Date   

Re: Guy Atkin's Independent Testing of PL-380 7.5" Loopstick

Gary DeBock
 

Jim,
 
Puyallup is about 90 miles from the ocean, but only about 5 miles from salt water (Puget Sound). The TP propagation here is nowhere near as favorable as on a Pacific Ocean beach, but probably much better than 90 miles inland without any salt water nearby.
 
73, Gary
 

In a message dated 2/11/2010 9:46:57 P.M. Pacific Standard Time, jkearman@... writes:
 


--- In ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com, D1028Gary@... wrote:
 
> The daytime DX range changes greatly if you can manage to set up your loop
> on an ocean beach, however. Using one of the new collapsible-frame 6' PVC
> loops (designed to fit inside a compact car) at Grayland, WA, California
> coastal stations are far stronger in the daytime than they are at home (90
> miles from the ocean) on the 9' loop.

I didn't realize Puyallup was so far inland. I thought it was just outside Seattle. And you've got the Cascades on your back. Here, a couple of miles inland, with indoor antennas, my best daytime is WCBS in NYC, an hour before sunset. You know how the coastline curves in, so the path is pretty much all-water. In pure daylight I've heard up into Georgia and Charleston, SC, 400-600 miles. Charleston is all-water like NYC, but the Georgia station is inland, in Warner Robins. No mountains in Florida!
73,

Jim, KR1S
http://qrp.kearman.com/ 


ULR AWARDS PROGRAM....Temporarily on Hold

robert ross
 

Hello All Fellow ULR DX'ers:

In light of the Tragic News of John Bryant's passing earlier this
week, I have consulted with Gary DeBock regarding the Future of the ULR
Awards Program. As many of you are aware, John and myself managed the
Awards Program, with Gary acting as a consultant on the Awards
Committee. The Awards Committee consisted of John, Gary and myself. I
did some of the Grunt Work...but the Main Cog in the Awards Program was
John!! He Invented the Program, he Designed the Awards, and it was he
who actually printed them up and sent them off to the various Dx'ers who
earned them.

At present I personally have no capabilities to Issue the Awards myself.
Gary DeBock advises that we may be able to continue printing them up
with the aid of some software that John had forwarded to Gary a short
time ago. There is a very good chance that we can keep the Awards
Program going ....but we are going to need a little time to Re-Group and
Re-Organize things a bit.

It would not be right to undo all the Great work John did to get the
Awards Program to where it is today. John was so proud of the Awards all
the ULR DX'ers were earning. He was also proud of the Personal Goals ULR
DXers were setting and achieving as they earned these ULR Awards!!

So...with all that said...I would like to ask everyone to just hold onto
any Awards Applications you may have.....and give Gary and I some time
to get this all figured out...and once we do.....we will announce when
the Awards Program is back and running at full capacity.

Thanks for everyone's understanding....but this really was a One Man
Show for the most part......and with that One Man gone......the 2 that
are left are gonna have a hard time filling his shoes!!

73...ROB VA3SW

Robert S. Ross

(For The ULR AWARDS COMMITTEE)


Re: Guy Atkin's Independent Testing of PL-380 7.5" Loopstick

Tony Germanotta
 

I'll have to look into building a regen. Sounds like my kind of radio. Right now I'm swamped with work I am not so successfully avoiding. So I have had to put real radio projects on hold. When I come up for air in a month, I guess I could combine the hobby by building a regen amp for a box loop to feed into one of those non-tuned stereo set air-core AM loops I can couple to the UL by slipping it around the radio.

And pretty soon this ultra light outfit will take up an entire room. And that's the charm of what John and you others discovered. The pure joy of using little radios to do amazing things. I find I keep going back to a station until I can conquer it without loops or any other assistance beyond a pair of headphones.  

On Feb 11, 2010, at 8:45 PM, jim_kr1s wrote:

 


--- In ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com, Tony Germanotta <germanotta.tony@...> wrote:

> But one of the problems of the new radios is we wind up with so little to tweak and turn. How many times have I missed an ID because I tried to "improve" the signal that little bit more right at the top or bottom of the hour?

Ha! Yep. Keep those fingers away from the radio at TOH/BOH!

> My old set up used to include a bunch of audio processors as well: the JPS NIR10, a magic notch, and an Autek QF-1A all feeding high quality communications headphones.

I had an NIR-10, reviewed it for QST and wound up buying it. Still have a couple of QF1-As here. The NIR-10 had the ability to knock out vocals and leave the background music, in case you were into karaoke.

