Date   

FM Station # 2,000 Logged....Did John have anything to do with this?????

robert ross
 

Hi Guys:

This is a Little Off topic.......but is one of those Truth is Stranger than Fiction things!!

At 2300 EDT tonight I logged my 2,000th FM Station ....(NOT on ULRS!!). It only took me 34 Years to accomplish this!! HAHAHAHA......

Our ULR Co-Founder and Good Friend, John Bryant and I had exchanged several Emails about my FM Dxing during the AM BCB Off Season, and he knew I was working my way to # 2,000 and would probably hit it sometime this Summer.

Well...tonight was the night, and where do you think # 2,000 was from????

Oklahoma City.....about 100 Miles South of where John used to Live!!!

The Station I logged was.......

101.9 KTST "The Twister" Oklahoma City, OKLA 100 KW. Logged by E-Skip Propagation.

John...if you had anything to do with this Logging for #2,000....Thanks Buddy!!

73.....ROB VA3SW

Robert S. Ross
London, Ontario CANADA


Re: FM Station # 2,000 Logged....Did John have anything to do ...

Gary DeBock
 

Hi Rob,
 
Congratulations on FM station #2000 (KTST-101.9)... from Oklahoma! That certainly has a special meaning. 
 
I know how you feel about John-- he was just starting to show interest in FM-DXing, mostly because of your great E-skip success. Despite his decades of DXing knowledge and experience, John was always willing to try something new, and discover a new way to enjoy the hobby. One of my biggest thrills was developing the E100 Slider loopstick antenna together with him, and watching it become popular with various DXers. John took special pride in the growing popularity of the Ultralightdx group, and how it was bringing new enthusiasm into the AM-DXing hobby.
 
Before long I'll be heading to Grayland to chase DU's, the first summer in 3 years that Guy Atkins and I won't be able to coordinate DXpedition times with John at the Grayland Motel. I'm sure that both of us will still need a while to get used to the new situation.
 
73, Gary  
 

In a message dated 6/19/2010 8:55:11 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, va3sw@... writes:
 

Hi Guys:

This is a Little Off topic.......but is one of those Truth is
Stranger than Fiction things!!

At 2300 EDT tonight I logged my 2,000th FM Station ....(NOT on ULRS!!).
It only took me 34 Years to accomplish this!! HAHAHAHA......

Our ULR Co-Founder and Good Friend, John Bryant and I had exchanged
several Emails about my FM Dxing during the AM BCB Off Season, and he
knew I was working my way to # 2,000 and would probably hit it sometime
this Summer.

Well...tonight was the night, and where do you think # 2,000 was from????

Oklahoma City.....about 100 Miles South of where John used to Live!!!

The Station I logged was.......

101.9 KTST "The Twister" Oklahoma City, OKLA 100 KW. Logged by E-Skip
Propagation.

John...if you had anything to do with this Logging for #2,000....Thanks
Buddy!!

73.....ROB VA3SW

Robert S. Ross
London, Ontario CANADA


Re: E-skip reception 6/18/10

bbwrwy
 

John:

The skip faded out here before 2200 EDT. I considered WJIS, but I also found WPIR, Hickory NC, was also "Joy FM".

Right now (1042 EDT), I'm receiving Canadian TV on channel on the Sony Watchman receiver. I guess that means the grass won't get cut today!

Good DX.

Richard.


Re: E-skip reception 6/18/10

Pilgrimway <jcereghin@...>
 

Richard,

The 6/18 Es was a MONSTER here on the East Coast with some DXers getting skip as late as 3 AM! I bagged 9 new stations from 8 states myself well past 11 PM. I didn't use any ultralights for most of the event. By the time I dug out my PL310, just a few Florida stations were in weakly, so I don't really have a UL FM report from yesterday.

Your unidentified on 88.1 Joy FM may be WJIS in Bradenton FL. They are an Es pest here when Florida is coming in.

John Cereghin
Smyrna DE

--- In ultralightdx@..., "RichardA" <richarda@...> wrote:

Sporadic E openings have been rare here so far this season. However, today there was a good opening lasting until mid-evening local time. Reception of Mexican TV signals up through channel six began early this morning and lasted until early evening. There is nothing better than watching a World Cup match on Mexican TV. They know how to enjoy the game.

Because the signals are analog I resurrected my ultra light Sony FD2A Watchman receiver from the 1980's. It was fun to again be able to watch the tiny TV set with its two-inch black and white picture.

I was able to log several new FM stations using a barefoot Tecsun PL-360 as follows:

1627 EDT 88.1 MHz KHOY, Laredo TX (1004 km/624 mi)
1640 89.1 XHCAO, Reynosa TM
1901 88.1 Unid. NPR (either WRJA, Sumter SC, or WUBJ, Jamestown NY, as they are the only two stations on 88.1 carrying "Fresh Air" at this time)
1948 88.1 Unid. "The Joy FM"
1958 92.1 CKPC, Brantford ON, "The Jewel" (1646 km/1023 mi)
2012 92.7 CJBX, London ON, "BX93" (1573 km/978 mi)
2029 92.9 WIKX, Charlotte Harbor FL, "Kix Country" (1780 km/1106 mi)
2037 93.1 WNTQ, Syracuse NY, "93Q" (1965 km/1221 mi)
2046 93.1 WPAW, Winston-Salem, "The Wolf" (1564 km/972 mi)
2123 92.3 WKRR, Ashboro NC, "Rock 92" (1580 km/982 mi)
2144 95.5 WFGI, Johnstown PA (1664 km/1034 mi)

I hope the other FM DXers among our little group had a better time.

Richard.

Richard Allen
36°22'51"N /97°26'35"W
(near Perry OK USA)


E-skip reception 6/18/10

bbwrwy
 

Sporadic E openings have been rare here so far this season. However, today there was a good opening lasting until mid-evening local time. Reception of Mexican TV signals up through channel six began early this morning and lasted until early evening. There is nothing better than watching a World Cup match on Mexican TV. They know how to enjoy the game.

Because the signals are analog I resurrected my ultra light Sony FD2A Watchman receiver from the 1980's. It was fun to again be able to watch the tiny TV set with its two-inch black and white picture.

