Date   

Re: PL360 PL380 PL310 stand

dave_m1ctk
 

That's a very good effort, design is noval but a black finish would suit me, also maybe some felt on the sides ?

Just an idea anyway

Dave
UK

--- In ultralightdx@..., "tonyzl" <tonyzl@...> wrote:

I've built a small stand that supports any small receiver at an angle, (like 45 degrees) and as the stand is movable 360 degrees horizontally like a turntable the internal ferrite (or outrigger) can be broadside or end on to an external antenna.
I call it the Big Tick in the PHOTO section - made simply out of blocks of wood cut in the tick design and connected by a base.

Regards,

Tony King
NZ


Re: non-destructive coupling of hoop loop to PL-310

sdwillingham
 

--- In ultralightdx@..., "Stephen" <pianoplayer88key@...> wrote:
You wouldn't by any chance know if the PL-3x0 has a tuned RF front end amplifier, does it? I'm guessing it does not.
The PL-380 in MW operation has a tracking tuned circuit at the front-end, before any amplification. The loopstick inductance is resonated with a variable capacitance. But this is just a 2nd-order network with a Q of 25 or so (I think), so it only helps attenuate strong blockers that are farther away from the desired station than you would like. A substantially more selective network would be bulky and expensive. Does anyone know of a small portable with a more selective front-end circuit?

The PL-380's manual does claim a selectivity of > 60dB, though. A local station on 910 reads 62-63dBu here. In the 1kHz bandwidth mode, if I tune to 908, I get a reading of 50dBu. Tuning to 900, I get a reading of 32dBu, and still some chatter from the station on 910, even though my bandwidth is set to 1kHz. That sounds like a LOT less than > 60dB selectivity. What gives?
All indications from your many descriptions of your RF operating environment point to overload of the radio front-end circuit. What gives is that all of the sensitivity and selectivity specs of the radio are given with the implied qualification "when not operated in overloaded conditions". When overloaded, the front-end circuits have nonlinear characteristics that create new frequencies from combinations of all the strong frequencies that are present. The creation of new frequencies from strong overloading signals is called "intermodulation" and "cross-modulation". When this occurs at some point in the circuitry, there is no way for further circuits to "sort out" the desired signals from the new spurious signals.

-Scott-


Re: non-destructive coupling of hoop loop to PL-310

sdwillingham
 

Silicon Labs specifies the sensitivity of the Si4734 to the inputs applied at the pins of the chip. The sensitivity of the full radio circuit depends on the antenna design and any external components connecting the antenna to the radio. Therefore, I can't give you any complete insight into Tecsun's specs. Nevertheless, I can try to give some helpful information.

The "dBu" indicator that Tecsun displays comes from the Si4734's RSSI indication. Some Tecsun radios limit this number to 63 and the Si4734 limits the lowest value to 0. Within manufacturing tolerances, this number corresponds to decibels relative to 1 uV (dBuV) at the chip's input pin. For FM inputs, typical sensitivity is about 1 dBuV at the pin, up to about 5 dBuV worst case. I don't have any idea where in the circuit or in equivalent field-strength Tecsun is basing their spec.

For MW sensitivity, Silab's spec is 25 to 35 uV, which is 28 to 31 dBuV for an SNR of 26 dB. AM characteristics are fairly linear if the signal is not too weak, so for an SNR of 6 dB, an input of 8 dBuV is roughly sufficient, etc. Tecsun's specs in this case imply that a field strength of 1mV/m (in AM with the stock antenna) corresponds to about 28 dBuV at the chip, and therefore at the RSSI indicator. Also note that the AM RSSI indicator in Tecsun's implementation does not read accurately near and below 15 dBu.

That's about all I can make from the numbers. Remember that all of this is my judgement only -- I don't speak officially for Silabs and I don't have any contact with Tecsun.

-Scott-

--- In ultralightdx@..., "Stephen" <pianoplayer88key@...> wrote:

Ok, Scott, I have a question about the sensitivity specifications...
My PL-380 specifies the sensitivity as follows:
FM (S/N=30dB) < 3µV
MW (S/N=26dB) < 1mV/m
LW (S/N=26dB) < 10mV/m
SW (S/N=26dB) < 20µV
Given that info, is it possible to translate dBu and S/N readings into approximate field strength readings in µV/m or mV/m?
Also, the FM and SW don't specify field strength in terms of µV/m, but just in terms of µV. Is it assumed to be µV/m, or is it something else?


Re: Congratulations to Rob Ross-- 80 Graveyard Stations Re...

pianoplayer88key
 

WHAT??!?!? your 380 is reading SEVENTY-FIVE (75)?!???? Why is it that my PL-380 is only reading 63dBu??? Or did you mean to type PL-360 or PL-310?
Also, you named 4 pests, which COMBINED only wipe out 80kHz of the band on your barefoot PL-380, and I'm guessing the IBOC torch on 850 accounts for most of that. As I recall, you're a mile away from 1450, and I don't remember how far from 850. What are your readings approximately 20 to 30 kHz off of the strongest ones (assuming there aren't stations on those frequencies)? Are there any frequencies that are showing 50/00 for the RSSI and S/N readings? Or is it 15/00 once you're more than 15-20kHz away from the carrier (except the IBOC monstrosity)?

Here, I'm 6 miles away from a 10kW on 1130, 7 miles away from a 5kW IBOC on 600 and 5kW day / 50kW night on 760, 8 miles away from a 5kW day / 1kW night on 1360, 9 miles away from a 5kW on 910 and a 50kW day / 2.9kW night on 1170 (which diplex with each other), and 32 miles from a 77.5kW day / 50kW night on 690, all of which read 63dBu (max scale on my PL-380) at least most of the time. The ones that aren't 63dBu all the time are: 690 ~ 56dBu night, 910 ~ 62dBu day, 1170 ~ 60dBu night, 1360 ~ 57dBu night. My main daytime pest is 1170 (shows 40-45dBu on 1150 and 1190), nighttime pest is 760 (shows 41dBu on 747 and 774), and the runner-up 24/7 pest is 1130 (shows 35dBu on 1116 and 1143). Between all those pests, it's rare to see a blank channel from about 570kHz to about 1400kHz or so with an RSSI under 30dBu on my PL-380 here.
However, I've had my PL-380 in less RF-saturated environments a few times, and was getting signals that were reading 15/18 dBu RSSI and dB S/N. Going the other direction, at my grandparents' house in San Gabriel, CA, a few notable local blowtorches are a 50kW IBOC on 1110 5 miles away, a 23kW on 1300 and a 50kW on 1430 0.4 miles away. Last time I was there, I was getting readings > 40/00 above 870kHz, and 50/00 from about 1090 or so practically all the way up to 1710 on blank channels.
What's it like on your PL-380? Is it better behaved than mine? (Also I think the ground conductivity here in southern CA is much better than there in WA state - here it's around 8 or 15 or so, and there it appears to be 2 or 4.)
Also, I was just reading the review you wrote (trying to find where it was you said what distance you are from a few pests, and apparently it's not in that article I think) on the PL-380, and you say that when listening to 1460 KARR, you get NO slop from 1450 KSUH, even though their signal is, as you say, 75dBu. On my PL-380, even in the 1kHz mode, I get considerable slop +/-11-12kHz on everything with an RSSI over about 60dBu.

I'm wondering if my PL-380 is possibly defective (besides the fact that it does have a little (but enough to be annoying) soft mute on weak signals, and the tuning thumbwheel has broken twice on it). Mine is an 11/2009 model, btw.

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:

Hi Stephen,

Well, you seem to know almost as much about the local Puyallup pests as
me-- maybe because I try to avoid them?

On my barefoot PL-380 the RSSI and S/N readings for the Korean mega-pest
1450-KSUH are 75/25, the readings for the Spanish pest KKMO-1360 are 55/25,
the IBOC monstrosity KHHO-850 is 73/25, and KKOL-1300 is a modest 56/25.
These fine examples of modern AM broadcasting together wipe out about 80 kHz
of DXing spectrum on the barefoot PL-380 in Puyallup.

I don't really chase much domestic DX, Stephen, but I have logged various
California graveyard stations here in the past. It's pretty much a question
of waiting around until they come up out of the jumble at night-- something
for which I probably don't have too much patience. If I were highly
motivated, it would probably be easy to go after them with one of the monster PVC
loops having great gain and sharp nulls-- but as you may be aware, there
are always about 10 projects going on here at the same time, typically
causing all to be equally delayed :-)

73, Gary


In a message dated 5/24/2010 9:31:44 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
pianoplayer88key@... writes:




Sounds like an excellent achievement! I sure wouldn't have the patience to
attempt it barefoot, though. Maybe I could try if I had a much better
antenna, though, like one that was sensitive enough to make the GY frequencies
sound at noon like they normally sound at midnight using only the
Select-A-Tenna. It would also need to be directional, as well. For example, I did a
search from Puyallup, WA's coordinates (approximately where Gary is,
although I don't know his exact coordinates where he reviews the radios from), and
noted a few graveyard stations, distances and headings:

1230 KGEO Bakersfield, CA = 835.12mi, 167.11°
1230 KYPA Los Angeles, CA = 932.04mi, 165.60°
1230 KSZL Barstow, CA = 890.57mi, 160.29°
1230 KXO El Centro, CA = 1056.47mi, 158.02°

1240 KEZY San Bernardino, CA = 941.70mi, 162.21°
1240 KNSN San Diego, CA = 1037.25mi, 162.98°

1340 KCLU Santa Barbara, CA = 892.28mi, 170.34°
1340 KYNS San Luis Obispo, CA = 829.82mi, 173.64°

1400 KESQ Indio, CA = 981.67mi, 159.12°
1400 KCYK Yuma, AZ = 1081.27mi, 155.48°
1400 KKZZ Santa Paula, CA = 903.52mi, 168.24°
1400 KEZL Visalia, CA = 763.98mi, 167.27°

1450 KTIP Porterville, CA = 783.96mi, 166.58°
1450 KFSD Escondido, CA = 1008.92mi, 162.57°
1450 KPTR Palm Springs, CA = 975.25mi, 159.71°

1490 KMET Banning, CA = 957.48mi, 161.09°
1490 KGBA Heber, CA = 1058.63mi, 158.07°
1490 KWAC Bakersfield, CA = 835.12mi, 167.11°
1490 KOWL South Lake Tahoe, CA = 581.40mi, 167.49°
1490 KIST Santa Barbara, CA = 892.28mi, 170.34°

Of the list above, I can hear KYPA, KXO, KNSN, KCLU, KFSD, KGBA and KIST
in the daytime from here, and have also heard KTIP around local sunset,
although on a different radio a few years ago.
So, Gary, what antenna would you use to try to pick up those stations from
there? Would one of the 7.5" loopsticks be directional enough, or would it
require the 9' loop?

And, what was your best ever GY catch? Mine would have to be pulling in
1240 KALY Los Ranchos de Albuquerque, NM, from a distance of 615.88mi,
heading 71.26°, a few years ago with my Panasonic RQ-SW20 and Select-A-Tenna. I
have a local co-channel GY, 1240 KNSN, which is 11.22 miles away at a
heading of 245.91°. KNSN WAS on the air at the time, but it helped that it was
broadcasting an unmodulated carrier. Normally, when they are "on", I don't
even hear the graveyard rumble underneath them. On my PL-380, KNSN's signal
indicates about 54dBu with the stock antenna from here. What does KSUH
indicate from your location on its frequency on your DSP radios, with the stock
antennas? Also do you get any readings higher than 15dBu when tuned off 20
or 30 kHz, and if so, what?

(re-attempting post (again.. I seem to be having connection problems or
something) - seems to not have gone through earlier)

--- In _ultralightdx@...
(mailto:ultralightdx@...) , D1028Gary@ wrote:

Hello All,

Ultralight DXing legend Rob Ross of London, Ontario has qualified for
one
of the toughest Awards in our diverse program-- 80 Stations Heard on the
Graveyard frequencies! Previously awarded only to one other fanatical
DXer
(Frank Welch of Massachusetts), this award truly requires the utmost in
patience and tenacity. As much as I admire Rob and Frank for their
amazing
Graveyard DXing accomplishments, the idea of sitting on a frequency for
hours
waiting for something new to come up is definitely not my first choice!

