Date   

Re: I am (not) skeptical

Stephan Schaa <schaa@...>
 

Hi Neil!
 
There are some sound and videofiles from a german DXer (which is not a Medium DXer, but mostly shortwave)
 
 
73, Stephan


PL-310 report-FARMERIK

Rik
 

I had hoped the adjustable selectivity on the PL-310 would allow for really wide audio range sound on SW, and I have been searching for some music with different signal strengths to make comparisons.

Tonight was the night, and I compared the 310 to the G8 and one of my old Zenith Royal 94 InterOceanics. The 310 is the winner, for audio clarity and detail in music from a strong SW station. On signals with fading, the volume drops slightly, but noise appears during the fade on the 310. With the Zenith, there is a slight drop in volume during the fade [also heard on the 310 at the same time], but there is no noise/interference. The G8 comes in last, because it is less sensitive, and did not sound as good under any circumstance.

I tried my untuned 4 foot loop as an antenna on each radio. With the Zenith, it brought up the signal level significantly, and works very well. On the 310 it also helps, but not as much gain. On these two radios, connecting one side of the loop to the antenna boosts signals and noise, but connecting the other side of the loop to ground on the radio makes the noise quieter than using the whip antenna on the radios instead of the loop. On the G8, I tried connecting the other side of the loop to the edge of the 'computer plug' as a ground, and on the earphone jack 'ring' [ground]. Both worked the same, quieting the noise by connecting the other side of the loop to the whip antenna on the radio.

On some other radios I have, the loop overloads the antenna input, and some work better with only one lead from the antenna.

I also tried the 4 foot loop as an antenna on my PL-600 and REDSUN RF-1210, both of which have multilevel RF 'gain' controls. I did need to attenuate with those controls on these more sensitive radios, and it lowered back round noise and boosted the volume of signals, just as a good antenna should.

- FARMERIK


Characterising the Ionosphere

jim_kr1s <jkearman@...>
 

In January 2009, NATO sponsored a symposium with the Subject title. Papers submitted for the symposium were published in PDF, and may be downloaded for free. I recommend chapters 1 and 5 for starters. From the site:

"This report is a compilation of papers from academic and other research institutes that describe ionospheric phenomena and parameters that affect electromagnetic propagation. The report addresses both mid-latitude and high-latitude effects. The first chapter describes the morphology of the ionosphere, briefly covers the neutral atmosphere and expands on the influence of the geomagnetic field, ionospheric electric field and currents, and particle precipitation at high latitudes."

Chapter 5 "considers the specific effects of space weather on the ionosphere during severe geomagnetic and ionospheric storms, the impact on technology including communication and navigation systems, and emphasises the need for a global perspective of the system."

Devote some time to these chapters and you'll better understand why stations sometimes pop up unexpectedly -- which is good -- and why short-term predictions are generally impossible -- which is bad, but at least you'll understand why. I've only encountered equations on a couple of pages, so if like me you're math-challenged, fear not.

http://www.rta.nato.int/pubs/rdp.asp?RDP=RTO-TR-IST-051 

The entire publication is about 15 MB.

73,
 
Jim, KR1S
http://kr1s.kearman.com/ 
http://qrp.kearman.com/ 


From China's mouth to Texans' ears

jim_kr1s <jkearman@...>
 

No, nothing to do with Kirk's ULR. This is a Washington Post article about China Radio International's programming on U.S. AM BC stations.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/04/24/AR2010042402492_pf.html 

A quote from the article: "Their philosophy is build it and people will tune in." I think they're hoping you'll listen, and then an hour later you'll want to listen again. :)

73,
 
Jim, KR1S
http://kr1s.kearman.com/ 
http://qrp.kearman.com/ 


OT: Solar Observatory Releases First Pictures

Kirk <kirk74601@...>
 

NASA has unveiled the first images from a new satellite designed to predict
disruptive solar storms, and scientists say they're already learning new things.

Researchers showed off brightly colored images and short movie clips of the sun
from the Solar Dynamics Observatory in a webcast Wednesday.

The satellite was launched Feb. 11. Dean Pesnell, the chief scientist, says it
already has disproved at least one theory, but he didn't give any details.

Richard Fisher, director of NASA's heliophysics division, says the satellite is
operating flawlessly.