> It was fun switching in filters, narrowing passbands and trying to eke out intelligence from the noise. But that would seem awfully silly attached to these tiny radios as well. Sort of defeats the spirit of UL.

The QF1-A can help notch heterodynes but I haven't tried it on a ULR, for no particular reason. Have used it on the regen. If you like twisting knobs, a regen is the way to go. There isn't much I can get on the PL-380 that isn't there on the regen, except when coping with a couple of local stations. And there's no AGC, which I find is a benefit. I took some pains to make a good audio system in the regen, with a low-pass filter to help roll off noise, and low distortion. I always listen with headphones. I've logged stuff on the regen I still haven't logged on a ULR.

> Sony or Philips or any other electronics giant can't operate at that profit margin.

They could always build a plant in China! Sony does some really dumb stuff. I have one of their MP3 recorders, the -70 model. The instruction book covers the -60, -70 and -80. Reading the book you'd think the only difference was the size of the flash memory. The -70 is 1 GB, more than enough for a night of DXing. But the book talks about charging the internal AAA battery off the USB port, by turning on that function in a menu, in case you're using an alkaline cell instead. So I get some AAA NiMH cells, and discover that function isn't on the menu! They must have included it only on the -80 model. Arrrrrrrrrggh. But the thing works well and now I have a $2.00, postage included, AAA charger from Hong Kong, to add to the menagerie.

73,

Jim, KR1S
http://qrp.kearman.com/ 



Re: UL Logs Feb. 10- New Country!Thursday, February 11, 2010 4:58 PM

Allen Willie
 

 
 
 Congratulations  John on your great catch there in Deleware of Germany on 756  The other two frequencies we often here as well for Germany are 972 and especially 1422 which can be found playing a lot of Classical music most nights
 
73 and Good Dx
 
Allen Willie
St. John's, Newfoundland


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Re: Guy Atkin's Independent Testing of PL-380 7.5" Loopstick

jim_kr1s <jkearman@...>
 


--- In ultralightdx@..., Tony Germanotta wrote:

> But one of the problems of the new radios is we wind up with so little to tweak and turn. How many times have I missed an ID because I tried to "improve" the signal that little bit more right at the top or bottom of the hour?

Ha! Yep. Keep those fingers away from the radio at TOH/BOH!

> My old set up used to include a bunch of audio processors as well: the JPS NIR10, a magic notch, and an Autek QF-1A all feeding high quality communications headphones.

I had an NIR-10, reviewed it for QST and wound up buying it. Still have a couple of QF1-As here. The NIR-10 had the ability to knock out vocals and leave the background music, in case you were into karaoke.

> It was fun switching in filters, narrowing passbands and trying to eke out intelligence from the noise. But that would seem awfully silly attached to these tiny radios as well. Sort of defeats the spirit of UL.

The QF1-A can help notch heterodynes but I haven't tried it on a ULR, for no particular reason. Have used it on the regen. If you like twisting knobs, a regen is the way to go. There isn't much I can get on the PL-380 that isn't there on the regen, except when coping with a couple of local stations. And there's no AGC, which I find is a benefit. I took some pains to make a good audio system in the regen, with a low-pass filter to help roll off noise, and low distortion. I always listen with headphones. I've logged stuff on the regen I still haven't logged on a ULR.

> Sony or Philips or any other electronics giant can't operate at that profit margin.

They could always build a plant in China! Sony does some really dumb stuff. I have one of their MP3 recorders, the -70 model. The instruction book covers the -60, -70 and -80. Reading the book you'd think the only difference was the size of the flash memory. The -70 is 1 GB, more than enough for a night of DXing. But the book talks about charging the internal AAA battery off the USB port, by turning on that function in a menu, in case you're using an alkaline cell instead. So I get some AAA NiMH cells, and discover that function isn't on the menu! They must have included it only on the -80 model. Arrrrrrrrrggh. But the thing works well and now I have a $2.00, postage included, AAA charger from Hong Kong, to add to the menagerie.

73,

Jim, KR1S
http://qrp.kearman.com/ 


Re: Guy Atkin's Independent Testing of PL-380 7.5" Loopstick

jim_kr1s <jkearman@...>
 



--- In ultralightdx@..., "Pollock,Raphael E" wrote:
>
> Hi Jim!
>
> Yes, it is the old BAX-1.

