Date   

Re: Un -Logging Eurovision Song Contest in MW

Zacharias Liangas
 

Thessaloniki Greece
ERA is Greek radio
MRT is Macedonski Radoi
For full info look WRTH


Re: Un -Logging Eurovision Song Contest in MW

kevin asato
 

where are you located? where are the transmitters? i am not familiar with the callsigns.

my daughter is watching the Peacock streaming  feed that is now/finally available in the US/California
73,
kevin
kc6pob

On Fri, May 21, 2021 at 9:03 AM Zacharias Liangas via groups.io <zliangas=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:



This happened yesterday local night at 19z with a double  fast search of 15 minutes im total.    
The only station airing ESC 21 was MRT in 810kHZ  being in // with second ERA program 90 MHz with 1.5 sec delay over Era
I kept the Degen 1103 as the main radio for ERA #2 while I used the R75 and later the PL380 by turning it for possible poorer signals but there was not any other MW station relaying it.
ERA1 was also relaying ESC in // to ERA2 in the past  .
Furthermore local TV reception is now near impossible and used my dummy-phone to watch them A few months ago the all digital TV streams  were limited to trasmit below 700MHZ to  free the remain bandwidth for 5G

Tomorrow is the last and final pasrt and will try once again !


Re: Ultralight FM DX'ing - What can a newbie expect?

Dave Hascall
 

Johnny, in the very early 80's, I had a Pioneer Receiver hooked to my parents basic log periodic TV antenna.  I never rotated it but heard lots of DX off of it.  I then discovered for the better openings, the rabbit ears worked as well.  Heck for a big Es opening, often you can get skip just from the feedline.

You are most welcome Paul.  Location and elevation are key for FM BCB.  Many six meter masters use large and high, antennas.


Un -Logging Eurovision Song Contest in MW

Zacharias Liangas
 



This happened yesterday local night at 19z with a double  fast search of 15 minutes im total.    
The only station airing ESC 21 was MRT in 810kHZ  being in // with second ERA program 90 MHz with 1.5 sec delay over Era
I kept the Degen 1103 as the main radio for ERA #2 while I used the R75 and later the PL380 by turning it for possible poorer signals but there was not any other MW station relaying it.
ERA1 was also relaying ESC in // to ERA2 in the past  .
Furthermore local TV reception is now near impossible and used my dummy-phone to watch them A few months ago the all digital TV streams  were limited to trasmit below 700MHZ to  free the remain bandwidth for 5G

Tomorrow is the last and final pasrt and will try once again !


Re: Why Your Hobbies Are Important – Finding Your Passion

Paul Blundell
 

Thanks. We find it works well for us.


On Fri, 21 May 2021, 18:20 Jorge Garzón via groups.io, <iberiaDX=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Paul, 
Congratulations for your concise, accurate and soustainable thoughts expressed on your blog post! I do agree with everything and regarding your minimalism way of living (I am also on that mood... ) is what I called the 'right human scale' of the things. 
Saludos


El vie., may. 21, 2021 a 6:37, Paul Blundell
<tanger32au@...> escribió:
 

 

Having a hobby that we enjoy and for which you have a passion can really bring out joy and improve our lives. It can give us something fun and enjoyable to do during our leisure time and provides us the opportunity to learn new skills. Over the past two decades, hobbies in general seem to have dropped off, whereas in the past they were seen as an essential part of a “balanced life”, between work and other things, having a hobby (no matter what that is) does not seem to be as important as it was in the past.

The best way to cultivate a new hobby is to try different hobbies until one “sticks”. Of course, all of us are unique and, therefore, our interests and hobbies vary. But once we find a hobby that we truly enjoy and are passionate about, we become hooked. It becomes a real part of our lives and captivates us in a very personal way. What matters the most is that you enjoy your hobby, and you are doing it for the right reasons, your own sense of enjoyment and not due to pressure from any other people.

Your hobbies are a part of you, no less than your job, friends, or any other part of you. 