It carries three instrument packages, one built by the University of Colorado's
Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics and two built by Lockheed Martin in
Palo Alto, Calif.

http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2010/04/21/science/AP-US-Solar-Observatory.html?\;
partner=rss&emc=rss

Also take a look at:
http://sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/

Kirk Allen
Pasadena, TX


Tecsun PL-360 7.5" Plug-in Loopstick Comparison MP3

Gary DeBock
 

Hello All,
 
One of the final design changes to the PL-360 upgraded plug-in loopsticks was to provide a system for mp3 recordings, even with the headphone jack located fairly close to the loopstick jack. That has now been accomplished, with a secure loopstick plastic frame allowing both MP3 recording and whip antenna usage. With this final step (pictured below), it's about time to go into "production" of these plug-in loopsticks, allowing great AM and LW sensitivity without any need to modify the radio itself.
 
For those curious about the huge sensitivity boost provided by a 7.5" plug-in loopstick, a comparison MP3 was recorded today on the local 530 kHz TIS frequency. In the first 14 seconds, the midget stock loopstick struggles to receive a single weak TIS station in Federal Way, while in the last 20 seconds the 7.5" loopstick on the same frequency easily receives three TIS stations (Federal Way, SeaTac airport and Highway 410/ 167 junction):  http://www.mediafire.com/?wbfm5zlldkm .
 
Those DXers looking for a plug-in system to greatly boost AM-DXing sensitivity should soon have an ideal option.
 
73 and Good DX, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
 
                                           
 
 
 
 
 
  


Re: Unid. Spanish 1620 kHz

Gil Stacy
 

At one time WDHP contracted with Radio Marti for rebroadcasts.
In any event, here's a livestream link for comparison if you hear SS again on 1620. Gil
http://www.reefbroadcasting.com/


Re: Congratulations to Tim Chandler-- 20 States Received on ULR's

Kirk <kirk74601@...>
 

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:

Hello All,

Tim Chandler of Memphis, Tennessee has qualified for an Ultralight Award
Certificate with a special meaning-- 20 States Received, several of which
were heard on his new, homemade 24" PVC-framed loop!
Congratulations, Tim, on a fine ultralight radio accomplishment. I hope you enjoy getting the next 10 states!

Kirk Allen
Pasadena, TX


Re: Unid. Spanish 1620 kHz

Russ Edmunds <wb2bjh@...>
 

I can't guarantee the 1 kw. There have been some folks who believe they're running 10kw many nights.

Russ Edmunds
Blue Bell, PA ( 360' ASL )
[15 mi NNW of Philadelphia]
40:08:45N; 75:16:04W, Grid FN20id

FM: Yamaha T-80 & Onkyo T-450RDS w/ APS9B @15'
AM: Modified Sony ICF 2010 barefoot


--- On Sat, 4/24/10, RichardA wrote:

From: RichardA
Subject: [ultralightdx] Re: Unid. Spanish 1620 kHz
To: ultralightdx@...
Date: Saturday, April 24, 2010, 11:33 AM

 

Russ:

Thank you. It's a possibility as the azimuth is correct for the signal heard. But at 3804 km (2364 miles) it's a long stretch for WDHP's 1 kW signal. I'll have to listen again this evening.

Best wishes for a good weekend.

Richard.

Richard Allen
36°22'51"N / 97°26'35"W
(16 km northwest of Perry OK USA)



Re: Unid. Spanish 1620 kHz

bbwrwy
 

Russ:

Thank you. It's a possibility as the azimuth is correct for the signal heard. But at 3804 km (2364 miles) it's a long stretch for WDHP's 1 kW signal. I'll have to listen again this evening.

Best wishes for a good weekend.

Richard.

Richard Allen
36°22'51"N / 97°26'35"W
(16 km northwest of Perry OK USA)


Re: Unid. Spanish 1620 kHz

Pilgrimway <jcereghin@...>
 

Hmmm...maybe I had them last week. I had Spanish on 1620 with very un-Cuban like music, very bouncy and lively. No IDs but I was too lazy (and tired) to check the Cuban parallels.

--- In ultralightdx@..., Russ Edmunds <wb2bjh@...> wrote:

This is likely WDHP-USVI. The broadcast in Spanish at times at night.

