Date   

Re: Building a FSL antenna

Jorge Garzón
 

Well, finally I would like to build a 3'5" FSL antenna and I would like some easy advice. 

1. How many ferriterods do I need for 10mm thick rods? 
2. I have seen 10 cm long, 12 or 14 cm long. Any advice of this? 
3. I have discovered some suppliers. Preferences? 
a) https://www.rapidonline.com/Electrical-Power/100 mm-Ferrariite-Rod-Aerial-88-3098
b) https://www.ebay.com/itm/6-pcs-Ferrite-Rod-NiZn-8-x-125mm-for-Amateur-and-Crystal-Radio-Coils-AM-SW-USSR/202472305698?_trkparms=aid=555021&algo=PL.SIMRVI&ao=1&asc=225086&meid=e016db1db03d403397c81ab528bbeeff&pid=100752&rk=2&rkt=8&mehot=ag&sd=124092146554&itm=202472305698&pmt=1&noa=0&pg=2047675&algv=SimplRVIAMLv5WebWithPLRVIOnTopCombiner&_trksid=p2047675.c100752.m1982&redirect=mobile
c) Any other supplier? 

Thank you in advance! 

Jorge Garzón Gutiérrez "IberiaDX" 
(EB7EFA · EA1036 SWL · BDXC Member 1409) 
QTH: IN83ag / 43º15' N · 03º56' W
Urb. San Roque 95, casa 5 (Villasevil)
39698 Santiurde de Toranzo (ESPAÑA - SPAIN)
..................................................................................
Blog: IberiaDX  · Twitter: @IberiaDX


En sábado, 14 de noviembre de 2020 16:56:28 CET, Jorge Garzón via groups.io <iberiadx@...> escribió:


Maybe there is a post (or several) regarding this but I have some questions that I would like to share with you:

1. The core of the FSL, has to be foamed or can be just a non conductive cylinder-shaped object? What about PVC?
2. I am interested in NDB and MW band, so my interest would be from 150 to 1750 (more or less). Which kind of variable capacitor do I need? I know it depend on the diameter of the aerial. Maybe a 3" baby loop or even a 5" are suitable for me as a first project. My portables are DEGEN DE1103 and Tecsun PL-330. 
3. Is it possible avoid the variable capacitor adding a pre-amp to get a broadband FSL?

I am thinking to purchase ferrites in the same place where Graham (Maynard) got the ones he used. Any other suggestion?

Thank you very much in advance!

--
Jorge Garzón (EB7EFA · EA1036 SWL) 
QTH: IN83ag / 43º15' N · 03º56' W
Urb. San Roque 95, casa 5 (Villasevil)
39698 Santiurde de Toranzo (ESPAÑA - SPAIN)
..................................................................................
Blog: IberiaDX  · Twitter: @IberiaDX


Re: FM Aerials

K7DWI Art
 

Good morning all from the great Northwest (Oregon).
I have been FM/TVing for decades.  But, I spend my time as a Ham.
All I can say say is, "Keep It Simple!".
For portable FM DXing, a simple set of TV Rabbit Ears measured to your frequency works great and better than anything.
You can pick up Es and Tropo and null out locals.
Attached...
A simple demo: 
https://youtu.be/69Hz1wwREFg
SASE Measurements of Rabbit Ears by Frequency
Dipole Length FMBC Attached 

73 Art K7DWI


Re: FM Aerials

Jorge Garzón
 

Hi Paul,
What's your main proposal? A local bandscan? As many stations the best? Get unusual ones? Most of the times, at least in VHF, the goal is the main clue on how to choose the aerial. A local bandscan can get the best results just using your car radio (as antenna+receiver system is probably the most efficient system to monitor the band). Most of the times I use a 5 el yagi to get the best when the Tropo or Es season start. A yagi antenna also serves me to avoid some azimuths in which I am not interested in or are where my usual stations are.

