Date   

Hot-Rodded Sony ICF-SW7600GR Performance Report

Gary DeBock
 

Hello Guys,
 
     The Sony ICF-SW7600GR is compact digital SSB portable with reasonably good MW performance, using a stock 4.75" x .37" fixed-coil loopstick for the 530-1700 kHz frequencies.  At $134.80 plus shipping from Amazon.com (via Gigabargain), it has excellent Synch detector function for a portable, as well as decent shortwave performance.
 
     Having a sudden need for a very compact SSB-equipped MW portable to use as a "spotting receiver" for South Pacific DX targets during a short Ultralight Radio DXpedition to Grayland, Washington, I became intrigued with the idea of replacing the SW7600GR's stock loopstick with a 7.5" Amidon ferrite bar, wound with 40/44 Litz wire.  This combination of MW frequency-optimized ferrite and Litz wire has provided huge sensitivity gains not only in the SRF-39FP and E100 Ultralight models, but also in the larger ICF-2010 traditional DX portable.  Upon checking the stock SW7600GR loopstick, it was found to be a smaller-sized copy of the ICF-2010 loopstick system, having a fixed (non-alignable) larger coil and a smaller tickler coil, to optimize spurious signal rejection.
 
     The SW7600GR loopstick was easily replaced with a 7.5" x .5" Amidon ferrite bar-based antenna, wound with 40/44 Litz wire to match the 983 mh inductance of the stock main coil.  The sensitivity improvement was very dramatic, boosting the weak-signal performance of this compact portable past that of a stock ICF-2010.  This was a total reversal of its performance prior to the modification, in which the SW7600GR was clearly inferior to the stock 2010 on all MW frequencies.
 
     At Grayland, the newly hot-rodded SW7600GR performed very well as an SSB "spotting receiver," with different TP station frequencies stored in memory, easily accessed by pushing single buttons.  SSB carrier strength of the "targets" could be quickly checked, and the direction of the received signal could be easily determined by the new loopstick's excellent nulling ability.
 
     On the domestic frequencies, the newly modified SW7600GR provided lots of sensitivity, with easy loggings of KPUA-670 and KGU-760 in Hawaii.  For the 9 kHz split targets in the South Pacific, however, the modified SW7600GR's sensitivity alone wasn't quite adequate to keep up with the modified Eton E100 Ultralight, which had a Murata CFJ455K5 premium ceramic IF filter installed (the same narrow filter as in the Eton E1).  The modified E100 could split off Fiji-639, Tonga-1017, 2ZB-1035 and 2YA-567 significantly better than could the modified SW7600GR, which had to contend with more domestic slop.
 
     Despite this, the compact Sony's function as an SSB "spotting receiver" was excellent, and it directed the AM-mode only Eton E100 to the "hot" frequencies very well.  9 kHz SSB carrier strength can usually be checked even in the presence of domestic splatter, and the SW7600GR was great for this purpose.
 
     For domestic DXers, this modified ICF-SW7600GR would provide a great sensitivity improvement over the stock model, for a very reasonable cost in parts (under $30 for the ferrite bar, Litz wire and other items).  The modification is easy to perform, and the unit remains very compact (a photo is on the Ultralightdx Yahoo group site in the "Roll Your Own DXing Monster" album).  Nulling ability is excellent, and the loopstick's external mounting provides extremely quiet reception compared to the stock antenna, crammed as it is inside a cramped cabinet next to the SW whip antenna.  The full modification article should be written shortly, for those interested in this impressive performance upgrade. 
 
     For serious 9 kHz split-frequency DXers, however, a premium IF filter upgrade would be very helpful in chasing TP's and TA's next to domestic splatter.  The good news is that with an IF of 455 kHz, the ICF-SW7600GR can be modified with the same premium ceramic filter that has transformed the tiny E100 into a DXing sensation this summer.  Well, there's always a nice-to-do project that is on the drawing board...
 