Russ Edmunds
Blue Bell, PA ( 360' ASL )
[15 mi NNW of Philadelphia]
40:08:45N; 75:16:04W, Grid FN20id
<wb2bjh@...>
FM: Yamaha T-80 & Onkyo T-450RDS w/ APS9B @15'
AM: Modified Sony ICF 2010 barefoot

--- On Fri, 4/23/10, RichardA <richarda@...> wrote:

From: RichardA <richarda@...>
Subject: [ultralightdx] Unid. Spanish 1620 kHz
To: ultralightdx@...
Date: Friday, April 23, 2010, 11:27 PM







 









Three evenings this week I've heard Spanish language programming on 1620. It was not parallel to Radio Rebelde 670/5025 or Marti 7365? The earliest heard was 0054 and disappearing around 0200 UTC. The signal is coming from my southeast and consists mostly of music. Does anyone have an idea who it might be? By 0230 UTC tonight I was hearing a mixture of KOZN, WTAW, WNRP and Rebelde, with WNRP dominating. Does WNRP broadcast in Spanish in the early evening? Or does Rebelde 1620 occasionally carry difference programming at that time? I've haven't been able to catch an ID. The other possibility is the Dominican Republic.



Thanks for any help.



Richard.



Richard Allen

36°22'51"N / 97°26'35"W

(16 km northwest of Perry OK USA)


Re: Unid. Spanish 1620 kHz

Russ Edmunds <wb2bjh@...>
 

This is likely WDHP-USVI. The broadcast in Spanish at times at night.

Russ Edmunds
Blue Bell, PA ( 360' ASL )
[15 mi NNW of Philadelphia]
40:08:45N; 75:16:04W, Grid FN20id

FM: Yamaha T-80 & Onkyo T-450RDS w/ APS9B @15'
AM: Modified Sony ICF 2010 barefoot


--- On Fri, 4/23/10, RichardA wrote:

From: RichardA
Subject: [ultralightdx] Unid. Spanish 1620 kHz
To: ultralightdx@...
Date: Friday, April 23, 2010, 11:27 PM

 

Three evenings this week I've heard Spanish language programming on 1620. It was not parallel to Radio Rebelde 670/5025 or Marti 7365? The earliest heard was 0054 and disappearing around 0200 UTC. The signal is coming from my southeast and consists mostly of music. Does anyone have an idea who it might be? By 0230 UTC tonight I was hearing a mixture of KOZN, WTAW, WNRP and Rebelde, with WNRP dominating. Does WNRP broadcast in Spanish in the early evening? Or does Rebelde 1620 occasionally carry difference programming at that time? I've haven't been able to catch an ID. The other possibility is the Dominican Republic.

Thanks for any help.

Richard.

Richard Allen
36°22'51"N / 97°26'35"W
(16 km northwest of Perry OK USA)



Re: I am (not) skeptical

pianoplayer88key
 

I don't know of there are any rewards for it, but the fact that there are often a lot of co-channel stations logged, and some limited experience I've had, gave me a couple ideas...

One would be a category for co-channel graveyard stations logged on a channel where you are close enough to a transmitter that it always rises above the graveyard jungle and has a fairly clear signal. For example, I live about 10 miles east of a local on 1240 (KNSN - may have been KSON at the time - this was a few years ago). One time they were broadcasting an unmodulated carrier, and I was able to hear a Radio Disney station in Albuquerque, NM, on 1240.

Or, for any channel, co-channel loggings of distant stations underneath a "powerhouse" local. I'm not sure how to state it in a way that it would be understood for all radios (maybe something like the local pest must have absolutely NO audible background static whatsoever, or a SNR of at least 60-90dB or something like that maybe, or if you can hear the local station on a crystal set with no more than a couple feet of wire for an antenna), but I'm thinking in order to qualify, the local co-channel pest would have to be indicating at least 60dBu (when the antenna is pointed for strongest reception of that station) or so on the SiLabs chip based radios. In the case of an IBOC local, I wonder if getting the DX co-channel with the IBOC carrier (as long as that is at least, say, 50-55dBu) might be ok?
Unfortunately I can't think of any loggings I would have under those circumstances, though. Bonus points if the local pest happens to be a 1-A clear. Now on the other hand... how would I set it up so that the Mexicans on 640 and 1070 that stomp on KFI and KNX are disqualified? Or are they operating within their specified, internationally-agreed-upon parameters?

And a third one would be most daytime stations logged, with the requirement that it be at least 2 or 3 hours after local sunrise and at least 2 or 3 hours before local sunset, to minimize skip. I'm thinking there ought to at least be categories for something like 25, 40, 70, 100 or so daytime stations heard.

Are there any categories like those in the awards?