A 5 elements mounted yagi does not fit in a car so I take it on the roof or to put it in I fold one of the halves of each element, as I can loose screws and wing nuts. The dipole can be also separated easily. A 5 element yagi allows you to manage the size quickly and depending of its design, gives you a very good gain in one half of the band while decreases at the other half. Mine, with 158 cm boom is great from 87,5 to 96, good from 96 to 100 MHz and even shows an inverse gain from 104 to 108 MHz. This wouldn't happen with a longer boom, say 200 cm), but would be much more tedious to manage as now I have a very good aerial system (antenna, telescopic pole, pole base and quick guy ropes attachments). I can be operative in just 10 minutes.

I have a 5 el yagi similar to the one showed in the Czech link that gave you, and also hava another 5 el yagi (Antiference) both with very good results. VHF Band II yagis are becoming rarer and are disappearing quickly from stores. DIY projects are easy to face and usually give very good results.

Elevation is not as critical for Band II as it is for 2m VHF 144 / 432 MHz when conditions are good. For hams mountains are real walls but for FM'ers they can be very good allied!

73!



Re: FM Aerials

Russ Edmunds
 

I think it depends on what radio you'll be using. Since you're asking the question, I'll presume that the radio you'll use has an external antenna connection.

Height and avoidance of obvious horizon blockage due to hills or structures are a good start.

A dipole is a bit difficult to work with but it can be done. If I have to choose between a dipole and rabbit ears, I'll go with the latter. For your purpose, a small collapsible FM yagi seems best - perhaps 4 or 6 elements. Then you can mount that to a short mast and anchor it with a portable tripod or even a concrete block. For portable work manual rotation is fine. I don't know what's available there, but to give you an idea, attached is some info on one I've used with some success - it's lightweight, but not to the point of being fragile.



From: main@UltralightDX.groups.io <main@UltralightDX.groups.io> on behalf of Dave Hascall via groups.io <dhinfomedia@...>
Sent: Thursday, December 10, 2020 9:24 AM
To: main@UltralightDX.groups.io <main@UltralightDX.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [UltralightDX] FM Aerials
 
Hi Paul.

Are you DXing for Es, tropo, or just doing a bandscan? If it's the last two, elevation is key. I know a lot of 6 meter hams will climb fire towers, hills, parking garages, and so on to get an advantage in terms of elevation.  Sporadic E doesn't need so much elevation.  Good luck.

73,
Dave in Indy (Noblesville)


Re: FM Aerials

Dave Hascall
 

Hi Paul.

Are you DXing for Es, tropo, or just doing a bandscan? If it's the last two, elevation is key. I know a lot of 6 meter hams will climb fire towers, hills, parking garages, and so on to get an advantage in terms of elevation.  Sporadic E doesn't need so much elevation.  Good luck.

73,
Dave in Indy (Noblesville)


Re: FM Aerials

Paul Blundell
 

They both look like good options, I will see if I can find anything like this locally.


On Thu., 10 Dec. 2020, 20:20 Marc Coevoet, <sintsixtus@...> wrote:
Op 10/12/2020 om 05:53 schreef Paul Blundell:
> Over the upcoming Christmas break I am looking at undertaking some
> portable FM dxing, given the success of the various FSL aerial for the
> mediumwave band, what would work the best on the FM band? I have found
> some instructions for various FM dipoles, would a look work this high?
>
> Paul


I have compared this with the Antiference Fm yagi, and it looks the best
for 106.2 here .  One of the last places to buy in Europe is ..

https://www.wifi-shop.cz/fm-antenna-iskra-fm-50-f_d10791.html?action=setcursetlng&lngid=1&curid=14

https://www.amazon.co.uk/ANTIFERENCE-Aerial-1085-Element-Boxed/dp/B00BDIVCGE


Marc
--
The "Penguin" has arrived - and he's not going away - ever.
For former Apple users: Xubuntu.org (menu's up left)
For former Windows users: Lubuntu.org (menu's down left)






Re: FM Aerials

Marc Coevoet
 

Op 10/12/2020 om 05:53 schreef Paul Blundell:
Over the upcoming Christmas break I am looking at undertaking some portable FM dxing, given the success of the various FSL aerial for the mediumwave band, what would work the best on the FM band? I have found some instructions for various FM dipoles, would a look work this high?
Paul