Is your hobby also your passion or has your passion become your hobby? Does it matter? What about interests, where do they fit in? A lot of people think that your hobby is your passion and that you must have a hobby you are passionate about; I disagree for several reasons.

What is the difference between a hobby and a passion? One definition I have heard is this: “A hobby is something you choose to do when you have a little spare time, but a passion is something that you consider fundamental to your life”

Expanding on this and relating it back to radios and me I have some thoughts this. A lot of people are involved in the radio hobby for several reasons. Some people have this as an extension of their professional work or volunteer work, for others it was a hobby passed on to them from family or friends. The main difference to me between a hobby, passions and interests is both how you feel about and how other people see it.

I first became involved in the radio hobby as a teenager listening to distant radio stations on the AM broadcast band of a night-time, as I grew older, I became involved in electronics at college and this grew to an interest in another radio related area which was radio scanning, this was about 20 years ago. Over the past 20 years while I have mostly been involved in radio scanning, I have a couple of times tried by hand at shortwave and medium wave listening with mixed success. In all these cases this was as an addition to the radio scanning hobby, now I have totally removed myself from the radio scanning hobby and I am concentrating on the broadcast bands, mostly medium wave Ultralight DXing.

The reason I decided to make this change after 20 years is based on a few things: 

- The public perception of radio scanning is not as good as shortwave listening or AM BCB DXing, most people know nothing about radio scanning and when you try and explain it to them either they think it should be illegal or they look at you like you are some sort of weirdo. Radio scanning is not really the sort of hobby that you can talk to other people about easily. When I was involved in the radio scanning hobby, I was more interested in the technical / procedure details and less about the content which is different to most people who only care about finding out what was going on.

- The cost of equipment is less, and it is easier to source locally. Whereas a scanner can start at $150 and go up into the thousands, ultralight broadcast band receivers are much cheaper and unless you want to get very serious a basic $60 radio will do 95% of what you need.

- After 20 years the radio scanning hobby has to me lost some of the appeal, you can only hear so many taxi drivers calling for jobs or rubbish trucks talking about bin pickups before you get sick of it.

- As I work during the day my scanning time is limited to a night-time or of a weekend, while you can sometimes hear interesting things during these times most of the radio traffic, I am interested in happens during the day, while I am at work. As medium wave broadcasting is a 24/7 business at any time of the day or night, I can be comfortable that I will be able to pick up something of interest. 

- I have recently become active in the Ultralight DXing hobby and I am finding this to be a good match for my time, skills, and equipment. What you hear on a scanner can vary a lot based on your location; even 25km can make a huge difference. With the Ultralight DXing hobby you can hear something of interest no matter where you are. This is becoming a passion of mine.

Going back to my original question of the difference between a hobby, passion, and interest I have some thoughts, I will use fishing as an example, but this can be related back to almost anything.

If you go fishing a couple of times a year when you go away for a holiday, then this is an interest.

If you go fishing a couple of times a month and maybe read a magazine or two this is a hobby.

If you go fishing as often as you can, read magazines and books, maybe be a part of a club and plan things around fishing then this is a passion.

The second part of this is around other people and what they see of you from your interest, hobby, or passion. I work with computers as my job and while I enjoy the work it is not really a passion; it is what pays the bills. Some people I know work with computers but also play games, build websites, and build computers outside work, this then becomes a passion for them. Sometimes when I am talking to people, they are surprised to find I do not have a huge computer at home and that I do not play games much. A lot of people get defined by other people because of their work whereas in a lot of cases that is not all that is important to them. I would much rather talk about radios than computers for example.

Something to always be mindful of is that your interest, hobby, or passion does not become to the determent of your work, family, friends, or relationships. I have on more than one occasion seen how destructive a single focus having can be to relationships. Balance is the key; however, you should not let somebody try and change you to suit what they perceive as being right or better. 

This leads to an interesting question: “How Much Is Too Much to Spend on Your Hobbies?”

Recently my wife and I have taken on the "minimalism" lifestyle by making the choice to live happily with less. 

The UltralightDX hobby is already focused on this, our radios are both small and cheap. As part of my research, I came across this article which I found very interesting, and which made me think: How much is too much to spend on a hobby? 