73,  Gary DeBock      




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Re: Potential Ultralight Radio – Grundig Mini 300

John H. Bryant <bjohnorcas@...>
 

Steve,

Thanks for the excellent review of the 300.  I was interested enough that I went to the eham reviews to read what other users had to say and most were reasonably positive. However, one user who seemed knowledgeable noted quite a number of images and even some breakthrough from shortwave broadcasters.  He was unsure as to whether he had a defective, mis-aligned unit or whether this ight be a characteristic.  It might be worth taking a look at that problem, if you didn't. Here are the comments:


My Grundig Mini 300PE performs very well with the exception of the MW (standard AM) band. My set experiences poor image rejection. Ex. a station on several miles away (WTOP Wheaton MD) 1500Khz can clearly be heard at a tuning of 590Khz. That tells that this radio uses an IF freq. of 540Khz.

I was surprized initially at all the whistles and hetrodynes that occurred at night time at frequencies above 1000Khz. With some investigation, I've discovered that this radio is receiving short wave transmissions from the 5 to 7 Mhz band. At a tuning of 1082.5Khz, WWCR on 5.070Mhz is tremendously strong. By some simple arithmetic calculations, it appears that the third harmonic of the local oscillator (at the 1082.5Khz tuning) is at 4.62Mhz--below 5.070Mhz by the IF frequency of 450Khz. For the math to work exactly right, the exact receiver tuning would need to be 1.090Khz, so that the radio's frequency display may be a bit off by -7.5Khz. Similarly, I receive other shortwave stations where there is no conflicting AM broadcaster. The FM/SW telescoping antenna seems to be active on MW; touching it attenuates reception. It's as though there is no front end tuning.

This is poorer AM performance than a '60s shirt pocket six transistor radio.

It's hard to believe that this performance is typical for this radio. If I got a bad one, someone please say so.

http://www.eham.net/reviews/detail/4761?page=2

No one responded to this man, either way.

Thanks for your work!

John B.
Orcas Island, WA, USA
Rcvrs: WiNRADiO 313e, Eton e1, Ultralights
Antennas: Two 70' x 100' Conti Super Loops, West and Northwest






loggings last night 8/4/08

Allen Willie
 

 
Hi Everyone,
 
Pretty good Transatlantic session last night, decent discernable audio on just about  every split frequency. Including a lot of middle east stations.
 
Managed to notch a few new ones also using the SRF-M37V barefoot
 
1170 khz - 01:06 UTC 8/4/08 - UNITED ARAB EMIRATES , R. Farda  Dabiya, w/ arabic song and commentary; ID ; good
 
1251 khz - 01:12 UTC 8/4/08 - LIBYA , Voice of Africa Tripoli w/ type of arabic speech or reading , mention of Europe , good
 
1341 khz - 00:51 UTC 8/4/08 - HUNGARY, R Magyar Katolikis, Siófok w/ religious talk in Hungarian,  musical selections ; (good at times stronger than the usual  R. Ulster)
***NEW ONE *** New Country on ultralights also****
 
1503 khz - 00:35 UTC 8/4/08 - IRAN , IRIB Tehran w/ persian chants and commentary; good
 
1521 khz - 00:45 UTC 8/4/08 - SAUDI ARABIA , BSKSA Duba, w arabic commentary, mentions of arabie often ; (good as is the case most nights here )
 
1539 khz - 00:22 UTC 8/4/08 - UNITED ARAB EMIRATES , VOA Relay Dubai, man in arabic mentions of Afghanistan, mention Voice of America ; fair *** NEW ONE ***
 
1540 khz - 05:07 UTC 8/4/08 - KXEL Waterloo, Iowa w/ CBS News, Trucking Ad , ID ; good (stronger than usual WDCD ) *** NEW ONE*** on ultralights
 
1548 khz - 00:42 UTC 8/4/08 - KUWAIT, R. Sawa Kuwait City w/ arabic commentary and music ; ID "Radio Sawa" good
 
1575 khz - 00:40 UTC 8/4/08 - UNITED ARAB EMIRATES , R. Farda w/ arabic talk and song by the Bee Gees; good
 
73
 
Allen Willie
St. John's, Newfoundland
SRF-M37V barefoot
 
 
 
 


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Re: new country logged

MarkWA1ION
 

In Oct. 1991 when I was on a business trip to Mountain View, CA -
still some distance from the shore - I had no problem hearing Japan
on 774 on a "barefoot" Sony ICF-2010 in my hotel room around local
dawn. I think 747 and 828 were making showings too.