--- In ultralightdx@..., John Cereghin <jcereghin@...> wrote:

I have several frequencies in my UL log where I have 10 or more stations
logged, including 850, 920, 1260, 1310, 1320, 1340, 1370, 1390, 1480, 1490,
1550, so there is no reason for any kind of skepticism.

Part of it comes down to honor and trust. There is an honor code among
DXers, that we have actually heard what we claimed to. I have logged 908 AM
stations overall, 697 on ultralights and 511 FM stations. Y'all will just
have to trust me on that unless I give you a reason not to. And I promise
to return the favor for everyone else.

On Fri, Apr 23, 2010 at 3:52 PM, <D1028Gary@...> wrote:



Hi Neil,

Thanks for sharing your impression.

Ultralight radio DXing is actually capable of producing overall results
above and beyond those from table receivers, because of the unique ability
of these tiny receivers to null out nearby pest stations. The most
successful domestic DXers in our group tend to chase new stations with the
Sony SRF-T615, a tiny radio with amazing nulling abilities.When you can null
out local stations and wait out the best propagation openings, you would be
amazed at the variety of stations that can be received.

Also, the Ultralightdx Yahoo group has had a long tradition of avoiding
"flame" postings, primarily because of our close-knit core group (that
has always shown mutual courtesy and respect). This concept has occasionally
been tested by new members, but I'm sure that the vast majority of our
membership respect each other, and our goal of working together to transform
the MW-DXing hobby.

73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
ULR Group Co-founder


In a message dated 4/23/2010 12:25:24 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
neil.bell@... writes:



In looking at some loggers with 300-400-500 stations and sometimes 10
co-channel stations I find it hard to believe unless the individual does a
lot of traveling. 10 co-channel station from one location and all barefoot??
Very unlikely!

Logs are only meaningful when the listening location is recorded in the
logs.

I will probably get flames from this post...

Neil Bell




--
John Cereghin WDX3IAO KB3LYP
Smyrna DE
My radio page www.pilgrimway.org/dx
The Ultralight Scoreboard www.pilgrimway.org/ulradio


Re: I didn't intend to call anyone a liar

pianoplayer88key
 

--- In ultralightdx@..., "neilbellgroups" <neil.bell@...> wrote:

So, let me clarify a couple of things. First I am NOT new to radio but new to being a Ham - Yes.

I have been a SWL for about 45 years (I am 77 years old) and done MW Dxing for only a few years. For MW I have used two random wires with a Quantum Phaser and a Quantum Loop. The radios have included a Sony 2010, an Eton E1, an NRD 545 and an ICOM R75 and Currently also a Perseus SDR.

It was hard for me to visualize a tiny ultralight could have a ferrite bar antenna large enough to be highly directional. I just assumed that some traveling must have been required. Evidently this assumption was incorrect.

Yes, they can be quite directional, especially if you also tilt (not just rotate) the radio. I live 7.3 miles from KFMB's 50kW nighttime signal on 760 (approx 2,000mV/m @ 1 km in my direction), and 9.34 miles from KCBQ's 50kW daytime signal on 1170 (approx 3800mV/m @ 1 km in my direction), and by tilting AND rotating the few ULR-sized radios I have I can bury them fairly deep in the noise, although I can't quite completely null them. On my PL-380, for example, they'll go from showing 40dBu RSSI several channels away (pegging the meter on-channel at 63dBu) to showing less than 20, possibly 15 (lowest it will indicate) dBu on channel.



I do know that MW Dxing here in the SF Bay area is very tough with all the 50 KW powerhouses plus some IBOCs we have. Even with some pretty good equipment on the GY frequencies I feel lucky to get 4 or 5 co-channel stations.
Interesting. I have heard quite a few bay area stations here in San Diego, CA area, including, but not limited to: 560 KSFO, 610 KEAR, 680 KNBR, 740 KCBS, 810 KGO, possibly KNEW 910 when my local 910 (63dBu on PL-380) was off the air, 1050 KTCT, 1100 KFAX, 1310 KMKY (also have a local on 1310), and 1640 KDIA, as well as possibly few others I can't remember off hand (maybe (but not sure of) 960 KKGN, 1010 KIQI, 1190 KDYA, 1260 KSFB, 1510 KPIG).


Part of this is due to being on the west coast I have about 180 degrees of azimuth to seek out weak stations unlike those of you in the middle parts of the country, or north or south.

