Date   

Re: electronic goldmine ferrite rods on sale

Phillip Fimiani
 

The russian site translated very well in Google Translate

Mortimer says "Stay Safe"
Best Regards
Phil
KD2HTN / WA2069SWL
Long: 34.210293 Lat:-78.057048
FM04xf 30dl
______________________________




On Monday, September 7, 2020, 11:37:06 PM EDT, vbifyz <3ym3ym@...> wrote:


38lbs! That's not quite UltraLight :)
You mention 2012 as the  year when FSL was introduced.
Here is a design from 2006 by UA6CA, the link still works:
http://www.cqham.ru/ant6.htm
It is in Russian, but the pictures are informative enough. They also used it for TX on 160 and 80m, up to 10W.

73, Mike AF7KR

--
73
Phil
KD2HTN / WA2069SWL
Long: 34.210293 Lat:-78.057048
FM04xf 30dl


Re: electronic goldmine ferrite rods on sale

vbifyz
 

One more link, dated 2005. The design itself is probably much earlier.
http://www.rxcontrol.org/Receivers/AN510/index.html


Re: electronic goldmine ferrite rods on sale

vbifyz
 

38lbs! That's not quite UltraLight :)
You mention 2012 as the  year when FSL was introduced.
Here is a design from 2006 by UA6CA, the link still works:
http://www.cqham.ru/ant6.htm
It is in Russian, but the pictures are informative enough. They also used it for TX on 160 and 80m, up to 10W.

73, Mike AF7KR


Re: Howdy - it’s been awhile

Gary DeBock
 

Hi Gregory,

Your question is very similar to one by J.P. Tuttle on July 29th, concerning the currently approved Ultralight Radio models. Of course there have been many new pocket radios introduced since 2009, some of which were reviewed in the detailed 2015 Ultralight Radio Shootout posted at https://swling.com/blog/2015/03/gary-debocks-2015-ultralight-radio-shootout-review/
All of those models are "officially" approved Ultralight radios. As for the current state of the Ultralight Radio Classification Committee and Ultralight Radio group administration in general, I'll re-post the comments I made to J.P. Tuttle back in July.

During the worldwide Ultralight Radio Boom in early 2008 we had a very dedicated group of volunteers to handle administration, a classification and awards program, numerous Ultralight technical modifications (loopstick transplants and upgrade IF filters) and breakthrough Ultralight-related DXing antenna experimentation.

Unfortunately we have lost a lot of our volunteers since then. John Bryant provided most of our administration, but he was lost in a tragic accident in February of 2010. Kevin Schanilec also assisted in the early Ultralight Group administration, but he has been inactive in the hobby since 2015. Most of the original "super DXers" who contributed to the Ultralight Radio Boom (Rob Ross, Allen Willie and Richard Allen) are still with us, although they may currently enjoy DXing outside the Ultralight Radio niche group (which is fine with me, of course). We will always hold their accomplishments in the highest honour, regardless of how they are currently enjoying the hobby.

So, to summarize, even though the Ultralight Radio attraction is still booming throughout the world after twelve years, we suffer from the same limitation that almost every radio hobby group struggles with-- a severe shortage of volunteers. I am the only original survivor of the Ultralight Radio administrative group in early 2008, but my personal focus has always been on transoceanic DXing and antenna experimentation, not on administration. The fascinating new challenges of ocean cliff transoceanic propagation, FSL antenna development and "Frequent Flyer" Ultralight Radio DXpeditions are thrilling to the extreme-- and more than enough to keep this fanatic fully occupied.

Concerning the original Ultralight Radio Classification rules posted by J.P., they are still currently valid, although multiple DSP filters and SSB capability are now acceptable (primarily due to a decision concerning the new C.Crane Skywave model). The 20 cubic inch size limit is a guideline which is unlikely to be ever changed, however. In the absence of any currently functional Ultralight Awards program this limitation may seem irrelevant, but there have already been many top-performing Ultralight Radio models fully approved in years past, several of which have been used to receive over 1,000 stations in stock form. My strong advice to anyone who really wishes to experience a new thrill in the hobby is to focus on the challenge of receiving rare DX with minimal equipment, rather than on attempting to change the equipment to make the challenge easier.

73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
Ultralight Radio Group Co-Founder


Re: electronic goldmine ferrite rods on sale

Gary DeBock
 

Hi Mike,

<<<   A couple more ideas for experiments. Maybe you or somebody else tried these already?
1. Place the rods "in series", creating an arbitrary long stick. Say, 4x140mm=560mm.
2. Leave spaces between the rods on the sleeve. The diameter stays the same with fewer rods, or the diameter can be increased with the same number of rods.
Combining the 2 ideas, one can make a long and wide ferrite antenna with fewer rods.   >>>

Thanks for the experimental suggestions, Mike. Unfortunately all of these have been tried previously by myself or others, and never did result in any gain boost (or even equivalent performance) with the "standard" tightly packed ferrite rod cylindrical sleeve.