I was able to log several new FM stations using a barefoot Tecsun PL-360 as follows:

1627 EDT 88.1 MHz KHOY, Laredo TX (1004 km/624 mi)
1640 89.1 XHCAO, Reynosa TM
1901 88.1 Unid. NPR (either WRJA, Sumter SC, or WUBJ, Jamestown NY, as they are the only two stations on 88.1 carrying "Fresh Air" at this time)
1948 88.1 Unid. "The Joy FM"
1958 92.1 CKPC, Brantford ON, "The Jewel" (1646 km/1023 mi)
2012 92.7 CJBX, London ON, "BX93" (1573 km/978 mi)
2029 92.9 WIKX, Charlotte Harbor FL, "Kix Country" (1780 km/1106 mi)
2037 93.1 WNTQ, Syracuse NY, "93Q" (1965 km/1221 mi)
2046 93.1 WPAW, Winston-Salem, "The Wolf" (1564 km/972 mi)
2123 92.3 WKRR, Ashboro NC, "Rock 92" (1580 km/982 mi)
2144 95.5 WFGI, Johnstown PA (1664 km/1034 mi)

I hope the other FM DXers among our little group had a better time.

Richard.

Richard Allen
36°22'51"N /97°26'35"W
(near Perry OK USA)


Re: upcoming shootout - DSPs immune to overload or not? (Re: K...

Gary DeBock
 

Hi Stephen,
 
All of the Shootouts are conducted in my generous back yard in the valley part of Puyallup, WA, a location about 6 miles from salt water Puget Sound. This is a typical suburban RF environment, with the usual mix of a few local mega-pests combined with many moderately irritating urban (Seattle) sloppers.
 
KSUH-1450 (a Korean-language station cited by the FCC for poor tower maintenance) is about 3 miles away, and covers a huge part of the AM band on Ultralights with poor selectivity (SRF-M37V, etc.). In the very early days of the ULR boom, I was sure I had logged 1566-HLAZ (Korea) on the barefoot SRF-M37V shortly after local midnight... until I followed the Korean-language program all the way back to KSUH-1450 :-) The station can be nulled at night, however, on ULR's with 1 kHz DSP selectivity like the PL-380. The same ULR's can receive 1460-KARR in Kirkland, WA during the daytime-- a superb show of sharp selectivity.
 
There is a 10kw IBOC monstrosity in Tacoma only about 5 miles from here (KHHO-850) which covers 830-870 kHz in the daytime, but is not bad at night (apparently protecting Denver, which is in the same SE direction as my location). KKOL-1300 is a major 50 kw daytime pest only about 7 miles from here, and usually wipes out 1290-1310 kHz, except on the 1 kHz DSP Ultralights.
 
It would be nice to run a few comparison tests close to the 50 kw pests, Stephen, but the Shootouts are really only designed to give "relative" performance information on how the ULR's compare with each other. Here in the Puyallup suburban environment, all the models are tested for relative AM sensitivity, selectivity, nulling ability, spurs/defects, etc., and the top models always have a decent opportunity to excel in each category. The relative performance results would probably not change, even adjacent to 50 kw sloppers. Regarding your individual PL-380 unit's adjacent-channel rejection, my own impression (along with that of Scott, and others who have analyzed your situation) is that the model is probably defective. A normal PL-380 should provide excellent 1 kHz DSP selectivity to limit the splatter from local pests, and if you are not satisfied, I would certainly recommend replacement of the model.
 
For those interested in the detailed Shootout radio reviews from previous seasons, links are provided below.
 
73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA)
 
 
December 2007 "Round One" Shootout  http://www.dxer.ca/latest/56-ultralight-radio-am-dx-shootout-round-one  (SRF-59, SRF-M37V, DT-200VX, ICF-S10Mk2)
 
2008 Spring Shootout  http://www.mediafire.com/?zijl1lqtznn  (SRF-T615, SRF-39FP, DT-180V, DT-210V, C.Crane SWP
 
2008 Summertime Shootout  http://www.mediafire.com/?2t5godzzyaw  (SRF-M97, SRF-S84, E100, DT-400W, SRF-M37W
 
2009 Shootout  http://www.mediafire.com/?nokcjzwtyzt  (DE1123, R911, R9012, PL-300WT/ G8, D92L, D96L, C.Crane SWP)
 
 
 
 
           
 

In a message dated 6/18/2010 3:03:02 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time, pianoplayer88key@... writes:
 



Gary, when you do the shootouts, where approximately do you do them? From your home in/near Puyallup, or near Grayland, or somewhere else?
Also besides testing adjacent-channel selectivity, do you test for other evidence of overloading on radios, like desensitization or blocking, besides just harmonics and spurious/mixed images/intermodulation? On my own PL-380, I live in a place where the RSSI on some stations exceeds 35-40dBu even 20-30kHz away from a strong station's frequency, and is generally at least 30dBu in blank channels over most of the band. Also I'm often in places where the RSSI in the blank channels can touch 50dBu over a portion of the band due to a very strong local. (By comparison, in rural areas, or if the radio is in a shielded enclosure, the RSSI is 15dBu on the blank channels, and I've often had readable stations indicating up to a 1 or 2 dB HIGHER SNR than the RSSI indicated.) I'm wondering how well your Tecsuns and other DSP and other radios perform in similar environments, for example about 0.5km from a 50kW stick?
Also, I was just reading your PL-380 review, and you say KARR has no KSUH slop, in spite of it being only 10kHz away. Also, if I remember correctly, you are a mile or two away from KSUH's transmitter, and I think I saw you mention their RSSI in another post as being somewhere in the upper 70s to low 80s dBu... but my own PL-380 caps it at 63dBu. Also I notice some slop +/-10kHz away from 63dBu stations, even in 1kHz mode.
It does seem that my PL-380 is a good 12-15dB more sensitive than my previous radio... that is, when it's not overwhelmed by not-so-strong semi-locals, like, for example, a 50kW 9 miles away, a 5kW IBOC 7 miles away, a 10kW 6 miles away, just to name a few. However, due to the elevated RSSI from the strong stations, it seems to negate the effect somewhat.
Is it possible I got a dud PL-380 (not to mention the tuning knob has broken TWICE), or do they all perform like that? When I originally was looking into getting another portable AM radio to replace one I had (and still have), and ordered the PL-380, one of my goals was to bring in some stations that on my previous radio (a Panasonic RQ-SW20, ~15dB less sensitive than PL-380, comparable selectivity to Sony SRF-M37W, and possibly worse due to the splatter being just as wide, if not wider on the SW20, even though it's less sensitive than the M37W) would just basically not exist. Occasionally the SW20 just wasn't sensitive enough to pull in the stations I wanted to hear, but usually even if it WAS sensitive enough, chances are a local pest 10kHz would completely wipe it off the face of the dial, and would ITSELF be heard over a +/- 50-200kHz swath of the dial, while still being a strong, low-noise signal (and strong enough to light the tuning indicator LED), except for a little distortion and slightly higher audio fidelity while tuned off frequency. (The Donald Duck effect is typically only noticeable at +/-10kHz, then at +/- 20-30kHz (except on exceptionally strong signals, like in the example below) it cleans up quite a bit on that Panasonic. Also, on that radio, it's interesting to note that when you're tuned close to, but not on, a very strong local station (typically one where the tuning indicator is still lit at least 30kHz off), not only do you get the Donald Duck distortion close in, the audio level drops considerably compared to when you're tuned on the frequency. That effect can be heard in this audio clip recorded a couple months ago - http://cid-6bdd1917662288cb.office.live.com/self.aspx/AM%20radio%20files/1170%20KCBQ%20-%202010-04-16/KCBQ%201170%20-%20RQ-SW20%20-%201170%20to%201710%20-%20SAT%20@%20Power%20Pole.mp3 - that's my RQ-SW20 with the Select-A-Tenna at a power pole tuning in 50kW 1170 from 9 miles away, then going up to 1710kHz in 10kHz increments. My PL-380 in the same situation actually overloads (distorted audio on channel): http://cid-6bdd1917662288cb.office.live.com/self.aspx/AM%20radio%20files/1170%20KCBQ%20-%202010-04-16/KCBQ%201170%20-%20PL-380%20-%201170%20to%201710%20-%20SAT%20@%20PowerPole.mp3 )

