Date   

Re: Alice Springs, Australia

Chris Knight
 

Hi Jim,
 
I'm now building the original Hoop Loop. Obviously, it is a very impressive antenna! The parts are on hand. The turntable was from Target and the round, wood clock-mount base was from Michael's. Both were only $5 each. The embroidery hoop was close to $6 from Jo-Ann fabrics (I bought three for $18). As far as the terminal for the loop windings, I'm going with a Radio Shack speaker terminal mounted on the inside bottom of the hoop assembly. However, iIt's a little big for that purpose. Any suggestions as to what would work better? As far as ferrite cores I have one FT-114-J. I suppose I'll wind a 7-turn bifilar primary and 60-turn secondary out of Radio Shack magnet wire as you did, provided Type J is equivalent to the type you used. How did you mount the hoop to the wood base? I believe you used adhesive. Kind and brand name?
 
I just need to refresh my memory on how to do a bifilar winding. Where exactly on the circuit board did you ground the center primary tap? In my line of work I see CHASSIS_GND separate from GND a lot. CHASSIS_GND is usually associated with plated mounting holes and GND is associated with the bulk of the circuit being zero potential.
 
That's a lot of questions and I could figure it all out, but thought it may help others as well who potentially want to build the Hoop Loop. Once I get this puppy together I'll place it up on Youtube for the benefit of others.
 
73,
 
Chris (N0IJK)


From: jim_kr1s
To: ultralightdx@...
Sent: Sat, May 1, 2010 5:50:00 AM
Subject: [ultralightdx] Alice Springs, Australia

 

The Hoop Loop  antenna is remotely tuned by an inductor and capacitor. The inductor makes up part of a radio-frequency transformer. With Si4734-based radios, from 150-1710 kHz, the tuning capacitor is inside the radio. Above 1710 kHz, the radio switches to the whip antenna and the capacitor is set at a low, fixed value. The term "medium frequency" applies to signals up to 3000 kHz. There isn't much between 1710 and 3000 kHz that the chip can demodulate, as it lacks a BFO. But there are a few stations of interest. Three in particular caught my attention, as they are 50-kW broadcast stations in Australia's Northern Territory. They're on 2310 (Alice Springs), 2325 (Tennant Creek) and 2485 kHz (Katherine).

This week I've been experimenting with the Hoop Loop connected to a communications receiver, using a discrete, manually adjusted tuning capacitor. Last night I thought, 'Why not try this on the PL-380?' I'd removed the whip antenna from my PL-380, but it was easy to connect the tuned circuit in its place. I used a small additional secondary winding on the transformer. I was able to copy WWV on 2.5 MHz very well, so I went to bed with high hopes.

The Australian stations  are night-time only, and sunset in the NT is about 2 hours ahead of my sunrise right now. I was up at 5 a.m. local time, 0900Z. About 1000Z I started noticing a hint of signals on 2310 and 2325 kHz, and a noisy local buzz on 2485 kHz, so I gave up on that frequency. Tennant Creek on 2325 kHz never got loud enough to hear audio, but Alice Springs (10,300 miles from me) did, about 1020Z, 20 minutes before my sunrise. The audio wasn't strong, but I could hear a man speaking, and what sounded like five "chip" beeps every 5 minutes, with some variation at 1045Z and 1100Z, about 20 minutes after my sunrise. Shortly after 1100Z, the signal faded into the noise.

The tuned part of the transformer is 30 turns of #28 on an FT50-61 core, resonated with a 150-pF (max) variable capacitor (a 365-pF variable capacitor would work, but the smaller capacitor has less capacitance variation per degree of shaft rotation, making it easier to peak a signal). The Hoop Loop is matched through 7 turns bifilar-wound, and there's a 2-turn winding going to the whip-antenna terminal and ground inside the PL-380. I chose two turns to couple to the radio because it felt right, and it seems to be. Band noise increases when I connect the Hoop Loop, and can be peaked with the tuning capacitor. Now I only have to wait for the right propagation some morning!

The Hoop Loop is a very versatile antenna. Above 3 MHz, this type of loop becomes omnidirectional, but still can be quieter than a random-length wire. Up to 2.5 MHz it shows definite directivity and nulling. I was able to turn it to minimize lightning crashes from the west, even though Alice Springs is due west of me (bearing 268 degrees). I've now used the Hoop Loop to copy trans-oceanic signals on the PL-380 from 153 to 2310 kHz, simply by changing coils, and adding a variable capacitor for frequencies above 1710 kHz. As noted, with a discrete tuning capacitor it can be used with any receiver. (The Hoop Loop is a natural for the PL-360 too, as the matching transformers can plug right into the top of the radio. ) I'll be adding information to the Hoop Loop page over the next few days, but if you'd like more details, drop me an email.

