Date   

Re: Sony SRF-M37V/W alignment

Gary DeBock
 

Hello Richard,
 
     I just finished the MW alignment of my new SRF-M37W, in preparation for the Summertime Shootout.  It is not an alignment for the faint-hearted, to say the least.
 
     You were very close to finishing the alignment yourself--  the last step was to adjust the "CT2 MW RF" control to peak a high-band (1360-1450 kHz) weak signal.  This is the trimming capacitor closest to the upper right corner of the radio, and also the one at the tip of my index finger in a photo I will upload to the group photo site.
 
     The alignment itself requires a jumper wire between the disconnected red wire and the front circuit board ground, and also requires the hobbyist to hold the battery in place (to contact both the positive and negative leads).  In addition, the front panel should be placed over the front circuit board to allow use of the On-Off switch and Tuning controls, which creates quite a collection of jumpers, fingers, and circuit boards.
 
     The loopstick only has one coil secured with wax, however--  the other is secured with glue, and is not part of the 600 kHz alignment.  After this tricky procedure, no performance improvement was gained.  The new SRF-M37W was aligned to maximum sensitivity at the factory, with final sensitivity moderate in comparison to the SRF-T615.  Selectivity is still barn-door wide (local KSUH-1450 is heard from 1400-1610).
 
                                                                                 73,  Gary DeBock   
 

In a message dated 8/9/2008 7:00:42 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, richarda@... writes:

Thanks everyone.

I managed to freed up the moving coil for the 600 kHz adjustment. Now
I need to figure out which control is used for the 1400 kHz
adjustment. My guess it's either the one marked "L4 MW OSC" or "CT2
MW RF". Because of thunderstorms I'll have to wait until another day.

I have to admit the E100 is easier to work on than the M37V/W. But as
some DXers have shown the little receiver has potential.

Richard Allen.

.


Re: Sony SRF-M37V/W alignment

Gary DeBock
 

Hi Guy, Richard and Kevin,
 
     The new SRF-M37W here needs to be aligned anyway before the Summertime Shootout, so I'll just put it at the top of the list, and write notes about which coils and trimmers to adjust.  For those needing alignment instructions for either the SRF-M37V or 37W models, this should do the trick.
 
     By the way, most of our current Ultralight model alignment instructions were made possible only by tinkerers performing "quick and dirty" operations without a service manual.  Guy was the first to perform the DT-200VX and SRF-T615 alignments, and deserves a lot of thanks for his efforts.  The E100 procedure was also developed this way here, among others.  The "quick and dirty" alignment procedure will also be performed on the SRF-M97V, SRF-S84, and DT-400W, before the Summertime Shootout.  We can then be sure how much sensitivity these units are capable of, as well as know how good the factory alignment is.
 
                                     73,  Gary
 
                                                                         
 
    




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Re: Sony SRF-M37V/W alignment

bbwrwy
 

I've posted several photos of a disassembled SRF-M37V.

To get to the RF circuit board you need to unsolder the red wire in
the lower left hand corner must be unsoldered. When reassembling the
receiver resolder and fit it into the notch below the solder point.

Richard Allen.


Mercy.Frankline Spam

John H. Bryant <bjohnorcas@...>
 

Sorry for the spam this morning.

We had been warned not to make this group a "public" group, where anyone could join without being vetted. The fear was that we would be flooded with spam. This is the first spam that I'm aware of in the 6 months or so of operation. I've already removed "Mercy.Frankline" as a member. If this becomes a problem, we will have to go to a restricted, vetted, format. I hope not.

May all spammers rot in hell!

John Bryant
List Manager


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EBay Seller Confirms-- No More SRF-39FP "Prison Radios"

Gary DeBock
 

Hello Guys,
 
     Those of you fortunate enough to have obtained a new Sony SRF-39FP  "Prison Radio" can consider yourselves lucky.  Greg Stanbury, the Florida seller responsible for providing almost all of the SRF-39FP's on eBay, has now confirmed that they are all gone.
 