Another thing... any chance that you could give the radios in the shootout a bit more of a challenge in the selectivity and overload sections of the shootout? Here's a picture of one idea, although I would have liked to have been about 86 meters or so closer to the source of the QRM to increase the difficulty of the test.
http://picasaweb.google.com/PianoPlayer88Key/TecsunPL380#5483998330737401682
In that picture, the PL-380 is tuned to the 18th harmonic of 1170 KCBQ, one of the stations broadcasting from the towers in the background (the other is 910 KECR), and showing a signal strength of 62dBu!
I did record a bandscan at that location, but unfortunately I didn't keep very good track of what was what in the recording (partially due to the PL-380's beep function being turned off)... but I did note the readings on some frequencies.... I should note that that location in the photo is in the main lobes of the directional patterns of both stations (50kW 1170 KCBQ and 5kW 910 KECR).

1170 KCBQ vs. Tecsun PL-380 - near-field experiment.

PL-380 held up to power pole outside transmitter property

MW
1170 = 63dBu RSSI, 25dB SNR
1171 = 63dBu RSSI, 0dB SNR
1180 = 63dBu
1190 = 50-63dBu
1210 = 50dBu
1300 = 56-57dBu
1400 = 50dBu
1710 = 56dBu

SW, whip antenna stored
3510 = 63dBu (KCBQ's 3rd harmonic)
2300 = 50dBu (lowest SW tune)
2340 = 63dBu (KCBQ's 2nd harmonic)
2300 = 52dBu (repeat?)
4680 = 63dBu (KCBQ's 4th harmonic)
11700 = 63dBu (KCBQ's 10th harmonic)
18720 = 60dBu (KCBQ's 16th harmonic)
15210 = 63dBu (KCBQ's 13th harmonic)
17550 = 61dBu (KCBQ's 15th harmonic)
21060 = 59dBu (KCBQ's 18th harmonic)

LW
153 = 63dBu
200 = 57dBu
300 = 50dBu
400 = 54-58dBu
513 = 50-57dBu

MW
520 = 63dBu
600 = 53-56dBu - some kogo audible
760 = 53-57dBu - some kfmb audible
910 = 63dBu RSSI,20dB SNR - KECR (with whom KCBQ diplexes)

SW: 21060 = 59-63dBu - whip antenna extended

FM
64.0 = 10dBu - whip antenna stored
80.0 = 4dBu
108.0 = 0dBu
89.5 = 8dBu RSSI, 1dB SNR - KPBS

As for how much amplification I'm getting from the power pole.... I have previously posted examples recorded at my house, 9 miles away, of tuning the same station using the Select-A-Tenna and a ground wire on a power pole outside my house. This is a picture of where I would be to approximately match that signal level on the barefoot PL-380 (approximate location 32°53'35.4"N, 116°55'39.7"W): http://picasaweb.google.com/PianoPlayer88Key/TecsunPL380#5483998340770303378
In a nutshell, it overloads on the frequency, which can be heard starting at about 0:22 in this recording: http://cid-6bdd1917662288cb.office.live.com/self.aspx/AM%20radio%20files/1170%20KCBQ%20-%202010-04-16/KCBQ%201170%20-%20PL-380%20-%20overload%20demo%20-%202nd%20half%20SAT%20@%20PowerPole.mp3
RSSI was 45dBu at 153kHz, 50dBu across most of the AM band, 63dBu at 2340kHz (2nd harmonic), ~50dBu at 3510kHz (3rd harmonic), just to summarize a few points.

Any chance that you could conduct a portion of the 2010 shootout in a similar strong-signal environment? ;)

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:
>
> Hello,
>
> One of these Kchibo KK-D6110 radios (the official name) has been ordered
> for the upcoming 2010 Shootout, which will also feature the PL-310, PL-380
> and PL-360 models. I'm kind of curious myself whether Kchibo has corrected
> the digital "chuffing noise" of the D96L model.
>
> 73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA)
>
>
> In a message dated 6/16/2010 5:42:37 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
> schuster@... writes:
>
>
>
>
> There's a thread from 2009 on the Chinese "leowood.net" BBS on this radio.
> Google Translate says it's the "battery version of ordinary D-96L". They
> also say it's very ugly.
>
> I parted company with my D-96L over the DSP/display noise problem. Wonder
> if this is any better. Not willing to invest to find out - Kchibo's quality
> control seems to be worse than Tecsun.
>
> --- In _ultralightdx@..._ (mailto:ultralightdx@...)
> , "DiamJ" wrote:
> >
> > The Kchibo KK-6110 is available on e-bay from hygt369 for about 51.99
> US$. If it won't come up directly on e-bay then google the name and follow
> the link to e-bay. Unlike the DL-96 this one uses AA batteries.
> > I don't know if there is an English manual.
> >
> > Jim Z
> >
>


Log 6/17/2010

Randy B <randyebrown@...>
 

Added one to the log last night, #168

1330 WSPQ Springville, NY 6/17/10 2145 EDT 1000W 207.8 miles, 334.7 km

G8 Barefoot
Randy Brown
East Stroudsburg PA


Re: could I ask a question ?

David Alpert
 


§ 73.1201 Station identification.
(a) When regularly required. Broadcast station identification announcements shall be made:
(1) At the beginning and ending of each time of operation, and
(2) Hourly, as close to the hour as feasible, at a natural break in program offerings. Television and Class A television broadcast stations may make these announcements visually or aurally.
(b) Content. (1) Official station identification shall consist of the station’s call letters immediately followed by the community or communities specified in its license as the station’s location; Provided, That the name of the licensee, the station’s frequency, the station’s channel number, as stated on the station’s license, and/or the station’s network affiliation may be inserted between the call letters and station location.