Is this from a financial point of view? What about the value you get from it? Can you put a value on this? What is your time worth? Where does it fit in to your overall life?

To me it is all about value, if I spend $1000 on something and use it every day for three years then it costs me about 91c a day. Spending $100 on something I use only 10 times is not good value. 


Re: Sangean HDR-14 UL HD AM/FM Radio - What do you think?

Peter 1956 <pe1etr@...>
 

Yes it has both 9kHz and 10kHz steps but no 1kHz step, on MW.
It is basically the same radio as the Eton Traveller III, that came number 1 for MW sensitivity and directivity on Gary DeBock's 2015 ultralight shootout. (The only negative is that it just has a fixed IF bandwidth on AM)
Yes it has 50kHz and 100kHz steps on FM. The main problem is the telescopic whip is short, same length as the Skywave.
The tuning wheel slow/fast steps can be set by pressing a button, like on the Eton G8 Traveller II.

Peter


Re: Why Your Hobbies Are Important – Finding Your Passion

Jorge Garzón <iberiaDX@...>
 

Paul, 
Congratulations for your concise, accurate and soustainable thoughts expressed on your blog post! I do agree with everything and regarding your minimalism way of living (I am also on that mood... ) is what I called the 'right human scale' of the things. 

El vie., may. 21, 2021 a 6:37, Paul Blundell
<tanger32au@...> escribió:
 

 

Having a hobby that we enjoy and for which you have a passion can really bring out joy and improve our lives. It can give us something fun and enjoyable to do during our leisure time and provides us the opportunity to learn new skills. Over the past two decades, hobbies in general seem to have dropped off, whereas in the past they were seen as an essential part of a “balanced life”, between work and other things, having a hobby (no matter what that is) does not seem to be as important as it was in the past.

The best way to cultivate a new hobby is to try different hobbies until one “sticks”. Of course, all of us are unique and, therefore, our interests and hobbies vary. But once we find a hobby that we truly enjoy and are passionate about, we become hooked. It becomes a real part of our lives and captivates us in a very personal way. What matters the most is that you enjoy your hobby, and you are doing it for the right reasons, your own sense of enjoyment and not due to pressure from any other people.

Your hobbies are a part of you, no less than your job, friends, or any other part of you. 

Is your hobby also your passion or has your passion become your hobby? Does it matter? What about interests, where do they fit in? A lot of people think that your hobby is your passion and that you must have a hobby you are passionate about; I disagree for several reasons.

What is the difference between a hobby and a passion? One definition I have heard is this: “A hobby is something you choose to do when you have a little spare time, but a passion is something that you consider fundamental to your life”

Expanding on this and relating it back to radios and me I have some thoughts this. A lot of people are involved in the radio hobby for several reasons. Some people have this as an extension of their professional work or volunteer work, for others it was a hobby passed on to them from family or friends. The main difference to me between a hobby, passions and interests is both how you feel about and how other people see it.

I first became involved in the radio hobby as a teenager listening to distant radio stations on the AM broadcast band of a night-time, as I grew older, I became involved in electronics at college and this grew to an interest in another radio related area which was radio scanning, this was about 20 years ago. Over the past 20 years while I have mostly been involved in radio scanning, I have a couple of times tried by hand at shortwave and medium wave listening with mixed success. In all these cases this was as an addition to the radio scanning hobby, now I have totally removed myself from the radio scanning hobby and I am concentrating on the broadcast bands, mostly medium wave Ultralight DXing.

The reason I decided to make this change after 20 years is based on a few things: 

- The public perception of radio scanning is not as good as shortwave listening or AM BCB DXing, most people know nothing about radio scanning and when you try and explain it to them either they think it should be illegal or they look at you like you are some sort of weirdo. Radio scanning is not really the sort of hobby that you can talk to other people about easily. When I was involved in the radio scanning hobby, I was more interested in the technical / procedure details and less about the content which is different to most people who only care about finding out what was going on.