     Undoubtedly the most popular analog DXing Ultralight, the "Prison Radio" holds many of the Ultralight DXing records, and was extensively modified with huge loopsticks, a digital frequency readout, vernier tuning dials, etc.  It was especially popular in Canada, where the eBay seller himself refused to ship.  Because of phenomenal Canadian support for the Ultralight Radio program, many units made it across the border anyway.
 
     Although most current DXer experimentation is on the E100 model (another popular Ultralight model facing an uncertain future), the SRF-39FP will certainly continue to be popular for mofication, as well as for stock DXing.  Enjoy it either way, for it's a true classic.
 
     73,  Gary 




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Re: Sony SRF-M37V/W alignment

bbwrwy
 

Thanks Kevin and Gary. I likewise tried, without success, to obtain a
service manual. As common as these receivers are you would think it'd
be easier. I feel the alignment process is fairly straight forward,
but I just don't want to do the wrong thing. The antenna detaches from
the bottom of the circuit board and it has two coils. I might send
along a photo or two for you to see.

Regarding the weather band, I can't hear any of the three NOAA
stations in area. All are within about 45 miles of my QTH. Of
course, I didn't buy the receivers to listen to NOAA. I simply wanted
a good receiver to stick in my pocket and it readily fits that
requirement.

Have a good DX weekend.

Richard Allen


Re: Welcome to New Ultralightdx Members!

markjtaylor73 <beulahland@...>
 

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:

Hello Guys,

We are thrilled at the rapid growth of Ultralight radio interest among
the AM-DX community, and very happy to note that our Yahoo group site now has
59 members.

We also extend our warmest welcome to new members markjtaylor73,
darobin12001, radioman69uk, sgrossklass, flemingchris, and rjbrjb20022002.

73 and Best Wishes,

Gary DeBock (N7EKX)
Hello to all,

Thank you Gary for the kind welcome. I currently have a Sony 7600GR and a Grundig
Mini World 100 PE. The Grundig certainly qualifies as an ultralight. I look forward to
reading and posting on this sight. Thanks again.

Regards,

Mark Taylor


Re: Sony SRF-M37V/W alignment

satya@...
 

Hi Richard:

Gary DeBock tried a couple places on-line who claimed to have M37V service
manuals, but no one ever actually sent him the manual. Not sure how much
he spent on the effort, but there appears to be no such manual readily
available. Now that Sony is coming out with the M37W model, perhaps Sony
will reissue the manual?

My M37V has weather band as well, and it appears to do fine picking up WB
here in the metro Seattle area. I haven't tried it out in a more distant
area, though.

73 - Kevin S
Bainbridge Island, WA

Has anyone performed an alignment of a M37? If so, could you share
with us how to do it?

Because I have three of these little receivers, I decided to
disassemble the least sensitive one. After removing four screws from
the back, you have to be careful with the clips holding the
logic/display circuit board in place. They are easily broken,
especially the one over the battery compartment. Also a short wire
runnig between the two circuit boards needs to be unsoldered. It's in
the lower left hand side, near the DX/local switch.

But I don't know where the adjustment points for alignment are
located. And I don't want to rely on guesswork.

I really enjoy using these little receivers, whether for general
listening or DXing. I always carry one (or a SRF-M35) with me to
sporting events. They fit into my hand just right and, in my opinion,
have a decent battery life. True, strong signals tend to spill over to
adjacent channels, such as local KFXY-1640 is heard from 1620 to 1660
kHz during the day. I assume this can be corrected somewhat with
tighter filters. So far I haven't found the images some others have
reported. However, I do wonder about Sony quality control because the
sensitivity on my three sets varies widely with the newer M37W being
the best. It's amazing how well the five centimeter antenna pulls in
signals. Its nulling ability is excellent.

The only real disappointment I've found is the weather band - it's
useless. I live in what is called "tornado alley" and the M37W's are
often sold locally (especially by Wal-Mart) as weather radios. It's
definitely false advertising.


Re: Sony SRF M37V image problem solved - Update

satya@...
 