- DRA


At 08:04 AM 6/16/2010, you wrote:
 

The following comes from the FCC website:

"Station Identification. Stations must air identification announcements when they sign on and off for the day. They also must broadcast these announcements every hour, as close to the start of the hour as possible, at a natural programming break. TV stations may make these announcements on-screen or by voice only. Official station identification includes the station's call letters, followed by the community specified in its license as the station's location. Between the call letters and its community, the station may insert the name of the licensee, the station's channel number, and/or its frequency. It may also include any additional community or communities, as long as it first names the community to which it is licensed by the FCC. DTV stations also may identify their digital multicast programming streams separately if they wish, and, if so, must follow the format described in the FCC's rules."

As we're all aware, the rules are often not adhered to and only sporadically enforced. If you know of a station not abiding by the law, it is your duty to inform the FCC.

Richard Allen
36°22'51"N / 97°26'35"W


64 Mb Memorex Digital Recorder on Sale for $14.99

Guy Atkins
 

Some in the group might be interested in this model of digital voice recorder, now selling for $14.99: http://www.surpluscomputers.com/349416/memorex-64mb-digital-voice-recorder.html 

73,

Guy Atkins
Puyallup, WA



PL-380 vs RQ-SW20 near strong signals

pianoplayer88key
 

Hi all. I own a PL-380, and have been a bit disappointed in how it performs near strong signals, especially considering the glowing reviews I had read. So, I decided to record some tests, and some comparisons between that and my previous radio, a Panasonic RQ-SW20 which has selectivity that's probably comparable to the Sony SRF-M37W, if not a bit worse.

For one of the tests, I checked reception of some weaker stations inside a stationary vehicle (to reduce overall signal strength, and reduce the RSSI on blank channels from local strong stations). I generated the strong signal by tuning an old (1980s or older) Zenith AM radio I have to a few particular frequencies to generate a local oscillator signal 455kHz above where the Zenith was tuned.

First - PL-380 tests, tuning Zenith's LO (local oscillator) to particular channels and comparing LO off vs LO on. For all tests, the PL-380 was in the 1kHz bandwidth mode.


Zenith LO = 1000 kHz

http://cid-6bdd1917662288cb.office.live.com/self.aspx/AM%20radio%20files/PL-380%20vs%20RQ-SW20%20near%20strong%20signals%20-%202010-06-17/1030%20XESDD%20-%20LO=1000%5EJ%20PL-380%20-%20off%5EJ%20on.mp3
1030 XESDD (LO to XESDD = 30 kHz)
LO off: 26,25 (dBu RSSI, dB SNR)
LO on: 50,00 (start 0:09.5, weak XESDD)

http://cid-6bdd1917662288cb.office.live.com/self.aspx/AM%20radio%20files/PL-380%20vs%20RQ-SW20%20near%20strong%20signals%20-%202010-06-17/1040%20KURS%20-%20LO=1000%5EJ%20PL-380%20-%20off%5EJ%20on%5EJ%20off.mp3
1040 KURS (LO to KURS = 40 kHz)
LO off: 34,25
LO on: 50,00 (start 0:10, weak KURS, turn off @ 0:25)

http://cid-6bdd1917662288cb.office.live.com/self.aspx/AM%20radio%20files/PL-380%20vs%20RQ-SW20%20near%20strong%20signals%20-%202010-06-17/1070%20KNX%20-%20LO=1000%5EJ%20PL-380%20-%20off%5EJ%20on%5EJ%20off.mp3
1070 KNX (LO to KNX = 70 kHz)
LO off: 28,25
LO on: 50,03 (start 0:25, almost no trace of KNX, turn off @ 0:42)

http://cid-6bdd1917662288cb.office.live.com/self.aspx/AM%20radio%20files/PL-380%20vs%20RQ-SW20%20near%20strong%20signals%20-%202010-06-17/1130%20KSDO%20-%20LO=1000%5EJ%20PL-380%20-%20off%5EJ%20on.mp3
1130 KSDO (LO to KSDO = 130 kHz)
LO off: 57,25
LO on: 51,25 (start 0:11.5, some noise behind KSDO)


Zenith LO = 1290 kHz

http://cid-6bdd1917662288cb.office.live.com/self.aspx/AM%20radio%20files/PL-380%20vs%20RQ-SW20%20near%20strong%20signals%20-%202010-06-17/1170%20KCBQ%20-%20LO=1290%5EJ%20PL-380%20-%20off%5EJ%20on.mp3
1170 KCBQ (KCBQ to LO = 120 kHz)
LO off: 61,25
LO on: 58,25 (start 0:21.5, some noise behind KCBQ)

http://cid-6bdd1917662288cb.office.live.com/self.aspx/AM%20radio%20files/PL-380%20vs%20RQ-SW20%20near%20strong%20signals%20-%202010-06-17/1270%20XEAZ%20-%20LO=1290%5EJ%20PL-380%20-%20off%5EJ%20on.mp3
1270 XEAZ (XEAZ to LO = 20 kHz)
LO off: 31,25
LO on: 50,00 (start 0:24, very weak XEAZ)

http://cid-6bdd1917662288cb.office.live.com/self.aspx/AM%20radio%20files/PL-380%20vs%20RQ-SW20%20near%20strong%20signals%20-%202010-06-17/1280%20KFRN%20-%20LO=1290%5EJ%20PL-380%20-%20off%5EJ%20on.mp3
1280 KFRN (KFRN to LO = 10 kHz)
LO off: 20,05
LO on: 50,01 (start 0:37, 10kHz het, no KFRN)

http://cid-6bdd1917662288cb.office.live.com/self.aspx/AM%20radio%20files/PL-380%20vs%20RQ-SW20%20near%20strong%20signals%20-%202010-06-17/1310%20XEC%20-%20LO=1290%5EJ%20PL-380%20-%20off%5EJ%20on.mp3
1310 XEC (LO to XEC = 20 kHz)
LO off: 23,21
LO on: 50,00 (start 0:20, no XEC)

http://cid-6bdd1917662288cb.office.live.com/self.aspx/AM%20radio%20files/PL-380%20vs%20RQ-SW20%20near%20strong%20signals%20-%202010-06-17/1360%20KLSD%20-%20LO=1290%5EJ%20PL-380%20-%20off%5EJ%20on.mp3
1360 KLSD (LO to KLSD = 70 kHz)
LO off: 50,25
LO on: 50,11 (start 0:13.5, noisy KLSD)

http://cid-6bdd1917662288cb.office.live.com/self.aspx/AM%20radio%20files/PL-380%20vs%20RQ-SW20%20near%20strong%20signals%20-%202010-06-17/1390%20XEKT%20-%20LO=1290%5EJ%20PL-380%20-%20off%5EJ%20on.mp3
1390 XEKT (LO to XEKT = 100 kHz)
LO off: 26,25
LO on: 50,18 (start 0:19.5, very weak XEKT)

http://cid-6bdd1917662288cb.office.live.com/self.aspx/AM%20radio%20files/PL-380%20vs%20RQ-SW20%20near%20strong%20signals%20-%202010-06-17/1450%20KFSD%20-%20LO=1290%5EJ%20PL-380%20-%20off%5EJ%20on.mp3
1450 KFSD (LO to KFSD = 160 kHz)
LO off: 17,04
LO on: 50,01 (start 0:33, no KFSD)