That thing is a museum piece! :)

> a nice use of my hands as compared to performing cancer surgery,

You chose a good profession, but I can see why you'd want something to get away from it sometimes.

> The Bax-1 adds mucho red dots on my 2010 and essentially doubled or triples the S/N on the E1.  Most of the time it amplifies the noise as much as the signal,

That's the problem we face with smaller antennas. The noise is all around us, so a preamp boosts it equally with the signals. Getting the antenna outside and away from household noise sources, even if the antenna is lossy, like a long wire on the ground (a Beverage "wave" antenna is properly one that is above the ground and terminated, so Beverage-on-ground is a misnomer!), the signal-noise ratio is improved enough to let us hear the weak sigs.

> The alternative might be to buy a fishing rod padded case and ship thru as luggage.

It is a crazy world indeed. My advice is worth what you're paying for it, but my sense is that they are using sniffers to look for bad chemicals, and might not even notice the antenna, except that it would show up in an x-ray. You might print out Ben Tongue's paper on ferrite-rod inductors and stick it in with the antenna. OTOH, I once saw an Orthodox rabbi nearly disrobed by security before boarding an El Al flight in London, so you never know what will set them off. (His wife was complaining that the nice young lads weren't frisking her, too!)

I took some small ham gear to Europe in 2007, in carry-on, with ham license documentation and a magazine ad for the radio itself, and nobody even bothered to look. A French customs guy was fascinated by the flash memory cards for my camera, though, and thoroughly examined every one. The radio would look suspicious to me, but I guess it wasn't making a proscribed scent.  http://qrp.kearman.com/html/kx1.html 

> I spend a fair amount of time in Tel Aviv, Israel

I have a question for you! What's the line-noise situation like in Israel? Many a night on 40 meters, I hear Israeli stations booming in, and the whole East Coast is calling them to no avail. Some of my compatriots are running 1500 W to multi-element beam antennas, and should be at least as strong on the other end as the Israeli is here, but they go unheard. During the same times we can work anything else in the Mideast that shows up with little difficulty, so the only conclusion I can draw is that it's noisier in Israel.

73,

Jim, KR1S
http://qrp.kearman.com/ 


Re: Guy Atkin's Independent Testing of PL-380 7.5" Loopstick

Gary DeBock
 

"One of these days I'd like to build a large box loop or something that's several feet in diameter. I may base it on one of the loops on Bruce Carter's website, but would be open to other suggestions, like maybe the PVC loops mentioned earlier in this group. I'm hoping I would be able to get 1000+ mile daytime DX with whatever loop I end up using, though, like Bruce was able to get with his loops."
 
Hi Stephen,
 
The monster PVC box loops were built here up to the 9' square size, and were outstanding performers in TP and TA-DXing this past season (when inductively coupled to ULR's). But without a location close to an ocean beach, hoping for a daytime DX range of 1000+ miles may be a little unrealistic, even with such a huge loop.
 
The daytime DX range changes greatly if you can manage to set up your loop on an ocean beach, however. Using one of the new collapsible-frame 6' PVC loops (designed to fit inside a compact car) at Grayland, WA, California coastal stations are far stronger in the daytime than they are at home (90 miles from the ocean) on the 9' loop.
 
73, Gary (in Puyallup, WA)   

 

In a message dated 2/11/2010 7:56:50 P.M. Pacific Standard Time, pianoplayer88key@... writes:
 

I agree - daytime DXing can be quite interesting. For right now that's most of the DXing I like to do, too. I'm about 15 miles or so east of San Diego, CA, and some stations I've been able to hear from here around midday are 1530 KFBK Sacramento, CA, 1580 KMIK Tempe, AZ, and 700 KALL Salt Lake City, UT, on the PL-380 coupled with the Select-A-Tenna.
One of these days I'd like to build a large box loop or something that's several feet in diameter. I may base it on one of the loops on Bruce Carter's website, but would be open to other suggestions, like maybe the PVC loops mentioned earlier in this group. I'm hoping I would be able to get 1000+ mile daytime DX with whatever loop I end up using, though, like Bruce was able to get with his loops.

