Date   

Re: Future of Radio DXing Hobby

Paul Blundell
 

Thanks for the excellent response Jorge. You have touched on some great points and I agree about the fact that in some ways the radio hobby seems to be more about computers than radios these days.

That is sad about your divorce.

On Tue., 1 Dec. 2020, 20:57 Jorge Garzón via groups.io, <iberiaDX=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Well, after more than 35 years practising the hobby I think that I am a serious hobbyist, even when I stopped a bit to organize my children's life, my job career and my own's life after I got divorced (it wasn't the radio at all, 😉) 

I am not only interested in DXing as I am very attached to heritage, ecology and botany fields since I was a teenager being part of my life, both personally and professionally. I know how to draw a line in between personal affaires and work duties, but being both close enough, it allows me enjoying the radio and DXing as I often visit natural and rural QRM-free areas, which is a real joy these days. I could also say 'COVID-free areas', BTW!

For me, a hobby is as important as my work duty and a balance has to be found, logically; but enjoy a hobby (DXing) help me to balance myself in an emotional, cultural, researching, technical way, it also allows me keep in touch with the world and understand better the society where I live in. My hobby helps me to work better and being a better person, no doubt! My job allows me to practise the hobby as I get incomes to live comfortably, with all my needs covered, including those regarding DXing and radio activities. Simple! 

I love the radio, but the technology does not attract me, at least in the way many people do. Dxing have to see with listening to the radio, and not as much with signal processing, at least for me. Using computers and SDR with screens is a kind of signal processing task and not real radio by audio. Without a screen or a computer, everything collapses, no radio, no DXing! 

Computers are a must in our society, they are useful tools but also a new kind of slavery. People spend tons of hours fixing drivers, getting new software, changing bank memories, finding the right comm ports, and so on, instead of listening to the radio. I prefer to switch on a button 'et voilá' ! I also have SDR devices but I think I use it in the right way, from time to time, to cover my needs. 

The hobby is facing a very dark future as conditions to practise it are difficult when a DXer is in a big city or dense urban areas. Faster and more accepted means to get in touch with the world are going on. The technology is addictive because we have an addictive brain and the capitalism know that (cyber Monday and Black Friday are there). For them being attached to the radio is a kind of obsolete way to live. That's a teenager's nightmare, being obsolete! No way! 

Something very important, in my opinion, is how to get into the hobby. How many families still listen to the radio together, or children enjoying the radio experience with their families? Even the cars include video screens on the backseats. Years back, clubs helped to many of us to progress. Now there are just a few with not much members and unattractive for young people. 

That's why ULR and portables can add fun to the hobby. Instead of quantity, quality. Keep the gate open to research, and enjoy the nature and wild areas also with a radio in the pocket. We will discover the beauty of life and why not that elusive station always hidden at home in downtown. 

¡Saludos y buen DX! 

Jorge


Re: Future of Radio DXing Hobby

Jorge Garzón
 

Well, after more than 35 years practising the hobby I think that I am a serious hobbyist, even when I stopped a bit to organize my children's life, my job career and my own's life after I got divorced (it wasn't the radio at all, 😉) 

I am not only interested in DXing as I am very attached to heritage, ecology and botany fields since I was a teenager being part of my life, both personally and professionally. I know how to draw a line in between personal affaires and work duties, but being both close enough, it allows me enjoying the radio and DXing as I often visit natural and rural QRM-free areas, which is a real joy these days. I could also say 'COVID-free areas', BTW!

For me, a hobby is as important as my work duty and a balance has to be found, logically; but enjoy a hobby (DXing) help me to balance myself in an emotional, cultural, researching, technical way, it also allows me keep in touch with the world and understand better the society where I live in. My hobby helps me to work better and being a better person, no doubt! My job allows me to practise the hobby as I get incomes to live comfortably, with all my needs covered, including those regarding DXing and radio activities. Simple! 

