Date   

WENR 1090-TN DX Test

Dave Hascall
 

Not sure if this went out or not.

Heard the DX Test perfectly on my Tecsun PL-606 barefoot.  In fact when I first tuned in at 0002, EST (standard at that time), it sounded like the sweep tones made it the only station on the frequency.  But in reality, there was a small break in programming from (apparent) KAAY-AR.  

New station.  Thanks to Les and Phil and everyone involved.

73,
Dave in Indy (Noblesville)


Re: "Disco Inferno" On 1107kHz In Alaska!

K7DWI Art
 

Recently revived my Gerrard Turntable.
I didn't want to injure a good album testing it out.
So I picked up my "Saturday Night Fever" album and put on "Disco Inferno" 😁
By the way, the Tecsun, Kaito and my Radio Shack (I have that one) MW Loops works great with the Pioneer.
Hoping the weather clears out (snowing today) to have a good DXing session before FM BC begins.
73 Art 


2NC 1233kHz In Alaska!

Paul B. Walker, Jr.
 

Between 1430 and 1500UTC heard some phone chat then a lady telling some kind of story.  Heard ABC fanfare and newsreader say “ABC” going into the news intro. 20kw at 7220 miles!

Paul walker 
McGrath Alaska 
Cc Skywave and 5” DeBock fsl antenna


Re: NEW LOG: Rhema Radio 1251kHz

Paul B. Walker, Jr.
 

Here’s my audio of Rhema Raido 1251 Auckland.  Not great but it’s there:


On Sun, Mar 14, 2021 at 3:23 PM Paul B. Walker, Jr. <walkerbroadcasting@...> wrote:
The 5000 Watt Auckland transmitter for Rhema Radio on 1251khz made the 7100 mile/11410km journey to McGrath, Alaska on Sunday March 14th between 1545 and 1605UTC. I had some music that sounded like english language music.. just starting to bubble up slightly above the noise. Pulling up the Rhema stream, it sounded like a cadence match but I couldn't be for absolute sure, but the only other english language 1251 was in Australia and running all talk at the moment, I certainly had music here.  

About 1703UTC give or take I had a fade up of accented english reading a weather.. I grabbed my phone and hit play on the Rhema stream and had a MATCH with weather playing on the stream about 45 seconds later as I stood outside at -5F below.  (amazing considering I was using wifi on my phone thats connected to satellite internet.. amazing that the delay was only 45 seconds!)

Paul Walker
McGrath, Alaska
CC Skywave & DeBock 5" FSL Antenna


Re: Initial impressions of the CCrane Skywave SSB

Paul Blundell
 

It is great to hear how well this is working for you, they sure sound like a "do it all" radio.

Paul

On Mon, 15 Mar 2021, 10:35 Jock Elliott, <jock.elliott@...> wrote:

There’s a tendency, on viewing the CCrane Skywave SSB for the first time, to say something like, “Awwww, it’s so cute!” It measures just 3 inches high by 5 inches wide by about an inch thick and weighs just ounces. It’s so small that it will actually slide into the chest pocket of one of my flannel shirts with a bit of room to spare. It seems, well, almost toy-like.

A thought comes to mind: can something so small actually perform well? Further, it ought to perform well for the price, right?

Jay of www.radiojayallen.com calls the Skywave SSB “the Swiss Army Knife of radio,” and the moniker fits: it covers FM 87.5 – 108.0 Mhz, AM 520-1710 kHz, WX channels 1-7, AIR 118-137 MHz, and SW 1711-29999 kHz.

But despite its diminutive size, the CCrane Skywave SSB is a serious radio. It does everything advertised on the box; it does them pretty darn well, and in my mind so far at least, it’s worth the money.

What I really enjoy about the Skywave SSB is that it is small enough to hold in my lap and cruise the bands to what’s out there, and it is simply great fun.

I found some happy surprises.