I have compared this with the Antiference Fm yagi, and it looks the best for 106.2 here . One of the last places to buy in Europe is ..

https://www.wifi-shop.cz/fm-antenna-iskra-fm-50-f_d10791.html?action=setcursetlng&lngid=1&curid=14

https://www.amazon.co.uk/ANTIFERENCE-Aerial-1085-Element-Boxed/dp/B00BDIVCGE


Marc
--
The "Penguin" has arrived - and he's not going away - ever.
For former Apple users: Xubuntu.org (menu's up left)
For former Windows users: Lubuntu.org (menu's down left)


Re: FM Aerials

Paul Blundell
 

Thanks for the ideas. I might see what I can find locally.


On Thu., 10 Dec. 2020, 18:03 kevin asato via groups.io, <kc6pob=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Not too portable but i have used an old log periodic style television antenna (US market) which tuned down to 56MHz and up through UHF. it helps receiving signals up and down the coast from the Los Angeles coastline (San Diego to Ventura). The problem is that the very high mountains around Los Angeles do not allow much more to leak in as FM broadcast is a bit more line of sight. As I live near the coastline, i do experience some interesting ducting effects at times. During those times, a half or 5/8 wave 2 meter vertical antenna works well.
73,
kevin
kc6pob

On Wednesday, December 9, 2020, 09:12:47 PM PST, Paul Blundell <tanger32au@...> wrote:


Over the upcoming Christmas break I am looking at undertaking some portable FM dxing, given the success of the various FSL aerial for the mediumwave band, what would work the best on the FM band? I have found some instructions for various FM dipoles, would a look work this high?

Paul


Re: FM Aerials

Paul Blundell
 

Thanks. I have used that software before, I will download it and have a play around.


On Thu., 10 Dec. 2020, 17:55 Phillips, <phillicom@...> wrote:
You are dipping into the black-magic world of antennas here.


Commercial FM frequencies are line-of-sight and so antenna height is a DX advantage.

There are few high-gain portable FM options other than Yagi antennas.

Yagi antennas are highly reliant on the physical dimensions of the length and spacing of the antenna elements.
These dimensions are commensurate with the frequency of interest and most Yagi's are half a wavelength wide and probably a bit longer depending on a number of antenna parameters - and that's where the black-magic comes in.

While it is possible to use some jiggery-pokery to reduce a Yagi's physical dimensions, the antenna performance invariably suffers.

A Yagi's gain is dependent on many variables but, aside from the length of the elements, the number of elements have a great importance in antenna gain and antenna directionality.  However, as the number of elements rise, the increase in performance diminishes. 

For serious portable use,  I would suggest the best compromise of size and performance is 5 elements - 1 reflector, 1 active, and 3 directors. Such an antenna for the commercial FM band is unlikely to fit in a car and would need to be carried on roof racks.

You can get Yagi designs off the 'net (make sure the design is for your frequencies of interest).

You can use MMana-gal software (free and very good) to design your own or to model designs of interest.

Warning!!  Antenna design is addictive!


From: main@UltralightDX.groups.io <main@UltralightDX.groups.io> on behalf of Paul Blundell <tanger32au@...>
Sent: Thursday, 10 December 2020 3:23 PM
To: main@UltralightDX.groups.io <main@UltralightDX.groups.io>
Subject: [UltralightDX] FM Aerials
 
Over the upcoming Christmas break I am looking at undertaking some portable FM dxing, given the success of the various FSL aerial for the mediumwave band, what would work the best on the FM band? I have found some instructions for various FM dipoles, would a look work this high?

Paul


Re: FM Aerials

kevin asato <kc6pob@...>
 


Not too portable but i have used an old log periodic style television antenna (US market) which tuned down to 56MHz and up through UHF. it helps receiving signals up and down the coast from the Los Angeles coastline (San Diego to Ventura). The problem is that the very high mountains around Los Angeles do not allow much more to leak in as FM broadcast is a bit more line of sight. As I live near the coastline, i do experience some interesting ducting effects at times. During those times, a half or 5/8 wave 2 meter vertical antenna works well.
73,
kevin
kc6pob

On Wednesday, December 9, 2020, 09:12:47 PM PST, Paul Blundell <tanger32au@...> wrote:


Over the upcoming Christmas break I am looking at undertaking some portable FM dxing, given the success of the various FSL aerial for the mediumwave band, what would work the best on the FM band? I have found some instructions for various FM dipoles, would a look work this high?