I love the radio, but the technology does not attract me, at least in the way many people do. Dxing have to see with listening to the radio, and not as much with signal processing, at least for me. Using computers and SDR with screens is a kind of signal processing task and not real radio by audio. Without a screen or a computer, everything collapses, no radio, no DXing! 

Computers are a must in our society, they are useful tools but also a new kind of slavery. People spend tons of hours fixing drivers, getting new software, changing bank memories, finding the right comm ports, and so on, instead of listening to the radio. I prefer to switch on a button 'et voilá' ! I also have SDR devices but I think I use it in the right way, from time to time, to cover my needs. 

The hobby is facing a very dark future as conditions to practise it are difficult when a DXer is in a big city or dense urban areas. Faster and more accepted means to get in touch with the world are going on. The technology is addictive because we have an addictive brain and the capitalism know that (cyber Monday and Black Friday are there). For them being attached to the radio is a kind of obsolete way to live. That's a teenager's nightmare, being obsolete! No way! 

Something very important, in my opinion, is how to get into the hobby. How many families still listen to the radio together, or children enjoying the radio experience with their families? Even the cars include video screens on the backseats. Years back, clubs helped to many of us to progress. Now there are just a few with not much members and unattractive for young people. 

That's why ULR and portables can add fun to the hobby. Instead of quantity, quality. Keep the gate open to research, and enjoy the nature and wild areas also with a radio in the pocket. We will discover the beauty of life and why not that elusive station always hidden at home in downtown. 

¡Saludos y buen DX! 

Jorge


Re: Future of Radio DXing Hobby

Paul Blundell
 

Thanks for the reply Keith.

Moving out of the city would make a huge difference and help with the electrical noise.

Much like a fisherman can't fish without fish and a plane spotter can't do that without planes, we are at the mercy of the broadcasters as to the future of AM broadcasts.

On Tue., 1 Dec. 2020, 19:27 keith beesley via groups.io, <keith1226=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I have a life-long interest in all things radio, so in that sense, I am a "serious" hobbyist; but I've cycled in and out of the actual DXing hobby several times, due to changing circumstances in my life, so in that sense, maybe more "casual." The biggest boost I received in recent years was moving out of a city apartment laden with all kinds of RFI from streetlamps, trolley-bus wires, neighbors' gadgets, etc., to a wood-frame house in a less urban location. I was pleased to discover I could hear out-of-town MW stations and some SW stations again. 

Now that I'm kind of involuntarily semi-retired due to the pandemic, I hope to find some time to get back into serious DXing again. Maybe I'll start keeping a log, maybe even get my ham ticket. 

As for the future of radio listening in general and DXing in particular, it's anybody's guess how much longer broadcast radio will last. It seems everything is destined to be replaced by online streaming sooner or later. But, broadcasting is still here now, and as long as it lasts, we'll be listening. 

Keith Beesley
Seattle USA





Re: Future of Radio DXing Hobby

keith beesley
 

I have a life-long interest in all things radio, so in that sense, I am a "serious" hobbyist; but I've cycled in and out of the actual DXing hobby several times, due to changing circumstances in my life, so in that sense, maybe more "casual." The biggest boost I received in recent years was moving out of a city apartment laden with all kinds of RFI from streetlamps, trolley-bus wires, neighbors' gadgets, etc., to a wood-frame house in a less urban location. I was pleased to discover I could hear out-of-town MW stations and some SW stations again. 

Now that I'm kind of involuntarily semi-retired due to the pandemic, I hope to find some time to get back into serious DXing again. Maybe I'll start keeping a log, maybe even get my ham ticket. 

As for the future of radio listening in general and DXing in particular, it's anybody's guess how much longer broadcast radio will last. It seems everything is destined to be replaced by online streaming sooner or later. But, broadcasting is still here now, and as long as it lasts, we'll be listening. 

Keith Beesley
Seattle USA





Re: Future of Radio DXing Hobby

Paul Blundell
 

Thanks for the reply Kevin, I think this has been more of an issue for people as the line between work and hobbies gets fuzzy.

My professional life is in IT, so I try to not let my hobby become to IT focus, part of the reason I have avoid SDR's and the like.