Mark Connelly, WA1ION - Billerica, MA, USA

--- In ultralightdx@..., "Dennis Gibson" <wb6tnb@...>
wrote:
I'm almost within spitting distance of the Pacific Ocean but have
never really tried for any TP's. The problem is that staying up until
prime DX time messes up my body clock. Even on weekends I can't stay
up long enough. If I do I can't wake up well enough on Monday morning.
I have good radios; Sony ICF-2010 (stock), all three models of
Superadio, both Realistic TRF models, Radio Shack DX-398 (Sangean
ATS-909; a big disappointment) and a few more. I also have both the
Sony SRF-39FP and 59; both tweaked by Gary. I have a Select-a-Tenna,
which works well. I can't put up any outdoor antennas. I don't know if
I have much of a chance of hearing any exotic DX. I have three locals
(1290, 1340 and 1490) one mile away (all on the same tower!) but they
are relatively low power; none more than 1 KW.

I've always been impressed at the TA's you hear but don't know if I
have a chance of hearing anything spectacular from here with the
equipment I have.

--- In ultralightdx@..., "MarkWA1ION" <MarkWA1ION@...>
wrote:

There is no substitute in this hobby for being right at the
seashore.

Even though my home QTH is only 15 miles inland on some bearings,
the
difference in signal strengths versus what I notice at coastal sites
such as my favorite DXpedition QTH at Granite Pier in Rockport, MA
(less than an hour's drive away) is phenomenal. At home I have have
heard maybe 2 or 3 Brazilian stations. At the shore, well over a
dozen ... even though I'm out there less than a tenth of one-percent
of the time I'm at home.

Some European, African, and Middle Eastern stations make it to the
house, even on Ultralights at times, but there is no comparison to
the greater variety and often monster-level strengths observed at
top-
gun shore sites in Rockport, Rowley, Duxbury, Eastham, etc.

Mark Connelly, WA1ION - Billerica, MA, USA
15 miles / 24 km NW of Boston


Re: Potential Ultralight Radio – Grundig Mini 300

Gary DeBock
 

Hello Steve,
 
     Thank you for your efforts in reviewing the Grundig Mini 300.  The E100 itself will be reviewed as part of the Midsummer Ultralight Radio Shootout, along with the Sony SRF-M97V, SRF-S84, SRF-M37W and DT-400W.
 
                                    73,  Gary
 




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Re: Modified E100 South Pacific DX mp3's

Gary DeBock
 

Thanks Guy,
 
     Your suggestion and procurement of the Murata narrow filters made a huge difference in the effectiveness of the modified E100's.  Without the narrow filters (even with great sensitivity), the modified E100 would have a tough time dealing with un-nullable domestic QRM, in chasing the DU's at Grayland.
 
     The combination of great sensitivity and great selectivity has produced results that surprise us all.
 
                                                    73,  Gary
 
                                                                         
 
    




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Re: Modified E100 South Pacific DX mp3's

Guy Atkins
 

Gary, Great going with those super catches! I will have to check out the recordings. That was quite a feat and must have been a lot of fun.

I look forward to getting closer to the coast again...I am in St. Louis right now. ;^)

73,

Guy

Sent via BlackBerry from T-Mobile


From: D1028Gary@...
Date: Sun, 3 Aug 2008 18:44:14 EDT
To: <ultralightdx@...>
Subject: [ultralightdx] Modified E100 South Pacific DX mp3's

Hello Guys,
 
     The modified E100 (with a 7.5" slider loopstick and narrow filter) really provided some excitement in Grayland, WA on July 31st, receiving Fiji-639, Tonga-1017, 2ZB-1035 in New Zealand, and KPUA-670 in Hawaii.  I wish that all of you could have experienced the fun of chasing Ultralight South Pacific DX on an exceptional morning!
 
     Uploaded to the Ultralightdx group site were a couple of mp3's from that superb session, of Fiji-639 and 2ZB-1035.  The Fiji-639 mp3 starts off with a marginal mumbling ID in Pidgin English, but quickly gets stronger with Polynesian choral music.  The 2ZB-1035 mp3 was my first recorded ID from New Zealand, despite hearing 2YA-567 and 2YC-657 many times with sleep-inducing EZL music.
 