Hi Stephan:

Gre aus Amerika! Ich habe Ihre Artikel ber die 7600GR geniessen.

False alarm! I forgot that the M37V uses a 450 khz filter, and so the
images are only 900 khz away. Sure enough, this morning my neighborhood
stations at 1590 and 1680 are solidly represented on 690 and 780, and so
the image problem is still there. I too was wondering how IF filtering
could solve an RF stage problem...

Sorry for the confusion!

73 - Kevin S
Bainbridge Island, WA


--- In ultralightdx@..., "dhsatyadhana" <satya@...> wrote:
Hi all:
Jim Kenny and I were talking on the phone and each pulled out our M37V
with a 4.5 khz retrofitted filter installed. Both of us realized that,
unlike the stock M37V, there were no images from strong locals (i.e.,
phantom 680 signal from local 1590, etc.). I then turned on my Sony
7600GR, and the images from my strong locals were blanketing the dial,
but nothing on the M37V!

Do keep in mind that the '7600GR with its wideband MW/LW
frontend will be more easily overloaded by strong AM
locals than a set with frontend tuning. (Its image
rejection is no greater than on shortwave, i.e. an
estimated 30..40 dB, for the same reason.)

But in any case, improved image rejection with a better
IF filter is a puzzler. Image rejection should be a
function solely of the frontend, i.e. RF tuning and mixer
(or, for most sets, RF tuning only, as regular mixers
have no inherent image rejection).

(A 680 kHz response from 1590 definitely is an image
if we're looking at a single conversion set with the LO
running above the tuned frequency - as it's normally the
case - and an IF of 455 kHz.)

Depending on achieved Q (and thus ultimately parts
quality), image rejection near the bottom end of MW for
sets with a single tuned IF circuit is about 30 to 50 dB.
It drops quite a bit towards the high end, but as there
are no strong signals directly above the band, this is
not an issue.

Anyway, I fail to see how the IF filter would play in
here. It can't really be spurious responses either.

Hmm. *scratches head*

Stephan


Sony SRF-M37V/W alignment

bbwrwy
 

Has anyone performed an alignment of a M37? If so, could you share
with us how to do it?

Because I have three of these little receivers, I decided to
disassemble the least sensitive one. After removing four screws from
the back, you have to be careful with the clips holding the
logic/display circuit board in place. They are easily broken,
especially the one over the battery compartment. Also a short wire
runnig between the two circuit boards needs to be unsoldered. It's in
the lower left hand side, near the DX/local switch.

But I don't know where the adjustment points for alignment are
located. And I don't want to rely on guesswork.

I really enjoy using these little receivers, whether for general
listening or DXing. I always carry one (or a SRF-M35) with me to
sporting events. They fit into my hand just right and, in my opinion,
have a decent battery life. True, strong signals tend to spill over to
adjacent channels, such as local KFXY-1640 is heard from 1620 to 1660
kHz during the day. I assume this can be corrected somewhat with
tighter filters. So far I haven't found the images some others have
reported. However, I do wonder about Sony quality control because the
sensitivity on my three sets varies widely with the newer M37W being
the best. It's amazing how well the five centimeter antenna pulls in
signals. Its nulling ability is excellent.

The only real disappointment I've found is the weather band - it's
useless. I live in what is called "tornado alley" and the M37W's are
often sold locally (especially by Wal-Mart) as weather radios. It's
definitely false advertising.

Again, if anyone knows how to align the M37, please tell the rest of
us how it's done. It's a readily available, affordable ULR with DX
potential.


Re: Sony SRF-M37V/W alignment

Gary DeBock
 

Hello Richard and Kevin,
 
     Because of a timing quirk, the SRF-M37V is one of the very few Ultralights that I haven't yet aligned.  It was part of the "Round One" Shootout posted on dxer.ca in late December, before I routinely started to align Ultralight radios prior to shootout competitions.  I know that local Puyallup, WA resident (and filter guru) Guy Atkins has done an alignment on an SRF-M37V, using instructions that I provided for a "quick and dirty" alignment on any AM portable without a service manual.  Perhaps he will read this, and share his experience. 
 