Fellow ULR Awards Committee member Rob has assured me that he has
diligently checked his own logs-- and having known Rob from the time
that John and
I started this craziness, I'm inclined to believe him! Congratulations,
Rob, and best wishes for very spirited Graveyard DX in the future.

73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)

An extensive group of awards certificates is available from the
Ultralight MW DXing Awards Committee. Each recipient receives a digital
file which
may be used for electronic display or is suitable for framing when
printed
at 8 12" x 11" on good quality paper. Information on the Awards Program
and
the simple application procedures are found in the Downloads>Ultralight
Files>General Information area of dxer.ca and our own file area here at
ultralightdx. Applications go directly to Rob Ross <va3sw@>


Re: Congratulations to Rob Ross-- 80 Graveyard Stations Re...

pianoplayer88key
 

WHAT??!?!? your 380 is reading SEVENTY-FIVE (75)?!???? Why is it that my PL-380 is only reading 63dBu??? Or did you mean to type PL-360 or PL-310?
Also, you named 4 pests, which COMBINED only wipe out 80kHz of the band on your barefoot PL-380, and I'm guessing the IBOC torch on 850 accounts for most of that. As I recall, you're a mile away from 1450, and I don't remember how far from 850. What are your readings approximately 20 to 30 kHz off of the strongest ones (assuming there aren't stations on those frequencies)? Are there any frequencies that are showing 50/00 for the RSSI and S/N readings? Or is it 15/00 once you're more than 15-20kHz away from the carrier (except the IBOC monstrosity)?

Here, I'm 6 miles away from a 10kW on 1130, 7 miles away from a 5kW IBOC on 600 and 5kW day / 50kW night on 760, 8 miles away from a 5kW day / 1kW night on 1360, 9 miles away from a 5kW on 910 and a 50kW day / 2.9kW night on 1170 (which diplex with each other), and 32 miles from a 77.5kW day / 50kW night on 690, all of which read 63dBu (max scale on my PL-380) at least most of the time. The ones that aren't 63dBu all the time are: 690 ~ 56dBu night, 910 ~ 62dBu day, 1170 ~ 60dBu night, 1360 ~ 57dBu night. My main daytime pest is 1170 (shows 40-45dBu on 1150 and 1190), nighttime pest is 760 (shows 41dBu on 747 and 774), and the runner-up 24/7 pest is 1130 (shows 35dBu on 1116 and 1143). Between all those pests, it's rare to see a blank channel from about 570kHz to about 1400kHz or so with an RSSI under 30dBu on my PL-380 here.
However, I've had my PL-380 in less RF-saturated environments a few times, and was getting signals that were reading 15/18 dBu RSSI and dB S/N. Going the other direction, at my grandparents' house in San Gabriel, CA, a few notable local blowtorches are a 50kW IBOC on 1110 5 miles away, a 23kW on 1300 and a 50kW on 1430 0.4 miles away. Last time I was there, I was getting readings > 40/00 above 870kHz, and 50/00 from about 1090 or so practically all the way up to 1710 on blank channels.
What's it like on your PL-380? Is it better behaved than mine? (Also I think the ground conductivity here in southern CA is much better than there in WA state - here it's around 8 or 15 or so, and there it appears to be 2 or 4.)
Also, I was just reading the review you wrote (trying to find where it was you said what distance you are from a few pests, and apparently it's not in that article I think) on the PL-380, and you say that when listening to 1460 KARR, you get NO slop from 1450 KSUH, even though their signal is, as you say, 75dBu. On my PL-380, even in the 1kHz mode, I get considerable slop +/-11-12kHz on everything with an RSSI over about 60dBu.

I'm wondering if my PL-380 is possibly defective (besides the fact that it does have a little (but enough to be annoying) soft mute on weak signals, and the tuning thumbwheel has broken twice on it). Mine is an 11/2009 model, btw.

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:

Hi Stephen,

Well, you seem to know almost as much about the local Puyallup pests as
me-- maybe because I try to avoid them?

On my barefoot PL-380 the RSSI and S/N readings for the Korean mega-pest
1450-KSUH are 75/25, the readings for the Spanish pest KKMO-1360 are 55/25,
the IBOC monstrosity KHHO-850 is 73/25, and KKOL-1300 is a modest 56/25.
These fine examples of modern AM broadcasting together wipe out about 80 kHz
of DXing spectrum on the barefoot PL-380 in Puyallup.

I don't really chase much domestic DX, Stephen, but I have logged various
California graveyard stations here in the past. It's pretty much a question
of waiting around until they come up out of the jumble at night-- something
for which I probably don't have too much patience. If I were highly
motivated, it would probably be easy to go after them with one of the monster PVC
loops having great gain and sharp nulls-- but as you may be aware, there
are always about 10 projects going on here at the same time, typically
causing all to be equally delayed :-)

73, Gary


In a message dated 5/24/2010 9:31:44 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
pianoplayer88key@... writes:




Sounds like an excellent achievement! I sure wouldn't have the patience to
attempt it barefoot, though. Maybe I could try if I had a much better
antenna, though, like one that was sensitive enough to make the GY frequencies
sound at noon like they normally sound at midnight using only the
Select-A-Tenna. It would also need to be directional, as well. For example, I did a
search from Puyallup, WA's coordinates (approximately where Gary is,
although I don't know his exact coordinates where he reviews the radios from), and
noted a few graveyard stations, distances and headings:

1230 KGEO Bakersfield, CA = 835.12mi, 167.11°
1230 KYPA Los Angeles, CA = 932.04mi, 165.60°
1230 KSZL Barstow, CA = 890.57mi, 160.29°
1230 KXO El Centro, CA = 1056.47mi, 158.02°

1240 KEZY San Bernardino, CA = 941.70mi, 162.21°
1240 KNSN San Diego, CA = 1037.25mi, 162.98°

1340 KCLU Santa Barbara, CA = 892.28mi, 170.34°
1340 KYNS San Luis Obispo, CA = 829.82mi, 173.64°

1400 KESQ Indio, CA = 981.67mi, 159.12°
1400 KCYK Yuma, AZ = 1081.27mi, 155.48°
1400 KKZZ Santa Paula, CA = 903.52mi, 168.24°
1400 KEZL Visalia, CA = 763.98mi, 167.27°

1450 KTIP Porterville, CA = 783.96mi, 166.58°
1450 KFSD Escondido, CA = 1008.92mi, 162.57°
1450 KPTR Palm Springs, CA = 975.25mi, 159.71°

1490 KMET Banning, CA = 957.48mi, 161.09°
1490 KGBA Heber, CA = 1058.63mi, 158.07°
1490 KWAC Bakersfield, CA = 835.12mi, 167.11°
1490 KOWL South Lake Tahoe, CA = 581.40mi, 167.49°
1490 KIST Santa Barbara, CA = 892.28mi, 170.34°

Of the list above, I can hear KYPA, KXO, KNSN, KCLU, KFSD, KGBA and KIST
in the daytime from here, and have also heard KTIP around local sunset,
although on a different radio a few years ago.
So, Gary, what antenna would you use to try to pick up those stations from
there? Would one of the 7.5" loopsticks be directional enough, or would it
require the 9' loop?

And, what was your best ever GY catch? Mine would have to be pulling in
1240 KALY Los Ranchos de Albuquerque, NM, from a distance of 615.88mi,
heading 71.26°, a few years ago with my Panasonic RQ-SW20 and Select-A-Tenna. I
have a local co-channel GY, 1240 KNSN, which is 11.22 miles away at a
heading of 245.91°. KNSN WAS on the air at the time, but it helped that it was
broadcasting an unmodulated carrier. Normally, when they are "on", I don't
even hear the graveyard rumble underneath them. On my PL-380, KNSN's signal
indicates about 54dBu with the stock antenna from here. What does KSUH
indicate from your location on its frequency on your DSP radios, with the stock
antennas? Also do you get any readings higher than 15dBu when tuned off 20
or 30 kHz, and if so, what?

(re-attempting post (again.. I seem to be having connection problems or
something) - seems to not have gone through earlier)

--- In _ultralightdx@...
(mailto:ultralightdx@...) , D1028Gary@ wrote:

Hello All,

Ultralight DXing legend Rob Ross of London, Ontario has qualified for
one
of the toughest Awards in our diverse program-- 80 Stations Heard on the
Graveyard frequencies! Previously awarded only to one other fanatical
DXer
(Frank Welch of Massachusetts), this award truly requires the utmost in
patience and tenacity. As much as I admire Rob and Frank for their
amazing
Graveyard DXing accomplishments, the idea of sitting on a frequency for
hours
waiting for something new to come up is definitely not my first choice!

Fellow ULR Awards Committee member Rob has assured me that he has
diligently checked his own logs-- and having known Rob from the time
that John and
I started this craziness, I'm inclined to believe him! Congratulations,
Rob, and best wishes for very spirited Graveyard DX in the future.

73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)

An extensive group of awards certificates is available from the
Ultralight MW DXing Awards Committee. Each recipient receives a digital
file which
may be used for electronic display or is suitable for framing when
printed
at 8 12" x 11" on good quality paper. Information on the Awards Program
and
the simple application procedures are found in the Downloads>Ultralight
Files>General Information area of dxer.ca and our own file area here at
ultralightdx. Applications go directly to Rob Ross <va3sw@>


Re: Congratulations to Rob Ross-- 80 Graveyard Stations Re...

pianoplayer88key
 

WHAT??!?!? your 380 is reading SEVENTY-FIVE (75)?!???? Why is it that my PL-380 is only reading 63dBu??? Or did you mean to type PL-360 or PL-310?
Also, you named 4 pests, which COMBINED only wipe out 80kHz of the band on your barefoot PL-380, and I'm guessing the IBOC torch on 850 accounts for most of that. As I recall, you're a mile away from 1450, and I don't remember how far from 850. What are your readings approximately 20 to 30 kHz off of the strongest ones (assuming there aren't stations on those frequencies)? Are there any frequencies that are showing 50/00 for the RSSI and S/N readings? Or is it 15/00 once you're more than 15-20kHz away from the carrier (except the IBOC monstrosity)?

Here, I'm 6 miles away from a 10kW on 1130, 7 miles away from a 5kW IBOC on 600 and 5kW day / 50kW night on 760, 8 miles away from a 5kW day / 1kW night on 1360, 9 miles away from a 5kW on 910 and a 50kW day / 2.9kW night on 1170 (which diplex with each other), and 32 miles from a 77.5kW day / 50kW night on 690, all of which read 63dBu (max scale on my PL-380) at least most of the time. The ones that aren't 63dBu all the time are: 690 ~ 56dBu night, 910 ~ 62dBu day, 1170 ~ 60dBu night, 1360 ~ 57dBu night. My main daytime pest is 1170 (shows 40-45dBu on 1150 and 1190), nighttime pest is 760 (shows 41dBu on 747 and 774), and the runner-up 24/7 pest is 1130 (shows 35dBu on 1116 and 1143). Between all those pests, it's rare to see a blank channel from about 570kHz to about 1400kHz or so with an RSSI under 30dBu on my PL-380 here.
However, I've had my PL-380 in less RF-saturated environments a few times, and was getting signals that were reading 15/18 dBu RSSI and dB S/N. Going the other direction, at my grandparents' house in San Gabriel, CA, a few notable local blowtorches are a 50kW IBOC on 1110 5 miles away, a 23kW on 1300 and a 50kW on 1430 0.4 miles away. Last time I was there, I was getting readings > 40/00 above 870kHz, and 50/00 from about 1090 or so practically all the way up to 1710 on blank channels.
What's it like on your PL-380? Is it better behaved than mine? (Also I think the ground conductivity here in southern CA is much better than there in WA state - here it's around 8 or 15 or so, and there it appears to be 2 or 4.)
Also, I was just reading the review you wrote (trying to find where it was you said what distance you are from a few pests, and apparently it's not in that article I think) on the PL-380, and you say that when listening to 1460 KARR, you get NO slop from 1450 KSUH, even though their signal is, as you say, 75dBu. On my PL-380, even in the 1kHz mode, I get considerable slop +/-11-12kHz on everything with an RSSI over about 60dBu.

I'm wondering if my PL-380 is possibly defective (besides the fact that it does have a little (but enough to be annoying) soft mute on weak signals, and the tuning thumbwheel has broken twice on it). Mine is an 11/2009 model, btw.