When the propagation gods are smiling we can get some nice trans-pacific MW stations and of course a number of big Pan-American stations, usually from Mexico are easily heard.
The propogation gods rarely smile on me for trans-pacific stations. I have yet to log my first one. :( Maybe it's because most of the TP powerhouses happen to be a few kHz away from powerful locals for which I'm within at least their 20, if not 100mV/m contour or so. :|

Now, on the other hand, I can easily get Mexican stations, even in the middle of the day. Just with my radios' built-in ferrite bars, I can get fairly good signals on 540 XESURF, 620 XESS, 690 XEWW, 800 XESPN, 860 XEMO, 950 XEKAM, 1030 XESDD, 1090 XEPRS, 1270 XEAZ, 1310 XEC, 1390 XEKT (it's listed as 1380 on FCC's site but it's actually on 1390), 1420 XEXX, 1470 XERCN, 1550 XEBG, 1630 XEUT and 1700 XEPE. Going for weak signals (some of which require a little external antenna help) I would add 730 XEEBC, 790 XESU (under KABC) 820 XEVMS(?), 850 XEZF, 940 XEWV, 990 XECL (mixing with KTMS), 1010 XEDX (maybe, if it's not KXPS), and 1050 XED.... all in the daytime.


Obviously post was poorly worded and could easily offend people - for that I do sincerely apologize.

Maybe I should just buy one of these ultra-lights and see this directionality for myself. If I decide to do that I would be interested in your suggestion as to which model - maybe I could become a convert. I initially joined the group after being given a Grundig G5 and feeling that it performed quite well with fairly good directionality (I know it is not a ultra-light)

Sheepishly,
Neil Bell


Re: The Hoop Loop goes sideways

Chris Knight
 

Jim,
 
Very nice! I can't wait to give it a try.
 
73,
 
Chris


From: jim_kr1s
To: ultralightdx@...
Sent: Fri, April 23, 2010 4:30:56 PM
Subject: [ultralightdx] The Hoop Loop goes sideways

 

Chris Knight and Scott Willingham both suggested making the Hoop Loop tiltable. So I did! Scroll down this page for details.

http://kr1s. kearman.com/ html/hooploop. html 

I refer you to a link I gave, to Radio Intel, that may interest you if you'd like to make a larger-inductance Hoop Loop. I was unaware of this design when I made mine, so I partially re-invented his work! Cutting off the top half of the outer loop makes it easier to tilt. If I were him I would have mounted the variable capacitor on the base. The added length of wire wouldn't make much difference in tuning and would make the loop easier to balance mechanically.

A preliminary test on two stations gave mixed results. I can't find a good null on WJNX-1330, about 30 miles north of me, but they're 63 / 25 all the way around. WBZT-1230, about 30 miles in the other direction, is 56 / 25 on peak, and nulls to 42 / 12 with the loop vertical. The tilt null is very sharp, but I can get it to 30 / 00 easily, and one time it went down to 25 /00. Once I get some practice flying this thing it should do very well. Thanks to Chris and Scott for encouraging me to add this mod. Chris, MULDxER 3 will be even better!

73,
 
Jim, KR1S
http://kr1s. kearman.com/ 
http://qrp.kearman. com/ 



Unid. Spanish 1620 kHz

bbwrwy
 

Three evenings this week I've heard Spanish language programming on 1620. It was not parallel to Radio Rebelde 670/5025 or Marti 7365? The earliest heard was 0054 and disappearing around 0200 UTC. The signal is coming from my southeast and consists mostly of music. Does anyone have an idea who it might be? By 0230 UTC tonight I was hearing a mixture of KOZN, WTAW, WNRP and Rebelde, with WNRP dominating. Does WNRP broadcast in Spanish in the early evening? Or does Rebelde 1620 occasionally carry difference programming at that time? I've haven't been able to catch an ID. The other possibility is the Dominican Republic.

Thanks for any help.

Richard.

Richard Allen
36°22'51"N / 97°26'35"W
(16 km northwest of Perry OK USA)


Re: I am skeptical

Alex
 

--- In ultralightdx@..., "neilbellgroups" <neil.bell@...> wrote:

In looking at some loggers with 300-400-500 stations and sometimes 10 co-channel stations I find it hard to believe unless the individual does a lot of traveling. 10 co-channel station from one location and all barefoot?? Very unlikely!

Logs are only meaningful when the listening location is recorded in the logs.

I will probably get flames from this post...