--- In ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com, Tony Germanotta tony@...> wrote:
>
> Here's another web site with info on that radio I just found for the guy who owns it. You can see the coils a little better in this one.
> http://www.oldradioworld.de/oe333.htm
>
> And if you speak German, you probably can learn how to use it.
>
> Sometimes the sun can do some amazing things. I remember tuning the dials once and being astounded to hear WGN Chicago here in Chesapeake in the afternoon. Never happened before or since. It defies all the rules of propagation. But somehow that D layer just didn't get scrambled right where it needed to be smooth enough to bounce the signal back to me, I guess. Sort of Tropoducting on AM maybe. I didn't have a tape recorder handy. Hell, I wasn't even DXing at the time. I was playing with my new radio at the time, an ITT Mackay Marine. So it was just something I noted in a log somewhere and went on. That ITT Mackay Marine had great selectivity -- almost equal to these little Tecsuns. I guess some of the higher end Ham stuff uses the SiLabs chips for signal processing. The thing is those Chinese manufacturers are doing it on very low cost gear. My shack is quite happy with an Icom 735 and all its analog dials that move the passband. But I'd love to see they could accomplish . I don't think anybody is using it yet for SSB or synchronous detection.
>
>
> On Feb 11, 2010, at 3:49 PM, jim_kr1s wrote:
>
> >
> > --- In ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com, Tony Germanotta tony@> wrote:
> > >
> > > Yea, mine was built for speed not beauty, but I used it for years to listen to the Phillies games in daylight here some 300 miles south of the transmitter. That's a much tougher task than just DXing,
> >
> > Yes, daytime DXing is an art all its own. You can learn a lot about solar effects on propagation, too. When the sun is having a hissy fit, bye-bye long-distance daytime reception.
> >
> > > I have a nice work of art loop here that I bought at a silent auction years back at the old SWL Winterfest. It's an altazimuth model complete with preamp and works like a charm as the MW antenna for my Drake R8A. Coupled to a longwire and an MFJ phasing unit and I can do a lot with it. But it sure doesn't qualify for Ultra Light status.
> >
> > One of these days, some smart Chinese manufacturer is going to stick the SiLabs chip in a for-real communications receiver. The only problem will be making a low-freq BFO for SSB/CW/ECSS, but I'm sure they'll figure it out. Of course, the beauty of ULR DXing is the small size coupled with large performance. I feel guilty hooking up a big antenna to a shirt-pocket radio. :)
> >
> > > Yesterday at a meeting of our local antique radio club, one member brought in a single tube radio made in Germany that has a single tube that does the work of three. It was designed for the local market there to cheat on broadcast taxes that were based on how many tubes your radio had. Anyway, the thing used small, plug in air core loops wound in a combination of spiral and box format. They were only a couple inches large but amazingly beautiful. They looked like something out of string theory.
> >
> > Oh! Oh! What I'd give to see that! The Germans machined some coils for military gear that were astounding. I've only seen scanned photos and descriptions, unfortunately. The crystal-set folks make some nice coils. You can find photos on Dave Schmarder's site, http://www.makearadio.com/ Crystal sets need low-loss and high-Q inductors, well beyond what we active-device users require.
> >
> > 73,
> >
> > Jim, KR1S
> > http://qrp.kearman.com/
> >
>


Re: Guy Atkin's Independent Testing of PL-380 7.5" Loopstick

Tony Germanotta
 

I thought about using varactors to remote tune a loop, but always wound up preferring to be right alongside it, so I could nudge it for that little bit of extra signal. I think it's all psychological. But one of the problems of the new radios is we wind up with so little to tweak and turn. How many times have I missed an ID because I tried to "improve" the signal that little bit more right at the top or bottom of the hour? My old set up used to include a bunch of audio processors as well: the JPS NIR10, a magic notch, and an Autek QF-1A all feeding high quality communications headphones. It was fun switching in filters, narrowing passbands and trying to eke out intelligence from the noise.  But that would seem awfully silly attached to these tiny radios as well. Sort of defeats the spirit of UL.


You're right on the Sony's, they seem to have abandoned a lot of their electronics market over the years, not just shortwave. I have the 2010 and it is a great radio and probably couldn't be made today because of the cost of all those individual tuning buttons. I also have the SW100 and that is a marvel as well, with synchronous detection in a pocket size unit that is much better than that on my Drake R8A. I think Drake finally got it right with the R8B, then stopped making radios again.  Sony dithered around trying to protect its record label from piracy and lost its portable audio lead to Apple and others. Portable audio used to be synonymous with the Walkman. Even when Sony brought out a digital player, they limited it at first to their own MiniDisc codec. Now they have come out with an MP3 player that is supposedly a great item, but it is more expensive than the iPod and not likely to knock it off its perch. Sony makes a decent HD table radio, but again the portable model that could have been the HD FM walkman was made by another company. It's sold under the Insignia brand at Best Buy for under $50. Then again, with the cost advantage the Chinese companies have, I can hardly blame them for throwing up their hands. I still can't believe how little my Tecsun PL310 cost, including shipping, for what it does. Sony or Philips or any other electronics giant can't operate at that profit margin. 