(11. In the wee hours of the morning, I was tuning through the MW AM band with both the Skywave SSB and the 2E (both on their internal antennas), found a barely audible station, and found that I could actually hear it better with the Skywave SSB because of the selection of bandwidths that I could access on the SSB. Note: I am not asserting that the SSB will outperform the 2E in all circumstances, but it’s nice to know that it did in at least this one instance.

(22. The WX (NOAA weather channel) performance appears to be as good on the Skywave SSB as on the 2E. There is also a weather radio alert function that is easy to engage.

(33. The SSB has a scan feature that works on AM, FM, SW bands, and even works for scanning the ham bands in SSB mode. If you scan the HF frequencies in AM mode, the radio will jump from one international shortwave band to another. If you scan in SSB mode, the radio jumps from one international ham band to another and automatically switches from USB to LSB as appropriate.

(44. At first, I thought the Skywave SSB might be relatively deaf on the ham bands, but then I checked the ham bands with my Grundig Satellit 800 and heard nothing there as well. So I hooked up the reel-up shortwave antenna that comes with the Skywave SSB, clipping it to the SSB’s whip antenna, and was soon happily listening to hams chatting on the 40 meters band.

Further, the ergonomics of the SSB are pretty darn good, and the manual is clear, well written, and obviously written by someone who actually enjoys radios and gives a hoot about the user.

Interestingly, the Skywave SSB treats single-sideband as a separate band. Right below the display it says: AM, FM, WX, AIR, SW, SSB. There is a separate button to engage SSB mode (there is a tiny LED that lights when SSB is active) and yet another button to select LSB/USB. If you want to fine-tune the signal, there is another button, with light, for that.

There is also a one-page “Quickstart Guide for SSB” that I think is just terrific, and the introduction to the manual provides a very brief overview of some of the things you might be able to hear while using the Skywave SSB. Well done, CCrane!

Years ago, I had a conversation with Tom Kneitel, editor of PopComm. He said he saw his job as “10 percent telling people how to do something, and 90 percent selling the romance of doing it at all.”

There is a lot more that could be said about the Skywave SSB, and I certainly recommend radiojayallen’s review: https://radiojayallen.com/c-crane-cc-skywave-ssb-radio/

My initial impression is that the CCrane Skywave SSB is really enjoyable tool for engaging “the romance” of scanning the airwaves.

Before you comment, realize this is an initial impression and not intended to be an exhaustive review.

 

 


Re: NEW LOG: Rhema Radio 1251kHz

Paul Blundell
 

Great logging Paul, I love reading about what you are able to log.

Paul

On Mon, 15 Mar 2021, 10:23 Paul B. Walker, Jr., <walkerbroadcasting@...> wrote:
The 5000 Watt Auckland transmitter for Rhema Radio on 1251khz made the 7100 mile/11410km journey to McGrath, Alaska on Sunday March 14th between 1545 and 1605UTC. I had some music that sounded like english language music.. just starting to bubble up slightly above the noise. Pulling up the Rhema stream, it sounded like a cadence match but I couldn't be for absolute sure, but the only other english language 1251 was in Australia and running all talk at the moment, I certainly had music here.  

About 1703UTC give or take I had a fade up of accented english reading a weather.. I grabbed my phone and hit play on the Rhema stream and had a MATCH with weather playing on the stream about 45 seconds later as I stood outside at -5F below.  (amazing considering I was using wifi on my phone thats connected to satellite internet.. amazing that the delay was only 45 seconds!)

Paul Walker
McGrath, Alaska
CC Skywave & DeBock 5" FSL Antenna


Initial impressions of the CCrane Skywave SSB

Jock Elliott
 

There’s a tendency, on viewing the CCrane Skywave SSB for the first time, to say something like, “Awwww, it’s so cute!” It measures just 3 inches high by 5 inches wide by about an inch thick and weighs just ounces. It’s so small that it will actually slide into the chest pocket of one of my flannel shirts with a bit of room to spare. It seems, well, almost toy-like.

A thought comes to mind: can something so small actually perform well? Further, it ought to perform well for the price, right?