On Tue, Dec 1, 2020 at 2:17 PM kevin asato <kc6pob@...> wrote:
Hi Paul, 
Serious listening to radio tends to take a back seat in life as i still have a day job to deal with (Please, i am not belittling others activities). Interestingly enough, it involves point to point microwave radios of the analog and digital varieties as well as flavors of Land Mobile Radio (LMR/2-way) radio systems that tie into the IP/MPLS router backhaul networks that I help deploy. I stated my day job in this manner as that is where I see the migration away from radio interests to computers and networking. A lot of the radio shops i used to work with have been absorbed into the network shop with radio treated with the same regard as fiber. I find myself having to explain radios, T1, and analog voice circuits to those only knowing VoIP, cell phones, and Ethernet technologies to a lot of new hires straight out of school as the older technologies seemingly do not exist. The most difficult is having to explain to my wife that WiFi and Bluetooth are radios! It does not compute to her.

In my free time, I am trying to (re)learn CW to get my speed up to a level beyond 5-10wpm. i have just wound a Quaker Oats box to see if I can get a crystal receiver to tune below 500KHz. It would be interesting to see what i can hear as i live almost next to a 50KW barn burner. Probably pointless but hey, it's a hobby and my spare time. If i don't try it, i will never know.

I appreciate reading you postings. i used to be a bit more serious in my high school days when i had lots of spare time. So for the meantime, serious listening is taking a back seat to solving my problems of the day.
73,
kevin
kc6pob

On Sun, Nov 29, 2020 at 7:11 PM Paul Blundell <tanger32au@...> wrote:

All hobbies have people who are involved with them to different levels, this can be anything from a casual passing interest to the other extreme where they are a major part of your life and something you see as fundamental to your life, happiness and wellbeing.

 

Over the years I have been involved in a number of hobbies, with a number of these I was involved at a high level and have seen how “seriously” some people take their hobbies.

 

This year I have really taken on the radio hobby and have focused on ultralight radio DXing, this I have found is a great fit for me. What I have found is that generally speaking, you have people who fit in to two groups, those who take on the hobby at a less serious, more casual level and those who are more serious / dedicated to their hobby with not many people who fit in between.

 

What I have noticed is that as the average age of radio DX’ers has increased and sadly with more passing on, we don’t seem to have many people coming along as “the next generation” who are willing and able to take on the hobby and see these in to the future. Those younger people generally seem to fit in to the first group.

 

How seriously do you take the radio hobby? Do you see yourself taking on a more active / driving role in the future? Where do you see the radio hobby in 10 – 20 years’ time?

 

What can we as a hobby do to keep ourselves relevant today and bring more young people in to the hobby, who will drive this going forward? I don’t have all the answers, I just don’t want to see our radio hobby die.

 

Paul

https://ultralightradiodxing.blogspot.com

 



--
Paul


Re: Future of Radio DXing Hobby

kevin asato
 

Hi Paul, 
Serious listening to radio tends to take a back seat in life as i still have a day job to deal with (Please, i am not belittling others activities). Interestingly enough, it involves point to point microwave radios of the analog and digital varieties as well as flavors of Land Mobile Radio (LMR/2-way) radio systems that tie into the IP/MPLS router backhaul networks that I help deploy. I stated my day job in this manner as that is where I see the migration away from radio interests to computers and networking. A lot of the radio shops i used to work with have been absorbed into the network shop with radio treated with the same regard as fiber. I find myself having to explain radios, T1, and analog voice circuits to those only knowing VoIP, cell phones, and Ethernet technologies to a lot of new hires straight out of school as the older technologies seemingly do not exist. The most difficult is having to explain to my wife that WiFi and Bluetooth are radios! It does not compute to her.

In my free time, I am trying to (re)learn CW to get my speed up to a level beyond 5-10wpm. i have just wound a Quaker Oats box to see if I can get a crystal receiver to tune below 500KHz. It would be interesting to see what i can hear as i live almost next to a 50KW barn burner. Probably pointless but hey, it's a hobby and my spare time. If i don't try it, i will never know.