     John Bryant had already received all of these stations with an E100 hooked up to his 4-element Wellbrook Array, but I doubt that he had as much fun as I did, using a 7.5" slider loopstick at a picnic table :>)
 
                                     73,  Gary
 
      




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Modified E100 South Pacific DX mp3's

Gary DeBock
 

Hello Guys,
 
     The modified E100 (with a 7.5" slider loopstick and narrow filter) really provided some excitement in Grayland, WA on July 31st, receiving Fiji-639, Tonga-1017, 2ZB-1035 in New Zealand, and KPUA-670 in Hawaii.  I wish that all of you could have experienced the fun of chasing Ultralight South Pacific DX on an exceptional morning!
 
     Uploaded to the Ultralightdx group site were a couple of mp3's from that superb session, of Fiji-639 and 2ZB-1035.  The Fiji-639 mp3 starts off with a marginal mumbling ID in Pidgin English, but quickly gets stronger with Polynesian choral music.  The 2ZB-1035 mp3 was my first recorded ID from New Zealand, despite hearing 2YA-567 and 2YC-657 many times with sleep-inducing EZL music.
 
     John Bryant had already received all of these stations with an E100 hooked up to his 4-element Wellbrook Array, but I doubt that he had as much fun as I did, using a 7.5" slider loopstick at a picnic table :>)
 
                                     73,  Gary
 
      




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Re: Potential Ultralight Radio – Grundig Mini 300

satya@...
 

Hey Steve:

Thanks for the Grundig Mini 300 review! I have seen this unit around, and
have always wondered how it performs. The analog/digital tuning which
allows 1 khz fine tuning would be a nice thing to have. Your testing
methodology is great - I wish I was so thorough :-).

It looks like the 300's no substitute for the "Jumbo Shrimp" Eton E100 but
still manages to hold its own. Given the uneven sensitivity results, I
wonder if an alignment would perk it up?

As for selectivity, since the E100 is the stock selectivity champ, it
wasn't a fair fight: do you have a Sony SRF 39 or 59 to compare
selectivity with? That may be an intersting quick comparison. (***Hey
Gary/John/Guy*** - I wonder if the 300 would accept a Murata filter...)

I look forward to when you get the time and energy to keep going on your
stable of Ultralights to see how the other little guys fare!

73 - Kevin S
Bainbridge Island, WA

Based on the fact that my totally non-scientific results returned over
50% in both categories (sensitivity and selectivity), I think the
Grundig Mini 300 world be a worthy addition to the list of Ultralight
Radios!

73 and Great DX,

Steve N5WBI
Houston TX


Potential Ultralight Radio – Grundig Mini 300

Steve Ponder N5WBI <n5wbi@...>
 

Radios

Radio Reviewed:
  Grundig Mini 300 (unmodified)
Radio Used for Comparison:  Eton E-100 (unmodified)

Description of the Grundig Mini 300

Frequency Coverage:  AM (525-1710 kHz), FM (88-108 MHz), SW1/49M (5.95-6.20 MHz), SW2/41M (7.00-7.30 MHz), SW3/31M (9.50-9.95 MHz), SW4/25M (11.60-12.10 MHz), SW5/22M (13.60-13.80 MHz), SW6/19M (15.10-15.80 MHz), and SW7/16M (17.50-17.90 MHz).

Size:  Fits in your pocket.  Dimensions are 2.6 x 7 x 1.2 inches (65 x 170 x 23 mm).  Weight without batteries is 4 ounces (127 g).

Tuning:  Analog with digital display.  Tuning is accomplished by means of thumbwheel on right side of radio.  MW tunes in 0.5 kHz increments.  FM tunes in 50 kHz increments.  Shortwave tunes in 5 kHz increments.  Bands are selected by a 9-position slide switch on the left side of the radio.  FM Stereo is available through the headphone jack, located on the left side of the radio just below the band switch.

Antennas:  FM and Shortwave reception use a telescopic antenna that is located on the left side of the radio.  There is a molded part of the radio case that extends approximately 2.125 inches (57 mm) above the top of the radio to protect the antenna.  Unfortunately, it also prevents the antenna from swiveling or turning.  You must occasionally orient the entire radio for best FM reception.  Fully extended, the telescopic antenna adds another 19.75 inches (502 mm) to the overall height of the radio.  This often causes the radio to tip over.   The AM band uses an internal ferrite bar loop antenna oriented parallel to the top of the radio.

Power Source:  The radio operates on 2 AA batteries.  There is no provision for an external DC power adapter.