When the early FSL antenna experimentation was going on (2011-2012) all the major experimenters were trying every possible way to save money, since the cost of multiple ferrite rods was already extremely steep, even when purchased on eBay from eastern Europe. We tried every possible way to get equivalent gain by spending less money, including some wacky ideas which were never publicized. Unfortunately there were only two guaranteed ways to improve FSL antenna sensitivity-- use longer ferrite rods (or bars) in the sleeve, or increase the diameter of the ferrite sleeve by adding more rods (or bars) in the cylindrical assembly. The most sensitive FSL antennas turned out to be models which were tweaked in both ways-- although that started the infamous search for the Ultimate Gain Monster FSL (38 pound models costing over $1K to build).

Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)



 

   


Re: electronic goldmine ferrite rods on sale

vbifyz
 

Hi Gary,
Very interesting experiments, great work.
A couple more ideas for experiments. Maybe you or somebody else tried these already?
1. Place the rods "in series", creating an arbitrary long stick. Say, 4x140mm=560mm.
2. Leave spaces between the rods on the sleeve. The diameter stays the same with fewer rods, or the diameter can be increased with the same number of rods.
Combining the 2 ideas, one can make a long and wide ferrite antenna with fewer rods.

73, Mike AF7KR


Re: Howdy - it’s been awhile

Paul S. in CT
 

A lot of things change, and people have moved on. Right now there is no "official" specification enforced. The 2009 document is a clear guideline for a small, lightweight radio. A more universal (to metric and and US measures) is 340 grams and 340 cubic centimeters that translates to 12oz and 21 cubic inches.

MHO is to be as close as possible to the original specs from 2009. As written above, I am just a little more above specs, but not much. Tecsun 880 = no, Tecsun PL310et = Yes for example.

Regards
Paul S. in CT FN31nl.


Howdy - it’s been awhile

Gregory Mosher
 

Howdy everyone - it’s been while since I’ve been around - life gets in the way.  I hope all is well with everyone.  Do you guys have a updated list of official ultralight models - looking I only see a doc for 2009?  I just got a Radiwow R-108 this is a hot little number on MW!  Anyways - happy Dx’ing to all.
Gpsfool


Re: Australian Assistance Needed

Gary DeBock
 

<<<   I listened to that recording multiple times and the signal is to low down for my ears. I was able to pick out a couple of words but unfortunately no clue as to who it was or an id. I heard 4KZ in Poipu on 531 so it could have been that, or 2PM.   >>>

Thanks again for listening, Chris.

On that Oregon cliff it's tough to get much signal strength from the Australian stations on 531, although the Kiwi stations (531-More FM and 531-PI) usually hit S9 peaks every morning. By some quirk of propagation, the transoceanic signal boost on the Kiwi stations (and 558-Fiji) at the Rockwork cliff is usually stronger than any reception I've had in Poipu, Hawaii. The Oz and Kiwi reception is far more balanced in Hawaii, and not freakishly twisted toward New Zealand, like on the Oregon cliff.

My Rockwork DXpedition partner Tom Rothlisberger and I have discussed a Hawaii DXpedition later this year, but it depends on how the Pandemic shakes out. Both Hawaii and the Cook Islands are desperate for tourists, I understand. Stay safe!

Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
    


Re: Oklahoma TP DX 9-5-20

Peter Laws
 

On Sat, Sep 5, 2020 at 10:34 AM Gord Seifert <gks61711@...> wrote:


What is 'JJ'? Usage seems to indicate a language.

JJ - Japanese
SS - Spanish
EE - English
TAABM - There Are A Bunch More

--
Peter Laws | N5UWY | plaws plaws net | Travel by Train!


Re: Oklahoma TP DX 9-5-20

Gord Seifert
 


   What is 'JJ'?   Usage seems to indicate a language.


Oklahoma TP DX 9-5-20

Richard Allen <dx747j@...>
 

I listened from 1114 until past local sunrise at 1204 GMT.
594 JOAK with barely audible JJ talk at 1155-1157.
612 unID carrier from WSW at 1200, stronger at 1205.
702 unID weak carrier from WSW at 1210.
747 JOIB poor man talking in JJ at 1131, barely audible at 1139 and 1151.
774 JOUB poor-to-fair woman talking in JJ at 1114, fading away at 1121.
828 JOBB? carrier, no audio at 1149-1158.
Receiver: Skywave SSB with ALA1530LNP.

Richard Allen,
near Perry OK USA.


Re: Australian Assistance Needed

Chris Rogers
 

Hi Gary,
I listened to that recording multiple times and the signal is to low down for my ears. I was able to pick out a couple of words but unfortunately no clue as to who it was or an id. I heard 4KZ in Poipu on 531 so it could have been that, or 2PM.