Neil Bell

Neil get yourself a good ULR radio and start listening by late September till early to mid March. Listen every night trawling the band from one end to the other, from one hour till local sunset every night. When you do go to bed, rise a hour before local sunrise till about a hour after.

You'll be surprised at the number of stations that pop in and out on a nightly basis. I've heard 4 watt Tennessee radio stations here in southern Ohio on a Sony SRF-49, that cost me all of $1 dollar at the flea market, with Odd Lots special headphones. No exterior antennas of any kind and I live 10 feet (yes I said feet) from a set of neighborhood power lines that wipe shortwave reception for my Grundig Satellite 800, Sangen "Super 909" and ATS-505 off the dial.

I've heard 4 Canadian provinces including CBR Calgary, Alberta Canada a distance of 1,639 miles from my 13'X 13' bedroom here in sleepy old Springboro, OH. The only different place I've gone to other than my bed to my desk, was a "DXpedition to a local park less that 10 air miles away. I've also logged 25 states and with 140 stations in my log in a little over a year. The thing is I go to night school which kills my listening time considerably, or I be a lot further along in the station count standings.

But you'll call me a liar just the same, so go to K-Mart and get yourself a $15, SONY SRF-59, a pack of AA batteries, a note book, and have pen or pencil ready and prove it to youself!

Alex N8UCN / KOH8IG / SWLR-RN037


Re: I am (not) skeptical

robert ross
 

In a message dated 4/23/2010 12:25:24 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, neil.bell@... writes:

 

In looking at some loggers with 300-400-500 stations and sometimes 10 co-channel stations I find it hard to believe unless the individual does a lot of traveling. 10 co-channel station from one location and all barefoot?? Very unlikely!

Logs are only meaningful when the listening location is recorded in the logs.

I will probably get flames from this post...

Neil Bell




Hi Guys:

  Well...I think enough has been said on this subject....so I won't beat the Dead Horse any longer!!

On a happier note......I just got back from the Hospital Emergency Room....where I had 3 Tubes of Fluid Drained from my knee.....had 3 Needles full of Freezing......1 Needle full of Morphine....and 1 Needle full of Cortisone pumped in to replace what they took out!!! If that ain't fun then I don't know what is!! HAHHAHAHHA....

My knee is still the size of a Softball...but the Pressure that was in my knee caused by the Fluid and swelling sure feels a lot better.....and the Happy Juice didn't hurt either!! HAHHAHHAA...heck I can almost walk again.....Hopefully this will just return to normal and I can carry on with life.

I feel so much better now....I may just turn on an Ultralight and see what's coming in.....before the Rain and Thunderstorms arrive!!

So after this little Blip on radar (both the goofy message and my knee buggering up)....let's resume normal activities!!

Have a Good One Boys......

Salute....ROB VA3SW

Robert S. Ross
London, Ontario CANADA




Re: I am (not) skeptical

John Cereghin <jcereghin@...>
 

I have several frequencies in my UL log where I have 10 or more stations logged, including 850, 920, 1260, 1310, 1320, 1340, 1370, 1390, 1480, 1490, 1550, so there is no reason for any kind of skepticism. 

Part of it comes down to honor and trust.  There is an honor code among DXers, that we have actually heard what we claimed to.  I have logged 908 AM stations overall, 697 on ultralights and 511 FM stations.  Y'all will just have to trust me on that unless I give you a reason not to.  And I promise to return the favor for everyone else.


On Fri, Apr 23, 2010 at 3:52 PM, <D1028Gary@...> wrote:
 

Hi Neil,
 
Thanks for sharing your impression.
 
Ultralight radio DXing is actually capable of producing overall results above and beyond those from table receivers, because of the unique ability of these tiny receivers to null out nearby pest stations. The most successful domestic DXers in our group tend to chase new stations with the Sony SRF-T615, a tiny radio with amazing nulling abilities.When you can null out local stations and wait out the best propagation openings, you would be amazed at the variety of stations that can be received.
 
Also, the Ultralightdx Yahoo group has had a long tradition of avoiding "flame" postings, primarily because of our close-knit core group (that has always shown mutual courtesy and respect). This concept has occasionally been tested by new members, but I'm sure that the vast majority of our membership respect each other, and our goal of working together to transform the MW-DXing hobby.
 
73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
ULR Group Co-founder
  
 
In a message dated 4/23/2010 12:25:24 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, neil.bell@... writes:
 

In looking at some loggers with 300-400-500 stations and sometimes 10 co-channel stations I find it hard to believe unless the individual does a lot of traveling. 10 co-channel station from one location and all barefoot?? Very unlikely!