Review Strategy

I checked the Mini 300 for (1) sensitivity and (2) selectivity using the Eton E-100 as my base for comparion.

For the sensitivity portion of the review, I selected two stations on the high end of the AM dial, one a local TIS station on 1610 kHz, the other a semi-local on 1460 kHz.  I also selected two stations on the low end of the AM dial, both semi-locals, one on 550 kHz, the other on 560 kHz.  I also threw in another TIS station on 830 kHz and a station in a neighboring state on 870 kHz that can be heard well at my location.  The sensitivity review was performed during the middle afternoon, before local sunset started affecting the signals.

For the selectivity portion of the review, I chose two local stations, one on 740 kHz, the other on 1480 kHz, that are (IMHO) notorious for splattering their immediate adjacent channels at night.  This is due, not to the fault of the stations, but to the quality of the radio - hence the reason for the test.  So, I compared the Mini 300 and the E-100 on 730, 750, 1470, and 1480 kHz at approximately 2 hours after local sunset in order to give the station's signals time to settle down into their nighttime strengths.

Grading Scale

To "quantify" my completely subjective evaluations, I used the same scale that Gerry Thomas of Radio Plus uses in his evaluations:

5 - Local (all background noise "quieted")
4 - Easily Readable, but not like a local
3 - Readable, but with some effort
2 - Intermittently readable
1 - Present, but not readable
0 - Not detectable

Sensitivity Results

 

TIS

1610 kHz

 

1460 kHz

KTSA

550 kHz

KLVI

560 kHz

TIS

830 kHz

WWL

870 kHz

Mini 300

4.0

3.5

1.0

5.0

3.0

2.5

E100

5.0

5.0

4.0

5.0

3.5

3.5


Selectivity Results

 

XEX

730 kHz

WSB

750 kHz

 

1470 kHz

 

1490 kHz

Mini 300

2.5

2.5

2.75

2.5

E100

3.5

3.75

3.5

3.5


Selectivity Results

 

XEX

730 kHz

WSB

750 kHz

 

1470 kHz

 

1490 kHz

Mini 300

2.5

2.5

2.75

2.5

E100

3.5

3.75

3.5

3.5


Overall Results

 

Sensitivity

Selectivity

Grundig Mini 300

63.33 %

51.25 %

Eton E-100

86.67 %

71.25 %


Based on the fact that my totally non-scientific results returned over 50% in both categories (sensitivity and selectivity), I think the Grundig Mini 300 world be a worthy addition to the list of Ultralight Radios!

Disclaimer:  The opinions stated in this review are myown.  I personally own all of the radiosthat I reviewed.  Measurements,calculations, and estimates were performed strictly by ear and reflect my bestjudgment alone.

73 and Great DX,

Steve N5WBI
Houston TX


Re: new country logged

John H. Bryant <bjohnorcas@...>
 

Dennis,

Ya just gotta try some of the Pacific stuff at dawn.... If nothing else, wait for the middle of the Asian season in late September and October...  With DST and sunrise so late, even night owls have a shot!

John B.




At 02:27 AM 8/2/2008 +0000, you wrote:

I'm almost within spitting distance of the Pacific Ocean but have
never really tried for any TP's. The problem is that staying up until
prime DX time messes up my body clock. Even on weekends I can't stay
up long enough. If I do I can't wake up well enough on Monday morning.
I have good radios; Sony ICF-2010 (stock), all three models of
Superadio, both Realistic TRF models, Radio Shack DX-398 (Sangean
ATS-909; a big disappointment) and a few more. I also have both the
Sony SRF-39FP and 59; both tweaked by Gary. I have a Select-a-Tenna,
which works well. I can't put up any outdoor antennas. I don't know if
I have much of a chance of hearing any exotic DX. I have three locals
(1290, 1340 and 1490) one mile away (all on the same tower!) but they
are relatively low power; none more than 1 KW.

I've always been impressed at the TA's you hear but don't know if I
have a chance of hearing anything spectacular from here with the
equipment I have.

--


Re: MW Image Discovered on E-100

satya@...
 

Hi Steve:

If you have the time and interest, a review of any one of those 5 would be
great!