Re: Australian Assistance Needed

Gary DeBock
 

Hi Chris,

Thanks very much for listening to the two mystery recordings from the Rockwork DXpedition. Usually on the "Kiwi Cliff" we get a mix of 531-PI and 531-More FM, so the 531 Australian station formats don't get heard very often.

There was an old country music song (from 1982) by T.G. Sheppard playing on a 531 kHz Australian station at 1326 UTC on August 10th (late Monday night, eastern Australia time). The presenter's male voice can be heard for a few seconds after the song, but the Australian accent is a little too tricky for me. Would you (or anyone else) have any idea which Oz 531 station might have this format?  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/wkxgmwwv2kt81divhel23uvqfh8l0bcn

Thanks again,
Gary



     


Re: Australian Assistance Needed

Chris Rogers
 

Hi Gary,
I have listened to the recordings several times and it is hard to work out but the first recording doesn't sound like the announcer Carter Edwards who runs a talk and country music show on 1000UTC to 1400 on weekends on 2PM relaying from 2SM. It is definitely not 3GG or 6DL. I think it sounds like the announcer Ray Hadley who runs a country music countdown and talk show from 2GB Saturday 1200 UTC to 1400 UTC relayed on 4KZ but I am not definite about that


Australian Assistance Needed

Gary DeBock
 

These two 531 kHz recordings were made during the Rockwork ocean cliff DXpedition on the Oregon coast last month, and both feature an Australian call-in talk station alone on the frequency. I'm pretty sure these are from  2PM in Kempsey (part of the "Super Network"), but the usual parallel station to confirm this on Ultralight radios (639-2HC) was MIA during the entire trip.

The first recording was at 1314 UTC on August 8th (late Saturday night in eastern Australia)
https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/axaacw3m9e8ixfgq4k1n0s36freev23r

The second recording was at 1246 UTC on August 10th (late Monday night in eastern Australia)
https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/2zsb9ycilrua5h13cgmbxz3oqqm6sscp

Any comments concerning the format and/ or host voices would be appreciated-- thanks!

Gary DeBock
(DXing at the Rockwork ocean cliff from August 5-13 with Tom Rothlisberger)


Re: electronic goldmine ferrite rods on sale

Paul S. in CT
 

Interesting... the 3 1/8" (80cm) length is suitable for a cake-frosting can (16oz!). Place them as inside perimeter: wind the coil outside. Might need 2 dozen.

Regards
Paul S. in CT FN31nl


Re: electronic goldmine ferrite rods on sale

Gary DeBock
 

Hi Joe (and Steve),

Thanks for posting the link about the 3.125" x .39" ferrite rods for sale from Electronic Goldmine.

They sound interesting, but in comparison to the Russian surplus ferrite rods (sold on eBay) commonly used for FSL antenna construction, their relatively short length would make their performance similar to that of the 62mm x 8mm Russian surplus ferrite rods, which were extensively tested in many FSL antenna designs during all-out experimentation for a 2012 article (posted at https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/mr7aec2o4fid5u4dc48xz0t6u9uto8xh

Back in 2012 (a year after Graham Maynard of the U.K. introduced modern FSL antennas) there were multiple controversies about whether ferrite rods or bars were superior, whether long ferrite rods or thick, solid ferrite was superior, whether huge diameter FSL coils with short ferrite rods could outperform smaller models with longer ferrite, etc. The article linked above was an all-out effort to honestly evaluate all possible FSL antenna configurations by recording their weak signal performance on fringe daytime DX signals, comparing the recorded signals against each other in switched A/B tests, and posting the MP3 recordings to back up my conclusions. This article was the experimental basis for the "FSL Antenna Sensitivity Score" conclusion-- that the relative sensitivity of any FSL antenna can be determined by multiplying the coil diameter by the length of the ferrite sleeve, as long as all other factors are identical (ferrite permeability, ferrite manufacturer, type of Litz wire, etc.).

So for the short ferrite rods for sale from Electronic Goldmine, since their size is similar to the 62mm x 8mm Russian surplus ferrite rods used in the "short rod" designs in the article, you can be pretty sure that their FSL performance would be similar (i.e. the least sensitive of all the different FSL designs).

Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)

   


Re: electronic goldmine ferrite rods on sale

Joe
 

Thanks Steve for your reply!
Certainly seem quite reasonable. I've purchased a number of items
from the Goldmine. I've never been disappointed!
73, Joe.


Re: electronic goldmine ferrite rods on sale

Steve Ratzlaff
 

I bought some of these about 8 months ago and tested them on the Q meter. They have good Q and I believe would make a good FSL, given their short length. They go on sale like they are now every few months.

73,

Steve

On 9/3/2020 6:03 AM, Joe wrote:
Hi Gary.
Sorry. OT but thought this might get your attention.
Would these be any good for a MW FSL?
https://www.goldmine-elec-products.com/prodinfo.asp?number=G19561&utm_source=Goldmine&utm_campaign=a6dc633095-MAY23-2014_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_15cb8e0368-a6dc633095-60297685
73, Joe-WA9LAE.