73,
 
Jim, KR1S
http://kr1s. kearman.com/ 
http://qrp.kearman. com/ 



Re: PL-360 Plug-in Loopstick Construction Details

bbwrwy
 

Gary & Russ:

I've been experimenting with my PL-360 and have found the included plug-in AM antenna is of little value. However, the receiver's sensitive really jumps when connected to either a Quantum QX Loop or long wire aerial. I prefer using it with my 35+ year old Space Magnet SM2 loop. The two do very well together.

With the long wire aerial plugged in, it's also possible to listen to short wave.

Richard.

Richard Allen
36°22'51"N / 97°26'35"W
(near Perry OK USA)


Re: PL-360 Plug-in Loopstick Construction Details

Russ Edmunds <wb2bjh@...>
 

Aha! That explains it ! Thanks-

Russ Edmunds
Blue Bell, PA ( 360' ASL )
[15 mi NNW of Philadelphia]
40:08:45N; 75:16:04W, Grid FN20id

FM: Yamaha T-80 & Onkyo T-450RDS w/ APS9B @15'
AM: Modified Sony ICF 2010 barefoot


--- On Sat, 5/1/10, D1028Gary@... wrote:

From: D1028Gary@... <D1028Gary@...>
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] PL-360 Plug-in Loopstick Construction Details
To: ultralightdx@...
Date: Saturday, May 1, 2010, 8:01 PM

Hi Russ,
 
The PL-360 has a loopstick plug-in jack on the top cabinet surface, which normally is used to hold the tiny stock loopstick. Because of this plug-in system, the stock loopstick can be easily removed and replaced with a much more sensitive custom loopstick, such as the two models described in the previous post.
 
73, Gary
 
In a message dated 5/1/2010 4:57:25 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, wb2bjh@... writes:


I must be missing something here, not having seen a 360, but just what is the plug plugged into ?

Russ Edmunds
Blue Bell, PA ( 360' ASL )
[15 mi NNW of Philadelphia]
40:08:45N; 75:16:04W, Grid FN20id

FM: Yamaha T-80 & Onkyo T-450RDS w/ APS9B @15'
AM: Modified Sony ICF 2010 barefoot

--- On Sat, 5/1/10, D1028Gary@... wrote:

From: D1028Gary@...
Subject: [ultralightdx] PL-360 Plug-in Loopstick Construction Details
To: ultralightdx@...
Date: Saturday, May 1, 2010, 7:53 PM

Hello All,
 
Thanks to all who have expressed interest in the PL-360 plug-in loopsticks, which provide a very rare chance for non-technical DXers to greatly boost AM sensitivity in this DSP model without voiding the warranty (or even opening up the radio cabinet). Today the first "production run" was started for the 4 DXers who have expressed interest in receiving the 7.5" plug-in loopsticks for the PL-360. For those of you who would like to construct your own, the coil winding details are summarized below.
 
 
The 3 x 3/8" loopstick is made of 84 turns of 40/44 Litz wire, starting 13 mm from either end of the type 61 bar (sold by Amidon). The 7.5 x .5" loopstick is made of 58 turns of 40/44 Litz, starting 80 mm from either end of the bar. Both coils are wound on a base of Johnson & Johnson waterproof tape, sticky side up, which is the only material in between the Litz wire and ferrite bars. Both of these coils finish up at around 350 uh, a design idea to minimize the Si4734 quirk of requiring re-tuning of the radio for maximum AM sensitivity, whenever the antenna inductance changes. In this system, as long as the coil inductances are very close, during a hurried DXing situation either loopstick can be plugged in without a severe drop-off in the PL-360's AM sensitivity (although re-tuning is still recommended). Both loopsticks are mounted on cut-up pieces of a 48" plastic carpenter's level, which provide excellent superglue bonding to the Radio Shack 1/8" mono plugs' plastic housing. A 10 mm (approximately 13/32") perpendicular hole is drilled in the cut-up plastic pieces to accommodate the phono plug housing. As explained previously, a short section of 3/8" I.D. rubber hose glued to the 7.5" loopstick frame is used to protect the loopstick from sideways bumps, and fits securely over the whip antenna tip to share the loopstick weight with the plug-in jack. 
 
The 3" loopstick provides a nice AM sensitivity boost for the PL-360 (giving it weak-signal performance superior to that of any stock Ultralight radio), while the 7.5" loopstick provides AM sensitivity equal to that of the E100 Sliders, 7.5" loopstick PL-380, etc. For those DXers who would like to use a little more AM-DXing sensitivity without any radio "surgery," these plug-in loopsticks may be the ideal solution.
 