Paul


Re: FM Aerials

Phillips
 

You are dipping into the black-magic world of antennas here.


Commercial FM frequencies are line-of-sight and so antenna height is a DX advantage.

There are few high-gain portable FM options other than Yagi antennas.

Yagi antennas are highly reliant on the physical dimensions of the length and spacing of the antenna elements.
These dimensions are commensurate with the frequency of interest and most Yagi's are half a wavelength wide and probably a bit longer depending on a number of antenna parameters - and that's where the black-magic comes in.

While it is possible to use some jiggery-pokery to reduce a Yagi's physical dimensions, the antenna performance invariably suffers.

A Yagi's gain is dependent on many variables but, aside from the length of the elements, the number of elements have a great importance in antenna gain and antenna directionality.  However, as the number of elements rise, the increase in performance diminishes. 

For serious portable use,  I would suggest the best compromise of size and performance is 5 elements - 1 reflector, 1 active, and 3 directors. Such an antenna for the commercial FM band is unlikely to fit in a car and would need to be carried on roof racks.

You can get Yagi designs off the 'net (make sure the design is for your frequencies of interest).

You can use MMana-gal software (free and very good) to design your own or to model designs of interest.

Warning!!  Antenna design is addictive!


From: main@UltralightDX.groups.io <main@UltralightDX.groups.io> on behalf of Paul Blundell <tanger32au@...>
Sent: Thursday, 10 December 2020 3:23 PM
To: main@UltralightDX.groups.io <main@UltralightDX.groups.io>
Subject: [UltralightDX] FM Aerials
 
Over the upcoming Christmas break I am looking at undertaking some portable FM dxing, given the success of the various FSL aerial for the mediumwave band, what would work the best on the FM band? I have found some instructions for various FM dipoles, would a look work this high?

Paul


FM Aerials

Paul Blundell
 

Over the upcoming Christmas break I am looking at undertaking some portable FM dxing, given the success of the various FSL aerial for the mediumwave band, what would work the best on the FM band? I have found some instructions for various FM dipoles, would a look work this high?

Paul


FM Loggings - 8/12/2020

Paul Blundell
 

Radio: Digitech AR-1733 

Aerial: Inbuilt Whip

Location:Home, Launceston Tasmania. 

Time: 20:30

FREQUENCY

CALLSIGN

87.6

TOTE SPORT RADIO

89.3

LA FM

90.1

CHILLI FM

90.9

TRIPLE J

91.7

ABC NORTHERN TASMANIA

92.5

ABC NEWS RADIO

93.3

ABC CLASSIC FM

94.1

ABC RADIO NATIONAL

95.3

TAMAR FM

96.5

CITY PARK RADIO

96.9

MEANDER VALLEY FM

98.1

WAY FM

100.3

LA FM (CBD TRANSLATOR)

101.1

CHILLI FM (CBD TRANSLATOR

102.7

ABC NORTHERN TASMANIA (TRANSLATOR)

103.7

CITY PARK RADIO

105.3

WAY FM

106.9

RPH LAUNCESTON


https://ultralightradiodxing.blogspot.com/2020/12/fm-loggings-8122020.html


File /2 General Information/Tas_FMBCB_Dec2020.pdf uploaded #file-notice

main@UltralightDX.groups.io Notification <noreply@...>
 

The following files have been uploaded to the Files area of the main@UltralightDX.groups.io group.

By: Paul Blundell

Description:
Tasmanian FM BCB - Export ACAM Database - December 2020


Re: Local Power Lines and DXing

Paul Blundell
 

Thanks Phil.

I think your experience is much the same as everybody else, with more and more RF noise coming from everyday appliances.