     For the benefit of those brave souls eager to align their Ultralight radio without a service manual, the "quick and dirty" alignment instructions are given below.  Proceed at your own risk, and be advised that some Ultralights (like the SRF-59) have a nasty reputation for inducing extreme regret in careless tinkerers.
 
1)  Remove the back cover to allow access to the loopstick.  Remove all wax binding the coil (or movable coil, if there are more than one) to the ferrite bar.  Ensure that the coil may be slid .25" either way, on the ferrite bar. NOTE:  The ICF-2010 and ICF-SW7600GR loopsticks cannot be aligned for sensitivity.
 
2)  If batteries are disconnected by the removal of the back panel, run jumpers and turn on the radio.  Tune in a WEAK station on the lower end of the dial (anything from 570- 630 kHz will do).  Slide the loopstick coil to peak the weak signal, and temporarily secure it with tape on the ferrite bar. NOTE:  This step will usually provide a major improvement in Ultralight radio sensitivity, and is quite easy to accomplish.
 
3)   Tune the radio to a WEAK station anywhere from 1360-1440 kHz.  On an analog radio, locate the 1400 kHz alignment trimmer (almost always located on the main tuning capacitor component) by attempting to peak the weak signal on the various trimmers, always after carefully noting the original position of the trimmers and returning to these exact positions, should the attempt prove unsuccessful.  The correct trimmer will peak the weak signal, but not shift the frequency to allow reception of adjacent stations.
    On a digital radio (assuming it is not the DT-200V, DT-200VX, DT-400W, DT-210V, DT-220V, E100, or C.Crane SWP for which we already have a procedure), the hobbyist will need to locate the correct 1400 kHz trimmer capacitor on the RF circuit board, usually adjacent to other trimmer capacitors for different bands.  Using the trial and error method described above for analog units, attempt to peak the weak signal by adjusting various trimmers, always after carefully noting the original position of the trimmers, and returning to these original positions if the peaking attempt is not successful.  The correct trimmer will peak the weak signal, but not shift the frequency to allow reception of adjacent stations.  NOTE:  AM IF transformers will behave exactly like 1400 kHz trimming capacitors, in peaking the weak signal. This is favorable to accomplish, since improvements in AM IF transformer peaking will increase the AM sensitivity.  For this reason, any component with an appearance like an IF transformer should have adjustment attempted, as described above.  The cumulative affect of multiple IF transformer adjustments can provide astonishing sensitivity improvements in some vintage radios like the TR-6400, 6R-33, etc.
 
4)   Return to the loopstick and attempt further peaking of the movable coil on the low-band (570- 630 kHz) weak signal by shifting the coil along the loopstick. If no further sensitivity improvement is noted, secure the coil in this position with wax, tape or a spot of woodworking glue. If a major improvement is noted, repeat Step 3, then repeat this step and secure the coil on the loopstick.
 
5)  Reassemble the radio, and enjoy the full sensitivity that the engineers designed for your particular model.
 
                             73,  Gary DeBock    
 
     
    




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Re: Sony SRF M37V image problem solved

huelbe_garcia@fastimap.com <huelbe_garcia@...>
 

Sorry for the horrible english in the last message, it seems I need some
coffee...

string = strong
could be fix = perhaps fixed

:)

--hg

----- Original message -----
From: "huelbe_garcia@..." <huelbe_garcia@...>
To: ultralightdx@...
Date: Fri, 08 Aug 2008 11:29:22 -0300
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] Re: Sony SRF M37V image problem solved

Hi group,

yesterday I was playing with Redsun RP300. It has an odd behaviour, if
you tune 10-20KHz away from a string, local station, you can still
listen to a demodulated and readable audio a little bit more 'trebly'.
It's like a 'leakage' between the RF/AF stages. I would consider it
normal if it was, say, 1-3KHz... but 20KHz is too much!

On the other hand E100 works just as one expect, if you tune about 5-7
KHz (or more) away from a local station you heard the splatter, kind of
noise non-readable.