- The cost of equipment is less, and it is easier to source locally. Whereas a scanner can start at $150 and go up into the thousands, ultralight broadcast band receivers are much cheaper and unless you want to get very serious a basic $60 radio will do 95% of what you need.

- After 20 years the radio scanning hobby has to me lost some of the appeal, you can only hear so many taxi drivers calling for jobs or rubbish trucks talking about bin pickups before you get sick of it.

- As I work during the day my scanning time is limited to a night-time or of a weekend, while you can sometimes hear interesting things during these times most of the radio traffic, I am interested in happens during the day, while I am at work. As medium wave broadcasting is a 24/7 business at any time of the day or night, I can be comfortable that I will be able to pick up something of interest. 

- I have recently become active in the Ultralight DXing hobby and I am finding this to be a good match for my time, skills, and equipment. What you hear on a scanner can vary a lot based on your location; even 25km can make a huge difference. With the Ultralight DXing hobby you can hear something of interest no matter where you are. This is becoming a passion of mine.

Going back to my original question of the difference between a hobby, passion, and interest I have some thoughts, I will use fishing as an example, but this can be related back to almost anything.

If you go fishing a couple of times a year when you go away for a holiday, then this is an interest.

If you go fishing a couple of times a month and maybe read a magazine or two this is a hobby.

If you go fishing as often as you can, read magazines and books, maybe be a part of a club and plan things around fishing then this is a passion.

The second part of this is around other people and what they see of you from your interest, hobby, or passion. I work with computers as my job and while I enjoy the work it is not really a passion; it is what pays the bills. Some people I know work with computers but also play games, build websites, and build computers outside work, this then becomes a passion for them. Sometimes when I am talking to people, they are surprised to find I do not have a huge computer at home and that I do not play games much. A lot of people get defined by other people because of their work whereas in a lot of cases that is not all that is important to them. I would much rather talk about radios than computers for example.

Something to always be mindful of is that your interest, hobby, or passion does not become to the determent of your work, family, friends, or relationships. I have on more than one occasion seen how destructive a single focus having can be to relationships. Balance is the key; however, you should not let somebody try and change you to suit what they perceive as being right or better. 

This leads to an interesting question: “How Much Is Too Much to Spend on Your Hobbies?”

Recently my wife and I have taken on the "minimalism" lifestyle by making the choice to live happily with less. 

The UltralightDX hobby is already focused on this, our radios are both small and cheap. As part of my research, I came across this article which I found very interesting, and which made me think: How much is too much to spend on a hobby? 

Is this from a financial point of view? What about the value you get from it? Can you put a value on this? What is your time worth? Where does it fit in to your overall life?

To me it is all about value, if I spend $1000 on something and use it every day for three years then it costs me about 91c a day. Spending $100 on something I use only 10 times is not good value. 


Re: Sangean HDR-14 UL HD AM/FM Radio - What do you think?

Jorge Garzón <iberiaDX@...>
 

I see Peter. Has it 9 kHz MW steps? Or more accurate 1 kHz. Any 50/100 kHz steps option on FM. Maybe you think a mods to add an external FM aerial plug-in? An ULR with PI decoding is a jewel! 

El vie., may. 21, 2021 a 6:03, Peter 1956
<pe1etr@...> escribió:
Hello Jorge,
The Eton Elite Traveler is an ultralight that will display a PI code, but it needs a strong signal, and there is no external aerial socket.
https://youtu.be/qK8wuSC3SJ8

Peter


Why Your Hobbies Are Important – Finding Your Passion

Paul Blundell
 

 

 

Having a hobby that we enjoy and for which you have a passion can really bring out joy and improve our lives. It can give us something fun and enjoyable to do during our leisure time and provides us the opportunity to learn new skills. Over the past two decades, hobbies in general seem to have dropped off, whereas in the past they were seen as an essential part of a “balanced life”, between work and other things, having a hobby (no matter what that is) does not seem to be as important as it was in the past.