Perhaps 10-15 minutes might show if any of these little guys have the
right stuff. Give 'em all a quick sensitivity check on a weak semi-local
during the day, one at the top and one at the bottom of the dial, compared
to the E-100 - that should quickly let you know which ones are worth
pursuing further. Then a quick selectivity check up against one your
favorite sloppers at night.

If any of them pass these two categories, we may have a new contender!!! I
can see the confused retailers now...

73 - Kevin S
Bainbridge Island, WA

Has anybody come forward with reviews of any of the radios listed on
the "Potential UltraLight Contenders" page? I have 5 of them - the
Kaito
WRX911, the Tecsun R9702, the Degen DE312, the Tecsun DR-910, and
the Grundig 300. Not that I have tons of time to devote to writing the
reviews, but maybe I could do at least one or two of the group's "Most
Wanted" if you could let me know what they are ...

73,

Steve N5WBI
Houston TX




Re: new country logged

Dennis Gibson <wb6tnb@...>
 

I'm almost within spitting distance of the Pacific Ocean but have
never really tried for any TP's. The problem is that staying up until
prime DX time messes up my body clock. Even on weekends I can't stay
up long enough. If I do I can't wake up well enough on Monday morning.
I have good radios; Sony ICF-2010 (stock), all three models of
Superadio, both Realistic TRF models, Radio Shack DX-398 (Sangean
ATS-909; a big disappointment) and a few more. I also have both the
Sony SRF-39FP and 59; both tweaked by Gary. I have a Select-a-Tenna,
which works well. I can't put up any outdoor antennas. I don't know if
I have much of a chance of hearing any exotic DX. I have three locals
(1290, 1340 and 1490) one mile away (all on the same tower!) but they
are relatively low power; none more than 1 KW.

I've always been impressed at the TA's you hear but don't know if I
have a chance of hearing anything spectacular from here with the
equipment I have.

--- In ultralightdx@..., "MarkWA1ION" <MarkWA1ION@...> wrote:

There is no substitute in this hobby for being right at the seashore.

Even though my home QTH is only 15 miles inland on some bearings, the
difference in signal strengths versus what I notice at coastal sites
such as my favorite DXpedition QTH at Granite Pier in Rockport, MA
(less than an hour's drive away) is phenomenal. At home I have have
heard maybe 2 or 3 Brazilian stations. At the shore, well over a
dozen ... even though I'm out there less than a tenth of one-percent
of the time I'm at home.

Some European, African, and Middle Eastern stations make it to the
house, even on Ultralights at times, but there is no comparison to
the greater variety and often monster-level strengths observed at top-
gun shore sites in Rockport, Rowley, Duxbury, Eastham, etc.

Mark Connelly, WA1ION - Billerica, MA, USA
15 miles / 24 km NW of Boston


I Cut the Ferrite Successfully!

John H. Bryant <bjohnorcas@...>
 

I finally got time to try cutting a small ferrite bar on my diamond-bladed tile saw.  I'd been cautioned to use plenty of water so as not to damage the annealing. I did.  It cut VERY easily and cleanly. I could tell no rise in temperature by touch, immediately after making the cut. It worked like a charm.  Thanks to everyone who made suggestions last week.

Someone asked why would you want to cut a ferrite bar??? Well, one reason might be if you were making a large bundled bar antenna where the final bundle is several bars in cross section (usually 3 or 7) and several bars long.  One way to help the lines of magnetism not see the end (butt) joints between individual bars is to stagger the ends at least one bar diameter... two is probably better. If you stagger the ends of the individual bars, you end up with a ragged end at the front and back of the bundle.... so, you might want to cut things off flush, for magnetic as well as aesthetic reasons. 

Another reason...mine in this case... is jamming a large high-grade IF filter in a little bitty radio... the E100. Since I intend to DX with either a larger ferrite bar or with a normal outside antenna, the stock bar is only needed as the core of an inductive coil arrangement for the outside antenna. It could also be used to pick up local stations when no outside antenna is attached. Neither of those functions require the size bar that comes in the E100 and I desperately need the space for the IF filter, so, I just cut an inch off'n mine and I'm happy as a clam.  Cutting the 3.3 inch bar to 2.3 inches did not change the inductance of the coil much, so sliding the bar a little farther to the center corrects the alignment. Losing 1/3 of the bar length should reduce sensitivity and nulling capability somewhat, but in this application, that is plenty OK.

