because of its "domestic" frequency. So nobody here has confirmed the parallel yet with actual reception. Theo Donnelly has put in a request to his Kiwi contacts in NZ but they haven't responded yet.

73, Gary
 
  


-----Original Message-----
From: David Sharp ddsradio@... [ultralightdx] <ultralightdx@...>
To: ultralightdx <ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Sat, Dec 2, 2017 1:19 pm
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] 846-Kiribati Back on Air

 
Has 846 replaced 1440 or are both active?

Sent from David Sharp's iPhone

On 2 Dec 2017, at 19:44, D1028Gary@... [ultralightdx] <ultralightdx@...> wrote:

The rejuvenated 846-Kiribati is managing a decent carrier and some anemic audio even through local KHHO slop in this DU-dead zone. It must be a powerful transmitter! Colin's video of the 846 weather report has the same lady announcer (and accent) as the 1440-Kiribati sign off MP3 recorded in Kona, Hawaii.

Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
7.5" loopstick CC Skywave + 15" FSL antenna



Noise Free Power

Jordan Dobrikin <jjdobrikin@...>
 


Hi 
The best IMHO is still Low Self Discharge (LSD) Rechargeable Batteries Alkaline or NiMh. 
However, transformer based Wallwarts are OK.  
thanx
73 de jordan ve7jjd 


Conclusion: The Skywave SSB will definitely appeal to people who love small marvels of technology. Back in its heyday, Sony offered a few high quality, miniature multi-band radios at extremely high prices which sold very well– radios like the popular ICF-SW100S and ICF-SW07. I bought the ‘SW07 in 1999 and paid about $400 for it (which was a discounted price) – that would equate to $589.22 as I write this in 2017. Considering that the Skywave SSB offers superior RF performance, more bandwidth options and better audio along with Air Band and Weather Band, along with far better FM reception, the price seems like a bargain. And if you’re on a budget and don’t need SSB, the original Skywave will continue to be available at lower cost. Either one is a great item to pack in your travel kit.

Special Note About the Optional Skywave AC Adapter

Get one. The Skywave AC Adapter is very special and is a valuable accessory. Many of today’s radios, like the Skywave and Skywave SSB require a USB Mini plug AC adapter to charge their batteries if you decide to use rechargeables. Almost all such power supplies are of the lightweight, switching variety, such as the type commonly used to charge cell phones and other devices. These power supplies are fine for charging purposes but generate so much noise that the radio can’t be listened to while connected to AC power…the noise just obliterates most AM/SW reception (although FM is mostly OK). Computer USB ports are just as noisy…again, fine for charging internal batteries but useless for powering the radio directly. It seems that low-noise transformer-based AC Adapters have almost totally vanished from the scene…virtually every supply you can find is a switching type and useless for listening to AM or SW…the give-away is their lightweight which means there is no power transformer used – such switching power supplies are great for cell phones but not for AM/SW radios.

Leave it to C. Crane to produce a high quality, transformer-based power supply for the Skywave. This power supply seems to be completely quiet. I tested it on my Skywave SSB and could not detect any added noise from the Skywave AC Adapter. I tuned the radio to several very weak AM and SW signals while on battery power, then plugged in the AC Adapter and heard absolutely no increase in noise level. For the first time I can listen to these radios if needed powered directly by AC…this is great if you inadvertently find yourself with dead batteries when you want to use your radio.

The Skywave AC Adapter is well-made and has a standard USB 5 volt 300 ma output, which is fine for the Skywave and most smaller radios. It is a bargain at $14.95 and I recommend it highly. This seems to be a one-of-a-kind product at a ridiculously low price of $14.99 so I bought two just to have a spare.

By the way, if you want a similar, totally quiet USB AC Adapter for radios which need more than 300 ma current, the C. Crane Witness Plus AC Adapter is another bargain. At $39.99 it will charge or directly power your larger radios such as the Tecsun S-8800 and PL-880 without adding any noise to their AM/SW reception and will charge them faster than most small USB chargers. It is only available as part of an accessory pack for the CC Witness Plus radio but even if you don’t need the other parts of it, the adapter is the only noise-free 900 ma USB charger I’ve seen – another one-of-a-kind product and is easily worth the price…I use mine with all my larger USB-equipped radios.