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:

Hi Stephen,

Well, you seem to know almost as much about the local Puyallup pests as
me-- maybe because I try to avoid them?

On my barefoot PL-380 the RSSI and S/N readings for the Korean mega-pest
1450-KSUH are 75/25, the readings for the Spanish pest KKMO-1360 are 55/25,
the IBOC monstrosity KHHO-850 is 73/25, and KKOL-1300 is a modest 56/25.
These fine examples of modern AM broadcasting together wipe out about 80 kHz
of DXing spectrum on the barefoot PL-380 in Puyallup.

I don't really chase much domestic DX, Stephen, but I have logged various
California graveyard stations here in the past. It's pretty much a question
of waiting around until they come up out of the jumble at night-- something
for which I probably don't have too much patience. If I were highly
motivated, it would probably be easy to go after them with one of the monster PVC
loops having great gain and sharp nulls-- but as you may be aware, there
are always about 10 projects going on here at the same time, typically
causing all to be equally delayed :-)

73, Gary


In a message dated 5/24/2010 9:31:44 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
pianoplayer88key@... writes:




Sounds like an excellent achievement! I sure wouldn't have the patience to
attempt it barefoot, though. Maybe I could try if I had a much better
antenna, though, like one that was sensitive enough to make the GY frequencies
sound at noon like they normally sound at midnight using only the
Select-A-Tenna. It would also need to be directional, as well. For example, I did a
search from Puyallup, WA's coordinates (approximately where Gary is,
although I don't know his exact coordinates where he reviews the radios from), and
noted a few graveyard stations, distances and headings:

1230 KGEO Bakersfield, CA = 835.12mi, 167.11°
1230 KYPA Los Angeles, CA = 932.04mi, 165.60°
1230 KSZL Barstow, CA = 890.57mi, 160.29°
1230 KXO El Centro, CA = 1056.47mi, 158.02°

1240 KEZY San Bernardino, CA = 941.70mi, 162.21°
1240 KNSN San Diego, CA = 1037.25mi, 162.98°

1340 KCLU Santa Barbara, CA = 892.28mi, 170.34°
1340 KYNS San Luis Obispo, CA = 829.82mi, 173.64°

1400 KESQ Indio, CA = 981.67mi, 159.12°
1400 KCYK Yuma, AZ = 1081.27mi, 155.48°
1400 KKZZ Santa Paula, CA = 903.52mi, 168.24°
1400 KEZL Visalia, CA = 763.98mi, 167.27°

1450 KTIP Porterville, CA = 783.96mi, 166.58°
1450 KFSD Escondido, CA = 1008.92mi, 162.57°
1450 KPTR Palm Springs, CA = 975.25mi, 159.71°

1490 KMET Banning, CA = 957.48mi, 161.09°
1490 KGBA Heber, CA = 1058.63mi, 158.07°
1490 KWAC Bakersfield, CA = 835.12mi, 167.11°
1490 KOWL South Lake Tahoe, CA = 581.40mi, 167.49°
1490 KIST Santa Barbara, CA = 892.28mi, 170.34°

Of the list above, I can hear KYPA, KXO, KNSN, KCLU, KFSD, KGBA and KIST
in the daytime from here, and have also heard KTIP around local sunset,
although on a different radio a few years ago.
So, Gary, what antenna would you use to try to pick up those stations from
there? Would one of the 7.5" loopsticks be directional enough, or would it
require the 9' loop?

And, what was your best ever GY catch? Mine would have to be pulling in
1240 KALY Los Ranchos de Albuquerque, NM, from a distance of 615.88mi,
heading 71.26°, a few years ago with my Panasonic RQ-SW20 and Select-A-Tenna. I
have a local co-channel GY, 1240 KNSN, which is 11.22 miles away at a
heading of 245.91°. KNSN WAS on the air at the time, but it helped that it was
broadcasting an unmodulated carrier. Normally, when they are "on", I don't
even hear the graveyard rumble underneath them. On my PL-380, KNSN's signal
indicates about 54dBu with the stock antenna from here. What does KSUH
indicate from your location on its frequency on your DSP radios, with the stock
antennas? Also do you get any readings higher than 15dBu when tuned off 20
or 30 kHz, and if so, what?

(re-attempting post (again.. I seem to be having connection problems or
something) - seems to not have gone through earlier)

--- In _ultralightdx@...
(mailto:ultralightdx@...) , D1028Gary@ wrote:

Hello All,

Ultralight DXing legend Rob Ross of London, Ontario has qualified for
one
of the toughest Awards in our diverse program-- 80 Stations Heard on the
Graveyard frequencies! Previously awarded only to one other fanatical
DXer
(Frank Welch of Massachusetts), this award truly requires the utmost in
patience and tenacity. As much as I admire Rob and Frank for their
amazing
Graveyard DXing accomplishments, the idea of sitting on a frequency for
hours
waiting for something new to come up is definitely not my first choice!

Fellow ULR Awards Committee member Rob has assured me that he has
diligently checked his own logs-- and having known Rob from the time
that John and
I started this craziness, I'm inclined to believe him! Congratulations,
Rob, and best wishes for very spirited Graveyard DX in the future.

73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)

An extensive group of awards certificates is available from the
Ultralight MW DXing Awards Committee. Each recipient receives a digital
file which
may be used for electronic display or is suitable for framing when
printed
at 8 12" x 11" on good quality paper. Information on the Awards Program
and
the simple application procedures are found in the Downloads>Ultralight
Files>General Information area of dxer.ca and our own file area here at
ultralightdx. Applications go directly to Rob Ross <va3sw@>


Re: Some random observations on the PL-360

Bill M <radioexray@...>
 

D1028Gary@... wrote:
Hi James,
Thanks for the clarification. I'm certainly no expert on the Anguilla-1610 station or its history, but it is the only Caribbean station I've ever received here in western Washington (along with 530-Cuba, which I needed to go to Grayland, WA to receive). Anguilla-1610 seems to show up only around February or March here, and is usually IDed in the TIS jumble only by the 6090 kHz parallel.
Howdy,

I used to live in Anguilla (1988-1991) before Dr. Scott acquired the station. They operated on both 690 and 1610 from a single tower. I forget if they advertised 100kw on both frequencies but they certainly did on 1610. The ~400 ft stick would be 5/8-wave on 1610 so I suspect there's some additional low angle gain to it.

In more recent times they backed off power on 1610 and the 690 freq went away. In fact I thought 1610 had gone also until just recently when Jim Kearman asked about them and I tuned around to check. Previously 1610 had been almost like a local at my location (160 miles west) and I figured they were gone once 1620-WDHP came on the air from St. Croix a few years ago. It took some careful listening but I found they were still there as of a couple months ago. Sure didn't sound like 10kw, though.

Definitely a good catch from the West Coast!

-Bill


Re: Congratulations to Rob Ross-- 80 Graveyard Stations Received

pianoplayer88key
 

Sounds like an excellent achievement! I sure wouldn't have the patience to attempt it barefoot, though. Maybe I could try if I had a much better antenna, though, like one that was sensitive enough to make the GY frequencies sound at noon like they normally sound at midnight using only the Select-A-Tenna. It would also need to be directional, as well. For example, I did a search from Puyallup, WA's coordinates (approximately where Gary is, although I don't know his exact coordinates where he reviews the radios from), and noted a few graveyard stations, distances and headings:

1230 KGEO Bakersfield, CA = 835.12mi, 167.11°
1230 KYPA Los Angeles, CA = 932.04mi, 165.60°
1230 KSZL Barstow, CA = 890.57mi, 160.29°
1230 KXO El Centro, CA = 1056.47mi, 158.02°

1240 KEZY San Bernardino, CA = 941.70mi, 162.21°
1240 KNSN San Diego, CA = 1037.25mi, 162.98°

1340 KCLU Santa Barbara, CA = 892.28mi, 170.34°
1340 KYNS San Luis Obispo, CA = 829.82mi, 173.64°

1400 KESQ Indio, CA = 981.67mi, 159.12°
1400 KCYK Yuma, AZ = 1081.27mi, 155.48°
1400 KKZZ Santa Paula, CA = 903.52mi, 168.24°
1400 KEZL Visalia, CA = 763.98mi, 167.27°

1450 KTIP Porterville, CA = 783.96mi, 166.58°
1450 KFSD Escondido, CA = 1008.92mi, 162.57°
1450 KPTR Palm Springs, CA = 975.25mi, 159.71°

1490 KMET Banning, CA = 957.48mi, 161.09°
1490 KGBA Heber, CA = 1058.63mi, 158.07°
1490 KWAC Bakersfield, CA = 835.12mi, 167.11°
1490 KOWL South Lake Tahoe, CA = 581.40mi, 167.49°
1490 KIST Santa Barbara, CA = 892.28mi, 170.34°

Of the list above, I can hear KYPA, KXO, KNSN, KCLU, KFSD, KGBA and KIST in the daytime from here, and have also heard KTIP around local sunset, although on a different radio a few years ago.
So, Gary, what antenna would you use to try to pick up those stations from there? Would one of the 7.5" loopsticks be directional enough, or would it require the 9' loop?

And, what was your best ever GY catch? Mine would have to be pulling in 1240 KALY Los Ranchos de Albuquerque, NM, from a distance of 615.88mi, heading 71.26°, a few years ago with my Panasonic RQ-SW20 and Select-A-Tenna. I have a local co-channel GY, 1240 KNSN, which is 11.22 miles away at a heading of 245.91°. KNSN WAS on the air at the time, but it helped that it was broadcasting an unmodulated carrier. Normally, when they are "on", I don't even hear the graveyard rumble underneath them. On my PL-380, KNSN's signal indicates about 54dBu with the stock antenna from here. What does KSUH indicate from your location on its frequency on your DSP radios, with the stock antennas? Also do you get any readings higher than 15dBu when tuned off 20 or 30 kHz, and if so, what?


(re-attempting post (again.. I seem to be having connection problems or something) - seems to not have gone through earlier)

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:

Hello All,

Ultralight DXing legend Rob Ross of London, Ontario has qualified for one
of the toughest Awards in our diverse program-- 80 Stations Heard on the
Graveyard frequencies! Previously awarded only to one other fanatical DXer
(Frank Welch of Massachusetts), this award truly requires the utmost in
patience and tenacity. As much as I admire Rob and Frank for their amazing
Graveyard DXing accomplishments, the idea of sitting on a frequency for hours
waiting for something new to come up is definitely not my first choice!

Fellow ULR Awards Committee member Rob has assured me that he has
diligently checked his own logs-- and having known Rob from the time that John and
I started this craziness, I'm inclined to believe him! Congratulations,
Rob, and best wishes for very spirited Graveyard DX in the future.

73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)

An extensive group of awards certificates is available from the
Ultralight MW DXing Awards Committee. Each recipient receives a digital file which
may be used for electronic display or is suitable for framing when printed
at 8 12" x 11" on good quality paper. Information on the Awards Program and
the simple application procedures are found in the Downloads>Ultralight
Files>General Information area of dxer.ca and our own file area here at
ultralightdx. Applications go directly to Rob Ross <va3sw@...>


Re: Congratulations to Rob Ross-- 80 Graveyard Stations Received

pianoplayer88key
 

Sounds like an excellent achievement! I sure wouldn't have the patience to attempt it barefoot, though. Maybe I could try if I had a much better antenna, though, like one that was sensitive enough to make the GY frequencies sound at noon like they normally sound at midnight using only the Select-A-Tenna. It would also need to be directional, as well. For example, I did a search from Puyallup, WA's coordinates (approximately where Gary is, although I don't know his exact coordinates where he reviews the radios from), and noted a few graveyard stations, distances and headings:

1230 KGEO Bakersfield, CA = 835.12mi, 167.11°
1230 KYPA Los Angeles, CA = 932.04mi, 165.60°
1230 KSZL Barstow, CA = 890.57mi, 160.29°
1230 KXO El Centro, CA = 1056.47mi, 158.02°

1240 KEZY San Bernardino, CA = 941.70mi, 162.21°
1240 KNSN San Diego, CA = 1037.25mi, 162.98°

1340 KCLU Santa Barbara, CA = 892.28mi, 170.34°
1340 KYNS San Luis Obispo, CA = 829.82mi, 173.64°

1400 KESQ Indio, CA = 981.67mi, 159.12°
1400 KCYK Yuma, AZ = 1081.27mi, 155.48°
1400 KKZZ Santa Paula, CA = 903.52mi, 168.24°
1400 KEZL Visalia, CA = 763.98mi, 167.27°

1450 KTIP Porterville, CA = 783.96mi, 166.58°
1450 KFSD Escondido, CA = 1008.92mi, 162.57°
1450 KPTR Palm Springs, CA = 975.25mi, 159.71°

1490 KMET Banning, CA = 957.48mi, 161.09°
1490 KGBA Heber, CA = 1058.63mi, 158.07°
1490 KWAC Bakersfield, CA = 835.12mi, 167.11°
1490 KOWL South Lake Tahoe, CA = 581.40mi, 167.49°
1490 KIST Santa Barbara, CA = 892.28mi, 170.34°

Of the list above, I can hear KYPA, KXO, KNSN, KCLU, KFSD, KGBA and KIST in the daytime from here, and have also heard KTIP around local sunset, although on a different radio a few years ago.
So, Gary, what antenna would you use to try to pick up those stations from there? Would one of the 7.5" loopsticks be directional enough, or would it require the 9' loop?