73 and Good DX, 
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
 
                                                                                        
 



Re: PL-360 Plug-in Loopstick Construction Details

Gary DeBock
 

Hi Richard,
 
Thanks for the report of your great results, with the PL-360 and Space Magnet SM2 Loop combination.
 
I certainly agree that the stock loopstick is for amusement only, but the PL-360 models here certainly come alive with the more effective plug-in loopsticks. The transformation in AM-DXing performance is amazing.
 
73, Gary 
 

In a message dated 5/1/2010 7:07:51 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, richarda@... writes:
 

Gary & Russ:

I've been experimenting with my PL-360 and have found the included plug-in AM antenna is of little value. However, the receiver's sensitive really jumps when connected to either a Quantum QX Loop or long wire aerial. I prefer using it with my 35+ year old Space Magnet SM2 loop. The two do very well together.

With the long wire aerial plugged in, it's also possible to listen to short wave.

Richard.

Richard Allen
36°22'51"N / 97°26'35"W
(near Perry OK USA)


Re: PL-360 Plug-in Loopstick Construction Details

Russ Edmunds <wb2bjh@...>
 

I must be missing something here, not having seen a 360, but just what is the plug plugged into ?

Russ Edmunds
Blue Bell, PA ( 360' ASL )
[15 mi NNW of Philadelphia]
40:08:45N; 75:16:04W, Grid FN20id

FM: Yamaha T-80 & Onkyo T-450RDS w/ APS9B @15'
AM: Modified Sony ICF 2010 barefoot


--- On Sat, 5/1/10, D1028Gary@... wrote:

From: D1028Gary@...
Subject: [ultralightdx] PL-360 Plug-in Loopstick Construction Details
To: ultralightdx@...
Date: Saturday, May 1, 2010, 7:53 PM

Hello All,
 
Thanks to all who have expressed interest in the PL-360 plug-in loopsticks, which provide a very rare chance for non-technical DXers to greatly boost AM sensitivity in this DSP model without voiding the warranty (or even opening up the radio cabinet). Today the first "production run" was started for the 4 DXers who have expressed interest in receiving the 7.5" plug-in loopsticks for the PL-360. For those of you who would like to construct your own, the coil winding details are summarized below.
 
 
The 3 x 3/8" loopstick is made of 84 turns of 40/44 Litz wire, starting 13 mm from either end of the type 61 bar (sold by Amidon). The 7.5 x .5" loopstick is made of 58 turns of 40/44 Litz, starting 80 mm from either end of the bar. Both coils are wound on a base of Johnson & Johnson waterproof tape, sticky side up, which is the only material in between the Litz wire and ferrite bars. Both of these coils finish up at around 350 uh, a design idea to minimize the Si4734 quirk of requiring re-tuning of the radio for maximum AM sensitivity, whenever the antenna inductance changes. In this system, as long as the coil inductances are very close, during a hurried DXing situation either loopstick can be plugged in without a severe drop-off in the PL-360's AM sensitivity (although re-tuning is still recommended). Both loopsticks are mounted on cut-up pieces of a 48" plastic carpenter's level, which provide excellent superglue bonding to the Radio Shack 1/8" mono plugs' plastic housing. A 10 mm (approximately 13/32") perpendicular hole is drilled in the cut-up plastic pieces to accommodate the phono plug housing. As explained previously, a short section of 3/8" I.D. rubber hose glued to the 7.5" loopstick frame is used to protect the loopstick from sideways bumps, and fits securely over the whip antenna tip to share the loopstick weight with the plug-in jack. 
 
The 3" loopstick provides a nice AM sensitivity boost for the PL-360 (giving it weak-signal performance superior to that of any stock Ultralight radio), while the 7.5" loopstick provides AM sensitivity equal to that of the E100 Sliders, 7.5" loopstick PL-380, etc. For those DXers who would like to use a little more AM-DXing sensitivity without any radio "surgery," these plug-in loopsticks may be the ideal solution.
 
73 and Good DX, 
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
 
                                                                                        
 


I just bought my first ULRadio

neilbellgroups <neil.bell@...>
 

After getting advice from some of the group members I decided to dip my toe into the UL world with a Tecsun PL380. Just how long it will take to reach me here in the USA - I have no idea!

Wish me luck playing with the radio barefoot and with my Terk passive loop...

Neil Bell
KJ6FBA


couple questions about logs

pianoplayer88key
 

Hi all.. I'm considering making some logs of stations I have heard on ULRs. Some of my loggings were done in the past several years - possibly even before the ULR group existed, but I think they would have been on ULRs.