Jay of www.radiojayallen.com calls the Skywave SSB “the Swiss Army Knife of radio,” and the moniker fits: it covers FM 87.5 – 108.0 Mhz, AM 520-1710 kHz, WX channels 1-7, AIR 118-137 MHz, and SW 1711-29999 kHz.

But despite its diminutive size, the CCrane Skywave SSB is a serious radio. It does everything advertised on the box; it does them pretty darn well, and in my mind so far at least, it’s worth the money.

What I really enjoy about the Skywave SSB is that it is small enough to hold in my lap and cruise the bands to what’s out there, and it is simply great fun.

I found some happy surprises.

(11. In the wee hours of the morning, I was tuning through the MW AM band with both the Skywave SSB and the 2E (both on their internal antennas), found a barely audible station, and found that I could actually hear it better with the Skywave SSB because of the selection of bandwidths that I could access on the SSB. Note: I am not asserting that the SSB will outperform the 2E in all circumstances, but it’s nice to know that it did in at least this one instance.

(22. The WX (NOAA weather channel) performance appears to be as good on the Skywave SSB as on the 2E. There is also a weather radio alert function that is easy to engage.

(33. The SSB has a scan feature that works on AM, FM, SW bands, and even works for scanning the ham bands in SSB mode. If you scan the HF frequencies in AM mode, the radio will jump from one international shortwave band to another. If you scan in SSB mode, the radio jumps from one international ham band to another and automatically switches from USB to LSB as appropriate.

(44. At first, I thought the Skywave SSB might be relatively deaf on the ham bands, but then I checked the ham bands with my Grundig Satellit 800 and heard nothing there as well. So I hooked up the reel-up shortwave antenna that comes with the Skywave SSB, clipping it to the SSB’s whip antenna, and was soon happily listening to hams chatting on the 40 meters band.

Further, the ergonomics of the SSB are pretty darn good, and the manual is clear, well written, and obviously written by someone who actually enjoys radios and gives a hoot about the user.

Interestingly, the Skywave SSB treats single-sideband as a separate band. Right below the display it says: AM, FM, WX, AIR, SW, SSB. There is a separate button to engage SSB mode (there is a tiny LED that lights when SSB is active) and yet another button to select LSB/USB. If you want to fine-tune the signal, there is another button, with light, for that.

There is also a one-page “Quickstart Guide for SSB” that I think is just terrific, and the introduction to the manual provides a very brief overview of some of the things you might be able to hear while using the Skywave SSB. Well done, CCrane!

Years ago, I had a conversation with Tom Kneitel, editor of PopComm. He said he saw his job as “10 percent telling people how to do something, and 90 percent selling the romance of doing it at all.”

There is a lot more that could be said about the Skywave SSB, and I certainly recommend radiojayallen’s review: https://radiojayallen.com/c-crane-cc-skywave-ssb-radio/

My initial impression is that the CCrane Skywave SSB is really enjoyable tool for engaging “the romance” of scanning the airwaves.

Before you comment, realize this is an initial impression and not intended to be an exhaustive review.

 

 


NEW LOG: Rhema Radio 1251kHz

Paul B. Walker, Jr.
 

The 5000 Watt Auckland transmitter for Rhema Radio on 1251khz made the 7100 mile/11410km journey to McGrath, Alaska on Sunday March 14th between 1545 and 1605UTC. I had some music that sounded like english language music.. just starting to bubble up slightly above the noise. Pulling up the Rhema stream, it sounded like a cadence match but I couldn't be for absolute sure, but the only other english language 1251 was in Australia and running all talk at the moment, I certainly had music here.  

About 1703UTC give or take I had a fade up of accented english reading a weather.. I grabbed my phone and hit play on the Rhema stream and had a MATCH with weather playing on the stream about 45 seconds later as I stood outside at -5F below.  (amazing considering I was using wifi on my phone thats connected to satellite internet.. amazing that the delay was only 45 seconds!)