Skywave AC Adapter (300 ma) – Highly Recommended. $14.99  See it on Amazon  

Witness Plus Accessory Pack with 900 ma USB Charger – $39.99  See It on Amazon  

See the Skywave SSB At C.Crane:  See the Original Skywave On Amazon:  

Jay Allen 


Re: 846-Kiribati Back on Air

Tony King <dx4me2@...>
 

Kiribati is still on 1440 and heard well in NZ on the occasions  - several - when Moana is hovering on an open carrier.

Tony K

On 3 December 2017 at 10:50, D1028Gary@... [ultralightdx] <ultralightdx@...> wrote:
 

Hi David,

<<<   Has 846 replaced 1440 or are both active?   >>>

According to noted Finnish DXer Mauno Ritola, 846 and 1440-Kiribati are both active and parallel. The rejuvenated 846 seems to be a fairly easy catch here on the North American west coast, but 1440 has always been very tough to track down because of its "domestic" frequency. So nobody here has confirmed the parallel yet with actual reception. Theo Donnelly has put in a request to his Kiwi contacts in NZ but they haven't responded yet.

73, Gary
 
  


-----Original Message-----
From: David Sharp ddsradio@... [ultralightdx] <ultralightdx@...>
To: ultralightdx <ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Sat, Dec 2, 2017 1:19 pm
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] 846-Kiribati Back on Air

 
Has 846 replaced 1440 or are both active?

Sent from David Sharp's iPhone

On 2 Dec 2017, at 19:44, D1028Gary@... [ultralightdx] <ultralightdx@...> wrote:

The rejuvenated 846-Kiribati is managing a decent carrier and some anemic audio even through local KHHO slop in this DU-dead zone. It must be a powerful transmitter! Colin's video of the 846 weather report has the same lady announcer (and accent) as the 1440-Kiribati sign off MP3 recorded in Kona, Hawaii.

Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
7.5" loopstick CC Skywave + 15" FSL antenna




Re: 846-Kiribati Back on Air

Gary DeBock
 

Hi David,

<<<   Has 846 replaced 1440 or are both active?   >>>

According to noted Finnish DXer Mauno Ritola, 846 and 1440-Kiribati are both active and parallel. The rejuvenated 846 seems to be a fairly easy catch here on the North American west coast, but 1440 has always been very tough to track down because of its "domestic" frequency. So nobody here has confirmed the parallel yet with actual reception. Theo Donnelly has put in a request to his Kiwi contacts in NZ but they haven't responded yet.

73, Gary
 
  


-----Original Message-----
From: David Sharp ddsradio@... [ultralightdx]
To: ultralightdx
Sent: Sat, Dec 2, 2017 1:19 pm
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] 846-Kiribati Back on Air

 
Has 846 replaced 1440 or are both active?

Sent from David Sharp's iPhone

On 2 Dec 2017, at 19:44, D1028Gary@... [ultralightdx] <ultralightdx@...> wrote:

The rejuvenated 846-Kiribati is managing a decent carrier and some anemic audio even through local KHHO slop in this DU-dead zone. It must be a powerful transmitter! Colin's video of the 846 weather report has the same lady announcer (and accent) as the 1440-Kiribati sign off MP3 recorded in Kona, Hawaii.

Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
7.5" loopstick CC Skywave + 15" FSL antenna



Re: 846-Kiribati Back on Air

David Sharp <ddsradio@...>
 

Has 846 replaced 1440 or are both active?

Sent from David Sharp's iPhone

On 2 Dec 2017, at 19:44, D1028Gary@... [ultralightdx] <ultralightdx@...> wrote:

The rejuvenated 846-Kiribati is managing a decent carrier and some anemic audio even through local KHHO slop in this DU-dead zone. It must be a powerful transmitter! Colin's video of the 846 weather report has the same lady announcer (and accent) as the 1440-Kiribati sign off MP3 recorded in Kona, Hawaii.

Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
7.5" loopstick CC Skywave + 15" FSL antenna



846-Kiribati Back on Air

Gary DeBock
 

The rejuvenated 846-Kiribati is managing a decent carrier and some anemic audio even through local KHHO slop in this DU-dead zone. It must be a powerful transmitter! Colin's video of the 846 weather report has the same lady announcer (and accent) as the 1440-Kiribati sign off MP3 recorded in Kona, Hawaii.

Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
7.5" loopstick CC Skywave + 15" FSL antenna



Rockwork File Review-- 558-7BU I.D.

Gary DeBock
 

It's weird how you can listen to a DX station recording 10 times and not hear any ID, but on the 11th time it suddenly jumps out at you. This recording of classic rock ("So Lonely" by the Police) from 558-7BU (2 kW in Tasmania, Australia) was made around 1304 on August 9th at the Rockwork 4 cliff, but after listening to the jumble after the end of the song about 5 times I wrote it off as undecipherable. Even after Todd Emslie of Australia said that he heard a muffled 7BU ID by a male voice I still couldn't dig it out. After wrapping up my own file review and hearing DXpedition partner Tom R.'s 558-7BU MP3 with a clear ID at 1300 on 8-4 (when my own FSL antennas were not on the 558 frequency), I decided to give it another try. 558-Fiji was smothering the frequency for most of the morning of August 9 at the cliff, and the classic rock station could barely get in a few songs edgewise.
https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/8kkdih6ws4wx5fv73usae0f40p2z2pjr

Well, the recording's muffled "...oldies, 7BU" in the male voice at 1:07 suddenly wasn't hiding in the noise anymore. Todd was right.. I could finally dig it out! This reminds me of a very strong DX recording on 531 made during the August 2012 Rockwork 4 DXpedition that I puzzled over for 4 years. The modern rock format didn't match anything I had ever heard on 531, but the station was pounding in at an S9 level. In between songs at :53 a female voice said something weird, but I couldn't decipher it. Paul Walker took one listen of the MP3 and immediately pronounced it as "More FM." Paul was right-- this 2012 MP3 was apparently the first reception of the very rare 2 kW Kiwi station on the west coast-- at an S9 level.
https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/9juolp6ocfgelchbizmhqzrn0nqk5b55

73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)


Re: Radio Caroline on 4" FSL.

steven
 

Hi,
Here is another short video of my 4 " FSL antenna, more just to show how it looks out from behind the radio.
My findings are that the 4" FSL antenna is more or less on a par with my 2 foot box loop.
Steven.
Scotland.





On Saturday, 25 November 2017, 22:44, "Steven mont633@... [ultralightdx]" wrote:


 
Hi,
I have been a lurker on here for a wee while now, but today made a short video of a test transmission from Radio Carolines new TX site in England, received at my QTH in Scotland (approx 350 miles) using my 4" FSL and my 1957 Bush Valve Radio.
Kind Regards,
Steven,
Scotland.









Radio Caroline on 4" FSL.

steven
 

Hi,
I have been a lurker on here for a wee while now, but today made a short video of a test transmission from Radio Carolines new TX site in England, received at my QTH in Scotland (approx 350 miles) using my 4" FSL and my 1957 Bush Valve Radio.
Kind Regards,
Steven,
Scotland.







Re: Congratulations to DXpedition Partner Tom R.

Gary DeBock
 

Hi Neil,

Thanks for your comments.

<<<   There is little doubt that limiting radio capabilities and cost has stimulated the experimentation and implementation of novel new antenna development.  It has also thereby provided the opportunity to apply these great new antennas to radios not meeting the standards for being "ultralight" and thereby helping all of us in our hobby.