I appreciate reading you postings. i used to be a bit more serious in my high school days when i had lots of spare time. So for the meantime, serious listening is taking a back seat to solving my problems of the day.
73,
kevin
kc6pob

On Sun, Nov 29, 2020 at 7:11 PM Paul Blundell <tanger32au@...> wrote:

All hobbies have people who are involved with them to different levels, this can be anything from a casual passing interest to the other extreme where they are a major part of your life and something you see as fundamental to your life, happiness and wellbeing.

 

Over the years I have been involved in a number of hobbies, with a number of these I was involved at a high level and have seen how “seriously” some people take their hobbies.

 

This year I have really taken on the radio hobby and have focused on ultralight radio DXing, this I have found is a great fit for me. What I have found is that generally speaking, you have people who fit in to two groups, those who take on the hobby at a less serious, more casual level and those who are more serious / dedicated to their hobby with not many people who fit in between.

 

What I have noticed is that as the average age of radio DX’ers has increased and sadly with more passing on, we don’t seem to have many people coming along as “the next generation” who are willing and able to take on the hobby and see these in to the future. Those younger people generally seem to fit in to the first group.

 

How seriously do you take the radio hobby? Do you see yourself taking on a more active / driving role in the future? Where do you see the radio hobby in 10 – 20 years’ time?

 

What can we as a hobby do to keep ourselves relevant today and bring more young people in to the hobby, who will drive this going forward? I don’t have all the answers, I just don’t want to see our radio hobby die.

 

Paul

https://ultralightradiodxing.blogspot.com

 


October 2020 ACMA Data

Paul Blundell
 

The latest ACMA AM Radio Data Set is available now, this might be useful for anybody looking to ID stations.

https://www.acma.gov.au/sites/default/files/2020-11/3%20MF%20AM%20Radio%20in%20Frequency%20Order.pdf


Re: Radio Plans 2021

Paul Blundell
 

Good luck with all that Peter, we can help keep you on task.


On Tue, Dec 1, 2020 at 7:17 AM Peter Laws <plaws0@...> wrote:
On Sun, Nov 29, 2020 at 10:01 PM Paul Blundell <tanger32au@...> wrote:
>
> With the end of the year cheaping up fast, what are all of our radio plans for 2021?

I need to up my game in the sub-let's-call-it-2000-kHz spectrum.  I
will likely start with an MLA-30+ because it's easy.  Before I do
that, the 2-m and 70-cm IsoPoles need to go back up now that the
house-painting is done (it's been done a while - I am slow).

I am contemplating a Beverage or other long wire for MWDXing but the
mag loop is much more likely to actually happen given the 12456 other
unfinished projects weighing me down.  :-)   (projects like getting
the dead bands on my recently acquired Realistic DX-160 working and
figuring out how to "restore" the buttons on my Tecsun PL-606 not to
mention finishing the audio interface box for my Icom IC-910 ...)

I also need a better FM antenna both for DXing and just general tunage
in the radio room.


--
Peter Laws | N5UWY | plaws plaws net | Travel by Train!







--
Paul


Re: AM/MW daytime reception test from Echuca VIC.

Paul Blundell
 

Great loggings Dan, it is good to see what you can hear and you are right, being outside makes a huge difference.
4QD  on  1548Khz is an interesting station, earlier this year I logged it during the day time from the North West coast: https://ultralightradiodxing.blogspot.com/2020/01/logging-1548khz-4qd.html


On Mon, Nov 30, 2020 at 9:33 PM Dan Merta <dnmerta0@...> wrote:
Here's the report from the outside session of the Echuca bandscan. This time outside on the Murray River.
This will demonstrate the difference outdoors with less RF noise.

Results are as follows. 
Date 26/11/2020. Time 2.30pm 
Radio used Digitech AR-1733 barefoot no loop antennas.