Zenith LO = 1500 kHz

http://cid-6bdd1917662288cb.office.live.com/self.aspx/AM%20radio%20files/PL-380%20vs%20RQ-SW20%20near%20strong%20signals%20-%202010-06-17/1550%20XEBG%20-%20LO=1500%5EJ%20PL-380%20-%20off%5EJ%20on.mp3
1550 XEBG (LO to XEBG = 50 kHz)
LO off: 15,12 (sometimes indicates up to 15,18)
LO on: 50,00 (start 0:20, no XEBG)



Then, I did some LO off/on comparisons between the Tecsun PL-380 and the Panasonic RQ-SW20. As noted above, the RQ-SW20's selectivity at best matches the Sony SRF-M37W, and is likely a bit worse.

http://cid-6bdd1917662288cb.office.live.com/self.aspx/AM%20radio%20files/PL-380%20vs%20RQ-SW20%20near%20strong%20signals%20-%202010-06-17/1070%20KNX%20-%20LO=1150%5EJ%20PL-380%20vs%20RQ-SW20.mp3
1070 KNX (LO = 1150 kHz, difference = 80 kHz)
PL-380:
LO off: 31,25
LO on: 50,23 (start 0:12, weak KNX)
RQ-SW20:
LO off: start 0:57.5
LO on: can't tell any noticeable difference, heard a little click at 1:19.5 or which was probably me turning the LO on)

http://cid-6bdd1917662288cb.office.live.com/self.aspx/AM%20radio%20files/PL-380%20vs%20RQ-SW20%20near%20strong%20signals%20-%202010-06-17/1280%20KFRN%20-%20LO=1150%5EJ%20PL-380%20vs%20RQ-SW20.mp3
1280 KFRN (LO = 1150 kHz, difference = 130 kHz)
PL-380:
LO off: 17,07
LO on: 50,00 (start 0:31, no KFRN)
RQ-SW20:
LO off: start 0:55.5
LO on: start 1:05, slight change in noise, KFRN maybe slightly weaker but can still be heard unlike with the PL-380

http://cid-6bdd1917662288cb.office.live.com/self.aspx/AM%20radio%20files/PL-380%20vs%20RQ-SW20%20near%20strong%20signals%20-%202010-06-17/1550%20XEBG%20-%20LO=1400%5EJ%20PL-380%20vs%20RQ-SW20.mp3
1550 XEBG (LO = 1400 kHz, difference = 150 kHz, slight interference from Zoom H2 that was being used to record)
PL-380:
LO off: 15,12 (as I said above, sometimes indicates up to 15,18)
LO on: 50,00 (start 0:26.5, no XEBG)
RQ-SW20:
LO off: start 1:09
LO on: start 1:25, slight change in noise but can still hear signal just about as well as with LO off



Finally, I took the radios outside (out of the truck), set the Zenith AM radio aside, and ran my second test. I tuned the Select-A-Tenna to 1170 kHz, my strongest local AM station, and oriented to face the station's transmitter. I then put the radios next to the SAT and did bandscans from 1170 to 1710, then down from 1170 to 950 on the RQ-SW20 and to 790 on the PL-380.

PL-380 scan: (beep was turned on so you can hear when the radio is tuned, normally I have it turned off)
http://cid-6bdd1917662288cb.office.live.com/self.aspx/AM%20radio%20files/PL-380%20vs%20RQ-SW20%20near%20strong%20signals%20-%202010-06-17/SAT%20tuned%20%5E0%20facing%201170%5EJ%20PL-380%20scan%2010k%201170-1710%5EJ%201170-790.mp3
not all frequencies will be listed below. occasional timestamps will be listed to help you get your bearings
first, scan from 1170 up to 1710
1170 - 63,25 - KCBQ
1180 - 50,00 - slight splatter from KCBQ
1210 - 50,00 - weak KPRZ (when not using the SAT to boost KCBQ, KPRZ is a nearly noise-free 52-54dBu signal with audio basically as loud as a 63+dBu signal)
1220 - 49,00
1240 - 49,14 - KNSN
1260 - 49,00 - weak image of KCBQ
1270 - 49,20 - XEAZ - 1:43
1280 - 49,00 - weak KFRN
1310 - 49,00 - semi-weak XEC - 2:22
1350 - 47,00
1360 - 51,25 - KLSD (some noise) - 2:58
1370 - 47,00
1390 - 47,00 - semi-weak XEKT
1420 - 47,23 - semi-noisy XEXX - 3:43
1430 - 49,00
1440 - 45,00
1450 - 45,00 - weak KFSD - 4:15
1470 - 53,25 - XERCN - 4:35.5
1480 - 43,00
1550 - 43,00 - semi-weak XEBG - 5:35
1560 - 41,00
1580 - 41,00 - weak KBLA - 6:03
1600 - 41,00 - weak KAHZ (? - Pomona)
1620 - 41,00 - weak WNSB415 San Ysidro TIS - 6:42
1630 - 48,25 - XEUT
1650 - 41,00 - weak KFOX
1670 - 39,00 - semi-weak KHPY
1700 - 47,25 - XEPE - 8:02.5
next, scan from 1170 down to 790
1160 - 50,00 - slight KCBQ splatter
1140 - 50,00 - moderate KSDO splatter
1130 - 63,25 - KSDO - 8:58.5
1120 - 49,00 - moderate KSDO splatter
1110 - 49,00 - weak KDIS
1090 - 50,25 - slightly noisy XEPRS
1070 - 49,14 - semi-weak KNX - 9:51
1040 - 49,20 - semi-noisy KURS
1030 - 49,21 - semi-noisy XESDD
1010 - 47,00
1000 - 45,22 - KCEO - 10:40.5
990 - 45,00
980 - 45,00 - weak KFWB
970 - 45,00 - very weak KNWZ - 11:20
960 - 43,00
950 - 50,25 - XEKAM
930 - 43,00 - weak KHJ - 11:54
910 - 63,25 - KECR (slight splatter on 920)
900 - 41,00 - slight KECR splatter
890 - 41,00
870 - 41,00 - weak KRLA
860 - 54,25 - XEMO - 12:54
850 - 39,00
830 - 39,19 - semi-weak KLAA
810 - 37,00
800 - 53,25 - XESPN (slight splatter on 810 & 790) - 13:43
790 - 37,00 - weak KABC, slight XESPN splatter, stopped here