I hope this antenna development continues and that some company decides to use the designs created by Gary and others to make these available to all of us.  I hope Gary and others have sought patents for their creative work.   >>>

Well, at least for myself, antenna experimentation has always been a labor of love with no thought of commercial applications, although I'm well aware that there is very serious demand for several of the recently developed projects (7.5 inch loopstick PL-380's and CC Skywaves, 3.5 inch "Frequent Flyer" FSL antennas, etc.). I certainly wish that I had the time to build one of these models for anyone who wants one, but in consideration of family time and other ongoing projects about the best that I can do currently is to draft detailed instructions for DXers who wish to build the models themselves. As for seeking patents it would probably make sense for someone who had profit in mind, but that certainly isn't me. All of the articles and construction projects that I've written have been freely shared on the Internet to all interested DXers, and the best "compensation" that I could ever have for my efforts is the knowledge that my designs have helped others enjoy greater hobby satisfaction.

We do face a challenge in keeping our hobby relevant and exciting in the 21st century, and discoveries like the FSL antennas and ocean cliff propagation enhancement really have put the Ultralight group among the leaders in MW-DXing innovation. I think that you will see more of that in the next couple of years, as the "Frequent Flyer" FSL antennas open up an entirely new world of long-range Ultralight radio travel DXing!

73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)        
  


-----Original Message-----
From: Neil Bell neil.neilbell@... [ultralightdx]
To: ultralightdx
Sent: Wed, Nov 22, 2017 11:39 pm
Subject: [ultralightdx] Re: Congratulations to DXpedition Partner Tom R.

 
Quite an accomplishment with obviously high quality antennas feeding a high-end radio.  To me the real value in this group is the research on antenna designs and placement.  Personally it does not matter whether a radio fits some arbitrarily specified dimensions or has or lacks "illegal" features like SSB.  What matters to me is the reception of signals, even just carriers, in difficult circumstances.

There is little doubt that limiting radio capabilities and cost has stimulated the experimentation and implementation of novel new antenna development.  It has also thereby provided the opportunity to apply these great new antennas to radios not meeting the standards for being "ultralight" and thereby helping all of us in our hobby.

I hope this antenna development continues and that some company decides to use the designs created by Gary and others to make these available to all of us.  I hope Gary and others have sought patents for their creative work.

Neil Bell, KJ6FBA


Re: Congratulations to DXpedition Partner Tom R.

Neil Bell <neil.neilbell@...>
 

Quite an accomplishment with obviously high quality antennas feeding a high-end radio.  To me the real value in this group is the research on antenna designs and placement.  Personally it does not matter whether a radio fits some arbitrarily specified dimensions or has or lacks "illegal" features like SSB.  What matters to me is the reception of signals, even just carriers, in difficult circumstances.

There is little doubt that limiting radio capabilities and cost has stimulated the experimentation and implementation of novel new antenna development.  It has also thereby provided the opportunity to apply these great new antennas to radios not meeting the standards for being "ultralight" and thereby helping all of us in our hobby.

I hope this antenna development continues and that some company decides to use the designs created by Gary and others to make these available to all of us.  I hope Gary and others have sought patents for their creative work.

Neil Bell, KJ6FBA


Congratulations to DXpedition Partner Tom R.

Gary DeBock
 

During exceptional propagation my August Rockwork 4 DXpedition partner Tom Rothlisberger was able to record a bonanza on his Perseus-SDR, including 64 New Zealand MW stations (once again surpassing the all-time Grayland record), 35 from Australia (including such obscurities as 531-6DL, 558-6WA, 558-7BU and 1161-7FG) as well as the huge signal from 558-Radio Fiji One, for a total of 100 DU stations on MW. In addition he also came away with multiple Longwave NDB and DGPS stations from the South Pacific, including several that had never been reported from North America. Even though Tom wasn't using an Ultralight radio, he and I frequently shared tips and recordings of exceptional DU-DX stations that were being received, especially on the lower frequencies like 531 and 558 (where the monster FSL's seem to really shine). Congratulations, Tom-- you have turned into an exceptional "Cliffhanger DXer!"
http://www.qsl.net/k7wv/RockworkDX4.htm

73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)


SSB with the C.Crane CC Skywave SSB

Stan Horzepa
 

I wanted to make sure I was not hearing things and I wanted to make sure I was passing along good information. So I contacted C.Crane Customer Service and asked them point blank does the new Skywave SSB do SSB on the AM/MW bands, as well as the SW bands.