And, what was your best ever GY catch? Mine would have to be pulling in 1240 KALY Los Ranchos de Albuquerque, NM, from a distance of 615.88mi, heading 71.26°, a few years ago with my Panasonic RQ-SW20 and Select-A-Tenna. I have a local co-channel GY, 1240 KNSN, which is 11.22 miles away at a heading of 245.91°. KNSN WAS on the air at the time, but it helped that it was broadcasting an unmodulated carrier. Normally, when they are "on", I don't even hear the graveyard rumble underneath them. On my PL-380, KNSN's signal indicates about 54dBu with the stock antenna from here. What does KSUH indicate from your location on its frequency on your DSP radios, with the stock antennas? Also do you get any readings higher than 15dBu when tuned off 20 or 30 kHz, and if so, what?


(attempting repost - seems to not have gone through earlier)

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:

Hello All,

Ultralight DXing legend Rob Ross of London, Ontario has qualified for one
of the toughest Awards in our diverse program-- 80 Stations Heard on the
Graveyard frequencies! Previously awarded only to one other fanatical DXer
(Frank Welch of Massachusetts), this award truly requires the utmost in
patience and tenacity. As much as I admire Rob and Frank for their amazing
Graveyard DXing accomplishments, the idea of sitting on a frequency for hours
waiting for something new to come up is definitely not my first choice!

Fellow ULR Awards Committee member Rob has assured me that he has
diligently checked his own logs-- and having known Rob from the time that John and
I started this craziness, I'm inclined to believe him! Congratulations,
Rob, and best wishes for very spirited Graveyard DX in the future.

73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)

An extensive group of awards certificates is available from the
Ultralight MW DXing Awards Committee. Each recipient receives a digital file which
may be used for electronic display or is suitable for framing when printed
at 8 12" x 11" on good quality paper. Information on the Awards Program and
the simple application procedures are found in the Downloads>Ultralight
Files>General Information area of dxer.ca and our own file area here at
ultralightdx. Applications go directly to Rob Ross <va3sw@...>


Re: Congratulations to Rob Ross-- 80 Graveyard Stations Received

pianoplayer88key
 

Sounds like an excellent achievement! I sure wouldn't have the patience to attempt it barefoot, though. Maybe I could try if I had a much better antenna, though, like one that was sensitive enough to make the GY frequencies sound at noon like they normally sound at midnight using only the Select-A-Tenna. It would also need to be directional, as well. For example, I did a search from Puyallup, WA's coordinates (approximately where Gary is, although I don't know his exact coordinates where he reviews the radios from), and noted a few graveyard stations, distances and headings:

1230 KGEO Bakersfield, CA = 835.12mi, 167.11°
1230 KYPA Los Angeles, CA = 932.04mi, 165.60°
1230 KSZL Barstow, CA = 890.57mi, 160.29°
1230 KXO El Centro, CA = 1056.47mi, 158.02°

1240 KEZY San Bernardino, CA = 941.70mi, 162.21°
1240 KNSN San Diego, CA = 1037.25mi, 162.98°

1340 KCLU Santa Barbara, CA = 892.28mi, 170.34°
1340 KYNS San Luis Obispo, CA = 829.82mi, 173.64°

1400 KESQ Indio, CA = 981.67mi, 159.12°
1400 KCYK Yuma, AZ = 1081.27mi, 155.48°
1400 KKZZ Santa Paula, CA = 903.52mi, 168.24°
1400 KEZL Visalia, CA = 763.98mi, 167.27°

1450 KTIP Porterville, CA = 783.96mi, 166.58°
1450 KFSD Escondido, CA = 1008.92mi, 162.57°
1450 KPTR Palm Springs, CA = 975.25mi, 159.71°

1490 KMET Banning, CA = 957.48mi, 161.09°
1490 KGBA Heber, CA = 1058.63mi, 158.07°
1490 KWAC Bakersfield, CA = 835.12mi, 167.11°
1490 KOWL South Lake Tahoe, CA = 581.40mi, 167.49°
1490 KIST Santa Barbara, CA = 892.28mi, 170.34°

Of the list above, I can hear KYPA, KXO, KNSN, KCLU, KFSD, KGBA and KIST in the daytime from here, and have also heard KTIP around local sunset, although on a different radio a few years ago.
So, Gary, what antenna would you use to try to pick up those stations from there? Would one of the 7.5" loopsticks be directional enough, or would it require the 9' loop?

And, what was your best ever GY catch? Mine would have to be pulling in 1240 KALY Los Ranchos de Albuquerque, NM, from a distance of 615.88mi, heading 71.26°, a few years ago with my Panasonic RQ-SW20 and Select-A-Tenna. I have a local co-channel GY, 1240 KNSN, which is 11.22 miles away at a heading of 245.91°. KNSN WAS on the air at the time, but it helped that it was broadcasting an unmodulated carrier. Normally, when they are "on", I don't even hear the graveyard rumble underneath them. On my PL-380, KNSN's signal indicates about 54dBu with the stock antenna from here. What does KSUH indicate from your location on its frequency on your DSP radios, with the stock antennas? Also do you get any readings higher than 15dBu when tuned off 20 or 30 kHz, and if so, what?


(attempting repost - seems to not have gone through earlier)

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:

Hello All,

Ultralight DXing legend Rob Ross of London, Ontario has qualified for one
of the toughest Awards in our diverse program-- 80 Stations Heard on the
Graveyard frequencies! Previously awarded only to one other fanatical DXer
(Frank Welch of Massachusetts), this award truly requires the utmost in
patience and tenacity. As much as I admire Rob and Frank for their amazing
Graveyard DXing accomplishments, the idea of sitting on a frequency for hours
waiting for something new to come up is definitely not my first choice!

Fellow ULR Awards Committee member Rob has assured me that he has
diligently checked his own logs-- and having known Rob from the time that John and
I started this craziness, I'm inclined to believe him! Congratulations,
Rob, and best wishes for very spirited Graveyard DX in the future.

73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)

An extensive group of awards certificates is available from the
Ultralight MW DXing Awards Committee. Each recipient receives a digital file which
may be used for electronic display or is suitable for framing when printed
at 8 12" x 11" on good quality paper. Information on the Awards Program and
the simple application procedures are found in the Downloads>Ultralight
Files>General Information area of dxer.ca and our own file area here at
ultralightdx. Applications go directly to Rob Ross <va3sw@...>


Re: Congratulations to Rob Ross-- 80 Graveyard Stations Re...

Gary DeBock
 

Hi Stephen,
 
Well, you seem to know almost as much about the local Puyallup pests as me-- maybe because I try to avoid them?
 
On my barefoot PL-380 the RSSI and S/N readings for the Korean mega-pest 1450-KSUH are 75/25, the readings for the Spanish pest KKMO-1360 are 55/25, the IBOC monstrosity KHHO-850 is 73/25, and KKOL-1300 is a modest 56/25. These fine examples of modern AM broadcasting together wipe out about 80 kHz of DXing spectrum on the barefoot PL-380 in Puyallup.
 
I don't really chase much domestic DX, Stephen, but I have logged various California graveyard stations here in the past. It's pretty much a question of waiting around until they come up out of the jumble at night-- something for which I probably don't have too much patience. If I were highly motivated, it would probably be easy to go after them with one of the monster PVC loops having great gain and sharp nulls-- but as you may be aware, there are always about 10 projects going on here at the same time, typically causing all to be equally delayed :-)
 
73, Gary    
 
In a message dated 5/24/2010 9:31:44 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, pianoplayer88key@... writes:

 

Sounds like an excellent achievement! I sure wouldn't have the patience to attempt it barefoot, though. Maybe I could try if I had a much better antenna, though, like one that was sensitive enough to make the GY frequencies sound at noon like they normally sound at midnight using only the Select-A-Tenna. It would also need to be directional, as well. For example, I did a search from Puyallup, WA's coordinates (approximately where Gary is, although I don't know his exact coordinates where he reviews the radios from), and noted a few graveyard stations, distances and headings:

1230 KGEO Bakersfield, CA = 835.12mi, 167.11°
1230 KYPA Los Angeles, CA = 932.04mi, 165.60°
1230 KSZL Barstow, CA = 890.57mi, 160.29°
1230 KXO El Centro, CA = 1056.47mi, 158.02°

1240 KEZY San Bernardino, CA = 941.70mi, 162.21°
1240 KNSN San Diego, CA = 1037.25mi, 162.98°

1340 KCLU Santa Barbara, CA = 892.28mi, 170.34°
1340 KYNS San Luis Obispo, CA = 829.82mi, 173.64°

1400 KESQ Indio, CA = 981.67mi, 159.12°
1400 KCYK Yuma, AZ = 1081.27mi, 155.48°
1400 KKZZ Santa Paula, CA = 903.52mi, 168.24°
1400 KEZL Visalia, CA = 763.98mi, 167.27°

1450 KTIP Porterville, CA = 783.96mi, 166.58°
1450 KFSD Escondido, CA = 1008.92mi, 162.57°
1450 KPTR Palm Springs, CA = 975.25mi, 159.71°

1490 KMET Banning, CA = 957.48mi, 161.09°
1490 KGBA Heber, CA = 1058.63mi, 158.07°
1490 KWAC Bakersfield, CA = 835.12mi, 167.11°
1490 KOWL South Lake Tahoe, CA = 581.40mi, 167.49°
1490 KIST Santa Barbara, CA = 892.28mi, 170.34°

Of the list above, I can hear KYPA, KXO, KNSN, KCLU, KFSD, KGBA and KIST in the daytime from here, and have also heard KTIP around local sunset, although on a different radio a few years ago.
So, Gary, what antenna would you use to try to pick up those stations from there? Would one of the 7.5" loopsticks be directional enough, or would it require the 9' loop?

And, what was your best ever GY catch? Mine would have to be pulling in 1240 KALY Los Ranchos de Albuquerque, NM, from a distance of 615.88mi, heading 71.26°, a few years ago with my Panasonic RQ-SW20 and Select-A-Tenna. I have a local co-channel GY, 1240 KNSN, which is 11.22 miles away at a heading of 245.91°. KNSN WAS on the air at the time, but it helped that it was broadcasting an unmodulated carrier. Normally, when they are "on", I don't even hear the graveyard rumble underneath them. On my PL-380, KNSN's signal indicates about 54dBu with the stock antenna from here. What does KSUH indicate from your location on its frequency on your DSP radios, with the stock antennas? Also do you get any readings higher than 15dBu when tuned off 20 or 30 kHz, and if so, what?