If you've read this far and don't own a tile saw, you'll be happy to know that Lowe's stores have them to cut customers tile and I'll bet that Home Depot does, too. Likely catching the staff at a quiet time and crossing their palm with a bit of silver could get your bar cut very nicely.

Thanks again for the suggestions!

John B.
Orcas Island, WA, USA
Rcvrs: WiNRADiO 313e, Eton e1, Ultralights
Antennas: Two 70' x 100' Conti Super Loops, West and Northwest


Fiji-639 and Tonga-1017 Logged on 7.5" "Slider" Loopstick E100 at Grayland

Gary DeBock
 

Hello Guys,
 
     The astonishing performance of the sensitivity and selectivity-enhanced Eton E100 (a joint project with Guy Atkins and John Bryant) has continued during a short DXpedition trip to Grayland, Washington.  With new loggings of Fiji, Tonga and Hawaii during a superb DX opening on July 31st, this compact Ultralight DXpedition wonder has again proven to be the breakthrough that serious transoceanic DXers were hoping for.
 
     Having a premium 455 kHz ceramic IF filter (the Murata CFJ455K5) recommended by Guy and an innovative "sliding coil" loopstick jointly developed with John, this tiny wonder has sensitivity and selectivity far out of proportion to its size.  With 5 Aussies, 3 Kiwis, Tonga, Fiji and Hawaii already logged on the 7.5" Amidon Loopstick model, Ultralight transoceanic DXing is suddenly looking very competitive indeed.
 
     John, Guy and I will shortly be providing articles on the development and evaluation of this modified E100, with the hope that other TP and TA-chasing DXers will feel motivated to create their own little Ultralight Transoceanic wonder.  Good luck, and get ready for a DXing thrill like no other!
 
                                                                                           73,  Gary DeBock
 
   




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Re: Toshiba RP-F11

John H. Bryant <bjohnorcas@...>
 

Steve,

I doubt that there will be flame attacks here... I think most folks here are old enough to know several things like a)DXing is an Art, not a Science, 2)When we are operating at the threshold of intelligibility, errors are bound to occur 3)The ionosphere is a bumpy, unpredictable, non-linear mess (thank goodness.) 4) Flame throwing really damps down free exchange of ideas and information and causes some of the best,  most creative people to look elsewhere for friends....

So, I think that I can speak for all in saying that we are really glad that you've joined this little Corner of Joy that we have going in the hobby.  We look forward to more notes from you, loggings, etc., and I personally, look forward to seeing you in the awards program one of these days.  Some of the beginning awards are relatively easy to achieve... but they get challenging in a hurry :>)

John B.  





At 12:22 AM 7/31/2008 -0500, you wrote:

John,

Methinks I may have muddied the waters a bit. Sorry for all
the confusion, especially coming from a newbie to the group
like myself.

I think the folks at Universal Radio are the ones that are
confused. The dimensions I used for the RP-F11 in my first
e-mail came from this page:

http://www.universal-radio.com/catalog/portable/RPF11.html

which are "5.1 x 3.1 x 1.1 inches" or 17.391 cubic inches.

But, like you discovered, another click to this page:

http://www.universal-radio.com/catalog/portable/RPF11s.html

reveals another set of dimensions which are
"7.8 x 4.5 x 1.325 inches" or 46.5075 cubic inches, which
completely blows it out of the water as being an UL radio.

So, I dug through Fibber McGee's closet and found my very
own RP-F11 and measured it. Here are my findings:

7.625 x 4.5 x 1.25 inches, or 42.89 cubic inches.

Bottom Line - NOT QUALIFIED as an Ultralight.

So, once again, sorry for making a mountain out of a
molehill. I'm just happy that all of this got me motivated
to dig my RP-F11 out of the "Radio Archives."

BTW - The RP-F11 was also sold as the Kenwood R-11 in
certain parts of the world.

Thanks, everybody, for humouring me and not flaming me
as would have happened in other not-to-be-named radio
reflectors.

73 & Great DX,

Steve N5WBI
Houston TX


Re: new country logged

MarkWA1ION
 

There is no substitute in this hobby for being right at the seashore.