549Khz 2CR fair listenable

594Khz 3WV excellent, the strongest station

621Khz 3RN excellent 

675Khz 2CO Very good

693Khz 3AW Average 

756Khz 3RN Wangaratta fair to average. With some sort of whine on this freq. I also checked with another radio (Tecsun pl-365) & the whine was there also.  

774Khz 3LO excellent 

945Khz HPON good

963Khz 2RG Weak to fair. Listenable 

1026Khz 3PB fair to average 

1071Khz 3CV average 

1089Khz 3WM good

1116Khz 3AK Weak to fair

1179Khz 3RPH Weak to fair

1224Khz 3EA Fair 

1260Khz 3SR Excellent 

1278Khz 3EE weak to fair

1314Khz 3BT fair

1332Khz 3SH Good

1377Khz 3MP weak

1422Khz HPON fair 

1503Khz 3KND fair

1521Khz 2QN Excellent 

1548Khz 4QD Faint carrier, some audible modulation. Was a surprise to log this one. Given it's easily the most distant station from my location. 

1566Khz 3NE Very faint carrier.

That's it. From the outside location many more stations were logged compared to the motel room. 

Dan.  





--
Paul


CPC Update, KSEN QSL's, Etc.

Les Rayburn
 

Quick Update From the Courtesy Program Committee: 


CPC Chairman Illness- 

On November 18, I underwent a minor surgical procedure to remove some skin cancer from my head. It was an outpatient procedure but I acquired a MSSA infection that resulted in crashing my immune system. This left me out of commission for over a week. Unfortunately, some notifications regarding the WNJC 1360 DX Tests were not relayed to the DXing community during this time, and I apologize. 

Thanks to Paul Walker, Phil Bytheway, Wayne Heinen, and others who helped to fill the void. 


WNJC 1360 DX Tests- 

John “Duke” Hamann continues to work on tuning the transmitters and antennas at WNJC during weekend overnights when their listenership is low. This is providing a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for DX’ers to log this station. Even better, he’s incorporating FT-8 mode for many of this tests since he only needs tones for his maintenance purpose. 

Duke has been kind enough to set up a Facebook Group dedicated to this continuing tests, where he also provides insights on what’s going on with the stations transmitters and antennas. This is the best source of information and updates for last minute test notifications. Check it often, especially as we approach the weekends. 

Not sure how long these will continue so get it while it’s hot! Thanks again Duke for this! 


KSEN 1150 Shelby, MT QSL’s-

My illness has also put me well behind on checking reception reports for the recent KSEN 1150 test. My apologies to all of you. Once that list is compiled, Joe Miller, KJ8O will be creating PDF QSL cards that will be e-mailed to all who were successful. It’s at the top of my “to do” list once I’m caught up at work. 

Please be patient, and don’t send duplicate reports. That only slows things down. A test report will be published soon as well. 


This is one of the most widely heard tests in years. Thanks to KSEN, Todd, and everyone involved. 

Upcoming DX Tests-

We have two pending DX Tests. Those stations are awaiting the creation of custom materials for their test which is also high on my “to-do” list. Hope to be able to announce something very soon. 



73,

Les Rayburn, N1LF
121 Mayfair Park
Maylene, AL 35114
EM63nf

NRC & IRCA Courtesy Program Committee Chairman
Member WTFDA, MWC

Perseus SDR, Elad FDM-S2 SDR, AirSpy + Discovery, SDRPlay RSP-2 Pro, Sony XDR-F1HD [XDR Guy Modified], Dennon TU-1500RD, Sangean HDT-1X, Ray Dees RDS Decoders, Korner 9.2 Antenna, FM-6 Antenna, Kitz Technologies KT-501 Pre-amps, Quantum Phaser, Wellbrook ALA1530 Loop, Wellbrook Flag, Clifton Labs Active Whip. 