Paul

On Tue, Dec 8, 2020 at 2:18 AM Phillip Fimiani via groups.io <myamiphil=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I've had several interesting investigative challenges since moving into my new house. Its loaded of course with lots of QRM. Even in the audio range. I once chased an intermittent alarm after moths only to find out it was my weather radio out in the garage! (a std weekly test!).

Or a refrigerator and a small freezer that lays against the wall and vibrates when it shuts down and you here it in the walls!!

But radio wise QRM is rampant. Anything with a wall wart or even a power supply is suspect. I have switched to LED lamps in the house for energy savings, but even the old halogens under the kitchen cabinets are noisy! Then you have the computer controlled appliances, stoves, ovens, washers, dryers.  Unless the product has a CE approval or the later UL 544 compliance etc, its going to be a noise source. And many cheap products fall into that category.

There was an issue a while back with industrial grade grow lamps. Being in an industrial area, it didn't matter. But when people started buying them to grow there "plants" at home, they were horrible RF radiators, and the FCC and the DEA didn't have a hard time finding the illegal culprits!

Then you have the power line carrier transmissions! Not the power itself, but the digital information it carries! Ask any techy in England. I don't know about the rest of Europe. But here too, my electric meter is remote read, another PLC.

Recently the town just installed an improved remote reader for my water meter. We have drive by meter readings... A little antenna now sticks out of the buried water meter!

My power lines are buried, as are any new housing development. Along with every other service coming to the house. Then there's the sprinkler system and its controller for the lawn...

My 2 HVAC heat pumps in the attic where I want to put my antennas for transmit (QRP) and receive...

The list goes on and on...

But the large AC power transformer locations are not near me, except of course for the transformer in my front yard! (;-(. I'm not so much concerned about the local QRM as I am about the house QRM. Maybe smaller in energy but more stronger and annoying to my listening.

Someday I'll make a DF antenna and search my property... LOLOL.. Ill have to buy up lots of ferrite beads!

Mortimer says "Stay Safe"
Best Regards
Phil
KD2HTN / WA2069SWL
Long: 34.210293 Lat:-78.057048
FM04xf 30dl
______________________________



On Monday, December 7, 2020, 6:34:50 AM EST, radiojayallen <radiojayallen@...> wrote:


Yes, you can walk around your neighborhood and listen. And driving around you will hear how the noise from overhead lines varies. Living in an area with underground utilities is the best scenario and I have been lucky enough to have that both in my old home and in the new one.

I do have one strange noise source in my new house I haven't figured out yet but luckily it is infrequent. On parts of the AM band I will hear a squeal which almost totally blanks out medium strength stations on 590 and 630 KHz but it only seems to happen once or perhaps twice a day for about 2 minutes. Some days I never hear it. Makes it tough to isolate...really odd though.

--
73
Phil
KD2HTN / WA2069SWL
Long: 34.210293 Lat:-78.057048
FM04xf 30dl



--
Paul


Re: The RADIOWOW R-108 is in the Amazon Prime-Day deals for $41.57

Paul Blundell
 

Thanks for the update, it sounds like it is working fairly well for you.

Paul

On Tue, Dec 8, 2020 at 1:57 AM Gary Sargent <GarySargent@...> wrote:

[Edited Message Follows]

I did order an R-108 on the Amazon Prime day price. I just received it this morning and I'm beginning to evaluate it. I noticed an earlier message thread on the warranty offered by 'RadioWow' on the radio as being essentially worthless. NO real surprise there on any low to moderate priced items from China as being essentially throwaway items.

Due to the covid situation, Amazon has extended the return time frame for purchases until 1/31/21. So I have basically a 90 day plus warranty time period on the radio!

My 30 minute impression of the R-108. Speaker output sounds very good for a tiny radio. Good volume. FM sensitivity seems typical for DSP radios these days. AM reception here (daytime) also seems typical. The radio looks to be solidly constructed. Looks to be a keeper so far. 