On Feb 11, 2010, at 6:05 PM, jim_kr1s wrote:

 

Tony,

Thanks for that other link. Yes, MW propagation is more interesting than HF IMO, and varies from one end of the band to the other. Probably not the best choice for broadcasting, but what did they know? Makes for an interesting hobby, anyway!

I think the ham rigs are using proprietary DSP, so they can thwart the competition. They use DSP to process transmitted audio and do other neat tricks for digital-mode reception and transmission, too. In a communications receiver, one of the slickest parts of the SiLabs chip would be less useful: The ability to resonate the LW/MW antenna. I've been experimenting with external air loops tuned by the radio, but there are problems when you try to make them big. What I wouldn't give to be able to tap into the varactor tuning voltage and disconnect the internal varactor. A remote box controlled through a fiber-optic cable would be a fine thing. Sony is way overdue to replace the 7600GR, but they may have abandoned the SWL market as far as new development. They seem to have lost interest, and it's been downhill since the ICF-2010.

73,

Jim, KR1S
http://qrp.kearman.com/ 



Re: UL Logs Feb. 10- New Country!Thursday, February 11, 20...

Gary DeBock
 

Hi John and Allen,
 
Congratulations on your logging of 756-Germany, John. It is a very rare visitor here on the west coast, but always requires a serious external antenna, in addition to a very selective ULR.
 
73, Gary DeBock 
 

In a message dated 2/11/2010 5:57:25 P.M. Pacific Standard Time, vo1_001_swl@... writes:
 

 
 
 Congratulations  John on your great catch there in Deleware of Germany on 756  The other two frequencies we often here as well for Germany are 972 and especially 1422 which can be found playing a lot of Classical music most nights
 
73 and Good Dx
 
Allen Willie
St. John's, Newfoundland


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Re: Guy Atkin's Independent Testing of PL-380 7.5" Loopstick

Pollock,Raphael E <rpollock@...>
 

Hi Jim!
 
Yes, it is the old BAX-1. This whole project begain two years ago when i was able to snag an Eton E1 for $225 from the Circuit City melt down of November 2007. I was interested in the E1 not only because of the various tuning features (PBT, ECSS, Synch, etc.) but especially because it did not have an in-board ferrite bar antenna--a looper's dream machine. So I basically took  something from the monster ferrite bar article co-authored by John Bryant, what I could glean from inspecting the Q-Stick antenna coupled with reading some old IRCA articles, some of the ultralight files, and some of Joe Carr's writings--I know very little about radio theory but sure like to tinker around--a nice use of my hands as compared to performing cancer surgery, which is what I do by way of earning my keep. It was really fun to experiment with the various windings and wires--the plumbing dept. @ Lowe's got very familiar with me as well, what with all the PVC piping and end caps I bought!  The Bax-1 adds mucho red dots on my 2010 and essentially doubled or triples the S/N on the E1.  Most of the time it amplifies the noise as much as the signal, but for the occasioanl signal it can help over and above the antenna being connected directly to the E1, bypassing the BAX-1 (which is housed in a little Radio Shack aluminum hobby box). It will make for a nice mobile unit, but I  am doubtful if Homeland Security will let me take the ferrite bar antenna on board an air flight--it has the heft and size of a hard ball bat. The alternative might be to buy a fishing rod padded case and ship thru as luggage.
 
I spend a fair amount of time in Tel Aviv, Israel and the Mediterranean shore is only about a 10 minute walk from where I stay.  The barefoot 380 has been useful to receive a bunch of European stations (> 10 countries so far without even trying when I was there for several days last week), and so I am eager to take the E1/27" ferrite/BAX-1 with me some time. One of these days I'll get around to taking photos of this set-up and downloading 'em as a file.
 
Thank you for all you are doing on behalf of our wonderful hobby!!!
 