Even though my home QTH is only 15 miles inland on some bearings, the
difference in signal strengths versus what I notice at coastal sites
such as my favorite DXpedition QTH at Granite Pier in Rockport, MA
(less than an hour's drive away) is phenomenal. At home I have have
heard maybe 2 or 3 Brazilian stations. At the shore, well over a
dozen ... even though I'm out there less than a tenth of one-percent
of the time I'm at home.

Some European, African, and Middle Eastern stations make it to the
house, even on Ultralights at times, but there is no comparison to
the greater variety and often monster-level strengths observed at top-
gun shore sites in Rockport, Rowley, Duxbury, Eastham, etc.

Mark Connelly, WA1ION - Billerica, MA, USA
15 miles / 24 km NW of Boston

<<
Great Work Allen....that puts you ONLY 42 COUNTRIES ahead of me!!!
HHAHHHHAHHA........If I live to be 185 I may catch you!!!! HAH!!

We're gonna have to go on DX-Peditions to Deserted Islands and start
up a
station....so you'll have something new to shoot for....

73...ROB.


Robert S. Ross VA3SW
Box 1003, Stn. B.
London, Ontario
CANADA N6A5K1

Antique/Vintage Radio Enthusiast
Amateur Radio Stations VA3SW/VE3JFC

Defy Physics.....Play Table Tennis!! (Ping Pong with an Attitude)
«¤»¥«¤»§«¤»¥«¤»§«¤»¥«¤»§«¤»¥«¤»§«¤»¥«¤»§«¤»¥«¤»¥«¤»§«¤»¥«


Re: new country logged

robert ross
 

At 09:52 PM 7/31/2008, you wrote:



Good evening from the North Atlantic,

I have a new country and new station to report tonight that I just
heard on the SRF-39FP Ultralight, with a little fancy footwork and turning the radio to null out my local here in St. John's on 640 that
left a signal all alone on 630 by itself . These ultralights are sure
great at nulling a nearby signal. If any prospective newcomers are
reading this message and thinking of joining us in this fabulous hobby
of ultralight dxing a lot of nice surprises are in the airwaves using
these radios.

My log as follows: Country # 51 on the ultralights

630 khz - 8/1/08 1:21 UTC NRK 1 Vigra Norway w/ man interviewing a
woman about a novel she wrote, commentary in Norwegian ; good

Great Work Allen....that puts you ONLY 42 COUNTRIES ahead of me!!!
HHAHHHHAHHA........If I live to be 185 I may catch you!!!! HAH!!

We're gonna have to go on DX-Peditions to Deserted Islands and start up a
station....so you'll have something new to shoot for....

73...ROB.


Robert S. Ross VA3SW
Box 1003, Stn. B.
London, Ontario
CANADA N6A5K1

Antique/Vintage Radio Enthusiast
Amateur Radio Stations VA3SW/VE3JFC

Defy Physics.....Play Table Tennis!! (Ping Pong with an Attitude)
«¤»¥«¤»§«¤»¥«¤»§«¤»¥«¤»§«¤»¥«¤»§«¤»¥«¤»§«¤»¥«¤»¥«¤»§«¤»¥«


new country logged

Allen Willie
 

 
 
  Good evening from the North Atlantic,
 
  I have a new country and new station  to report tonight that I just heard on the SRF-39FP Ultralight, with a little fancy footwork and turning the radio to null out my local here in St. John's on 640 that left a signal all alone on 630  by itself . These ultralights are sure great at nulling a nearby signal. If any prospective newcomers are reading this message and  thinking of  joining us in this fabulous hobby of ultralight dxing a lot of nice surprises are in the airwaves using these radios.
 
My log as follows: Country  # 51 on the ultralights
 
630 khz - 8/1/08  1:21 UTC  NRK 1 Vigra Norway  w/ man interviewing a woman about a novel she wrote, commentary in Norwegian ; good
 


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Re: loggings on SRF-M37V

bbwrwy
 

Thanks for reporting KWHN-1650. The station had been off since early
spring due to flood damage at the transmitter site. It's good to
learn they've returned. I'll have to try to log them this evening
before sunset. It shouldn't be too difficult a reach at only 296
kilometers.

I logged a couple of new Arkansas stations within the last 24 hours,
KGFL-1110 (5 kW @ 458 km) and KCAB-980 (32 W @ 406 km), using a
SRF-T615.

Good DX. While you're hearing signals from across an ocean, I'm just
hoping to catch something from over the river.

Richard Allen.