Is it permissible to count past stations that may no longer be receivable, because...
A - they were one-time catches (1240 Albuquerque, NM, while local 1240 was broadcasting unmodulated carrier; 720 WGN or 780 WBBM while KDWN was off the air or KKOH and KFMB's splatter was nulled (radio I was using has selectivity like SRF-M37W)
B - station changed pattern (670 KBOI Boise) or no longer on air

Also, what about counting stations heard on older, out-of-production radios? I think my Panasonic RQ-SW20, SW44V and Sony SRF-42 would have qualified - they were all available under $100 (SW20 about $50-$80, SW44V probably similar, SRF-42 about $30) at retail when they were being sold, but all were discontinued at least a few years or more before the ULR community got started. Also I believe they are all within the size limits. Some loggings were with the SAT, some were barefoot.


Re: Congratulations to the Ultralightdx Yahoo Group- 600 DXers Signed Up!

robert ross
 

david3752001 wrote:
 



Hi Jim,

Just to let you know that I have started my Ultralight log from scratch after my diversion into NDB listening over the winter. I have thoroughly enjoyed all the posts on this group and I'm looking forward to being a more active participant.

I have logged my first 100 barefoot ultralight stations this week for Rob's 7-day Challenge....that was a lot of FUN!!..... and I am in the process of typing them up. I will be adding my loggings to John's space....... probably tomorrow.

Cheers,

Dave (GM7VZV)
Aberdeen Scotland.

Great Work Dave.......I look forward to receiving your Award Application!! Glad to see our overseas friends having FUN with ULTRALIGHT RADIO!!

73....ROB VA3SW

Robert S. Ross
London, Ontario CANADA


Re: Congratulations to the Ultralightdx Yahoo Group- 600 DXers Signed Up!

david3752001 <david@...>
 

Hi Jim,

Just to let you know that I have started my Ultralight log from scratch after my diversion into NDB listening over the winter. I have thoroughly enjoyed all the posts on this group and I'm looking forward to being a more active participant.

I have logged my first 100 barefoot ultralight stations this week for Rob's 7-day Challenge....that was a lot of FUN!!..... and I am in the process of typing them up. I will be adding my loggings to John's space....... probably tomorrow.

Cheers,

Dave (GM7VZV)
Aberdeen Scotland.

--- In ultralightdx@..., "jim_kr1s" <jkearman@...> wrote:


--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@ wrote:

and the best is yet to come!
This is the most active of the 8 Yahoo groups I read, not all of which
pertain to radio. I'd like to take this opportunity to not only thank
the organizers, but to again encourage more participation! Not everyone
has large blocks of time to spend DXing, and we all put in what time we
can spare. I know we'd all appreciate hearing about more peoples'
loggings. John Cereghin has generously provided a place to record totals
(http://www.pilgrimway.org/ulradio <http://www.pilgrimway.org/ulradio>
), but only 16 people are participating. That's less than 3-percent of
our total membership. I'd hate to think anyone is put off by some of the
totals shown there, or thinks his or her own loggings aren't up to par
and thus aren't worth posting to the group. I'm sure I speak for all of
us when I say we look forward to reading about what others are hearing.
What say, you Silent 584?

73,

Jim, KR1S
http://kr1s.kearman.com/ <http://kr1s.kearman.com/>
http://qrp.kearman.com/ <http://qrp.kearman.com/>


Re: Congratulations to the Ultralightdx Yahoo Group- 600 DXers Signed Up!

jim_kr1s <jkearman@...>
 


--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:

> and the best is yet to come!

This is the most active of the 8 Yahoo groups I read, not all of which pertain to radio. I'd like to take this opportunity to not only thank the organizers, but to again encourage more participation! Not everyone has large blocks of time to spend DXing, and we all put in what time we can spare. I know we'd all appreciate hearing about more peoples' loggings. John Cereghin has generously provided a place to record totals (http://www.pilgrimway.org/ulradio), but only 16 people are participating. That's less than 3-percent of our total membership. I'd hate to think anyone is put off by some of the totals shown there, or thinks his or her own loggings aren't up to par and thus aren't worth posting to the group. I'm sure I speak for all of us when I say we look forward to reading about what others are hearing. What say, you Silent 584?

73,
 
Jim, KR1S
http://kr1s.kearman.com/ 
http://qrp.kearman.com/ 


Re: PL-360 Plug-in Loopstick Construction Details

Gary DeBock
 

Hi Russ,
 
The PL-360 has a loopstick plug-in jack on the top cabinet surface, which normally is used to hold the tiny stock loopstick. Because of this plug-in system, the stock loopstick can be easily removed and replaced with a much more sensitive custom loopstick, such as the two models described in the previous post.
 
73, Gary
 

In a message dated 5/1/2010 4:57:25 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, wb2bjh@... writes:


I must be missing something here, not having seen a 360, but just what is the plug plugged into ?