Raphael Pollock


From: ultralightdx@... [ultralightdx@...] On Behalf Of jim_kr1s [jkearman@...]
Sent: Thursday, February 11, 2010 2:36 PM
To: ultralightdx@...
Subject: [ultralightdx] Re: Guy Atkin's Independent Testing of PL-380 7.5" Loopstick

 


--- In ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com, "Pollock,Raphael E" wrote:
>
> Hi Jim!
>
> Do you know of any plans for the regen pre-amps that you mention in text below? It would have to be an improvement over my old BAX-1, a one transistor kit from the mid 1980s that is a broad band preamplifier...

Is that BAX-1 the old International Crystal amplifier? Meant to ask. A regen preamp might be an improvement, but it may not be necessary. I don't know of any published circuits, would like to get a look inside the commercial one.

In a tuned circuit where the inductance is fixed, the reactances increase as you go higher in frequency. A regen made with, say, a 240-uH coil and a 365-pF cap, can be hard to manage at the high end of the band, but very mellow at the low end. That's why I split the band on my receiver. I wondered how they managed that on the commercial antenna-preamp. Assuming you don't need extremely high selectivity (the antenna probably doesn't have to provide anywhere near the selectivity you can get with a regenerative circuit), you could swamp the tuned circuit with resistance and still get lots of gain, and reasonable selectivity.

I should look into this a little more. When I was cogitating on it, I was thinking of something that could be remotely located and tuned. You'd definitely want to use it with a ferrite-rod antenna to reduce hand effects. But an experimental version tuned with an air variable wouldn't be hard to whip up. I do think it would be more useful with older receivers, than with the latest high-gain ULRs and standard portables, which already have lots of front-end gain.

73,

Jim, KR1S
http://qrp.kearman.com/ 


Re: Guy Atkin's Independent Testing of PL-380 7.5" Loopstick

jim_kr1s <jkearman@...>
 

Tony,

Thanks for that other link. Yes, MW propagation is more interesting than HF IMO, and varies from one end of the band to the other. Probably not the best choice for broadcasting, but what did they know? Makes for an interesting hobby, anyway!

I think the ham rigs are using proprietary DSP, so they can thwart the competition. They use DSP to process transmitted audio and do other neat tricks for digital-mode reception and transmission, too. In a communications receiver, one of the slickest parts of the SiLabs chip would be less useful: The ability to resonate the LW/MW antenna. I've been experimenting with external air loops tuned by the radio, but there are problems when you try to make them big. What I wouldn't give to be able to tap into the varactor tuning voltage and disconnect the internal varactor. A remote box controlled through a fiber-optic cable would be a fine thing. Sony is way overdue to replace the 7600GR, but they may have abandoned the SWL market as far as new development. They seem to have lost interest, and it's been downhill since the ICF-2010.

73,

Jim, KR1S
http://qrp.kearman.com/ 


new log 2.10.10

Carl DeWhitt
 

WGBF 1280 Evansville,IN 2203-2206 EST 2.10.10 end of Fox news,into Fox news programs promo and i.d. as"news talk 1280,WGBF"fair-poor till lost in jumble.Sony SRF-59 barefoot.night power listed at 1 kw.
73
Carl DeWhitt
Maryville,Tn.


Re: UL Logs Feb. 10- New Country!

Kirk <kirk74601@...>
 

Congratulations, John, on the new ULR country! Very nice work!!
Kirk Allen
Pasadena, TX

--- In ultralightdx@..., "Pilgrimway" <pilgrimway.geo@...> wrote:

I'm totally sick of shoveling snow as we have almost 3 FEET on the ground here in central Delaware, so I spent time at the dials yesterday and was rewarded with a new UL country- Germany!
756 Deutschlandfunk, Germany, Braunschweig & Ravensburg,, 2130, weak GG talk, slop from WJR but the 1 khz filter on the PL-310 split it nicely. My 16th UL country and my 25th MW country overall.

John Cereghin
Smyrna DE


John Bryant newspaper obituary

Carl DeWhitt
 

It does not appear to be different than the funeral home obituary.But here is the link to the newspaper obituary for John Bryant.
http://www.legacy.com/stwnewspress/Obituaries.asp?Page=Lifestory&PersonId=139633022


Re: Guy Atkin's Independent Testing of PL-380 7.5" Loopstick

Tony Germanotta
 

One of the things that used to be done in those air core loops was a basket weave using wooden slats to reduce that self capacitance. I used some extra slats from my wife's wooden blinds to make up two slats per side of my loops and wove them through. It does reduce self capacitance, in fact it seems to extend the upper end of the loop itself. 