RQ-SW20 scan:
http://cid-6bdd1917662288cb.office.live.com/self.aspx/AM%20radio%20files/PL-380%20vs%20RQ-SW20%20near%20strong%20signals%20-%202010-06-17/SAT%20tuned%20%5E0%20facing%201170%5EJ%20RQ-SW20%20scan%2010k%201170-1710%5EJ%201170-950.mp3
as above, not all frequencies are listed, some timestamps are given
first, scan from 1170 to 1710:
1170 - strong KCBQ signal
1210 - KPRZ mixing under KCBQ, maybe slight mix of 1130 KSDO - 1:02
1240 - KNSN mixing with KCBQ
1260 - last frequency on which tuning indicator is lit - 1:36.5
1270 - XEAZ under KCBQ (XEAZ probably semi-attenuated due to SAT antenna pattern)
1310 - XEC over KCBQ - 2:11.5
1360 - strong KLSD - 2:37
1390 - XEKT
1420 - XEXX
1440 - image of KCBQ - 3:11.5
1450 - KFSD
1470 - strong XERCN - 3:30.5
1510 - weak KSPA mixing with weak KCBQ - 3:49
1550 - XEBG
1580 - weak KBLA - 4:21.5
1620 - WNSB415 under 1630 XEUT
1630 - XEUT
1650 - KFOX
1670 - weak KHPY - 5:12.5
1700 - strong XEPE
now, scan down from 1170 to 950:
1130 - KSDO over KCBQ - 6:02
1090 - XEPRS (KCBQ slightly in background maybe)
1070 - KNX - 6:35
1040 - KURS
1030 - XESDD - 6:50
1000 - KCEO
980 - weak KFWB - 7:14
950 - strong XEKAM, stopped here


Ok, so the PL-380 is SUPPOSED to have better selectivity than other radios. However, I've noticed that when faced with a very strong signal (one that spreads 50,00 readings on the PL-380 on a portion of the band, or splatters & lights the tuning LED several channels each way on the RQ-SW20) somewhere on the dial (it doesn't even have to be within 10 or 20kHz)... the Panasonic RQ-SW20, in spite of having MUCH worse selectivity than the PL-380 (and very likely worse than the Sony SRF-M37W, and being about 15dB less sensitive overall than the PL-380, actually is able to pull in stations from about 100-200kHz away from the strong local. However, the PL-380, when faced with that same strong signal, usually can't even get a trace. As noted in some of the LO off/on comparisons above, if the strong signal wasn't there, that non-existant signal would actually become one that would be moderately comfortable to listen to in some cases!

So... WHY is it that a radio with selectivity WORSE than the Sony SRF-M37W actually BEATS the PL-380 when listening to a semi-weak station 100-150kHz away from the very strong local signal?

Also, there are some stations on the PL-380 that I think would have a fairly strong signal, if it wasn't for strong locals 20 and 60 kHz above it that are putting about 39dBu or so on 1110, for one example. In other cases some stations that would otherwise be weak, but listenable (for example, may read 15,18 or so) are buried under the general 30,00 noise floor across most of the band at my location. What gives? :(

One of my reasons for getting the PL-380 was to help alleviate these problems I've been having, among them being having a radio not sensitive enough to hear weak signals I wanted to hear, and not selective enough to separate nearby strong ones. It seems that while the PL-380 is somewhat more selective than my RQ-SW20, the sensitivity suffers even more than the SW20 when faced with a strong signal. I will admit that within a few channels the PL-380 is generally better, but I really was hoping to get a much better signal on 1110 KDIS, for example. :(

Any ideas of another model I should try, preferably with a vertical orientation, multiple bandwidths, no soft-mute, etc, that will fit in my pants pocket? :(


upcoming shootout - DSPs immune to overload or not? (Re: Kchibo KK-6110)

pianoplayer88key
 

Gary, when you do the shootouts, where approximately do you do them? From your home in/near Puyallup, or near Grayland, or somewhere else?
Also besides testing adjacent-channel selectivity, do you test for other evidence of overloading on radios, like desensitization or blocking, besides just harmonics and spurious/mixed images/intermodulation? On my own PL-380, I live in a place where the RSSI on some stations exceeds 35-40dBu even 20-30kHz away from a strong station's frequency, and is generally at least 30dBu in blank channels over most of the band. Also I'm often in places where the RSSI in the blank channels can touch 50dBu over a portion of the band due to a very strong local. (By comparison, in rural areas, or if the radio is in a shielded enclosure, the RSSI is 15dBu on the blank channels, and I've often had readable stations indicating up to a 1 or 2 dB HIGHER SNR than the RSSI indicated.) I'm wondering how well your Tecsuns and other DSP and other radios perform in similar environments, for example about 0.5km from a 50kW stick?
Also, I was just reading your PL-380 review, and you say KARR has no KSUH slop, in spite of it being only 10kHz away. Also, if I remember correctly, you are a mile or two away from KSUH's transmitter, and I think I saw you mention their RSSI in another post as being somewhere in the upper 70s to low 80s dBu... but my own PL-380 caps it at 63dBu. Also I notice some slop +/-10kHz away from 63dBu stations, even in 1kHz mode.
It does seem that my PL-380 is a good 12-15dB more sensitive than my previous radio... that is, when it's not overwhelmed by not-so-strong semi-locals, like, for example, a 50kW 9 miles away, a 5kW IBOC 7 miles away, a 10kW 6 miles away, just to name a few. However, due to the elevated RSSI from the strong stations, it seems to negate the effect somewhat.
Is it possible I got a dud PL-380 (not to mention the tuning knob has broken TWICE), or do they all perform like that? When I originally was looking into getting another portable AM radio to replace one I had (and still have), and ordered the PL-380, one of my goals was to bring in some stations that on my previous radio (a Panasonic RQ-SW20, ~15dB less sensitive than PL-380, comparable selectivity to Sony SRF-M37W, and possibly worse due to the splatter being just as wide, if not wider on the SW20, even though it's less sensitive than the M37W) would just basically not exist. Occasionally the SW20 just wasn't sensitive enough to pull in the stations I wanted to hear, but usually even if it WAS sensitive enough, chances are a local pest 10kHz would completely wipe it off the face of the dial, and would ITSELF be heard over a +/- 50-200kHz swath of the dial, while still being a strong, low-noise signal (and strong enough to light the tuning indicator LED), except for a little distortion and slightly higher audio fidelity while tuned off frequency. (The Donald Duck effect is typically only noticeable at +/-10kHz, then at +/- 20-30kHz (except on exceptionally strong signals, like in the example below) it cleans up quite a bit on that Panasonic. Also, on that radio, it's interesting to note that when you're tuned close to, but not on, a very strong local station (typically one where the tuning indicator is still lit at least 30kHz off), not only do you get the Donald Duck distortion close in, the audio level drops considerably compared to when you're tuned on the frequency. That effect can be heard in this audio clip recorded a couple months ago - http://cid-6bdd1917662288cb.office.live.com/self.aspx/AM%20radio%20files/1170%20KCBQ%20-%202010-04-16/KCBQ%201170%20-%20RQ-SW20%20-%201170%20to%201710%20-%20SAT%20@%20Power%20Pole.mp3 - that's my RQ-SW20 with the Select-A-Tenna at a power pole tuning in 50kW 1170 from 9 miles away, then going up to 1710kHz in 10kHz increments. My PL-380 in the same situation actually overloads (distorted audio on channel): http://cid-6bdd1917662288cb.office.live.com/self.aspx/AM%20radio%20files/1170%20KCBQ%20-%202010-04-16/KCBQ%201170%20-%20PL-380%20-%201170%20to%201710%20-%20SAT%20@%20PowerPole.mp3 )