(re-attempting post (again.. I seem to be having connection problems or something) - seems to not have gone through earlier)

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:
>
> Hello All,
>
> Ultralight DXing legend Rob Ross of London, Ontario has qualified for one
> of the toughest Awards in our diverse program-- 80 Stations Heard on the
> Graveyard frequencies! Previously awarded only to one other fanatical DXer
> (Frank Welch of Massachusetts), this award truly requires the utmost in
> patience and tenacity. As much as I admire Rob and Frank for their amazing
> Graveyard DXing accomplishments, the idea of sitting on a frequency for hours
> waiting for something new to come up is definitely not my first choice!
>
> Fellow ULR Awards Committee member Rob has assured me that he has
> diligently checked his own logs-- and having known Rob from the time that John and
> I started this craziness, I'm inclined to believe him! Congratulations,
> Rob, and best wishes for very spirited Graveyard DX in the future.
>
> 73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
>
> An extensive group of awards certificates is available from the
> Ultralight MW DXing Awards Committee. Each recipient receives a digital file which
> may be used for electronic display or is suitable for framing when printed
> at 8 12" x 11" on good quality paper. Information on the Awards Program and
> the simple application procedures are found in the Downloads>Ultralight
> Files>General Information area of dxer.ca and our own file area here at
> ultralightdx. Applications go directly to Rob Ross
>


Re: Congratulations to Rob Ross-- 80 Graveyard Stations Received

pianoplayer88key
 

Sounds like an excellent achievement! I sure wouldn't have the patience to attempt it barefoot, though. Maybe I could try if I had a much better antenna, though, like one that was sensitive enough to make the GY frequencies sound at noon like they normally sound at midnight using only the Select-A-Tenna. It would also need to be directional, as well. For example, I did a search from Puyallup, WA's coordinates (approximately where Gary is, although I don't know his exact coordinates where he reviews the radios from), and noted a few graveyard stations, distances and headings:

1230 KGEO Bakersfield, CA = 835.12mi, 167.11°
1230 KYPA Los Angeles, CA = 932.04mi, 165.60°
1230 KSZL Barstow, CA = 890.57mi, 160.29°
1230 KXO El Centro, CA = 1056.47mi, 158.02°

1240 KEZY San Bernardino, CA = 941.70mi, 162.21°
1240 KNSN San Diego, CA = 1037.25mi, 162.98°

1340 KCLU Santa Barbara, CA = 892.28mi, 170.34°
1340 KYNS San Luis Obispo, CA = 829.82mi, 173.64°

1400 KESQ Indio, CA = 981.67mi, 159.12°
1400 KCYK Yuma, AZ = 1081.27mi, 155.48°
1400 KKZZ Santa Paula, CA = 903.52mi, 168.24°
1400 KEZL Visalia, CA = 763.98mi, 167.27°

1450 KTIP Porterville, CA = 783.96mi, 166.58°
1450 KFSD Escondido, CA = 1008.92mi, 162.57°
1450 KPTR Palm Springs, CA = 975.25mi, 159.71°

1490 KMET Banning, CA = 957.48mi, 161.09°
1490 KGBA Heber, CA = 1058.63mi, 158.07°
1490 KWAC Bakersfield, CA = 835.12mi, 167.11°
1490 KOWL South Lake Tahoe, CA = 581.40mi, 167.49°
1490 KIST Santa Barbara, CA = 892.28mi, 170.34°

Of the list above, I can hear KYPA, KXO, KNSN, KCLU, KFSD, KGBA and KIST in the daytime from here, and have also heard KTIP around local sunset, although on a different radio a few years ago.
So, Gary, what antenna would you use to try to pick up those stations from there? Would one of the 7.5" loopsticks be directional enough, or would it require the 9' loop?

And, what was your best ever GY catch? Mine would have to be pulling in 1240 KALY Los Ranchos de Albuquerque, NM, from a distance of 615.88mi, heading 71.26°, a few years ago with my Panasonic RQ-SW20 and Select-A-Tenna. I have a local co-channel GY, 1240 KNSN, which is 11.22 miles away at a heading of 245.91°. KNSN WAS on the air at the time, but it helped that it was broadcasting an unmodulated carrier. Normally, when they are "on", I don't even hear the graveyard rumble underneath them. On my PL-380, KNSN's signal indicates about 54dBu with the stock antenna from here. What does KSUH indicate from your location on its frequency on your DSP radios, with the stock antennas? Also do you get any readings higher than 15dBu when tuned off 20 or 30 kHz, and if so, what?

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:

Hello All,

Ultralight DXing legend Rob Ross of London, Ontario has qualified for one
of the toughest Awards in our diverse program-- 80 Stations Heard on the
Graveyard frequencies! Previously awarded only to one other fanatical DXer
(Frank Welch of Massachusetts), this award truly requires the utmost in
patience and tenacity. As much as I admire Rob and Frank for their amazing
Graveyard DXing accomplishments, the idea of sitting on a frequency for hours
waiting for something new to come up is definitely not my first choice!

Fellow ULR Awards Committee member Rob has assured me that he has
diligently checked his own logs-- and having known Rob from the time that John and
I started this craziness, I'm inclined to believe him! Congratulations,
Rob, and best wishes for very spirited Graveyard DX in the future.

73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)

An extensive group of awards certificates is available from the
Ultralight MW DXing Awards Committee. Each recipient receives a digital file which
may be used for electronic display or is suitable for framing when printed
at 8 12" x 11" on good quality paper. Information on the Awards Program and
the simple application procedures are found in the Downloads>Ultralight
Files>General Information area of dxer.ca and our own file area here at
ultralightdx. Applications go directly to Rob Ross <va3sw@...>


First Es Logging of the Year!

scottmac112 <scottmac1120@...>
 

Hey all:

I am pleased to announce my very first (confirmed) sporadic-E logging of the year! I received WSEK-FM "Power Country K93", 93.9 FM, Somerset, Kentucky, on my barefoot Grundig/Eton G8. This is an exact distance of 1,093 statute miles. I was so excited to hear this one! Unfortunately, I had to do some work, and the band closed in the process. But I got this one! I will from now on closely monitor DXRobot for more Es openings. Oh, by the way, did anyone else get anything interesting today on FM? It's looking like it's going to be a great VHF DX season!

Scott
Hobbs, NM


Re: Some random observations on the PL-360

Gary DeBock
 

Hello Bill,
 
Thanks for the information on the 1610-Anguilla-Gene Scott saga. About a year ago it seemed like almost everyone in our Ultralightdx group was scrambling to log them, especially after the Gene Scott sermons came back with 10 kw power.
 
Caribbean MW stations show up here once in a blue moon, but 1610-Anguilla seems to have some special propagation edge over all the others. I was pretty thrilled with my logging, until I heard that the station is also a regular in New Zealand and South Africa :-)  As far as the Cubans, they have been almost a total bust here. 530-Cuba was logged on a barefoot SRF-T615 only by traveling to Grayland, WA (a local DXpedition site) to escape 3 TIS stations on the frequency.
 
73, Gary (in Puyallup, WA) 
 
In a message dated 5/24/2010 10:49:06 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, radioexray@... writes:

 

D1028Gary@... wrote:
>
>
> Hi James,
>
> Thanks for the clarification. I'm certainly no expert on the
> Anguilla-1610 station or its history, but it is the only Caribbean
> station I've ever received here in western Washington (along with
> 530-Cuba, which I needed to go to Grayland, WA to
> receive). Anguilla-1610 seems to show up only around February or March
> here, and is usually IDed in the TIS jumble only by the 6090 kHz parallel.

Howdy,

I used to live in Anguilla (1988-1991) before Dr. Scott acquired the
station. They operated on both 690 and 1610 from a single tower. I
forget if they advertised 100kw on both frequencies but they certainly
did on 1610. The ~400 ft stick would be 5/8-wave on 1610 so I suspect
there's some additional low angle gain to it.

In more recent times they backed off power on 1610 and the 690 freq went
away. In fact I thought 1610 had gone also until just recently when Jim
Kearman asked about them and I tuned around to check. Previously 1610
had been almost like a local at my location (160 miles west) and I
figured they were gone once 1620-WDHP came on the air from St. Croix a
few years ago. It took some careful listening but I found they were
still there as of a couple months ago. Sure didn't sound like 10kw, though.

Definitely a good catch from the West Coast!

-Bill


Re: non-destructive coupling of hoop loop to PL-310

pianoplayer88key
 

Ok, Scott, I have a question about the sensitivity specifications...
My PL-380 specifies the sensitivity as follows:
FM (S/N=30dB) < 3µV
MW (S/N=26dB) < 1mV/m
LW (S/N=26dB) < 10mV/m
SW (S/N=26dB) < 20µV
Given that info, is it possible to translate dBu and S/N readings into approximate field strength readings in µV/m or mV/m?
Also, the FM and SW don't specify field strength in terms of µV/m, but just in terms of µV. Is it assumed to be µV/m, or is it something else?

--- In ultralightdx@..., "sdwillingham" <sdwillingham@...> wrote:



You're welcome Tony. I'm glad I can provide good explanations. It's been said that one doesn't understand something well until one can explain it to someone else. I take that to heart and do my best.

I'm learning a lot about the AM operation of our chips by participating in this group. Most of my work experience concentrates on FM performance, so I'm learning here in addition to trying to help out. The engineers (and marketing people) at Silabs all take pride in the cool chips we design and so it is gratifying to read about radio enthusiasts who can push performance to the limit and get great results.

Cheers,
Scott

--- In ultralightdx@..., Tony Germanotta <germanotta.tony@> wrote:

Thanks Scott, and thanks so much for all your help with this group. I took my last science course in Freshman year of College, and those were just repeats of my AP classes in High School, so I didn't really pay that much attention to it. I was a physics major back then with a double major in journalism and decided I should get out of science when I realized most of my physics professors had little idea there was a war going on in Vietnam they were so enthralled by watching the little counter on their basement cyclotron. I didn't fault them. I just realized that to be great in that field, I would need that kind of dedication and I just didn't have it. So I moved over to journalism full time and made a career of it. Still, I retained my love for science and your detailed explanations of what goes on inside that chip you designed have really been fun to read. And you do a great job explaining it at a level someone who didn't go on for his PhD can understand. This entire group is much better for your participation in it. And me, you just saved me opening the radio up again and trying to get a few turns off that loopstick with your eagle eyed attention to those hi-res photos. I'll play with this for a while as it is. But I'm sure I'll be back inside soon, trying a more-neatly wound bifilar winding to see if I can't increase Q and eke out those last few microvolts of signal. But first, it's to one of my ferrites for a more portable arrangement.



On May 21, 2010, at 7:41 PM, sdwillingham wrote:



Tony,

In the photos section of this group, Gary has posted high-res pictures of the PL-310 loopstick. It has 80 turns and a reported inductance of 318 uH.

Revising Jim's calculation:
With a 15-turn coupling winding, the turns ratio is 80/15 = 5.33, transforming a 16 uH loop to 16*5.33^2 = 455 uH. The Si4734 receiver input will see 455 in parallel with 318, or 187 uH. That should be good for tuning over the whole MW band.

Sounds like a fine hoop-loop system with minimal intrusion into the radio. Drawbacks relative to a toroid transformer will be things like selectivity (lower Q), less deep nulling, and some added noise sensitivity. But if you don't have a lot of strong pests and local noise, you may not miss those attributes.

As Jim wrote, a ferrite loop with inductance in the vicinity of 16 uH will also work well. I've attached a quickie ferrite loop to my PL-380 with something like 11 or 12 loops of wire-wrap wire over a ferrite similar to the stock loopstick. I haven't done extensive tests, but basic RSSI tests over the band are comparable.

-Scott-

--- In ultralightdx@..., "jim_kr1s" <jkearman@> wrote:


Tony,

Congrats on the Hoop Loop! The right number of turns you wind on the
ferrite rod depends on how many turns Tecsun used, and the inductance of
the rod by itself. Has anyone measured the inductance of a PL-310
internal antenna? Squaring the ratio of the number of turns on the
original antenna divided by the number of turns you add, and multiplying
by 16 (the inductance of the 23-inch Hoop Loop with 3 turns), gives you
the transformed inductance. That inductance is in parallel with the
inductance of the internal antenna. Here we're less concerned with the
positioning of the winding as the turns ratio. You determine the total
inductance by

Lt = L1 X L2 / L1 + L2

Not knowing the specs of the PL-310 internal antenna, I winged it and
assumed 56 turns and 330 uH.

56 / 15 = 3.7, the turns ratio. The inductance is transformed by an
amount equal to 3.7 squared, or about 14. A 16-uH Hoop Loop is
transformed to 16 X 14 or 224 uH. The parallel combination of 224 and
330 is 133 uH, which is below what the chip is specified to tune. Yours
does drop off a bit below 560 uH. If you used 10 turns, the antenna
inductance would be transformed to about 500 uH. In parallel with 330
uH, you'd have 200 uH, which is safely within the chip's specified
range. From what Scott has told me, I'd try to get at least 160 uH, to
make sure it tunes down to 530 kHz.