On Feb 11, 2010, at 3:58 PM, jim_kr1s wrote:

 

Thanks for that link! Those are "basket-weave" coils. The method allows high inductance while reducing self capacitance, which could turn the coil into a stand-alone resonant circuit.

Doesn't hurt to kick around the old radio stuff, as that's where all the innovations we still use were made. A DSP chip only synthesizes what once took lumped components to achieve. To understand the new stuff you have to understand the old stuff. And after 100 years, we're still making antennas with Litz wire.

73,

Jim, KR1S
http://qrp.kearman.com/ 



Re: Guy Atkin's Independent Testing of PL-380 7.5" Loopstick

Tony Germanotta
 

Here's another web site with info on that radio I just found for the guy who owns it. You can see the coils a little better in this one. 

And if you speak German, you probably can learn how to use it. 

Sometimes the sun can do some amazing things. I remember tuning the dials once and being astounded to hear WGN Chicago here in Chesapeake in the afternoon. Never happened before or since. It defies all the rules of propagation. But somehow that D layer just didn't get scrambled right where it needed to be smooth enough to bounce the signal back to me, I guess. Sort of Tropoducting on AM maybe. I didn't have a tape recorder handy. Hell, I wasn't even DXing at the time. I was playing with my new radio at the time, an ITT Mackay Marine. So it was just something I noted in a log somewhere and went on. That ITT Mackay Marine had great selectivity -- almost equal to these little Tecsuns. I guess some of the higher end Ham stuff uses the SiLabs chips for signal processing. The thing is those Chinese manufacturers are doing it on very low cost gear. My shack is quite happy with an Icom 735 and all its analog dials that move the passband. But I'd love to see they could accomplish. I don't think anybody is using it yet for SSB or synchronous detection.


On Feb 11, 2010, at 3:49 PM, jim_kr1s wrote:

 


--- In ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com, Tony Germanotta ...> wrote:
>
> Yea, mine was built for speed not beauty, but I used it for years to listen to the Phillies games in daylight here some 300 miles south of the transmitter. That's a much tougher task than just DXing,

Yes, daytime DXing is an art all its own. You can learn a lot about solar effects on propagation, too. When the sun is having a hissy fit, bye-bye long-distance daytime reception.

> I have a nice work of art loop here that I bought at a silent auction years back at the old SWL Winterfest. It's an altazimuth model complete with preamp and works like a charm as the MW antenna for my Drake R8A. Coupled to a longwire and an MFJ phasing unit and I can do a lot with it. But it sure doesn't qualify for Ultra Light status.

One of these days, some smart Chinese manufacturer is going to stick the SiLabs chip in a for-real communications receiver. The only problem will be making a low-freq BFO for SSB/CW/ECSS, but I'm sure they'll figure it out. Of course, the beauty of ULR DXing is the small size coupled with large performance. I feel guilty hooking up a big antenna to a shirt-pocket radio. :)

> Yesterday at a meeting of our local antique radio club, one member brought in a single tube radio made in Germany that has a single tube that does the work of three. It was designed for the local market there to cheat on broadcast taxes that were based on how many tubes your radio had. Anyway, the thing used small, plug in air core loops wound in a combination of spiral and box format. They were only a couple inches large but amazingly beautiful. They looked like something out of string theory.

Oh! Oh! What I'd give to see that! The Germans machined some coils for military gear that were astounding. I've only seen scanned photos and descriptions, unfortunately. The crystal-set folks make some nice coils. You can find photos on Dave Schmarder's site, http://www.makearadio.com/ Crystal sets need low-loss and high-Q inductors, well beyond what we active-device users require.

73,

Jim, KR1S
http://qrp.kearman.com/ 



Re: Guy Atkin's Independent Testing of PL-380 7.5" Loopstick

jim_kr1s <jkearman@...>
 

Thanks for that link! Those are "basket-weave" coils. The method allows high inductance while reducing self capacitance, which could turn the coil into a stand-alone resonant circuit.

Doesn't hurt to kick around the old radio stuff, as that's where all the innovations we still use were made. A DSP chip only synthesizes what once took lumped components to achieve. To understand the new stuff you have to understand the old stuff. And after 100 years, we're still making antennas with Litz wire.