“Nothing but blues and Elvis, and somebody else’s favorite song…” 


Re: Radio Plans 2021

Peter Laws
 

On Sun, Nov 29, 2020 at 10:01 PM Paul Blundell <tanger32au@gmail.com> wrote:

With the end of the year cheaping up fast, what are all of our radio plans for 2021?
I need to up my game in the sub-let's-call-it-2000-kHz spectrum. I
will likely start with an MLA-30+ because it's easy. Before I do
that, the 2-m and 70-cm IsoPoles need to go back up now that the
house-painting is done (it's been done a while - I am slow).

I am contemplating a Beverage or other long wire for MWDXing but the
mag loop is much more likely to actually happen given the 12456 other
unfinished projects weighing me down. :-) (projects like getting
the dead bands on my recently acquired Realistic DX-160 working and
figuring out how to "restore" the buttons on my Tecsun PL-606 not to
mention finishing the audio interface box for my Icom IC-910 ...)

I also need a better FM antenna both for DXing and just general tunage
in the radio room.


--
Peter Laws | N5UWY | plaws plaws net | Travel by Train!


Re: AM/MW daytime reception test from Echuca VIC.

Dan Merta
 

Here's the report from the outside session of the Echuca bandscan. This time outside on the Murray River.
This will demonstrate the difference outdoors with less RF noise.

Results are as follows. 
Date 26/11/2020. Time 2.30pm 
Radio used Digitech AR-1733 barefoot no loop antennas.

549Khz 2CR fair listenable

594Khz 3WV excellent, the strongest station

621Khz 3RN excellent 

675Khz 2CO Very good

693Khz 3AW Average 

756Khz 3RN Wangaratta fair to average. With some sort of whine on this freq. I also checked with another radio (Tecsun pl-365) & the whine was there also.  

774Khz 3LO excellent 

945Khz HPON good

963Khz 2RG Weak to fair. Listenable 

1026Khz 3PB fair to average 

1071Khz 3CV average 

1089Khz 3WM good

1116Khz 3AK Weak to fair

1179Khz 3RPH Weak to fair

1224Khz 3EA Fair 

1260Khz 3SR Excellent 

1278Khz 3EE weak to fair

1314Khz 3BT fair

1332Khz 3SH Good

1377Khz 3MP weak

1422Khz HPON fair 

1503Khz 3KND fair

1521Khz 2QN Excellent 

1548Khz 4QD Faint carrier, some audible modulation. Was a surprise to log this one. Given it's easily the most distant station from my location. 

1566Khz 3NE Very faint carrier.

That's it. From the outside location many more stations were logged compared to the motel room. 

Dan.  




Re: Radio Plans 2021

Paul Blundell
 

Good point, my recent experience with my AR-1733 dying after only 6 weeks shows that things just don't last. This is part of my reason for expanding my kit to include a few different brands.

Paul

On Mon., 30 Nov. 2020, 20:14 Michael.2E0IHW via groups.io, <blumu=btinternet.com@groups.io> wrote:
I am concerned about the longevity of modern radios
and the disincentive this entails.

There are credible insider reports of designed-in redundancy
after a certain period.  I have three which "died" prematurely,
possibly coincidences, possibly unreliable SMD components.
Dunno.

Not getting younger,  I am beginning to prefer non-UL radios
I can build or fix myself :-)

The gradual demise of AM broadcasting is another disconcerting factor.

Quo vadis, UL-dx, AM-dx, SWL?

Michael UK


On 30/11/2020 04:01, Paul Blundell wrote:
With the end of the year cheaping up fast, what are all of our radio plans for 2021?
...
- Expand my kit, I have my eye on a couple of radios.


Re: Radio Plans 2021

Michael.2E0IHW
 

I am concerned about the longevity of modern radios
and the disincentive this entails.

There are credible insider reports of designed-in redundancy
after a certain period.  I have three which "died" prematurely,
possibly coincidences, possibly unreliable SMD components.
Dunno.

Not getting younger,  I am beginning to prefer non-UL radios
I can build or fix myself :-)

The gradual demise of AM broadcasting is another disconcerting factor.

Quo vadis, UL-dx, AM-dx, SWL?