Russ Edmunds
Blue Bell, PA ( 360' ASL )
[15 mi NNW of Philadelphia]
40:08:45N; 75:16:04W, Grid FN20id

FM: Yamaha T-80 & Onkyo T-450RDS w/ APS9B @15'
AM: Modified Sony ICF 2010 barefoot

--- On Sat, 5/1/10, D1028Gary@... wrote:

From: D1028Gary@...
Subject: [ultralightdx] PL-360 Plug-in Loopstick Construction Details
To: ultralightdx@...
Date: Saturday, May 1, 2010, 7:53 PM

Hello All,
 
Thanks to all who have expressed interest in the PL-360 plug-in loopsticks, which provide a very rare chance for non-technical DXers to greatly boost AM sensitivity in this DSP model without voiding the warranty (or even opening up the radio cabinet). Today the first "production run" was started for the 4 DXers who have expressed interest in receiving the 7.5" plug-in loopsticks for the PL-360. For those of you who would like to construct your own, the coil winding details are summarized below.
 
 
The 3 x 3/8" loopstick is made of 84 turns of 40/44 Litz wire, starting 13 mm from either end of the type 61 bar (sold by Amidon). The 7.5 x .5" loopstick is made of 58 turns of 40/44 Litz, starting 80 mm from either end of the bar. Both coils are wound on a base of Johnson & Johnson waterproof tape, sticky side up, which is the only material in between the Litz wire and ferrite bars. Both of these coils finish up at around 350 uh, a design idea to minimize the Si4734 quirk of requiring re-tuning of the radio for maximum AM sensitivity, whenever the antenna inductance changes. In this system, as long as the coil inductances are very close, during a hurried DXing situation either loopstick can be plugged in without a severe drop-off in the PL-360's AM sensitivity (although re-tuning is still recommended). Both loopsticks are mounted on cut-up pieces of a 48" plastic carpenter's level, which provide excellent superglue bonding to the Radio Shack 1/8" mono plugs' plastic housing. A 10 mm (approximately 13/32") perpendicular hole is drilled in the cut-up plastic pieces to accommodate the phono plug housing. As explained previously, a short section of 3/8" I.D. rubber hose glued to the 7.5" loopstick frame is used to protect the loopstick from sideways bumps, and fits securely over the whip antenna tip to share the loopstick weight with the plug-in jack. 
 
The 3" loopstick provides a nice AM sensitivity boost for the PL-360 (giving it weak-signal performance superior to that of any stock Ultralight radio), while the 7.5" loopstick provides AM sensitivity equal to that of the E100 Sliders, 7.5" loopstick PL-380, etc. For those DXers who would like to use a little more AM-DXing sensitivity without any radio "surgery," these plug-in loopsticks may be the ideal solution.
 
73 and Good DX, 
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
 
                                                                                        
 


Re: I just bought my first ULRadio

Gary DeBock
 

Great Choice Neil,
 
You should have lots of fun playing with your new PL-380, and we will all be eager to assist in any way. Good luck DXing both barefoot, and with your Terk passive loop!
 
73, Gary DeBock (another west coast DXer)
 

In a message dated 5/1/2010 4:14:43 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, neil.bell@... writes:
 

After getting advice from some of the group members I decided to dip my toe into the UL world with a Tecsun PL380. Just how long it will take to reach me here in the USA - I have no idea!

Wish me luck playing with the radio barefoot and with my Terk passive loop...

Neil Bell
KJ6FBA


PL-360 Plug-in Loopstick Construction Details

Gary DeBock
 

Hello All,
 
Thanks to all who have expressed interest in the PL-360 plug-in loopsticks, which provide a very rare chance for non-technical DXers to greatly boost AM sensitivity in this DSP model without voiding the warranty (or even opening up the radio cabinet). Today the first "production run" was started for the 4 DXers who have expressed interest in receiving the 7.5" plug-in loopsticks for the PL-360. For those of you who would like to construct your own, the coil winding details are summarized below.
 
 
The 3 x 3/8" loopstick is made of 84 turns of 40/44 Litz wire, starting 13 mm from either end of the type 61 bar (sold by Amidon). The 7.5 x .5" loopstick is made of 58 turns of 40/44 Litz, starting 80 mm from either end of the bar. Both coils are wound on a base of Johnson & Johnson waterproof tape, sticky side up, which is the only material in between the Litz wire and ferrite bars. Both of these coils finish up at around 350 uh, a design idea to minimize the Si4734 quirk of requiring re-tuning of the radio for maximum AM sensitivity, whenever the antenna inductance changes. In this system, as long as the coil inductances are very close, during a hurried DXing situation either loopstick can be plugged in without a severe drop-off in the PL-360's AM sensitivity (although re-tuning is still recommended). Both loopsticks are mounted on cut-up pieces of a 48" plastic carpenter's level, which provide excellent superglue bonding to the Radio Shack 1/8" mono plugs' plastic housing. A 10 mm (approximately 13/32") perpendicular hole is drilled in the cut-up plastic pieces to accommodate the phono plug housing. As explained previously, a short section of 3/8" I.D. rubber hose glued to the 7.5" loopstick frame is used to protect the loopstick from sideways bumps, and fits securely over the whip antenna tip to share the loopstick weight with the plug-in jack. 
 