Another thing... any chance that you could give the radios in the shootout a bit more of a challenge in the selectivity and overload sections of the shootout? Here's a picture of one idea, although I would have liked to have been about 86 meters or so closer to the source of the QRM to increase the difficulty of the test.
http://picasaweb.google.com/PianoPlayer88Key/TecsunPL380#5483998330737401682
In that picture, the PL-380 is tuned to the 18th harmonic of 1170 KCBQ, one of the stations broadcasting from the towers in the background (the other is 910 KECR), and showing a signal strength of 62dBu!
I did record a bandscan at that location, but unfortunately I didn't keep very good track of what was what in the recording (partially due to the PL-380's beep function being turned off)... but I did note the readings on some frequencies.... I should note that that location in the photo is in the main lobes of the directional patterns of both stations (50kW 1170 KCBQ and 5kW 910 KECR).

1170 KCBQ vs. Tecsun PL-380 - near-field experiment.

PL-380 held up to power pole outside transmitter property

MW
1170 = 63dBu RSSI, 25dB SNR
1171 = 63dBu RSSI, 0dB SNR
1180 = 63dBu
1190 = 50-63dBu
1210 = 50dBu
1300 = 56-57dBu
1400 = 50dBu
1710 = 56dBu

SW, whip antenna stored
3510 = 63dBu (KCBQ's 3rd harmonic)
2300 = 50dBu (lowest SW tune)
2340 = 63dBu (KCBQ's 2nd harmonic)
2300 = 52dBu (repeat?)
4680 = 63dBu (KCBQ's 4th harmonic)
11700 = 63dBu (KCBQ's 10th harmonic)
18720 = 60dBu (KCBQ's 16th harmonic)
15210 = 63dBu (KCBQ's 13th harmonic)
17550 = 61dBu (KCBQ's 15th harmonic)
21060 = 59dBu (KCBQ's 18th harmonic)

LW
153 = 63dBu
200 = 57dBu
300 = 50dBu
400 = 54-58dBu
513 = 50-57dBu

MW
520 = 63dBu
600 = 53-56dBu - some kogo audible
760 = 53-57dBu - some kfmb audible
910 = 63dBu RSSI,20dB SNR - KECR (with whom KCBQ diplexes)

SW: 21060 = 59-63dBu - whip antenna extended

FM
64.0 = 10dBu - whip antenna stored
80.0 = 4dBu
108.0 = 0dBu
89.5 = 8dBu RSSI, 1dB SNR - KPBS


As for how much amplification I'm getting from the power pole.... I have previously posted examples recorded at my house, 9 miles away, of tuning the same station using the Select-A-Tenna and a ground wire on a power pole outside my house. This is a picture of where I would be to approximately match that signal level on the barefoot PL-380 (approximate location 32°53'35.4"N, 116°55'39.7"W): http://picasaweb.google.com/PianoPlayer88Key/TecsunPL380#5483998340770303378
In a nutshell, it overloads on the frequency, which can be heard starting at about 0:22 in this recording: http://cid-6bdd1917662288cb.office.live.com/self.aspx/AM%20radio%20files/1170%20KCBQ%20-%202010-04-16/KCBQ%201170%20-%20PL-380%20-%20overload%20demo%20-%202nd%20half%20SAT%20@%20PowerPole.mp3
RSSI was 45dBu at 153kHz, 50dBu across most of the AM band, 63dBu at 2340kHz (2nd harmonic), ~50dBu at 3510kHz (3rd harmonic), just to summarize a few points.


Any chance that you could conduct a portion of the 2010 shootout in a similar strong-signal environment? ;)

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:

Hello,

One of these Kchibo KK-D6110 radios (the official name) has been ordered
for the upcoming 2010 Shootout, which will also feature the PL-310, PL-380
and PL-360 models. I'm kind of curious myself whether Kchibo has corrected
the digital "chuffing noise" of the D96L model.

73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA)


In a message dated 6/16/2010 5:42:37 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
schuster@... writes:




There's a thread from 2009 on the Chinese "leowood.net" BBS on this radio.
Google Translate says it's the "battery version of ordinary D-96L". They
also say it's very ugly.

I parted company with my D-96L over the DSP/display noise problem. Wonder
if this is any better. Not willing to invest to find out - Kchibo's quality
control seems to be worse than Tecsun.

--- In _ultralightdx@... (mailto:ultralightdx@...)
, "DiamJ" <jm392c@> wrote:

The Kchibo KK-6110 is available on e-bay from hygt369 for about 51.99
US$. If it won't come up directly on e-bay then google the name and follow
the link to e-bay. Unlike the DL-96 this one uses AA batteries.
I don't know if there is an English manual.

Jim Z


Re: AMD Phenom II 1090T vs. Intel Core i7 980X

Scott <scottmac1120@...>
 

And how is any of that good for DX? I mean, you could theoretically DTV DX with a Celeron machine. A Core i7 seems like overkill.
 
Scott
Hobbs, NM

On Thu, Jun 17, 2010 at 10:00 AM, Electro Man <electro.man01@...> wrote:
 

We recently got to test two rigs — one from AMD and one from Intel. Both are the top of the heap in terms of the CPU. One is the AMD Phenom II 1090T and the other is Intel Core i7 Extreme 980X.
So we put them side by side and compare the basics. Here’s a comparative chart of the two CPUs.