Michael UK


On 30/11/2020 04:01, Paul Blundell wrote:
With the end of the year cheaping up fast, what are all of our radio plans for 2021?
...
- Expand my kit, I have my eye on a couple of radios.


Radio Plans 2021

Paul Blundell
 

With the end of the year cheaping up fast, what are all of our radio plans for 2021?

I have a few things I want to do:

- Continue with as many of my portable ultralight radio DXing sessions as I can. While it is fairly easy to get out and about now in our Summer, it might be harder to be as motivated come Winter.

- Continue to develop my blog, creating new content and posting anything of interest to the UltraLight Radio DXing community.

- Expand my kit, I have my eye on a couple of radios.

COVID-19 has thrown a lot of plans for 2020 out the window, I know after our restrictions were lifted locally, I struggled to get back into the groove of running my portable DXing sessions, I am still struggling with this a bit.

 

 

 


Future of Radio DXing Hobby

Paul Blundell
 

All hobbies have people who are involved with them to different levels, this can be anything from a casual passing interest to the other extreme where they are a major part of your life and something you see as fundamental to your life, happiness and wellbeing.

 

Over the years I have been involved in a number of hobbies, with a number of these I was involved at a high level and have seen how “seriously” some people take their hobbies.

 

This year I have really taken on the radio hobby and have focused on ultralight radio DXing, this I have found is a great fit for me. What I have found is that generally speaking, you have people who fit in to two groups, those who take on the hobby at a less serious, more casual level and those who are more serious / dedicated to their hobby with not many people who fit in between.

 

What I have noticed is that as the average age of radio DX’ers has increased and sadly with more passing on, we don’t seem to have many people coming along as “the next generation” who are willing and able to take on the hobby and see these in to the future. Those younger people generally seem to fit in to the first group.

 

How seriously do you take the radio hobby? Do you see yourself taking on a more active / driving role in the future? Where do you see the radio hobby in 10 – 20 years’ time?

 

What can we as a hobby do to keep ourselves relevant today and bring more young people in to the hobby, who will drive this going forward? I don’t have all the answers, I just don’t want to see our radio hobby die.

 

Paul

https://ultralightradiodxing.blogspot.com

 


Long Term DX Project - 29/11/2020

Paul Blundell
 
Edited

Date: 29/11/2020
Time: 6:15pm

Location: Home, Launceston Tasmania

Notes: An early evening session. Good signals were logged on the three 50KW big guns, 3GG on 531kHz provided an average signal. The top of the band did not perform very well with signal levels being down. 2CA was MIA, the signal from this struggled.

 

FREQ

CALLSIGN

LOGGED

DATE

RADIO

AERIAL

531

3GG

AVERAGE

29/11/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL

549

2CR

POOR

29/11/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL

594

3WV

GOOD

29/11/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL

621

3RN

GOOD

29/11/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL

774

3LO

GOOD

29/11/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL

1053

2CA

UNLOGGED

29/11/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL

1179

3RPH

WEAK

29/11/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL

1341

HPON GEELONG

WEAK

29/11/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL

1422

HPON MELBOURNE

POOR

29/11/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL

1503

3KND

POOR

29/11/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL

 


Re: AM/MW daytime reception test from Echuca VIC.

Paul Blundell
 

Great report and good to hear what you were able to log.


On Sun., 29 Nov. 2020, 22:00 Dan Merta, <dnmerta0@...> wrote:
I recently went to Echuca in Victoria and did a daytime band scan inside the motel room I was staying in.
Results are as follows. 
Date 26/11/2020. Time 1.30pm 
Radio used Digitech AR-1733 barefoot no loop antennas.
In room. Some low QRM on the lower portion of the band.

549Khz 2CR poor/faint carrier

594Khz 3WV excellent, the strongest station

621Khz 3RN  Good

675Khz 2CO Fair to average

756Khz 3RN Wangaratta Fair. some QRM on freq. just listenable

774Khz 3LO Good

945Khz HPON TAB  Fair to Good

1026Khz 3PB Weak

1071Khz 3CV Weak to Fair

1089Khz 3WM Fair

1260Khz 3SR Excellent 

1314Khz 3BT Weak

1332Khz 3SH Fair

1521Khz 2QN Very Good. 