Good news is that C.Crane Customer Service confirmed what I found... that the new Skywave SSB does do SSB on the AM/MW bands, as well as the SW bands!

Happy Thanksgiving!

Stan, WA1LOU


Re: 10th Anniversary

Gary DeBock
 

Thanks Allen (and Paul),

It's hard to believe that ten years have passed since the first wild receptions of three TP's (594-JOAK, 747-JOIB and 972-HLCA) on a $15 Sony SRF-59 back in November of 2007.

A series of amazing coincidences helped us get the niche group off of the ground ten years ago. Colin Newell published my enthusiastic review of the SRF-59 on DXer.Ca the next month (December), and suddenly the dirt-cheap SRF-59 was the talk of the IRCA list. In appreciation of Colin's contribution I send about 15 free SRF-59 models to any Canadian who asked for one-- one of which went to Rob Ross in London, Ontario-- who promptly received 300 stations in 30 days with it. We quickly discovered other pocket radio models like the Eton E100 and Sony SRF-T615, and by January of 2008 our wild enthusiasm had "hijacked" the IRCA list. John Bryant was apparently recruited to politely ask us to move away from the IRCA list and form our own Yahoo group, but when he tried out a gift Sony SRF-T615 that I sent him, he became as "hooked" as any of us! John decided to use his superb organizational skills to make sure that the new Yahoo group was a smash success.

As most of you know we lost John in an accident in February of 2010, but in credit to his outstanding insight in setting up the Ultralight classification guidelines, Firsts and Records lists, DXing awards and other features, our Ultralight group has not only survived but thrived, becoming a major force in promoting innovation and creativity in the MW-DXing community. The FSL antenna was introduced by Graham Maynard shortly after John's passing, and three antenna fanatics in our group (Steve R., Kevin S. and me) devoted some serious resources to optimize it. Within a few months it was tracking down DU-DX in a wacky new location where DXers had never dared to set up-- an ocean side cliff. A few years later SDR-DXers followed us to the cliffs-- and quickly broke the all-time record for reception of New Zealand stations during a west coast DXpedition (87, compared to the previous record of 61 at Grayland). Rob Ross, Allen Willie and Richard Allen have all received over 1000 MW stations on Ultralight radios, and we are the leaders in pocket radio modification, long-range travel DXing and joint DXpeditions with the Japanese. Congratulations to all who have contributed to an exciting ten years!

73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)     

   


-----Original Message-----
From: 'Paul S.' ferrite61@... [ultralightdx]
To: uldx
Sent: Mon, Nov 20, 2017 11:36 pm
Subject: [ultralightdx] 10th Anniversary

 
Happy 10th Anniversary! Good things do indeed come in small packages.

At the end of the 20th Century Crystal Radios had become resurgent: there were several websites devoted to building them. As part of that group I was more involved in building a "1-Active-Device" radio using a single transistor. Several of members of the "Xtal Set Society" had begun their DXing using a 1-tube radio. I was just a youngin' and was taking apart defunct transistor radios and recycling them as a 1-Transistor radio.

By 2004 the 1-Tubers and 1-Q'ers got our own contest. Key to logging these stations was the use of a spotter radio to confirm the RX. As such, I had a WRX-911 (new in 2005) and a Radio Shack DX350. I will note here that this was the 50th Anniversary of the first commercial transistor radios like the Regency TR-1, Motorola, Sony, etc.

In 2007 word spread of the SONY SRF49 pocket radio having amazing Receptions when based on the W. Coast USA/Canada. Word got to us at Crystal Radios, and even Y-Groups like Glenn Hauser's World of Radio.
Before I knew it there was the Ultralightdx Y-group similar to Colin's
B.C. based coffee and DX club (sorry, cant off-the-top-of-my-head remember his web-group). A few of my logs actually predate the group from Feb. 2006 using the Kaito WRX911. A few others at the time of the Club's beginning use the Tecsun PL-200.

It has been a rather marvelous experience here, these simpler sets are really quite good, and the ultralightdx group has/is a good place to share one's experiences. My thanks to the late John Bryant, and to Gary, Rob, et al for bring attention to, and providing a forum for these little receiver gems.