Paul Walker
McGrath, Alaska
CC Skywave & DeBock 5" FSL Antenna


February 2021 DX catches-with interactive map link

Alex
 

Well better late than never, here are my AM DX logs for February 2021, during February I was exposed via a Co-worker to COVID-19 and thus was quarantined for 14 days. So what to do on a Cold winter night? AM DX of course!!!!

A couple hours before I permanently left Facebook in February, I spotted a vintage Select-A-Tenna in Facebook marketplace. When it was originally listed on the site, the seller listed it at $70 (USD) and now about a month later it was lowered to $40 + $12 Shipping (USD). Seemed a little rich for something I was unsure if it really “worked ” or not. I remember seeing the ads in the classified ads of my fathers Popular Mechanics, and Popular Science Magazines from the 1970's through the 1990's, right next to the ads for “Miraculous Free Energy Machines” and plans to make your own “helicopter packs” in your garage.

I was about ready to pass it up, when I noticed the “Make a offer” box, on a whim I made a offer of $ 25 + shipping. Low and behold the seller accepted the offer!!!! A little research showed that S-A-T's were listed at $70 (USD) in the mid 90's or about $124 adjusted for inflation in today's money.

The Select-A-Tenna (S-A-T ) is a passive (no electrical power) tunable, inductively (no physical wires) coupled loop antenna that was sold from 1971 till about 2007 by Intensitronics Corporation of Hales Corners, Wisconsin. There were 3 basic models of S-A-T the 541 (which I bought), the 541-M, and the 541-S.

The 541 is totally passive in that it requires no power to work in conjunction with a AM receiver that has a internal AM loop stick antenna within 6in of the outer most edge of either face of the unit. Logistically and practically speaking you want the side with the tuning knob facing you. Through this inductive coupling it boosts the received signal up to 30+db.

The 541-M differ from the basic 541 in that it has a separate inductive coil (still integral into the same case), that allows for 3 “mode” operation. You can tell a 541-M from a basic 541 in that there is a 3.5mm phone jack on the face under the tuning knob. “First mode” like the Basic 541 it will inductively couple with the standard AM radios internal loop antenna. “Second mode” is if your receiver is say a consumer stereo unit or communications receiver lacking a internal AM loopstick antenna, you make a 3.5 jacket jumper from the S-A-T to the radio's input jack or lugs.

The third mode is if you live in a situation that makes conventional AM reception near impossible, say living in a modern construction house with metal lathe on it's face for a stucco look-a-like material called “Dryvit. The metal mesh holds the material to the face of the house, but blocks RF signals. Same with a mobile home or having a radio in a concrete basement. So by running a exterior antenna to the outside, the signal will come down the wire into to 3.5mm jack and re-radiate the signal via the S-A-T to the nearby radio receiver.

The 541-S does all the above, but the added wrinkle of having a on-board ACTIVE internal RF amplifier. It runs on a standard 9v battery. This on-board amplifier adds even more punch to the 30 db signal improvement of the passive 541/541M and adds yet another +10db to the signal. That's right 40+ db signal improvement!!!! The amplifier also allows for a ferrite “probe” to be used from the 3.5mm jack with a 6 foot (2 meter) long probe so a receiver lacking antenna input didn't have to be right next to the unit in order to benefit from the S-A-T. The probe could be remoted up to 26 feet to a receiver.

This model is the easiest to pick out for it has three knobs, a general frequency tuning knob, a “peak” knob for the active amplifier, and a fine tuning knob, a on switch, with LED indicator lamp, with a 3.5mm output on the front. On the back is a signal 3.5mm input and a 9v battery compartment door. It was the Ne Plus Ultra of the line of Intensitronics products. It used to retail for about $180 (USD) near the companies end in 2007.

So how well does the Select-A-Tenna work, or is it like the “X-Ray” specs you got from last page adds in the old childhood comic books?

 

Well I'm happy to say yes!!!!!!