For a moment, I thought the filter replacement could be fix some kind of
'signal leakage'.

--hg



----- Original message -----
From: "Stephan Grossklass" <sgrossklass@...>
To: ultralightdx@...
Date: Fri, 08 Aug 2008 10:31:52 -0000
Subject: [ultralightdx] Re: Sony SRF M37V image problem solved

--- In ultralightdx@..., "dhsatyadhana" <satya@...> wrote:

Hi all:

Jim Kenny and I were talking on the phone and each pulled out our
M37V
with a 4.5 khz retrofitted filter installed. Both of us realized
that,
unlike the stock M37V, there were no images from strong locals (i.e.,
phantom 680 signal from local 1590, etc.). I then turned on my Sony
7600GR, and the images from my strong locals were blanketing the
dial, but nothing on the M37V!
Do keep in mind that the '7600GR with its wideband MW/LW
frontend will be more easily overloaded by strong AM
locals than a set with frontend tuning. (Its image
rejection is no greater than on shortwave, i.e. an
estimated 30..40 dB, for the same reason.)

But in any case, improved image rejection with a better
IF filter is a puzzler. Image rejection should be a
function solely of the frontend, i.e. RF tuning and mixer
(or, for most sets, RF tuning only, as regular mixers
have no inherent image rejection).

(A 680 kHz response from 1590 definitely is an image
if we're looking at a single conversion set with the LO
running above the tuned frequency - as it's normally the
case - and an IF of 455 kHz.)

Depending on achieved Q (and thus ultimately parts
quality), image rejection near the bottom end of MW for
sets with a single tuned IF circuit is about 30 to 50 dB.
It drops quite a bit towards the high end, but as there
are no strong signals directly above the band, this is
not an issue.

Anyway, I fail to see how the IF filter would play in
here. It can't really be spurious responses either.

Hmm. *scratches head*

Stephan


------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links




------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: Sony SRF M37V image problem solved

huelbe_garcia@fastimap.com <huelbe_garcia@...>
 

Hi group,

yesterday I was playing with Redsun RP300. It has an odd behaviour, if
you tune 10-20KHz away from a string, local station, you can still
listen to a demodulated and readable audio a little bit more 'trebly'.
It's like a 'leakage' between the RF/AF stages. I would consider it
normal if it was, say, 1-3KHz... but 20KHz is too much!

On the other hand E100 works just as one expect, if you tune about 5-7
KHz (or more) away from a local station you heard the splatter, kind of
noise non-readable.

For a moment, I thought the filter replacement could be fix some kind of
'signal leakage'.

--hg

----- Original message -----
From: "Stephan Grossklass" <sgrossklass@...>
To: ultralightdx@...
Date: Fri, 08 Aug 2008 10:31:52 -0000
Subject: [ultralightdx] Re: Sony SRF M37V image problem solved

--- In ultralightdx@..., "dhsatyadhana" <satya@...> wrote:

Hi all:

Jim Kenny and I were talking on the phone and each pulled out our
M37V
with a 4.5 khz retrofitted filter installed. Both of us realized
that,
unlike the stock M37V, there were no images from strong locals (i.e.,
phantom 680 signal from local 1590, etc.). I then turned on my Sony
7600GR, and the images from my strong locals were blanketing the
dial, but nothing on the M37V!
Do keep in mind that the '7600GR with its wideband MW/LW
frontend will be more easily overloaded by strong AM
locals than a set with frontend tuning. (Its image
rejection is no greater than on shortwave, i.e. an
estimated 30..40 dB, for the same reason.)

But in any case, improved image rejection with a better
IF filter is a puzzler. Image rejection should be a
function solely of the frontend, i.e. RF tuning and mixer
(or, for most sets, RF tuning only, as regular mixers
have no inherent image rejection).

(A 680 kHz response from 1590 definitely is an image
if we're looking at a single conversion set with the LO
running above the tuned frequency - as it's normally the
case - and an IF of 455 kHz.)