Also, thanks for advancing the "science" of DXing. The ferrite "ring-core" antennas, and new U/L products have a place for test and review.

Regards
Paul S. in CT

--------------------------------------------
On Mon, 11/20/17, <ultralightdx@...> wrote:

Subject: [ultralightdx] Digest Number 3260
To: ultralightdx@...
Date: Monday, November 20, 2017, 8:12 PM

10th Anniversary Congratulations to the ULTRALIGHT DX Group

Mon Nov 20, 2017 1:48 pm(PST) Posted by: vo1_001_swl

Hello To All,

Ten years ago I was approached by our late friend and great
radio DXer , John Bryant who had noticed my posting of
radio logs on a group site and who had asked me to share
some station logs which I heard using a recently received
birthday gift, a brand new Sony SRF-M37V Ultralight radio.

For yours truly this was the start of my exploits in
"Ultralight radio DXing ".

Given my great DXing location, it was the perfect
opportunity to find out just what could be heard on these
mighty "mini-receiver s" .

It definitely was an added unique nitch to something that I
had been doing for the past 40 years at that time.

Recently hearing Alaska and China from here in Newfoundland
using an ultralight radio really demonstrates that there are
no boundaries to what can be heard with them.

The past ten years of being involved with the Ultralight
radio community has not only brought added personal
satisfaction to a hobby that I have enjoyed for several
decades but also good friendships and comradery along the
way, as well as helping others discover the excitement and
thrill of Ultralight Radio DXing.

My Thanks to Gary DeBock , Robert Ross and others for
getting me involved in the group , it has been a wonderful
journey and I look forward to many more years of
involvement ahead in this fascinating niche to a great hobby.

Congratulations on the 10th Anniversary to the Founders and
all members of the ULTRALIGHT DX Group

Allen Willie

Carbonear, Newfoundland


10th Anniversary

Paul S. in CT
 

Happy 10th Anniversary! Good things do indeed come in small packages.

At the end of the 20th Century Crystal Radios had become resurgent: there were several websites devoted to building them. As part of that group I was more involved in building a "1-Active-Device" radio using a single transistor. Several of members of the "Xtal Set Society" had begun their DXing using a 1-tube radio. I was just a youngin' and was taking apart defunct transistor radios and recycling them as a 1-Transistor radio.

By 2004 the 1-Tubers and 1-Q'ers got our own contest. Key to logging these stations was the use of a spotter radio to confirm the RX. As such, I had a WRX-911 (new in 2005) and a Radio Shack DX350. I will note here that this was the 50th Anniversary of the first commercial transistor radios like the Regency TR-1, Motorola, Sony, etc.

In 2007 word spread of the SONY SRF49 pocket radio having amazing Receptions when based on the W. Coast USA/Canada. Word got to us at Crystal Radios, and even Y-Groups like Glenn Hauser's World of Radio.
Before I knew it there was the Ultralightdx Y-group similar to Colin's
B.C. based coffee and DX club (sorry, cant off-the-top-of-my-head remember his web-group). A few of my logs actually predate the group from Feb. 2006 using the Kaito WRX911. A few others at the time of the Club's beginning use the Tecsun PL-200.

It has been a rather marvelous experience here, these simpler sets are really quite good, and the ultralightdx group has/is a good place to share one's experiences. My thanks to the late John Bryant, and to Gary, Rob, et al for bring attention to, and providing a forum for these little receiver gems.

Also, thanks for advancing the "science" of DXing. The ferrite "ring-core" antennas, and new U/L products have a place for test and review.

Regards
Paul S. in CT

--------------------------------------------

On Mon, 11/20/17, <ultralightdx@...> wrote:

Subject: [ultralightdx] Digest Number 3260
To: ultralightdx@...
Date: Monday, November 20, 2017, 8:12 PM

10th Anniversary Congratulations to the ULTRALIGHT DX Group

Mon Nov 20, 2017 1:48 pm(PST) Posted by: vo1_001_swl

Hello To All,

Ten years ago I was approached by our late friend and great
radio DXer , John Bryant who had noticed my posting of
radio logs on a group site and who had asked me to share
some station logs which I heard using a recently received
birthday gift, a brand new Sony SRF-M37V Ultralight radio.