73,

Jim, KR1S
http://qrp.kearman.com/ 


Re: Guy Atkin's Independent Testing of PL-380 7.5" Loopstick

jim_kr1s <jkearman@...>
 


--- In ultralightdx@..., Tony Germanotta wrote:
>
> Yea, mine was built for speed not beauty, but I used it for years to listen to the Phillies games in daylight here some 300 miles south of the transmitter. That's a much tougher task than just DXing,

Yes, daytime DXing is an art all its own. You can learn a lot about solar effects on propagation, too. When the sun is having a hissy fit, bye-bye long-distance daytime reception.

> I have a nice work of art loop here that I bought at a silent auction years back at the old SWL Winterfest. It's an altazimuth model complete with preamp and works like a charm as the MW antenna for my Drake R8A. Coupled to a longwire and an MFJ phasing unit and I can do a lot with it. But it sure doesn't qualify for Ultra Light status.

One of these days, some smart Chinese manufacturer is going to stick the SiLabs chip in a for-real communications receiver. The only problem will be making a low-freq BFO for SSB/CW/ECSS, but I'm sure they'll figure it out. Of course, the beauty of ULR DXing is the small size coupled with large performance. I feel guilty hooking up a big antenna to a shirt-pocket radio. :)

> Yesterday at a meeting of our local antique radio club, one member brought in a single tube radio made in Germany that has a single tube that does the work of three. It was designed for the local market there to cheat on broadcast taxes that were based on how many tubes your radio had. Anyway, the thing used small, plug in air core loops wound in a combination of spiral and box format. They were only a couple inches large but amazingly beautiful. They looked like something out of string theory.

Oh! Oh! What I'd give to see that! The Germans machined some coils for military gear that were astounding. I've only seen scanned photos and descriptions, unfortunately. The crystal-set folks make some nice coils. You can find photos on Dave Schmarder's site, http://www.makearadio.com/ Crystal sets need low-loss and high-Q inductors, well beyond what we active-device users require.

73,

Jim, KR1S
http://qrp.kearman.com/ 


Re: Guy Atkin's Independent Testing of PL-380 7.5" Loopstick

jim_kr1s <jkearman@...>
 


--- In ultralightdx@..., "Pollock,Raphael E" wrote:
>
> Hi Jim!
>
> Do you know of any plans for the regen pre-amps that you mention in text below? It would have to be an improvement over my old BAX-1, a one transistor kit from the mid 1980s that is a broad band preamplifier...

Is that BAX-1 the old International Crystal amplifier? Meant to ask. A regen preamp might be an improvement, but it may not be necessary. I don't know of any published circuits, would like to get a look inside the commercial one.

In a tuned circuit where the inductance is fixed, the reactances increase as you go higher in frequency. A regen made with, say, a 240-uH coil and a 365-pF cap, can be hard to manage at the high end of the band, but very mellow at the low end. That's why I split the band on my receiver. I wondered how they managed that on the commercial antenna-preamp. Assuming you don't need extremely high selectivity (the antenna probably doesn't have to provide anywhere near the selectivity you can get with a regenerative circuit), you could swamp the tuned circuit with resistance and still get lots of gain, and reasonable selectivity.

I should look into this a little more. When I was cogitating on it, I was thinking of something that could be remotely located and tuned. You'd definitely want to use it with a ferrite-rod antenna to reduce hand effects. But an experimental version tuned with an air variable wouldn't be hard to whip up. I do think it would be more useful with older receivers, than with the latest high-gain ULRs and standard portables, which already have lots of front-end gain.

73,

Jim, KR1S
http://qrp.kearman.com/ 


Re: John Bryant's Legacy

Horacio Nigro <hanigrodx@...>
 

Ontario DX Assn has it indexed as a CD in their Catalogue. Check at: http://www.odxa.on.ca/mailorder.pdf
 
                          
   Horacio A. Nigro

    Montevideo     
    Uruguay


De: Tony Germanotta
Para: ultralightdx@...
Enviado: jue,11 febrero, 2010 17:53
Asunto: Re: [ultralightdx] Re: John Bryant's Legacy

 

Does anybody sell reprints of those original Proceedings? Some of that stuff may be dated, but it was all so well written and researched and sometimes old knowledge comes back to the forefront. It's a shame to have to reinvent the wheel, like those guys did when they went back to building air core loops years after the radio manufacturers had moved on to their tiny ferrite models.



On Feb 11, 2010, at 2:50 PM, RichardA wrote:

 

I agree with Horacio. It would be beneficial to share John's knowledge with all radio hobbyist.

Richard Allen
36°22'51"N/97° 26'35"W
(near Perry OK USA)
SRF-T615 & PL-310 (barefoot)