The best way to cultivate a new hobby is to try different hobbies until one “sticks”. Of course, all of us are unique and, therefore, our interests and hobbies vary. But once we find a hobby that we truly enjoy and are passionate about, we become hooked. It becomes a real part of our lives and captivates us in a very personal way. What matters the most is that you enjoy your hobby, and you are doing it for the right reasons, your own sense of enjoyment and not due to pressure from any other people.

Your hobbies are a part of you, no less than your job, friends, or any other part of you. 

Is your hobby also your passion or has your passion become your hobby? Does it matter? What about interests, where do they fit in? A lot of people think that your hobby is your passion and that you must have a hobby you are passionate about; I disagree for several reasons.

What is the difference between a hobby and a passion? One definition I have heard is this: “A hobby is something you choose to do when you have a little spare time, but a passion is something that you consider fundamental to your life”

Expanding on this and relating it back to radios and me I have some thoughts this. A lot of people are involved in the radio hobby for several reasons. Some people have this as an extension of their professional work or volunteer work, for others it was a hobby passed on to them from family or friends. The main difference to me between a hobby, passions and interests is both how you feel about and how other people see it.

I first became involved in the radio hobby as a teenager listening to distant radio stations on the AM broadcast band of a night-time, as I grew older, I became involved in electronics at college and this grew to an interest in another radio related area which was radio scanning, this was about 20 years ago. Over the past 20 years while I have mostly been involved in radio scanning, I have a couple of times tried by hand at shortwave and medium wave listening with mixed success. In all these cases this was as an addition to the radio scanning hobby, now I have totally removed myself from the radio scanning hobby and I am concentrating on the broadcast bands, mostly medium wave Ultralight DXing.

The reason I decided to make this change after 20 years is based on a few things: 

- The public perception of radio scanning is not as good as shortwave listening or AM BCB DXing, most people know nothing about radio scanning and when you try and explain it to them either they think it should be illegal or they look at you like you are some sort of weirdo. Radio scanning is not really the sort of hobby that you can talk to other people about easily. When I was involved in the radio scanning hobby, I was more interested in the technical / procedure details and less about the content which is different to most people who only care about finding out what was going on.

- The cost of equipment is less, and it is easier to source locally. Whereas a scanner can start at $150 and go up into the thousands, ultralight broadcast band receivers are much cheaper and unless you want to get very serious a basic $60 radio will do 95% of what you need.

- After 20 years the radio scanning hobby has to me lost some of the appeal, you can only hear so many taxi drivers calling for jobs or rubbish trucks talking about bin pickups before you get sick of it.

- As I work during the day my scanning time is limited to a night-time or of a weekend, while you can sometimes hear interesting things during these times most of the radio traffic, I am interested in happens during the day, while I am at work. As medium wave broadcasting is a 24/7 business at any time of the day or night, I can be comfortable that I will be able to pick up something of interest. 

- I have recently become active in the Ultralight DXing hobby and I am finding this to be a good match for my time, skills, and equipment. What you hear on a scanner can vary a lot based on your location; even 25km can make a huge difference. With the Ultralight DXing hobby you can hear something of interest no matter where you are. This is becoming a passion of mine.

Going back to my original question of the difference between a hobby, passion, and interest I have some thoughts, I will use fishing as an example, but this can be related back to almost anything.

If you go fishing a couple of times a year when you go away for a holiday, then this is an interest.

If you go fishing a couple of times a month and maybe read a magazine or two this is a hobby.

If you go fishing as often as you can, read magazines and books, maybe be a part of a club and plan things around fishing then this is a passion.

The second part of this is around other people and what they see of you from your interest, hobby, or passion. I work with computers as my job and while I enjoy the work it is not really a passion; it is what pays the bills. Some people I know work with computers but also play games, build websites, and build computers outside work, this then becomes a passion for them. Sometimes when I am talking to people, they are surprised to find I do not have a huge computer at home and that I do not play games much. A lot of people get defined by other people because of their work whereas in a lot of cases that is not all that is important to them. I would much rather talk about radios than computers for example.

Something to always be mindful of is that your interest, hobby, or passion does not become to the determent of your work, family, friends, or relationships. I have on more than one occasion seen how destructive a single focus having can be to relationships. Balance is the key; however, you should not let somebody try and change you to suit what they perceive as being right or better. 