Both CPUs have 6 cores running on the chip but Intel’s have 12 threads compared to 6 on the AMD. The Core i7 also has bigger L3 Cache at 12MB versus the 6MB on the Phenom II X6.
Performance wise, we got the sub-score of the CPU on Windows Experience Index and the CPU Mark for both. The 980x trumps the X6 1090T but more than double.
However, the suggested retail price of the CPUs are far apart. Intel’s Core i7 980X is an extreme edition is expected to sell around Php50,000. The Phenom II X6 1090T is affordable at Php13,500. I think the Core i7 930 would be a more apt comparison

Electronics iBlog




Re: Kchibo KK-6110 available

dhsatyadhana <satya@...>
 

Not that Kchibo's sensitivity figures necessarily mean anything, but the 6110's MW and FM sensitivity is quoted as 2.5mV and 3.0uV, respectively, while for the D96L they are 2.0mV and 2.0uV. Normally you want lower numbers here, but with Tecsun, sometimes it is the case that the bigger the number, the better, so who knows!

Here's hoping that the 6110 has the kinks worked out and is a very sensitive machine. It is advertised as being about 19.5 cubic inches, so it may well fit the Ultralight size requirements as well.

Kevin S
Bainbridge Island, WA


Where's Jim (KR1S) ?

Bill <radioexray@...>
 

Had a few exchanges with him several weeks ago and he alluded to some pending health issues. My last couple of emails have gone unanswered?

Has anybody been in contact with him? Is he doing ok?

-Bill WX4A


Re: Kchibo KK-6110 available

Gary DeBock
 

Kevin and All,
 
It would be great if this KK-D6110 radio is Kchibo's answer to the latest Tecsun Ultralight DSP models, but it seems a little odd that the price is much lower than that of the Si4734 radios sold by the same seller (D92L, D96L, PL-310, PL-380 and PL-360), and that the seller makes no mention of the Si4734 DSP chip in the KK-D6110 listing (although he does for all the Tecsun Si4734 model listings). I guess Jim and I will know the full story before much longer!
 
73, Gary 
 

In a message dated 6/17/2010 8:55:45 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, satya@... writes:
 

Not that Kchibo's sensitivity figures necessarily mean anything, but the 6110's MW and FM sensitivity is quoted as 2.5mV and 3.0uV, respectively, while for the D96L they are 2.0mV and 2.0uV. Normally you want lower numbers here, but with Tecsun, sometimes it is the case that the bigger the number, the better, so who knows!

Here's hoping that the 6110 has the kinks worked out and is a very sensitive machine. It is advertised as being about 19.5 cubic inches, so it may well fit the Ultralight size requirements as well.

Kevin S
Bainbridge Island, WA


Kchibo KK-6110

Harold
 

I'm looking forward to the shootout and other reviews of this ulr.
Harold


Re: Kchibo KK-6110 available

Gil Stacy
 

As quirky as the D96L is in design, execution and operation, to my ear, the sound from its speaker is superior, richer in tone, to the Tecsuns's speakers. YMMV.
73 Gil


Re: Kchibo KK-6110 available

DiamJ <jm392c@...>
 

I've got one coming too. Once I've figured it out I'll report to the group. It looks as though they've done some re-styling to compete with the PL-380, much as the auto companies do when a more popular competitor comes on the market. One would hope they improved the engineering, too, if they went to all the trouble of making a new model.

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:

Hello,

One of these Kchibo KK-D6110 radios (the official name) has been ordered
for the upcoming 2010 Shootout, which will also feature the PL-310, PL-380
and PL-360 models. I'm kind of curious myself whether Kchibo has corrected
the digital "chuffing noise" of the D96L model.

73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA)


In a message dated 6/16/2010 5:42:37 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
schuster@... writes:




There's a thread from 2009 on the Chinese "leowood.net" BBS on this radio.
Google Translate says it's the "battery version of ordinary D-96L". They
also say it's very ugly.

I parted company with my D-96L over the DSP/display noise problem. Wonder
if this is any better. Not willing to invest to find out - Kchibo's quality
control seems to be worse than Tecsun.


Re: Kchibo KK-6110 available

Gary DeBock
 

Thanks Jim,
 
I'm glad you've also ordered this model. Now If the KK-D6610 turns out to be a lemon, at least we will have somebody else to share the regret of buying it :-)
 
When the Kchibo D96L model first came out last summer, I remember thinking that this would be a great Ultralight radio if Kchibo could solve the digital chuffing noise, and use standard AA batteries. Apparently Kchibo has been trying to this, and get back in the market after Tecsun's introduction of the superb PL-310, PL-380 and PL-360 models. It will be interesting to see how much progress they've made.
 
73, Gary    
 

In a message dated 6/17/2010 12:37:19 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, jm392c@... writes:
 

I've got one coming too. Once I've figured it out I'll report to the group. It looks as though they've done some re-styling to compete with the PL-380, much as the auto companies do when a more popular competitor comes on the market. One would hope they improved the engineering, too, if they went to all the trouble of making a new model.

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:
>
> Hello,
>
> One of these Kchibo KK-D6110 radios (the official name) has been ordered
> for the upcoming 2010 Shootout, which will also feature the PL-310, PL-380
> and PL-360 models. I'm kind of curious myself whether Kchibo has corrected
> the digital "chuffing noise" of the D96L model.
>
> 73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA)
>
>
> In a message dated 6/16/2010 5:42:37 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
> schuster@... writes:
>
>
>
>
> There's a thread from 2009 on the Chinese "leowood.net" BBS on this radio.
> Google Translate says it's the "battery version of ordinary D-96L". They
> also say it's very ugly.
>
> I parted company with my D-96L over the DSP/display noise problem. Wonder
> if this is any better. Not willing to invest to find out - Kchibo's quality
> control seems to be worse than Tecsun.
>


AMD Phenom II 1090T vs. Intel Core i7 980X

Electro Man <electro.man01@...>
 

We recently got to test two rigs — one from AMD and one from Intel. Both are the top of the heap in terms of the CPU. One is the AMD Phenom II 1090T and the other is Intel Core i7 Extreme 980X.
So we put them side by side and compare the basics. Here’s a comparative chart of the two CPUs.



Both CPUs have 6 cores running on the chip but Intel’s have 12 threads compared to 6 on the AMD. The Core i7 also has bigger L3 Cache at 12MB versus the 6MB on the Phenom II X6.
Performance wise, we got the sub-score of the CPU on Windows Experience Index and the CPU Mark for both. The 980x trumps the X6 1090T but more than double.
However, the suggested retail price of the CPUs are far apart. Intel’s Core i7 980X is an extreme edition is expected to sell around Php50,000. The Phenom II X6 1090T is affordable at Php13,500. I think the Core i7 930 would be a more apt comparison

Electronics iBlog