For yours truly this was the start of my exploits in
"Ultralight radio DXing ".

Given my great DXing location, it was the perfect
opportunity to find out just what could be heard on these
mighty "mini-receiver s" .

It definitely was an added unique nitch to something that I
had been doing for the past 40 years at that time.

Recently hearing Alaska and China from here in Newfoundland
using an ultralight radio really demonstrates that there are
no boundaries to what can be heard with them.

The past ten years of being involved with the Ultralight
radio community has not only brought added personal
satisfaction to a hobby that I have enjoyed for several
decades but also good friendships and comradery along the
way, as well as helping others discover the excitement and
thrill of Ultralight Radio DXing.

My Thanks to Gary DeBock , Robert Ross and others for
getting me involved in the group , it has been a wonderful
journey and I look forward to many more years of
involvement ahead in this fascinating niche to a great hobby.

Congratulations on the 10th Anniversary to the Founders and
all members of the ULTRALIGHT DX Group

Allen Willie

Carbonear, Newfoundland


10th Anniversary Congratulations to the ULTRALIGHT DX Group

Allen Willie
 



Hello To All,



Ten years ago I was approached by our late friend and great radio DXer ,  John Bryant who had noticed my posting of radio logs on a group site  and who had asked me to share some station logs which I heard using a recently received birthday gift, a brand new Sony SRF-M37V  Ultralight radio.


For yours truly this was the start of my exploits in "Ultralight radio DXing ".


Given my great DXing  location, it was the perfect opportunity to find out just what could be heard on these mighty "mini-receivers" .

It definitely was an added unique nitch to something that I had been doing for the past 40 years at that time.


Recently hearing Alaska and China from here in Newfoundland  using an ultralight radio really demonstrates that there are no boundaries to what can be heard with them.


The past ten years of being  involved with the Ultralight radio community has not only brought added personal satisfaction to a hobby that I have enjoyed for several decades but also good friendships and comradery along the way, as well as helping others discover the excitement and thrill of Ultralight Radio DXing.



My Thanks to Gary DeBock , Robert Ross and others for getting me involved in the group , it has been a wonderful journey and  I look forward to many more years of involvement ahead in this fascinating niche to a great hobby .


Congratulations on the 10th Anniversary to the Founders and all members of the ULTRALIGHT  DX Group


Allen Willie

Carbonear, Newfoundland




Re: CC Skywave SSB second impressions

Jim Trame
 

I agree.  The SSB works fine. I had no problems tuning in conversations on 80 and 40 meters with just the built in whip.  The fine tuning feature is a little different, but it works fine in touching up the speech for better intelligibility. 

I have used the original Skywave for a couple of years and this one definitely matches it on MW reception.

I was hoping for a worthy replacement for the G6 I let go a couple of years ago.  It certainly does that and a whole lot more considering the DSP bandwidths.  A great travel radio.

Jim, W4FJT


CC Skywave SSB second impressions

Stan Horzepa
 

After spending Friday afternoon playing with my new C.Crane CC Skywave SSB receiver, I tried it out after dark and logged a new station at 0210Z: WFUN on 970 kHz in Ashtabula, Ohio, transmitting 1 kW, 404 miles to the west broadcasting the Cleveland Cavaliers game.

With nightime conditions, the Skywave SSB performs like the original Skywave. Like the original, the SSB was able to pull out stations on 1070 despite the slop from 50-kW WTIC on 1080, 12 miles away. Using the SSB mode, I was also able to dig out a station on 980 from under the slop from WPRX on 990, 4 miles away.

IMHO, the sensitivity and selectivity of the Skywave SSB and original Skywave is about the same, but the addition of the SSB option on the AM and SW bands makes the Skywave SSB a better radio.

Stan Horzepa, WA1LOU
Wolcott, CT
horzepa.com

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