This leads to an interesting question: “How Much Is Too Much to Spend on Your Hobbies?”

Recently my wife and I have taken on the "minimalism" lifestyle by making the choice to live happily with less. 

The UltralightDX hobby is already focused on this, our radios are both small and cheap. As part of my research, I came across this article which I found very interesting, and which made me think: How much is too much to spend on a hobby? 

Is this from a financial point of view? What about the value you get from it? Can you put a value on this? What is your time worth? Where does it fit in to your overall life?

To me it is all about value, if I spend $1000 on something and use it every day for three years then it costs me about 91c a day. Spending $100 on something I use only 10 times is not good value. 


Re: Sangean HDR-14 UL HD AM/FM Radio - What do you think?

Peter 1956 <pe1etr@...>
 

Hello Jorge,
The Eton Elite Traveler is an ultralight that will display a PI code, but it needs a strong signal, and there is no external aerial socket.
https://youtu.be/qK8wuSC3SJ8

Peter


Re: 549kHz - 2CR - Other Stations

Paul Blundell
 

Last night was the first time in a week or more that I heard some weak traces of a signal that was not 2CR. Over the weekend I will be spending some time trying to track down what station it is.

Paul


AR-1733 - Charging

Paul Blundell
 

As per the user guide.
"*Charging Notes: When the user uses rechargeable batteries, we recommend to use Ni-MH or Ni-Cd rechargeable batteries. The average current is 200mA. For example, it will take 10 hours to charge 2000mA/H batteries fully. For more capacity battery, the user has to charge them by multi-startup methods until charging is full.

 Max charging time: ≤10 hours, the aim is to protect rechargeable batteries or unit from being damaged;

 Charging voltage protection: when the batteries reach full-charging voltage,the unit will stop charging automatically to prevent batteries from being damaged;

 Battery detection function: the unit can detect the status of short circuit or open circuit with one or two batteries. If Not sure batteries are in good or bad condition, the unit will stop charging automatically in 10 hours. "

Has anybody used the inbuilt charging feature of the AR-1733 and found it does not actually seem to work? I normally get a few weeks of use out of a set of 2200mHa rechargeable batteries, these I normally charge in an external charger but due to our recent move, I instead plugged in a USB cable and enabled the charging feature. This ran for around 8 hours. The next day I only got a very short run time before the batteries shown as flat.

Paul


Re: Your current "personal" radio DX challenge?

Paul Blundell
 

How has this worked out for you?

Paul


Re: Sangean HDR-14 UL HD AM/FM Radio - What do you think?

Paul Blundell
 

That is a nice looking radio, I look forward to hearing how it works for you.

Paul

On Thu, May 20, 2021 at 10:25 PM Johnny via groups.io <jlochey=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi all,

I just picked up a new Sangean HDR-14, UL sized HD AM/FM radio.

I'm looking forward to starting my VERY informal testing "process" with it.

I bought it mostly for FM DX and it's HD capabilities, as I think that it is just "okay" on AM in general.

I like to test my new radios against my current favorites:
  • CCrane Skywave
  • Sangean DT-800
  • Sihuadon R-108
  • CCrane CCRadio-2E (If it does good against this one, then in my opinion, it has pretty good reception)

Anyone else like this radio?  If so, how do you feel that is measures up to your other UL radios?


Johnny



--
Paul


Re: Ultralight FM DX'ing - What can a newbie expect?

Johnny
 

Hi Jay,

Yeah, I really like these two also!

I really like the CCRadio EP Pro as well, but the analog dial limits is somewhat, but on the other hand, the analog dial is kind of what makes it cool too!  :)


Johnny


Re: Sangean HDR-14 UL HD AM/FM Radio - What do you think?

Johnny
 

Hi Jorge,

Thanks for your great reply, very helpful!  As you said, the size of this unit is it's real draw for me.


Hi Jay,

I know!  I have read practically every review on your website at least a few times and probably go to your website at least once a day!  Thank you for this great resource!