Even better, though I suppose soldering inside the radio defeats
"Barefoot," would be 5 bifilar turns arranged as shown on the Hoop Loop
page <http://kr1s.kearman.com/html/hooploop.html> , with the center tap
connected to ground. It shouldn't affect the Barefoot classification
because the extra winding hanging free will probably degrade the already
lousy internal antenna's performance!

If you can get the coupling loop closer to the antenna winding, it will
make a big difference. You can't remove an antenna from one of these
radios without messing up the Litz wire, unfortunately. The glue they
use to keep the antenna from rattling gets onto the wire and shreds it
when you lift out the antenna. It is better to put the coupling loop
near the grounded end of the internal antenna winding if possible. If
the -310 is like the -380, that won't work. If I cared about Barefoot,
I'd buy a second PL-380, but so far I have resisted the temptation. :)

Your question about using a ferrite-rod antenna sent me back to the
bench. On the -61, 7.5-inch rod I picked up, 13 turns came to 17.5 uH,
which I decided was close enough to 16 uH for government work. Connected
to a MW matching transformer, signals were weaker than with the Hoop
Loop, but it worked better than expected with so few turns on the rod.

If you have a way to measure inductance, start with 15-16 turns spread
over about half the length of the rod, and work back until you get close
to the same inductance as your Hoop Loop. Go a little higher rather than
lower. The extra turn can only help.

73,

Jim, KR1S
http://kr1s.kearman.com/ <http://kr1s.kearman.com/>
http://qrp.kearman.com/ <http://qrp.kearman.com/>


Re: Some random observations on the PL-360

James McWain
 

The 1610 station is a 10kw station in Anguilla ..not a regular beacon.. It's branded as "The Caribbean Beacon".    James McWain


From: "D1028Gary@..."
To: ultralightdx@...
Sent: Mon, May 24, 2010 6:13:59 PM
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] Re: Some random observations on the PL-360

 

Hi Stephen,
 
About 2 years ago I was tuning the 1610 kHz frequency with a C. Crane SWP Slider model (a western Washington creation concocted together with John Bryant, having a weirdly sensitive 7.5" loopstick). 1610 kHz is a wide- open frequency here in Puyallup, WA, normally having a weak group of TIS stations in Washington and Oregon taking turns trying to produce barely readable signals every night.
  
Anyway, one of the TIS stations seemed to come up with a preacher, who didn't want to ID, or give his transmitter number. He rambled on and on, making me wonder if he was a Pirate! Finally I remembered that some East Coast DXers had been hearing the Anguilla beacon on 1610 kHz, from a small island off the coast of South America. It seemed like science fiction that the station could be heard in western Washington (we have to really work hard to even log Cuba), but I checked the recommended 6090 kHz parallel, and found the late Dr. Gene Scott booming in with his sermon, // 1610 kHz. This was indeed the Anguilla beacon-- making its way across a whole continent of QRM! http://www.mediafir e.com/?mznwzzmdg qn . I thought that this quite a catch-- until I found out that Tony King had heard the same station on his analog Tecsun R9012 in New Zealand :-) 
 
As for the "First Thrilling TP" article, it is probably due for a serious revision, in light of the recent DSP chip advances in Ultralight radios. The principles of using great propagation and SSB spotting receivers are the same, but the TP possibilities are much more plentiful now. Mark Connelly also gave us a list of the best TA possibilities for Ultralight radio DXers about 2 years back, and even I was able to use his recommendations to snag a few TA's last fall :-)
 
73, Gary  
 
In a message dated 5/24/2010 1:23:52 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time, pianoplayer88key@ yahoo.com writes:

 

What's this 1610-Anguilla station you're referring to? Around here, all I get on 1610 is either static, atmospheric noise, or hints of TIS's, even though I'm far enough away from the nearest TIS on 1610 so I'm not getting the 50,00 reading across the band from it.

Also, what's a good source to find out what TP / TA stations I should maybe try for? The few that have been mentioned in the article in the files section about first thrilling TP are all close to strong locals that come in at 63dBu on my PL-380. Is there a more comprehensive list of stations with locations, format/language info, antenna patterns, transmitter powers, frequencies, etc? Or am I out of luck with my PL-380 rarely reading below 30dBu across the band, with some places touching 45dBu?

--- In ultralightdx@ yahoogroups. com, D1028Gary@.. . wrote:
>
> Hi Phil,
>
> Actually the PL-360 7.5" plug-in loopsticks have a rubber hose locking
> system which fits over the whip antenna tip, so you are free to tip the radio
> any way you wish, without the loopstick rotating (or falling out). The
> plug-in model here can even be held completely upside down, without the
> loopstick coming loose at all. The PL-360 with the 7.5" plug-in loopstick
> installed can also stand upright on a table, as in the photo below.
>
> A DXer had asked whether the whip antenna could be used to check a
> Shortwave parallel, when the 7.5" plug-in loopstick is installed. The answer is
> yes, although you will need to disconnect the rubber air hose lock by pulling
> the loopstick straight up, then rotating it and plugging in the phone plug
> with the air hose on the back side of the radio (see photo below, which
> will also be uploaded to the PL-360 7.5" plug-in loopstick photo album).
> There is just enough clearance to extend the whip antenna to check a SW
> parallel, at the same time that the 7.5" loopstick is plugged in, and receiving
> DX. This might come in handy to check 6090 kHz, when the PL-360 is receiving
> 1610-Anguilla, for example.
>
> 73 and Good DX,
> Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
>
>
>
>
>
>
> In a message dated 5/23/2010 3:11:49 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
> ppasteur@... writes:
>
>
>
>
> I was going to ask this in a new thread, but this seems to kind of fit
> here. I have a PL-360 on order and Gary has been kind enought to agree to
> build one of his 7.5" amidon plug in loopsticks fro me. I have been looking at
> pictures of the radio and it's dimensions. I am wondering how people support
> the radio while listening and changing the antenna orientation.
> The radio seems to have quite a small base to support and balance such a
> large antenna on. Are people using some kind of a stand or something?
>
> Now how is that for a "random thought" ?
>
> :)
>
> Thanks,
> Phil
>
> --- In _ultralightdx@ yahoogroups. com_ (mailto:ultralightdx@ yahoogroups. com)
> , "dhsatyadhana" wrote:
> >
> > Hi Richard:
> >
> > I second that! With the MW conditions regrouping for a great fall season
> (i.e., not so great right now...), I have been playing with the shortwave
> bands as well, and plug both my roof-mounted H900 active whip and/or a
> indoor Wellbrook FLG-100/Super Loop right into the AM jack, and it works great.
> Off-tuning by 2-3 khz helps reduce the selective fading on SW, but off
> course one must bump up the volume a bit to overcome the audio stage
> soft-mute.
> >
> >
>



Re: Some random observations on the PL-360

pianoplayer88key
 

I seem to be having difficulty with getting posts to send, so I'm rewriting this. (The undo close tab trick didn't work for this one.) Take 3 (or is it #4 yet? I've lost count)...

I'll look forward to reading that revised article when it gets done. Considering all the projects you now have going, would I be too impatient if I expect to be reading it by the year 10,000? ;)

Also, if I remember correctly, one of your articles said your 9' PVC loops are sensitive enough to bring a signal on most portable ultralights from "undetectable" to "overloading". What's your approximate threshold for determining when a station is overloading? Is it when images start to pop up across the band, the station starts bleeding +/- 2 channels, or when the audio on-frequency actually distorts, like in the recording (2nd part) of my PL-380 below?
http://cid-6bdd1917662288cb.skydrive.live.com/self.aspx/AM%20radio%20files/1170%20KCBQ%20-%202010-04-16/KCBQ%201170%20-%20PL-380%20-%20overload%20demo%20-%202nd%20half%20SAT%20@%20PowerPole.mp3
That was recorded 9 miles away from 1170 KCBQ, with the PL-380 inductively coupled to a SAT, which was in turn next to what's in the linked pic below.
http://cid-6bdd1917662288cb.skydrive.live.com/self.aspx/AM%20radio%20files/1170%20KCBQ%20-%202010-04-16/KCBQ%201170%20-%20PL-380%20-%20overload%20demo%20-%202nd%20half%20SAT%20@%20PowerPole.mp3#resId/6BDD1917662288CB!148
What is that wooden piece going down the side of the pole? If I put a radio next to that, it greatly amplifies the signal.
Here's a pic of the setup in action...
http://cid-6bdd1917662288cb.skydrive.live.com/self.aspx/AM%20radio%20files/1170%20KCBQ%20-%202010-04-16/KCBQ%201170%20-%20PL-380%20-%20overload%20demo%20-%202nd%20half%20SAT%20@%20PowerPole.mp3#resId/6BDD1917662288CB!150
With that setup, and the Select-A-Tenna tuned to 1170kHz, I was getting readings of 45dBu at 153kHz, 49dBu at 520kHz, 50dBu at 680kHz and 1710kHz, 39dBu at 2300kHz, 63dBu at 2340kHz (2nd harmonic), 37dBu at 3000kHz, 44dBu at 3510kHz (3rd harmonic), 36dBu at 4680kHz (4th harmonic), 30dBu at 5100kHz, and 35dBu at 5850kHz. By comparison, using just the PL-380's built-in antenna, not near the power pole, I still get the 63dBu on 1170, of course, but my readings on other frequencies are 15dBu at 520kHz, 25dBu at 880kHz, 35dBu at 1155 and 1185kHz (normally it's closer to 40-45dBu), 32dBu at 1230, 27dBu at 1290, 25dBu at 1440, 22dBu at 1610kHz and 3000kHz, and 24dBu (25dB S/N) on 2340kHz, KCBQ's 2nd harmonic.

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:

Hi Stephen,

About 2 years ago I was tuning the 1610 kHz frequency with a C. Crane SWP
Slider model (a western Washington creation concocted together with John
Bryant, having a weirdly sensitive 7.5" loopstick). 1610 kHz is a wide- open
frequency here in Puyallup, WA, normally having a weak group of TIS
stations in Washington and Oregon taking turns trying to produce barely readable
signals every night.

Anyway, one of the TIS stations seemed to come up with a preacher, who
didn't want to ID, or give his transmitter number. He rambled on and on, making
me wonder if he was a Pirate! Finally I remembered that some East Coast
DXers had been hearing the Anguilla beacon on 1610 kHz, from a small island
off the coast of South America. It seemed like science fiction that the
station could be heard in western Washington (we have to really work hard to
even log Cuba), but I checked the recommended 6090 kHz parallel, and found
the late Dr. Gene Scott booming in with his sermon, // 1610 kHz. This was
indeed the Anguilla beacon-- making its way across a whole continent of QRM!
_http://www.mediafire.com/?mznwzzmdgqn_
(http://www.mediafire.com/?mznwzzmdgqn) . I thought that this quite a catch-- until I found out that Tony King
had heard the same station on his analog Tecsun R9012 in New Zealand :-)

As for the "First Thrilling TP" article, it is probably due for a serious
revision, in light of the recent DSP chip advances in Ultralight radios. The
principles of using great propagation and SSB spotting receivers are the
same, but the TP possibilities are much more plentiful now. Mark Connelly
also gave us a list of the best TA possibilities for Ultralight radio DXers
about 2 years back, and even I was able to use his recommendations to snag a
few TA's last fall :-)

73, Gary


In a message dated 5/24/2010 1:23:52 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
pianoplayer88key@... writes:




What's this 1610-Anguilla station you're referring to? Around here, all I
get on 1610 is either static, atmospheric noise, or hints of TIS's, even
though I'm far enough away from the nearest TIS on 1610 so I'm not getting the
50,00 reading across the band from it.

Also, what's a good source to find out what TP / TA stations I should
maybe try for? The few that have been mentioned in the article in the files
section about first thrilling TP are all close to strong locals that come in
at 63dBu on my PL-380. Is there a more comprehensive list of stations with
locations, format/language info, antenna patterns, transmitter powers,
frequencies, etc? Or am I out of luck with my PL-380 rarely reading below 30dBu
across the band, with some places touching 45dBu?

--- In _ultralightdx@... (mailto:ultralightdx@...)
, D1028Gary@ wrote:

Hi Phil,

Actually the PL-360 7.5" plug-in loopsticks have a rubber hose locking
system which fits over the whip antenna tip, so you are free to tip the
radio
any way you wish, without the loopstick rotating (or falling out). The
plug-in model here can even be held completely upside down, without the
loopstick coming loose at all. The PL-360 with the 7.5" plug-in
loopstick
installed can also stand upright on a table, as in the photo below.