Depending on achieved Q (and thus ultimately parts
quality), image rejection near the bottom end of MW for
sets with a single tuned IF circuit is about 30 to 50 dB.
It drops quite a bit towards the high end, but as there
are no strong signals directly above the band, this is
not an issue.

Anyway, I fail to see how the IF filter would play in
here. It can't really be spurious responses either.

Hmm. *scratches head*

Stephan


------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: Sony SRF M37V image problem solved

Stephan Grossklass
 

--- In ultralightdx@..., "dhsatyadhana" <satya@...> wrote:

Hi all:

Jim Kenny and I were talking on the phone and each pulled out our
M37V
with a 4.5 khz retrofitted filter installed. Both of us realized
that,
unlike the stock M37V, there were no images from strong locals (i.e.,
phantom 680 signal from local 1590, etc.). I then turned on my Sony
7600GR, and the images from my strong locals were blanketing the
dial, but nothing on the M37V!
Do keep in mind that the '7600GR with its wideband MW/LW
frontend will be more easily overloaded by strong AM
locals than a set with frontend tuning. (Its image
rejection is no greater than on shortwave, i.e. an
estimated 30..40 dB, for the same reason.)

But in any case, improved image rejection with a better
IF filter is a puzzler. Image rejection should be a
function solely of the frontend, i.e. RF tuning and mixer
(or, for most sets, RF tuning only, as regular mixers
have no inherent image rejection).

(A 680 kHz response from 1590 definitely is an image
if we're looking at a single conversion set with the LO
running above the tuned frequency - as it's normally the
case - and an IF of 455 kHz.)

Depending on achieved Q (and thus ultimately parts
quality), image rejection near the bottom end of MW for
sets with a single tuned IF circuit is about 30 to 50 dB.
It drops quite a bit towards the high end, but as there
are no strong signals directly above the band, this is
not an issue.

Anyway, I fail to see how the IF filter would play in
here. It can't really be spurious responses either.

Hmm. *scratches head*

Stephan


Sony SRF M37V image problem solved

dhsatyadhana <satya@...>
 

Hi all:

Jim Kenny and I were talking on the phone and each pulled out our M37V
with a 4.5 khz retrofitted filter installed. Both of us realized that,
unlike the stock M37V, there were no images from strong locals (i.e.,
phantom 680 signal from local 1590, etc.). I then turned on my Sony
7600GR, and the images from my strong locals were blanketing the dial,
but nothing on the M37V! I even tried putting a Terk Loop up to it,
and the true 680 station just came in better.

So, it appears that with a decent filter, the horrid selectivity and
images problems with the stock unit are done away with! Not sure if it
does anything for spurs such as those that Gary DeBock finds at his
QTH. I will have to check tomorrow when spur DXing conditions are at
their peak :-).

I am speculating that, as the TV band goes away, M37Vs will be at close-
out prices pretty soon. With 5 memories and 9 khz tuning, perhaps not
a bad investment! The DX challenges that remain for this little guy
are working around the modest selectivity from the native micro-
ferrite, and the inability to tune 1 khz off like the Eton e100 can.

73 - Kevin S
Bainbridge Island, WA


Re: Sony SRF M37V image problem solved

Gary DeBock
 

Hi Kevin,
 
     The Sony SRF-M37V is indeed a puzzle--  an Ultralight with fairly decent sensitivity but barn-door selectivity, in stock form. Allen Willie in Newfoundland has used it to receive more new TA countries than all other Ultralight DXers combined, but for most of us, it's just not as competitive as an SRF-T615, E100 or DT-200VX.
 
     During a recent visit to Oregon, I noticed the new SRF-M37W model for sale at a Fred Meyer, so I picked up one for the Ultralight Summertime Shootout.  It looks almost identical to the SRF-M37V, but the TV audio coverage has been replaced by weather band coverage (like the DT-200VX and DT-400W).  Price was $34.95, like the old SRF-M37V.  It hasn't been tested out yet, but if Sony improves the AM IF filter in this new model, it would make a huge difference for us (even though it's probably wishful thinking).
 