Hi Michael,

I do believe that this one is not a DX rig as you mention and I am concerned whether I will like it, but we shall see.  In my area, HD is not that popular yet, so that is also a factor.

"still sports the best LCD display technology that the 1990's can offer." -- Love it!!!  I laughed out loud!



Thanks guys!


Johnny


Re: Sangean HDR-14 UL HD AM/FM Radio - What do you think?

Michael Schuster
 
Edited

As somewhat a collector of IBOC ("HD Radio") sets I purchased this upon its release. A miniaturized version of the HDR-16, crammed into the cabinet used for the Sangean DPR-65 FM/DAB+ portable, there had to be some design compromises. Your intended comparison sets should prove to be an interesting exercise as the others are really aimed at different market segments - apples and oranges. The HDR-14 is not a DX rig but aimed at the casual program listener who has HD stations nearby and wants to take advantage. Frankly if you're outside of North America I can't see any reason to buy it over other postabls unless you are a collector .... but then, many of us are!

When this model was introduced I posted to the SWL blog a quick comparison with its direct competitor - the NiceTex ("SPARC" "Audiovox") SHD-TX2. In the end the NiceTex is marginally a better performer on RF and has much better audio from the speaker due to its passive radiator design. It was never well distributed though and unfortunately seems to have been silently discontinued along with the majority of their private label portables.

The HDR-14 is quite competent on FM which is probably true of most portables designed in the last few years. Its HD capture is really good, which does require very good sensitivity. AM performance is hampered by a small ferrite antenna and rather wide selectivity - again reflecting the design choices made in its market position and re-using a cabinet that did not even have AM section in its original configuration. There are quite a few birdies on AM which may or may not matter depending on whether you have stations which overlap those frequencies. I live in an area in which one of the last remaining AM-HD stations is still on the air, and it does handle it very well. I even snagged AM-HD Dx occasionally from a station ~75 miles away or so.

It is somewhat of a battery hog though, and true to Sangean's design philosophy of beating existing circuit designs to death, still sports the best LCD display technology that the 1990's can offer.


Re: Sangean HDR-14 UL HD AM/FM Radio - What do you think?

radiojayallen
 


Re: Ultralight FM DX'ing - What can a newbie expect?

radiojayallen
 

I find the CC-2E/CC-3 and Eton Field BT/Elite Field to be truly excellent FM performers...as good as it gets in portables. I use them as references to compare everything else to and several are in the same category but none have beat these two yet.

Jay


Re: Sangean HDR-14 UL HD AM/FM Radio - What do you think?

Jorge Garzón <iberiaDX@...>
 
Edited

Hi Johnny, 
I bought my Sangean HDR-14 nine months ago and I find this model a capable receiver. On MW (AM) is just on the average and better on FM. I cannot add anything regarding HD AM as this choice isn't implemented here in Europe. So FM is the main interest here.

RDS decode is quite good and do it correctly, at least the PS name. Unfortunately the PI decoding is just valid for the USA and Canada (not sure about this latest one) as they use the RDBS data index instead of the WW RDS data index. It's a pity because would be the only ULR/Small Portable that I know with PI decoding capabilities. A real useful DXing tool when implemented! 

This small toy is a Sangean portable and it does mean 'good sensitivity and not bad selectivity' by definition. The receiver will be able to detect weak signals but the inteligibility will be sometimes compromised because of a lack of good selectivity. Audio is OK and good by connecting the earbuds. Size is extraordinary to be carried in the field and directivity can be explored conveniently with the rotating whip. An example of this can be viewed here: https://youtu.be/pyrZ90RD9_0

PSE, share your comments on this small one here. Probably mine is one of the few Sangean HDR-14 units in Spain. 

¡73 y buen DX! 
--
Jorge Garzón (EB7EFA · EA1036 SWL) 
QTH: IN83ag / 43º15' N · 03º56' W
Urb. San Roque 95, casa 5 (Villasevil)
39698 Santiurde de Toranzo (ESPAÑA - SPAIN)
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Blog: IberiaDX  · Twitter: @IberiaDX

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