The 3" loopstick provides a nice AM sensitivity boost for the PL-360 (giving it weak-signal performance superior to that of any stock Ultralight radio), while the 7.5" loopstick provides AM sensitivity equal to that of the E100 Sliders, 7.5" loopstick PL-380, etc. For those DXers who would like to use a little more AM-DXing sensitivity without any radio "surgery," these plug-in loopsticks may be the ideal solution.
 
73 and Good DX, 
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
 
                                                                                        
 


Re: Breaking down the Numbers...

ferrite61 <dxrx@...>
 

[edited for response]

John: Of that list below, the only one heard up here in CT is WTHU, and that was an original reception using my home brew radio in late 2004 !

Some tips here: 900, 1100, and 1520 are going to be very tough. You would have to try late afternoon starting around 5PM EDT. WWKB 1520 here in CT is known to fade in at least an hour b4 sunset and remain at least an hour after sunrise. There is a narrow time-frame for me to log WIZZ in Greenfield MA only 85 miles away. CHML on 900 and WTAM 1100 will likely behave the same. So you might want to try these three frequencies 2 hours before sunset.

Paul S. in CT

--- In ultralightdx@..., John Cereghin <jcereghin@...> wrote:

I still have several stations less than 100 miles away that I haven't heard
on a UL, so I continue to target them. These would include:
900- WILC Laurel MD
1100- WGPA Bethlehem PA
1230- WKBO Harrisburg PA
1240- WIOV Reading PA
1250- WYYC York PA
1300- WIMG Ewing NJ
1400- WHGB Harrisburg PA
1400- WEST Easton PA
1440- WGLD Red Lion PA
1450- WOL Washington DC
1450- WTHU Thurmont MD
1510- WWSM Annville PA
1520 WCHE West Chester PA
1560- WKIK La Plata MD
1580- WGYM Hammonton NJ
1600- WLXE Rockville MD
1600- WHOL Allentown PA

That ought to keep me busy for a while!
John Cereghin WDX3IAO KB3LYP
Smyrna DE
My radio page www.pilgrimway.org/dx
The Ultralight Scoreboard www.pilgrimway.org/ulradio


Re: Four new ones at Sunset

ferrite61 <dxrx@...>
 

Sorry:
I forgot a few things... I was using the PL-310 barefoot. WSEV is located on 930 kHz and the time was 20:05 EDT. The African-American Gospel on 800 kHz still hasn't ID'd: there are two located on channel both from SC. Nothing across Top of Hour.

Paul S. in CT

--- In ultralightdx@..., "farmerik" <farmerik@...> wrote:

Good for YOU! Which radio were you using? - FARMERIK

--- In ultralightdx@..., "ferrite61" <dxrx@> wrote:

I was sitting out at the picnic table in backyard doing a casual scanning tonite at sunset local time. This would be about 1930 EDT to 2015EDT. I caught four new stations to log.

#1) WBMD on 750kHz at presumed sign-off 19:45 EDT mentioning they're a Christian Religious station. Fairly good RX w/o WSB competition. This one is rated 730 Watts Daytime only: Distance abt. 390km from Balt. MD.

#2) Very nice double call of WSEV Sevierville, TN during a WX report. Claims to be a Weather and traffic station. Look-up indicates 5kW day, and that its programming 'is' Weather and Traffic. Distance is 1112 km.

#3) and #4 are calls-heard only, no real programming heard amidst a jumble of stations... these came out of the mud for ID at 2015 and 2016 EDT respective.

On 1230 kHz a call for WFAS popped up... its located locally in White Plains, NY abt. 90 km away and 1kW of power.

On 1240 kHz a call for WP[AJK]L heard twice. I had to look this up to find its WPJL from Raleigh, NC rated 1kW and 804km distant.

Total station count is up to 430 ID's.

Paul S. in CT


Breaking down the Numbers...

John Cereghin <jcereghin@...>
 

The other day I finally broke the 700-station barrier with UL radios.  Conditions seem to have been rather good over the last week that allowed me to make that final push.  I've even been able to add two new stations to bring my total to 702.  I managed to add 970-WNED Buffalo NY and 1350-WCBA Corning NY to the log.