A DXer had asked whether the whip antenna could be used to check a
Shortwave parallel, when the 7.5" plug-in loopstick is installed. The
answer is
yes, although you will need to disconnect the rubber air hose lock by
pulling
the loopstick straight up, then rotating it and plugging in the phone
plug
with the air hose on the back side of the radio (see photo below, which
will also be uploaded to the PL-360 7.5" plug-in loopstick photo album).
There is just enough clearance to extend the whip antenna to check a SW
parallel, at the same time that the 7.5" loopstick is plugged in, and
receiving
DX. This might come in handy to check 6090 kHz, when the PL-360 is
receiving
1610-Anguilla, for example.

73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)






In a message dated 5/23/2010 3:11:49 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
ppasteur@ writes:




I was going to ask this in a new thread, but this seems to kind of fit
here. I have a PL-360 on order and Gary has been kind enought to agree
to
build one of his 7.5" amidon plug in loopsticks fro me. I have been
looking at
pictures of the radio and it's dimensions. I am wondering how people
support
the radio while listening and changing the antenna orientation.
The radio seems to have quite a small base to support and balance such a
large antenna on. Are people using some kind of a stand or something?

Now how is that for a "random thought" ?

:)

Thanks,
Phil

--- In __ultralightdx@...
(mailto:_ultralightdx@...) _ (mailto:_ultralightdx@...
(mailto:ultralightdx@...) )
, "dhsatyadhana" <satya@> wrote:

Hi Richard:

I second that! With the MW conditions regrouping for a great fall
season
(i.e., not so great right now...), I have been playing with the
shortwave
bands as well, and plug both my roof-mounted H900 active whip and/or a
indoor Wellbrook FLG-100/Super Loop right into the AM jack, and it works
great.
Off-tuning by 2-3 khz helps reduce the selective fading on SW, but off
course one must bump up the volume a bit to overcome the audio stage
soft-mute.


Re: Some random observations on the PL-360

pianoplayer88key
 

I seem to be having difficulty with getting posts to send, so I'm rewriting this. (The undo close tab trick didn't work for this one.)

I'll look forward to reading that revised article when it gets done. Considering all the projects you now have going, would I be too impatient if I expect to be reading it by the year 10,000? ;)

Also, if I remember correctly, one of your articles said your 9' PVC loops are sensitive enough to bring a signal on most portable ultralights from "undetectable" to "overloading". What's your approximate threshold for determining when a station is overloading? Is it when images start to pop up across the band, the station starts bleeding +/- 2 channels, or when the audio on-frequency actually distorts, like in the recording (2nd part) of my PL-380 below?
http://cid-6bdd1917662288cb.skydrive.live.com/self.aspx/AM%20radio%20files/1170%20KCBQ%20-%202010-04-16/KCBQ%201170%20-%20PL-380%20-%20overload%20demo%20-%202nd%20half%20SAT%20@%20PowerPole.mp3
That was recorded 9 miles away from 1170 KCBQ, with the PL-380 inductively coupled to a SAT, which was in turn next to what's in the linked pic below.
http://cid-6bdd1917662288cb.skydrive.live.com/self.aspx/AM%20radio%20files/1170%20KCBQ%20-%202010-04-16/KCBQ%201170%20-%20PL-380%20-%20overload%20demo%20-%202nd%20half%20SAT%20@%20PowerPole.mp3#resId/6BDD1917662288CB!148
What is that wooden piece going down the side of the pole? If I put a radio next to that, it greatly amplifies the signal.
Here's a pic of the setup in action...
http://cid-6bdd1917662288cb.skydrive.live.com/self.aspx/AM%20radio%20files/1170%20KCBQ%20-%202010-04-16/KCBQ%201170%20-%20PL-380%20-%20overload%20demo%20-%202nd%20half%20SAT%20@%20PowerPole.mp3#resId/6BDD1917662288CB!150
With that setup, and the Select-A-Tenna tuned to 1170kHz, I was getting readings of 45dBu at 153kHz, 49dBu at 520kHz, 50dBu at 680kHz and 1710kHz, 39dBu at 2300kHz, 63dBu at 2340kHz (2nd harmonic), 37dBu at 3000kHz, 44dBu at 3510kHz (3rd harmonic), 36dBu at 4680kHz (4th harmonic), 30dBu at 5100kHz, and 35dBu at 5850kHz. By comparison, using just the PL-380's built-in antenna, not near the power pole, I still get the 63dBu on 1170, of course, but my readings on other frequencies are 15dBu at 520kHz, 25dBu at 880kHz, 35dBu at 1155 and 1185kHz (normally it's closer to 40-45dBu), 32dBu at 1230, 27dBu at 1290, 25dBu at 1440, 22dBu at 1610kHz and 3000kHz, and 24dBu (25dB S/N) on 2340kHz, KCBQ's 2nd harmonic.

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:

Hi Stephen,

About 2 years ago I was tuning the 1610 kHz frequency with a C. Crane SWP
Slider model (a western Washington creation concocted together with John
Bryant, having a weirdly sensitive 7.5" loopstick). 1610 kHz is a wide- open
frequency here in Puyallup, WA, normally having a weak group of TIS
stations in Washington and Oregon taking turns trying to produce barely readable
signals every night.

Anyway, one of the TIS stations seemed to come up with a preacher, who
didn't want to ID, or give his transmitter number. He rambled on and on, making
me wonder if he was a Pirate! Finally I remembered that some East Coast
DXers had been hearing the Anguilla beacon on 1610 kHz, from a small island
off the coast of South America. It seemed like science fiction that the
station could be heard in western Washington (we have to really work hard to
even log Cuba), but I checked the recommended 6090 kHz parallel, and found
the late Dr. Gene Scott booming in with his sermon, // 1610 kHz. This was
indeed the Anguilla beacon-- making its way across a whole continent of QRM!
_http://www.mediafire.com/?mznwzzmdgqn_
(http://www.mediafire.com/?mznwzzmdgqn) . I thought that this quite a catch-- until I found out that Tony King
had heard the same station on his analog Tecsun R9012 in New Zealand :-)

As for the "First Thrilling TP" article, it is probably due for a serious
revision, in light of the recent DSP chip advances in Ultralight radios. The
principles of using great propagation and SSB spotting receivers are the
same, but the TP possibilities are much more plentiful now. Mark Connelly
also gave us a list of the best TA possibilities for Ultralight radio DXers
about 2 years back, and even I was able to use his recommendations to snag a
few TA's last fall :-)

73, Gary


In a message dated 5/24/2010 1:23:52 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
pianoplayer88key@... writes:




What's this 1610-Anguilla station you're referring to? Around here, all I
get on 1610 is either static, atmospheric noise, or hints of TIS's, even
though I'm far enough away from the nearest TIS on 1610 so I'm not getting the
50,00 reading across the band from it.

Also, what's a good source to find out what TP / TA stations I should
maybe try for? The few that have been mentioned in the article in the files
section about first thrilling TP are all close to strong locals that come in
at 63dBu on my PL-380. Is there a more comprehensive list of stations with
locations, format/language info, antenna patterns, transmitter powers,
frequencies, etc? Or am I out of luck with my PL-380 rarely reading below 30dBu
across the band, with some places touching 45dBu?

--- In _ultralightdx@... (mailto:ultralightdx@...)
, D1028Gary@ wrote:

Hi Phil,

Actually the PL-360 7.5" plug-in loopsticks have a rubber hose locking
system which fits over the whip antenna tip, so you are free to tip the
radio
any way you wish, without the loopstick rotating (or falling out). The
plug-in model here can even be held completely upside down, without the
loopstick coming loose at all. The PL-360 with the 7.5" plug-in
loopstick
installed can also stand upright on a table, as in the photo below.

A DXer had asked whether the whip antenna could be used to check a
Shortwave parallel, when the 7.5" plug-in loopstick is installed. The
answer is
yes, although you will need to disconnect the rubber air hose lock by
pulling
the loopstick straight up, then rotating it and plugging in the phone
plug
with the air hose on the back side of the radio (see photo below, which
will also be uploaded to the PL-360 7.5" plug-in loopstick photo album).
There is just enough clearance to extend the whip antenna to check a SW
parallel, at the same time that the 7.5" loopstick is plugged in, and
receiving
DX. This might come in handy to check 6090 kHz, when the PL-360 is
receiving
1610-Anguilla, for example.

73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)






In a message dated 5/23/2010 3:11:49 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
ppasteur@ writes:




I was going to ask this in a new thread, but this seems to kind of fit
here. I have a PL-360 on order and Gary has been kind enought to agree
to
build one of his 7.5" amidon plug in loopsticks fro me. I have been
looking at
pictures of the radio and it's dimensions. I am wondering how people
support
the radio while listening and changing the antenna orientation.
The radio seems to have quite a small base to support and balance such a
large antenna on. Are people using some kind of a stand or something?

Now how is that for a "random thought" ?

:)

Thanks,
Phil

--- In __ultralightdx@...
(mailto:_ultralightdx@...) _ (mailto:_ultralightdx@...
(mailto:ultralightdx@...) )
, "dhsatyadhana" <satya@> wrote:

Hi Richard:

I second that! With the MW conditions regrouping for a great fall
season
(i.e., not so great right now...), I have been playing with the
shortwave
bands as well, and plug both my roof-mounted H900 active whip and/or a
indoor Wellbrook FLG-100/Super Loop right into the AM jack, and it works
great.
Off-tuning by 2-3 khz helps reduce the selective fading on SW, but off
course one must bump up the volume a bit to overcome the audio stage
soft-mute.


Re: Some random observations on the PL-360

pianoplayer88key
 

I'll look forward to seeing a revised TP/TA article. Would it be too unreasonable for me to expect to see it by the year 10,000 considering all the other projects you now have going? :)
So what would you recommend I do to help "spot" signals, considering my best tuner is my PL-380, and my next best radio has the selectivity of the SRF-M37W and sensitivity about 15dB less than the PL-380?
Also, I remember reading in one of your articles (I think the PVC loop article) that the large loops give a huge signal boost - basically "boosting unreadable signals on ultralights to the point where they begin to overload" if I remember correctly. At what point do you consider them to be starting to overload - is it when the signals start splattering over +/-30kHz, or when you're getting 50dBu readings several channels away on the DSP radios....
or is it when the audio, when tuned ON the frequency, actually distorts, like in the 2nd part of the recording below?
http://cid-6bdd1917662288cb.skydrive.live.com/self.aspx/AM%20radio%20files/1170%20KCBQ%20-%202010-04-16/KCBQ%201170%20-%20PL-380%20-%20overload%20demo%20-%202nd%20half%20SAT%20@%20PowerPole.mp3
That was 50kW 1170 KCBQ, recorded from 9 miles away with my Tecsun PL-380 and Select-A-Tenna next to a power pole.
http://cid-6bdd1917662288cb.skydrive.live.com/self.aspx/AM%20radio%20files/1170%20KCBQ%20-%202010-04-16/KCBQ%201170%20-%20PL-380%20-%20overload%20demo%20-%202nd%20half%20SAT%20@%20PowerPole.mp3#resId/6BDD1917662288CB!150
http://cid-6bdd1917662288cb.skydrive.live.com/self.aspx/AM%20radio%20files/1170%20KCBQ%20-%202010-04-16/KCBQ%201170%20-%20PL-380%20-%20overload%20demo%20-%202nd%20half%20SAT%20@%20PowerPole.mp3#resId/6BDD1917662288CB!148
(By the way, what is that wooden piece running down the pole? If I put my radio next to that, it GREATLY amplifies the signal.) I was getting audio distortion on 1170, and readings of 45dBu on 153kHz, 49dBu on 520kHz, 50dBu on 680kHz and 1710kHz, 39dBu on 2300kHz, 63dBu on 2340kHz (2nd harmonic), 37dBu on 3000kHz, 44dBu on 3510kHz (3rd harmonic), 36dBu on 4680kHz (4th harmonic), 30dBu on 5100kHz, and 35dBu on 5850kHz (5th harmonic). If I inductively coupled my Panasonic RQ-SW20 (the aforementioned second fiddle to the PL-380, with the horrible selectivity) to the same setup, the audio on 1170 sounded perfectly fine, although the signal would splatter all the way up to 1710.