     The 450 kHz IF of the model makes some decent filter modifications possible (as you and Jim have experienced), but the E100's 1 kHz tuning steps provide a huge advantage for 9 kHz split-frequency DXing, to chase TP's and TA's.  The 455 kHz IF of the E100 also makes installation of some VERY effective IF filters possible, such as the Murata CFJ455K5 ceramic filter.
 
     Your modified SRF-M37V's would make a very interesting project for a large loopstick transplant, Kevin.  We have discovered that whenever a selectivity boost is combined with a major sensitivity boost, an Ultralight suddenly becomes an Ultra-effective DX chaser.
 
                                                                    73, Gary
 
       




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Welcome to New Ultralightdx Members!

Gary DeBock
 

Hello Guys,
 
     We are thrilled at the rapid growth of Ultralight radio interest among the AM-DX community, and very happy to note that our Yahoo group site now has 59 members.
 
     We also extend our warmest welcome to new members markjtaylor73, darobin12001, radioman69uk, sgrossklass, flemingchris, and rjbrjb20022002.  Our worldwide enthusiast group is united by interest in AM-DXing with relatively inexpensive pocket radios, and we all stand ready to assist you in any possible way concerning technical questions, equipment reviews, and high-performance modifications.
 
     Please also take advantage of the numerous Ultralight radio-related files posted on dxer.ca, truly a treasure trove of helpful information for all DXers interested in the excitement and challenge of pocket radio AM-DXing (for which we again express our gratitude to Colin Newell).
 
73 and Best Wishes,
 
Gary DeBock (N7EKX)
Puyallup, WA USA 
 
 




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Re: Potential Ultralight Radio – Grundig Mini 300

bbwrwy
 

I finally opened the case of my Mini 300 to take a look at what's
inside, but made no adjustments. My guess is alignment would similar
to the E100.

To disassemble, first remove three screws (two in the battery
compartment) and slowly lift the back from the bottom slowly to detach
it from a hook at top right (from the back). The hook could be broken
if not done correctly. Once unhooked, the back is free to set aside.

Now remove the two screws holding the main circuit board to the front
of the case. Below it you will notice a second circuit board attached
to the front case above the speaker. It's the frequency
counter/display circuit and there's no reason to remove it.

There is an approximately 5 x 0.7 cm. (1.9" x 0.27 ") ferrite bar
antenna at the top of the main circuit board. It looks like a shorten
version of the one in the E100. Like the E100, the antenna coil is
held in place with wax, so the 600 kHz adjustment should he easy. I
didn't identify the 1400 kHz adjustment point - it's one of the eleven
on the front of the circuit board.

To reassemble the receiver, first secure the main circuit board to the
case front ensuring the band switch is in its correct position. Then
hook the case back to the front checking to see the battery
compartment springs fit back into place. Finally replace the three
screws holding the two halves together.

My opinion is the tuning control on the Mini 300 keeps it from being
used for serious DXing. It's extremely tricky to use and takes a very
practiced thumb or forefinger to get it right on the desired
frequency. A 3.5 (1.4") cm. tuning control wheel is coupled directly
to a small variable capacitor. It would probably benefit from some
type of venier tuning apparatus.

Richard Allen


Re: loggings last night

robert ross
 

At 12:47 PM 8/6/2008, ALLEN WILLIE wrote:

Hi Guys,

Caught a couple new ones last night and early this morning

1530 khz - 7:44 UTC 8/6/08 - XEUR Mexico City, Mexico w/ mexican style
music and "Radio Fiesta " ID between songs, announcer in Spanish ; good
(My first Mexico station on Ultralights)

Another Good One Allen....and all I can say to that is......OLE!!!!

Wish I could hear that one....and I'm a lot closer to it than you are!!

73...ROB.


Robert S. Ross VA3SW
Box 1003, Stn. B.
London, Ontario
CANADA N6A5K1

Antique/Vintage Radio Enthusiast
Amateur Radio Stations VA3SW/VE3JFC

Defy Physics.....Play Table Tennis!! (Ping Pong with an Attitude)
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