From the very first station 1130 KHz WBBR I was convinced. I would tune the ICF-P26 away from the S-A-T for a real weak station, and then put it up against the SAT and fine tune the loop for maximum “peak” in signal. Now one “quirk” I've noticed with in process of tuning........ If say have my radio on 600 KHz, I can somehow end up with 590 KHz or 610 KHz come up full strength while tuning it. Which can lead to “false positives” if your tuning scale is off on your radio to start with.

But the Select-A-Tenna help put about 18 or so stations in the log, when I didn't employ the GE Super Radio II. One being only the 2nd Maryland station (WPTX) to put in my log book.

If one is like me and limited to “no antennas”, due to very strict HOA rules, a AM loop might just be the ticket!!!

By the way for those that can't find a used S-A-T at a reasonable price, Kaito / Tecsun called the AN-200 it's a loop antenna that is equivalent to the 541-M, and is also equal in performance when compared side by side. At this writing it's being sold on ebay for under $40. If you can pick a S-A-T near the same price for go for it.

Granted there are radios that the S-A-T can't help nor do they need it the GE Super Radio II is one of those radios. But lesser types, you'll be glad to you did.

There is one other tip, and that is purchase a flat 12” spice rack turntable from a housewares cooking store this $12 purchase will allow for the Select-A-Tenna and the radio to null out interfering stations and direct the lob towards the desired station.


 

 

 

 

Statistics


Most stations logged with Sony ICF-P-26 Pocket AM/FM Radio / Select-A-Tenna combination (ULR Unlimited Class), except as noted.

23 total stations logged, 6 Foreign, 17 Domestic.

Nearest station in air miles: 25 (WCNW Fairfield, OH)

Furthest station in air miles: 1445 Baracoa-Van Van, Guantánamo, Cuba

Most stations logged on a single frequency: 3 on 1560 Khz as WFME a 50 Kw Queens, NY station left the air for good on February 11, the rush was on to hear what could be heard from ones QTH in my case it was WCNW, WGLB, and WKDO.


 

States, Foreign countries, and provinces logged

 

1 – Alabama WXJC (Brigingham)


3 – Cuba (1*) Radio Reljo (Jovellanos, Matanzas and Baracoa-Van Van, Guantánamo) TX's Radio Rebelde One of 5 Synchronized TX's on the island at 50 Kw each.

 

4 – Canada ( 3- Ontario) (1*, 1$) CHKT / CHHA (Toronto) and CKAT (North Bay)


(1- Quebec) CFNV, (Montreal)

 

2 – Kentucky WKDO (Liberty) and WCWC (Williamsburg)

 

1 – Georgia WQXI (Atlanta)

 

1 – Iowa * KWMT (Fort Dodge)

1 – Maryland WPTX (Lexington Park)

1 – Michigan WGVS (Muskegon)

1 – New York WBBR (New York City)

2 – Ohio WCNW (Fairfield) and WVSG (EX-WOSU Columbus-Worthington)

1 – Pennsylvania WSAN (Allentown)

1 – Tennessee * WKTP (Jonesborough)

 

1 – Virginia 1260 KHz WWVT (Christiansburg)

1 – Wisconsin * WTMJ (Milwaukee)

* = GE Super Radio II ULR: D/Q.
$ = Relistic DX-394 Modified by Radio Labs (Base radio is a Radio Shack store branded 1st generation Sangean ATS-909) ULR: D/Q.


https://www.google.com/maps/d/edit?mid=1CkQI5AjRxAvGDgzH1PmLFDtkB9lhBzNW&usp=sharing

To work the above link just highlight as to copy and paste, then right click on the mouse, and click open link to a interactive map of my February 2021 DX catches.

 

   Alex N8UCN


Re: "Disco Inferno" On 1107kHz In Alaska!

Paul B. Walker, Jr.
 


I have Magic Talk 1107 again this Sunday morning a 1440UTC, and they’re running talk.  It doesn’t cut through the slip as well

They apparently do music n weekend evenings.