That's all for now. I did do an outside test on the Murray River. I'll post that tomorrow as it's getting late here now. 

73s  Dan. 


AM/MW daytime reception test from Echuca VIC.

Dan Merta
 

I recently went to Echuca in Victoria and did a daytime band scan inside the motel room I was staying in.
Results are as follows. 
Date 26/11/2020. Time 1.30pm 
Radio used Digitech AR-1733 barefoot no loop antennas.
In room. Some low QRM on the lower portion of the band.

549Khz 2CR poor/faint carrier

594Khz 3WV excellent, the strongest station

621Khz 3RN  Good

675Khz 2CO Fair to average

756Khz 3RN Wangaratta Fair. some QRM on freq. just listenable

774Khz 3LO Good

945Khz HPON TAB  Fair to Good

1026Khz 3PB Weak

1071Khz 3CV Weak to Fair

1089Khz 3WM Fair

1260Khz 3SR Excellent 

1314Khz 3BT Weak

1332Khz 3SH Fair

1521Khz 2QN Very Good. 

That's all for now. I did do an outside test on the Murray River. I'll post that tomorrow as it's getting late here now. 

73s  Dan. 


Re: Test bench

Jorge Garzón
 

That's great Paul! Waiting for it! 
73's

Jorge Garzón (EB7EFA · EA1036 SWL) 
QTH: IN83ag / 43º15' N · 03º56' W
Urb. San Roque 95, casa 5 (Villasevil)
39698 Santiurde de Toranzo (ESPAÑA - SPAIN)
..................................................................................
Blog: IberiaDX  · Twitter: @IberiaDX


En domingo, 29 de noviembre de 2020 00:47:38 CET, Paul Blundell <tanger32au@...> escribió:


That sounds like a great idea. I am planning a portable shootout, once my newest ones arrive.

Paul

On Sun., 29 Nov. 2020, 00:26 Jorge Garzón via groups.io, <iberiaDX=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi...
I would like to start a new section in the blog call 'Test Bench' where I will test portables, UL and similar receivers. I will focus on empiric testing instead to analyze their technical specifications. BTW today's tech info included, together with manuals and directions, are extremely poor most of the times. 

So, I would like to standardize some testings and would like to hear suggestions, if any. 

BANDS GO BE TESTED
Medium Wave and FM (VHF Band II)
(*) - If any other usable band would be included and test it.

FEATURES
Year of appearance, versions, weigth, size, robustness, portability, plug-ins, buttons and prices.

SITES
A. QTH, at home, with unavoidable noise, under real conditions. The receiver response will be better or worse depending on each one's conditions. 
B. Portable, in the field. More or less an ideal site QRM free to check receiver's features. I will do it close at home (pic-nic area at about 300 m away). 

Daylight tests (Ground wave) 
1. Selectivity. With two local stations aside, check filter effectiveness (adjacent QRM and splatter.) 
2. Sensitivity. Tuning in to far and weak signals, the weakest and furthest, the better.
3. Stations nulling. Rejection capacity with ferrite and/or whip. 
4. External antenna. How the receiver performs with an external loop, vertical or small aerials connected. (by induction or direct connection). 

Nighttime (Sky wave)
5. Stations nulling. Rejection capacity with ferrite and/or whip. 
6. QRM Inmunnity (There are more QRM sources at night that can be transmitted and received, affecting to listening conditions). 

Other
7. Audio quality. 
8. Ease of use.

What do you think about it?

73!


Jorge Garzón (EB7EFA · EA1036 SWL) 
QTH: IN83ag / 43º15' N · 03º56' W
Urb. San Roque 95, casa 5 (Villasevil)
39698 Santiurde de Toranzo (ESPAÑA - SPAIN)
..................................................................................
Blog: IberiaDX  · Twitter: @IberiaDX

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