Logs are only meaningful when the listening location is recorded in the logs.

I will probably get flames from this post...

Neil Bell




--
John Cereghin WDX3IAO  KB3LYP
Smyrna DE
My radio page www.pilgrimway.org/dx
The Ultralight Scoreboard  www.pilgrimway.org/ulradio


Re: weird evening

Tony Germanotta
 

Well, Russ, I gave it a listen tonight on my PL-310 and got an entirely different result. This time, there was no country music, but just about 8 p.m. I caught a partial ID announcing 107.5 and 1210 a.m. "Who Nellie" and then some sports talk about the NFL Draft. 

It looks like WQLS in Montgomery Alabama which just went to sports talk and put its The Ticket program on 107.5 there.  

I didn't get catch the call sign, but some folks say they are using WTXK on both. They faded out pretty much by 8:15 p.m.




On Apr 23, 2010, at 1:31 PM, Russ Edmunds wrote:

 

I'm about ten miles from WPHT. I've heard disturbances on their signal but never anything more.

It isn't even a greyline situation. Simply normal sunset DX - station to the west starts propagating farther on its daytime facilities as sunset approaches.

Some us us can remember hearing California daytimers from the East Coast on 1580 back in the early 1970's via the same phenomenon --- aided considerably by only two fulltimers on 1580 then - XEDM and CBJ.

Russ Edmunds
Blue Bell, PA ( 360' ASL )
[15 mi NNW of Philadelphia]
40:08:45N; 75:16:04W, Grid FN20id
com>
FM: Yamaha T-80 & Onkyo T-450RDS w/ APS9B @15'
AM: Modified Sony ICF 2010 barefoot

--- On Fri, 4/23/10, Tony Germanotta gmail.com> wrote:

From: Tony Germanotta gmail.com>
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] weird evening
To: ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com
Date: Friday, April 23, 2010, 1:25 PM

 

 That could be it. They might have hit the gray line duct right about then too. But probably the more important thing is the way the WPHT signal was degraded. I'll give a listen tonight and try to find time to break out the real radio -- that's a funny way to describe that $40 wonder vs. the Drake.


Of course, in PA, you'd probably have no chance to null out Philly and pick up OK.


On Apr 23, 2010, at 1:18 PM, Russ Edmunds wrote:

 

You should consider KGYN-OK, which has some power and would still be on day facilities at that hour. Their format is Country and Agricultural talk.

Russ Edmunds
Blue Bell, PA ( 360' ASL )
[15 mi NNW of Philadelphia]
40:08:45N; 75:16:04W, Grid FN20id

FM: Yamaha T-80 & Onkyo T-450RDS w/ APS9B @15'
AM: Modified Sony ICF 2010 barefoot

--- On Fri, 4/23/10, Tony Germanotta gmail.com> wrote:

From: Tony Germanotta gmail.com>
Subject: [ultralightdx] weird evening
To: ultralightdx@ yahoogroups. com
Date: Friday, April 23, 2010, 1:03 PM

 

Guys, I wasn't DXing last night, just listening the the Phillies game while I worked but there seemed to be some strange conditions that might portend some good DX for those with the time.

The Phillies are on 1210 AM, a 50KW powerhouse out of Philadelphia. Usually, that comes screaming in here in Virginia after sunset. I was working in my office, which has a closet that contains my radio room. So I turned on my R8A, hardly a ULR, about 7:15 p.m.

What was weird was I was picking up, at very good levels, a country western station on the same frequency. I never got an ID and didn't record it, since I was basically listening for content on the cochannel and too busy to break out the PL-310 and go direction finding. But the normal pest when I am listening to a game are latin stations. This was non-spanish and there right at our sundown and present up beyond the TOH at 8 p.m., so it was unlikely to be coming from stations to the west (although I was using my tall G5RV out back as the antenna.)

Anyways, this isn't an appeal for an ID, since I wasn't using the right radios. Just an alert that the ionosphere was playing tricks last night. So much so that the R8A's sync was having a hard time locking on the Phillies game and there was a consistent warble in the signal.

My guess is that conditions favored a northern path and I was receiving one of the relatively weak Canadian stations on 1210. But who knows. It may be a time to pick up something in WPHT's considerable shadow. Me, I'll be too busy with work for another week or so to test any theories. And tonight might be completely different. That's the fun and magic of propagation.