Paul. 

On Sat, Mar 13, 2021 at 3:49 PM Paul B. Walker, Jr. <walkerbroadcasting@...> wrote:
From 1441UTC this morning, this was just a stellar signal from the 5KW transmitter 7125 miles away in Tauranga, NZ... this is as far as I can go before I start taking a trip back towards myself!


Paul Walker
McGrath, Alaska
CC Skywave and 5" DeBock AmazeBalls FSL Antenna


Re: Rank newbie asks nutball question

Steve Whitt
 

Hi Jock

Interesting to see a list like this on a non-radio website.

 

It is slightly dated but fortunately these big guns don’t change too often.

 

1560 became WFME after WQXR but now is silent

1510 WWZN is no more and Boston is now WMEX with low power at night

 

73

Steve

 

 

 

 

From: main@UltralightDX.groups.io [mailto:main@UltralightDX.groups.io] On Behalf Of Jock Elliott
Sent: 13 March 2021 22:30
To: main@UltralightDX.groups.io
Subject: [UltralightDX] Rank newbie asks nutball question

 

While poking around for some Skywarn (US Weather service severe weather spotter volunteers) info, I ran across this:

https://www.weather.gov/jetstream/ll_ampm_stations

It's  a list of US/Canada clear channel MW stations. Has anybody got them call (including all the variations on the same freq) with ultralights . . . barefoot?

Cheers, Jock


MWDX 13/03/2021 Tecsun PL 398MP

Peter 1956
 

Barefoot inside the house.
(The radio was barefoot, I was wearing flip flops)
https://youtu.be/O5V3Lw0YgYs

Peter
Botswana


Re: Rank newbie asks nutball question

keith beesley
 


Jock, it would probably be difficult or impossible to hear them all from one location, even with a much more powerful receiver and extensive antenna array. From the Seattle area, I've heard only the ones in the western half of the continent.  But, thanks; that's a very handy list! I don't think I've seen Canada/US/Mexico/Bahamas all merged into one list. 

Keith Beesley
Seattle WA USA 

On Saturday, March 13, 2021, 02:29:34 PM PST, Jock Elliott <jock.elliott@...> wrote:


While poking around for some Skywarn (US Weather service severe weather spotter volunteers) info, I ran across this:

https://www.weather.gov/jetstream/ll_ampm_stations

It's  a list of US/Canada clear channel MW stations. Has anybody got them call (including all the variations on the same freq) with ultralights . . . barefoot?

Cheers, Jock


Re: Australian English Assistance Needed--Again

Gary DeBock
 

On Sat, Mar 13, 2021 at 09:25 PM, Chris Rogers wrote:
Hi Gary,
I had a good listen and near the start of the recording there is an ad from what I can make out for beer prices that mention Four X beer which is a Queensland Beer. That would be more than likely from 4KZ, however around 5.44 there is mention of New South Wales which would be more like from 2PM. There is other words heard at times but nothing conclusive, the mixing up and down so it is difficult to make out, despite the signal strength as no station is really dominating. I note the absence of the usual dominating NZers this trip?
Hi Chris,

Thanks for listening to this wild 531 clip, and for your comments! Yes, tolerating something like this wacky recording for 11 minutes is above and beyond the call of duty.

Your report of Queensland's "Four X Beer" advert in the beginning of the clip is interesting, and I'm sure that both 4KZ and 2PM have their dominant moments during this wild mix, which might explain the "New South Wales" mention at 5:44. One of the problems during this recent trip was discovering that both 4KZ and 2PM are capable of playing Oldies music in their formats, resulting in a identity nightmare for Yankee DXers unfamiliar with Oz English. 2PM did indeed stick with the SRN's "traditional" call-in talk format most of the time, but I have recorded at least one 2PM clip where a "Radio 531" and "Super Radio Network" ID is followed by "Georgy Girl" by the Seekers.