Update:
  • I did a middle of night casual comparison of the R-108 with my CountyComm GP5 (aka PL365) on 6 or 8 weak AM BCB signals. The R108 was more listenable in all cases. The sensitivity seems a little better on the R108 and the audio was definitely more listenable compared to the GP5. I suspect this is due to the superior speaker and better audio processing so far as suppressing the hissy noise that was more prominent on the GP5.
  • My 'ATS' AM BCB scan found 70 stations. Perhaps 10 or 12 were not listenable and I easily deleted a few. A deleted memory essentially leaves an empty channel in the middle of the full memories. I would prefer that the R108 would automatically 'squash' the memory channel's to eliminate the empty memories or just sorted the memories by the frequency. (People who maintain a memory reference sheet would not want this!) 
  • The tuning knob as two selectable speeds. The actual control takes a little force to rotate from one detent to the next.. Not really stiff but far from being able to 'spin the tuning dial' 
  • The supplied user manual looks to be complete and well written.
  • As of today, 10/18/20, there is a $10 off coupon on the R108 on Amazon .. making the price to be $41.97 .. which is just pennies more that the Prime day price.

Update #2 The battery life is on the order of 8 to 10 hours of listening time. My R108 seems to also draw some level of current when not even on such that it will slowly drain the battery on it's own. This is a minor inconvenience. Overall, a nice solid little radio that works well for general usage.

KE8WO



--
Paul


Re: TEAC PR130 V Digitech AR-1733 - Head to Head Testing - December 2020

Paul Blundell
 

Hi Tom,


For me it is not as easy to use and being slightly larger (taking 4 x AA's and having SSB mode) it is not quite an Ultralight radio. Still it is a good value radio for what it is.

Paul

On Mon, Dec 7, 2020 at 11:00 PM hamrad45 <hamrad@...> wrote:
Awesome review.  When I did a search for the 1733, I found the 1780 which looks very interesting.  Have tested it?

Have a great day,

Tom Stiles (hamrad88 - YouTube)



--
Paul


Re: Local Power Lines and DXing

Paul Blundell
 

Back in the early to mid 2000's here they were trying BPL, I know some of the local amateurs kicked up about it and it was stopped. Now we have the MTM NBN, those of us who have fibre are in a much better position than those who don't.

Paul

On Mon, Dec 7, 2020 at 10:47 PM Michael.2E0IHW via groups.io <blumu=btinternet.com@groups.io> wrote:
We are in rural SW England and  have overhead power and telephone lines,
the latter swamping HF reception with VDSL outspew.

Recently, a new 11kV-230V transformer was installed in the adjacent field.
Even before our houses were re-connected, QRM jumped up to about S6-7.
In the 8 hours without mains power, noise was S1.
(The friendly chaps also put their digger shovel through our water-supply pipe...)

Michael UK

On 07/12/2020 11:34, radiojayallen wrote:
Yes, you can walk around your neighborhood and listen.
And driving around you will hear how the noise from overhead lines varies.
...

  



--
Paul


Re: Sangean DT-250 review

Peter Laws
 

On Mon, Dec 7, 2020 at 3:50 AM Jorge Garzón via groups.io
<iberiaDX=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

I have made my first review of an ULR receiver, the Sangean DT-250. Can be seen here: https://youtu.be/BABe620f-3M

It's in Spanish, and could also be used to get better Spanish language skills for DXers abroad.

¡Buen DX!

Gracias! I didn't realize this was AM/FM only. Nice little radio.




--
Peter Laws | N5UWY | plaws plaws net | Travel by Train!


Re: Local Power Lines and DXing

Paul Blundell
 

Those "odd" signals are really hard to track down, I am going to catalogue everything in my house and see what are the main problem devices.

Paul 

On Mon, Dec 7, 2020 at 10:34 PM radiojayallen <radiojayallen@...> wrote:
Yes, you can walk around your neighborhood and listen. And driving around you will hear how the noise from overhead lines varies. Living in an area with underground utilities is the best scenario and I have been lucky enough to have that both in my old home and in the new one.

I do have one strange noise source in my new house I haven't figured out yet but luckily it is infrequent. On parts of the AM band I will hear a squeal which almost totally blanks out medium strength stations on 590 and 630 KHz but it only seems to happen once or perhaps twice a day for about 2 minutes. Some days I never hear it. Makes it tough to isolate...really odd though.



--
Paul

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