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:

Hi Stephen,

About 2 years ago I was tuning the 1610 kHz frequency with a C. Crane SWP
Slider model (a western Washington creation concocted together with John
Bryant, having a weirdly sensitive 7.5" loopstick). 1610 kHz is a wide- open
frequency here in Puyallup, WA, normally having a weak group of TIS
stations in Washington and Oregon taking turns trying to produce barely readable
signals every night.

Anyway, one of the TIS stations seemed to come up with a preacher, who
didn't want to ID, or give his transmitter number. He rambled on and on, making
me wonder if he was a Pirate! Finally I remembered that some East Coast
DXers had been hearing the Anguilla beacon on 1610 kHz, from a small island
off the coast of South America. It seemed like science fiction that the
station could be heard in western Washington (we have to really work hard to
even log Cuba), but I checked the recommended 6090 kHz parallel, and found
the late Dr. Gene Scott booming in with his sermon, // 1610 kHz. This was
indeed the Anguilla beacon-- making its way across a whole continent of QRM!
_http://www.mediafire.com/?mznwzzmdgqn_
(http://www.mediafire.com/?mznwzzmdgqn) . I thought that this quite a catch-- until I found out that Tony King
had heard the same station on his analog Tecsun R9012 in New Zealand :-)

As for the "First Thrilling TP" article, it is probably due for a serious
revision, in light of the recent DSP chip advances in Ultralight radios. The
principles of using great propagation and SSB spotting receivers are the
same, but the TP possibilities are much more plentiful now. Mark Connelly
also gave us a list of the best TA possibilities for Ultralight radio DXers
about 2 years back, and even I was able to use his recommendations to snag a
few TA's last fall :-)

73, Gary


In a message dated 5/24/2010 1:23:52 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
pianoplayer88key@... writes:




What's this 1610-Anguilla station you're referring to? Around here, all I
get on 1610 is either static, atmospheric noise, or hints of TIS's, even
though I'm far enough away from the nearest TIS on 1610 so I'm not getting the
50,00 reading across the band from it.

Also, what's a good source to find out what TP / TA stations I should
maybe try for? The few that have been mentioned in the article in the files
section about first thrilling TP are all close to strong locals that come in
at 63dBu on my PL-380. Is there a more comprehensive list of stations with
locations, format/language info, antenna patterns, transmitter powers,
frequencies, etc? Or am I out of luck with my PL-380 rarely reading below 30dBu
across the band, with some places touching 45dBu?

--- In _ultralightdx@... (mailto:ultralightdx@...)
, D1028Gary@ wrote:

Hi Phil,

Actually the PL-360 7.5" plug-in loopsticks have a rubber hose locking
system which fits over the whip antenna tip, so you are free to tip the
radio
any way you wish, without the loopstick rotating (or falling out). The
plug-in model here can even be held completely upside down, without the
loopstick coming loose at all. The PL-360 with the 7.5" plug-in
loopstick
installed can also stand upright on a table, as in the photo below.

A DXer had asked whether the whip antenna could be used to check a
Shortwave parallel, when the 7.5" plug-in loopstick is installed. The
answer is
yes, although you will need to disconnect the rubber air hose lock by
pulling
the loopstick straight up, then rotating it and plugging in the phone
plug
with the air hose on the back side of the radio (see photo below, which
will also be uploaded to the PL-360 7.5" plug-in loopstick photo album).
There is just enough clearance to extend the whip antenna to check a SW
parallel, at the same time that the 7.5" loopstick is plugged in, and
receiving
DX. This might come in handy to check 6090 kHz, when the PL-360 is
receiving
1610-Anguilla, for example.

73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)






In a message dated 5/23/2010 3:11:49 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
ppasteur@ writes:




I was going to ask this in a new thread, but this seems to kind of fit
here. I have a PL-360 on order and Gary has been kind enought to agree
to
build one of his 7.5" amidon plug in loopsticks fro me. I have been
looking at
pictures of the radio and it's dimensions. I am wondering how people
support
the radio while listening and changing the antenna orientation.
The radio seems to have quite a small base to support and balance such a
large antenna on. Are people using some kind of a stand or something?

Now how is that for a "random thought" ?

:)

Thanks,
Phil

--- In __ultralightdx@...
(mailto:_ultralightdx@...) _ (mailto:_ultralightdx@...
(mailto:ultralightdx@...) )
, "dhsatyadhana" <satya@> wrote:

Hi Richard:

I second that! With the MW conditions regrouping for a great fall
season
(i.e., not so great right now...), I have been playing with the
shortwave
bands as well, and plug both my roof-mounted H900 active whip and/or a
indoor Wellbrook FLG-100/Super Loop right into the AM jack, and it works
great.
Off-tuning by 2-3 khz helps reduce the selective fading on SW, but off
course one must bump up the volume a bit to overcome the audio stage
soft-mute.


Re: Some random observations on the PL-360

pianoplayer88key
 

I'll look forward to seeing a revised TP/TA article. Would it be too unreasonable for me to expect to see it by the year 10,000 considering all the other projects you now have going? :)
So what would you recommend I do to help "spot" signals, considering my best tuner is my PL-380, and my next best radio has the selectivity of the SRF-M37W and sensitivity about 15dB less than the PL-380?
Also, I remember reading in one of your articles (I think the PVC loop article) that the large loops give a huge signal boost - basically "boosting unreadable signals on ultralights to the point where they begin to overload" if I remember correctly. At what point do you consider them to be starting to overload - is it when the signals start splattering over +/-30kHz, or when you're getting 50dBu readings several channels away on the DSP radios....
or is it when the audio, when tuned ON the frequency, actually distorts, like in the 2nd part of the recording below?
http://cid-6bdd1917662288cb.skydrive.live.com/self.aspx/AM%20radio%20files/1170%20KCBQ%20-%202010-04-16/KCBQ%201170%20-%20PL-380%20-%20overload%20demo%20-%202nd%20half%20SAT%20@%20PowerPole.mp3
That was 50kW 1170 KCBQ, recorded from 9 miles away with my Tecsun PL-380 and Select-A-Tenna next to a power pole.
http://cid-6bdd1917662288cb.skydrive.live.com/self.aspx/AM%20radio%20files/1170%20KCBQ%20-%202010-04-16/KCBQ%201170%20-%20PL-380%20-%20overload%20demo%20-%202nd%20half%20SAT%20@%20PowerPole.mp3#resId/6BDD1917662288CB!150
http://cid-6bdd1917662288cb.skydrive.live.com/self.aspx/AM%20radio%20files/1170%20KCBQ%20-%202010-04-16/KCBQ%201170%20-%20PL-380%20-%20overload%20demo%20-%202nd%20half%20SAT%20@%20PowerPole.mp3#resId/6BDD1917662288CB!148
(By the way, what is that wooden piece running down the pole? If I put my radio next to that, it GREATLY amplifies the signal.) I was getting audio distortion on 1170, and readings of 45dBu on 153kHz, 49dBu on 520kHz, 50dBu on 680kHz and 1710kHz, 39dBu on 2300kHz, 63dBu on 2340kHz (2nd harmonic), 37dBu on 3000kHz, 44dBu on 3510kHz (3rd harmonic), 36dBu on 4680kHz (4th harmonic), 30dBu on 5100kHz, and 35dBu on 5850kHz (5th harmonic). If I inductively coupled my Panasonic RQ-SW20 (the aforementioned second fiddle to the PL-380, with the horrible selectivity) to the same setup, the audio on 1170 sounded perfectly fine, although the signal would splatter all the way up to 1710.

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:

Hi Stephen,

About 2 years ago I was tuning the 1610 kHz frequency with a C. Crane SWP
Slider model (a western Washington creation concocted together with John
Bryant, having a weirdly sensitive 7.5" loopstick). 1610 kHz is a wide- open
frequency here in Puyallup, WA, normally having a weak group of TIS
stations in Washington and Oregon taking turns trying to produce barely readable
signals every night.

Anyway, one of the TIS stations seemed to come up with a preacher, who
didn't want to ID, or give his transmitter number. He rambled on and on, making
me wonder if he was a Pirate! Finally I remembered that some East Coast
DXers had been hearing the Anguilla beacon on 1610 kHz, from a small island
off the coast of South America. It seemed like science fiction that the
station could be heard in western Washington (we have to really work hard to
even log Cuba), but I checked the recommended 6090 kHz parallel, and found
the late Dr. Gene Scott booming in with his sermon, // 1610 kHz. This was
indeed the Anguilla beacon-- making its way across a whole continent of QRM!
_http://www.mediafire.com/?mznwzzmdgqn_
(http://www.mediafire.com/?mznwzzmdgqn) . I thought that this quite a catch-- until I found out that Tony King
had heard the same station on his analog Tecsun R9012 in New Zealand :-)

As for the "First Thrilling TP" article, it is probably due for a serious
revision, in light of the recent DSP chip advances in Ultralight radios. The
principles of using great propagation and SSB spotting receivers are the
same, but the TP possibilities are much more plentiful now. Mark Connelly
also gave us a list of the best TA possibilities for Ultralight radio DXers
about 2 years back, and even I was able to use his recommendations to snag a
few TA's last fall :-)

73, Gary


In a message dated 5/24/2010 1:23:52 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
pianoplayer88key@... writes:




What's this 1610-Anguilla station you're referring to? Around here, all I
get on 1610 is either static, atmospheric noise, or hints of TIS's, even
though I'm far enough away from the nearest TIS on 1610 so I'm not getting the
50,00 reading across the band from it.

Also, what's a good source to find out what TP / TA stations I should
maybe try for? The few that have been mentioned in the article in the files
section about first thrilling TP are all close to strong locals that come in
at 63dBu on my PL-380. Is there a more comprehensive list of stations with
locations, format/language info, antenna patterns, transmitter powers,
frequencies, etc? Or am I out of luck with my PL-380 rarely reading below 30dBu
across the band, with some places touching 45dBu?

--- In _ultralightdx@... (mailto:ultralightdx@...)
, D1028Gary@ wrote:

Hi Phil,

Actually the PL-360 7.5" plug-in loopsticks have a rubber hose locking
system which fits over the whip antenna tip, so you are free to tip the
radio
any way you wish, without the loopstick rotating (or falling out). The
plug-in model here can even be held completely upside down, without the
loopstick coming loose at all. The PL-360 with the 7.5" plug-in
loopstick
installed can also stand upright on a table, as in the photo below.

A DXer had asked whether the whip antenna could be used to check a
Shortwave parallel, when the 7.5" plug-in loopstick is installed. The
answer is
yes, although you will need to disconnect the rubber air hose lock by
pulling
the loopstick straight up, then rotating it and plugging in the phone
plug
with the air hose on the back side of the radio (see photo below, which
will also be uploaded to the PL-360 7.5" plug-in loopstick photo album).
There is just enough clearance to extend the whip antenna to check a SW
parallel, at the same time that the 7.5" loopstick is plugged in, and
receiving
DX. This might come in handy to check 6090 kHz, when the PL-360 is
receiving
1610-Anguilla, for example.

73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)






In a message dated 5/23/2010 3:11:49 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
ppasteur@ writes:




I was going to ask this in a new thread, but this seems to kind of fit
here. I have a PL-360 on order and Gary has been kind enought to agree
to
build one of his 7.5" amidon plug in loopsticks fro me. I have been
looking at
pictures of the radio and it's dimensions. I am wondering how people
support
the radio while listening and changing the antenna orientation.
The radio seems to have quite a small base to support and balance such a
large antenna on. Are people using some kind of a stand or something?

Now how is that for a "random thought" ?

:)

Thanks,
Phil

--- In __ultralightdx@...
(mailto:_ultralightdx@...) _ (mailto:_ultralightdx@...
(mailto:ultralightdx@...) )
, "dhsatyadhana" <satya@> wrote:

Hi Richard:

I second that! With the MW conditions regrouping for a great fall
season
(i.e., not so great right now...), I have been playing with the
shortwave
bands as well, and plug both my roof-mounted H900 active whip and/or a
indoor Wellbrook FLG-100/Super Loop right into the AM jack, and it works
great.
Off-tuning by 2-3 khz helps reduce the selective fading on SW, but off
course one must bump up the volume a bit to overcome the audio stage
soft-mute.