I love to break down my log and "run the numbers".  I would have made a good statistician!  Looking at my UL log, I see the following:

Logs from 34 states.  I simply can't get that 35th state.  My best shot for it might be KSL for Utah or KTNN for Arizona.  Maybe KRVN in Nebraska if WCBS ever decided to take a night off?  Or maybe KAAY but local pest WBAL seldom cooperates.

Logs from 19 countries. 

My top 5 states logged are:
Pennsylvania 96
New York 78
Virginia 76
North Carolina 64
Maryland 45

My most productive frequencies are:
1310- 14 stations
1370- 13 stations
850, 920, 1260, 1340, 1480- 12 stations
1320, 1390, 1490- 11 stations
950, 1380, 1470, 1550- 10 stations

1210 continues to be my worst frequency with only 1 station- WPHT in Philadelphia, which is very difficult for me to null.

What would I do without Cuba?  I have 22 Cuban stations to fatten my up log.

I still only have 50 graveyarders as I haven't been concentrating too much on them lately.

I still have several stations less than 100 miles away that I haven't heard on a UL, so I continue to target them.  These would include:
900- WILC Laurel MD
1100- WGPA Bethlehem PA
1230- WKBO Harrisburg PA
1240- WIOV Reading PA
1250- WYYC York PA
1300- WIMG Ewing NJ
1400- WHGB Harrisburg PA
1400- WEST Easton PA
1440- WGLD Red Lion PA
1450- WOL Washington DC
1450- WTHU Thurmont MD
1510- WWSM Annville PA
1520 WCHE West Chester PA
1560- WKIK La Plata MD
1580- WGYM Hammonton NJ
1600- WLXE Rockville MD
1600- WHOL Allentown PA

That ought to keep me busy for a while!

I have a target list made up to log the next hundred stations in the new push to get to 800.  But with FM DX season coming up, I'll be spending more time chasing Es as I would like to push my FM station total to 600 by the end of the summer (I'm currently at 510).  I'm sure I'll be using my PL-300WT and PL-310 in chasing Es this summer and I'll post those logs here, again to show that these ULs can really shine when the Es and even the tropo are in, using just their build-in whip antennas.

Also, don't forget to check out the ultralight scoreboard (the link is below) and send me your updated totals.


--
John Cereghin WDX3IAO  KB3LYP
Smyrna DE
My radio page www.pilgrimway.org/dx
The Ultralight Scoreboard  www.pilgrimway.org/ulradio


Alice Springs, Australia

jim_kr1s <jkearman@...>
 

The Hoop Loop  antenna is remotely tuned by an inductor and capacitor. The inductor makes up part of a radio-frequency transformer. With Si4734-based radios, from 150-1710 kHz, the tuning capacitor is inside the radio. Above 1710 kHz, the radio switches to the whip antenna and the capacitor is set at a low, fixed value. The term "medium frequency" applies to signals up to 3000 kHz. There isn't much between 1710 and 3000 kHz that the chip can demodulate, as it lacks a BFO. But there are a few stations of interest. Three in particular caught my attention, as they are 50-kW broadcast stations in Australia's Northern Territory. They're on 2310 (Alice Springs), 2325 (Tennant Creek) and 2485 kHz (Katherine).

This week I've been experimenting with the Hoop Loop connected to a communications receiver, using a discrete, manually adjusted tuning capacitor. Last night I thought, 'Why not try this on the PL-380?' I'd removed the whip antenna from my PL-380, but it was easy to connect the tuned circuit in its place. I used a small additional secondary winding on the transformer. I was able to copy WWV on 2.5 MHz very well, so I went to bed with high hopes.

The Australian stations  are night-time only, and sunset in the NT is about 2 hours ahead of my sunrise right now. I was up at 5 a.m. local time, 0900Z. About 1000Z I started noticing a hint of signals on 2310 and 2325 kHz, and a noisy local buzz on 2485 kHz, so I gave up on that frequency. Tennant Creek on 2325 kHz never got loud enough to hear audio, but Alice Springs (10,300 miles from me) did, about 1020Z, 20 minutes before my sunrise. The audio wasn't strong, but I could hear a man speaking, and what sounded like five "chip" beeps every 5 minutes, with some variation at 1045Z and 1100Z, about 20 minutes after my sunrise. Shortly after 1100Z, the signal faded into the noise.

The tuned part of the transformer is 30 turns of #28 on an FT50-61 core, resonated with a 150-pF (max) variable capacitor (a 365-pF variable capacitor would work, but the smaller capacitor has less capacitance variation per degree of shaft rotation, making it easier to peak a signal). The Hoop Loop is matched through 7 turns bifilar-wound, and there's a 2-turn winding going to the whip-antenna terminal and ground inside the PL-380. I chose two turns to couple to the radio because it felt right, and it seems to be. Band noise increases when I connect the Hoop Loop, and can be peaked with the tuning capacitor. Now I only have to wait for the right propagation some morning!