In the absence of any other information I will assume that the Four X Beer ad came from Queensland, and appreciate your help. During this trip the Kiwi 531 kHz regulars (PI and More FM) pretty much got "kicked off the cliff" in favour of 2PM and 4KZ. There is a question whether 531-More FM is still broadcasting from Alexandra-- I certainly didn't hear any trace of it last week, which was unusual.

Thanks Again<
Gary

  


Re: Australian English Assistance Needed--Again

Chris Rogers
 

Hi Gary,
I had a good listen and near the start of the recording there is an ad from what I can make out for beer prices that mention Four X beer which is a Queensland Beer. That would be more than likely from 4KZ, however around 5.44 there is mention of New South Wales which would be more like from 2PM. There is other words heard at times but nothing conclusive, the mixing up and down so it is difficult to make out, despite the signal strength as no station is really dominating. I note the absence of the usual dominating NZers this trip?


WKNG 1060 Tallapoosa, GA ON LATE

Paul B. Walker, Jr.
 

No, im not hearing it in alaska.. others along the east and midwest us are, with king country slogans. see many report it on FB

Paul


Re: Australian English Assistance Needed--Again

Paul Blundell
 

I will have a listen when I can and see what I can hear.


On Sun, 14 Mar 2021, 10:58 Gary DeBock via groups.io, <D1028Gary=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
The following wild, 11 minute long 531 kHz S9 mix of 2PM and a presumed 4KZ was received on the Rockwork 2 ocean cliff near Manzanita, Oregon during a sunrise session on March 3 this month. The problem is that although this is almost certainly 4KZ in the S9 mix with 2PM, I don't have any identifying information for 4KZ during the entire session, despite its strength. If one of our Australian members could listen to this wacky 11 minute mix and try to pick out any information which would identify 531-4KZ, it would be greatly appreciated!

I have attempted do this myself, but my ability to decipher Australian English is worse than my ability to decipher Cantonese Chinese (my wife's native language). Thanks for any assistance  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/8vlp78qnl1o8pgdfuk4fzrhbkxp5pwg7

Gary DeBock (DXing at the Rockwork 2 ocean cliff from March 3-6
7.5" loopstick XHDATA D-808 portable + 6" FSL antenna (on a 5' PVC base)


  


"Disco Inferno" On 1107kHz In Alaska!

Paul B. Walker, Jr.
 

From 1441UTC this morning, this was just a stellar signal from the 5KW transmitter 7125 miles away in Tauranga, NZ... this is as far as I can go before I start taking a trip back towards myself!


Paul Walker
McGrath, Alaska
CC Skywave and 5" DeBock AmazeBalls FSL Antenna


Australian English Assistance Needed--Again

Gary DeBock
 

The following wild, 11 minute long 531 kHz S9 mix of 2PM and a presumed 4KZ was received on the Rockwork 2 ocean cliff near Manzanita, Oregon during a sunrise session on March 3 this month. The problem is that although this is almost certainly 4KZ in the S9 mix with 2PM, I don't have any identifying information for 4KZ during the entire session, despite its strength. If one of our Australian members could listen to this wacky 11 minute mix and try to pick out any information which would identify 531-4KZ, it would be greatly appreciated!

I have attempted do this myself, but my ability to decipher Australian English is worse than my ability to decipher Cantonese Chinese (my wife's native language). Thanks for any assistance  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/8vlp78qnl1o8pgdfuk4fzrhbkxp5pwg7

Gary DeBock (DXing at the Rockwork 2 ocean cliff from March 3-6
7.5" loopstick XHDATA D-808 portable + 6" FSL antenna (on a 5' PVC base)


  


Rank newbie asks nutball question

Jock Elliott
 

While poking around for some Skywarn (US Weather service severe weather spotter volunteers) info, I ran across this:

https://www.weather.gov/jetstream/ll_ampm_stations

It's  a list of US/Canada clear channel MW stations. Has anybody got them call (including all the variations on the same freq) with ultralights . . . barefoot?

Cheers, Jock

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