The Hoop Loop is a very versatile antenna. Above 3 MHz, this type of loop becomes omnidirectional, but still can be quieter than a random-length wire. Up to 2.5 MHz it shows definite directivity and nulling. I was able to turn it to minimize lightning crashes from the west, even though Alice Springs is due west of me (bearing 268 degrees). I've now used the Hoop Loop to copy trans-oceanic signals on the PL-380 from 153 to 2310 kHz, simply by changing coils, and adding a variable capacitor for frequencies above 1710 kHz. As noted, with a discrete tuning capacitor it can be used with any receiver. (The Hoop Loop is a natural for the PL-360 too, as the matching transformers can plug right into the top of the radio. ) I'll be adding information to the Hoop Loop page over the next few days, but if you'd like more details, drop me an email.

73,
 
Jim, KR1S
http://kr1s.kearman.com/ 
http://qrp.kearman.com/ 


Re: Congratulations to the Ultralightdx Yahoo Group- 600 DXers Signed Up!

robert ross
 

D1028Gary@... wrote:
 

Hello All,
 
No, this isn't really a new Award Certificate notice.
 
For all who have worked to make our Yahoo group one of the leading enthusiasm centers of the MW-DXing hobby, and who have generously volunteered their time and effort to organize, promote and administer our various programs, congratulations!  John Bryant would have been very proud to see our group continue to grow and prosper, based on his fine organizational efforts, and the generous help of DXers like Rob Ross, Kevin Scanilec, Gil Stacy, Nick Hall-Patch, Steve Ratzlaff, Colin Newell and many others. Outstanding contributions by Richard Allen, Kirk Allen, Frank Welch, John Cereghin and many others have certainly contributed to our booming growth. Thanks to you all, and the best is yet to come!
 
73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA) 



WOW!!!!!! 600 Members in our group now!!! Guess we must be doing something right eh???? I feel honoured to be part of this great group....and to have been able to get in on the ground floor of this most gratifying sub-culture of AM BCB DXing!!

Thanks to all who have got us where we are today......John would be proud indeed....

73...ROB VA3SW

Robert S. Ross
London, Ontario CANADA


Re: Four new ones at Sunset

Rik
 

Good for YOU! Which radio were you using? - FARMERIK

--- In ultralightdx@..., "ferrite61" <dxrx@...> wrote:

I was sitting out at the picnic table in backyard doing a casual scanning tonite at sunset local time. This would be about 1930 EDT to 2015EDT. I caught four new stations to log.

#1) WBMD on 750kHz at presumed sign-off 19:45 EDT mentioning they're a Christian Religious station. Fairly good RX w/o WSB competition. This one is rated 730 Watts Daytime only: Distance abt. 390km from Balt. MD.

#2) Very nice double call of WSEV Sevierville, TN during a WX report. Claims to be a Weather and traffic station. Look-up indicates 5kW day, and that its programming 'is' Weather and Traffic. Distance is 1112 km.

#3) and #4 are calls-heard only, no real programming heard amidst a jumble of stations... these came out of the mud for ID at 2015 and 2016 EDT respective.

On 1230 kHz a call for WFAS popped up... its located locally in White Plains, NY abt. 90 km away and 1kW of power.

On 1240 kHz a call for WP[AJK]L heard twice. I had to look this up to find its WPJL from Raleigh, NC rated 1kW and 804km distant.

Total station count is up to 430 ID's.

Paul S. in CT


Four new ones at Sunset

ferrite61 <dxrx@...>
 

I was sitting out at the picnic table in backyard doing a casual scanning tonite at sunset local time. This would be about 1930 EDT to 2015EDT. I caught four new stations to log.

#1) WBMD on 750kHz at presumed sign-off 19:45 EDT mentioning they're a Christian Religious station. Fairly good RX w/o WSB competition. This one is rated 730 Watts Daytime only: Distance abt. 390km from Balt. MD.

#2) Very nice double call of WSEV Sevierville, TN during a WX report. Claims to be a Weather and traffic station. Look-up indicates 5kW day, and that its programming 'is' Weather and Traffic. Distance is 1112 km.

#3) and #4 are calls-heard only, no real programming heard amidst a jumble of stations... these came out of the mud for ID at 2015 and 2016 EDT respective.

On 1230 kHz a call for WFAS popped up... its located locally in White Plains, NY abt. 90 km away and 1kW of power.

On 1240 kHz a call for WP[AJK]L heard twice. I had to look this up to find its WPJL from Raleigh, NC rated 1kW and 804km distant.

Total station count is up to 430 ID's.

Paul S. in CT