Date   

Re: FM DXing with Ultralights-- The Top Models

starship20012001 <starship_2001@...>
 

Gary Wrote:
4) Eton E100 As long as you don't care much about audio quality, -
-------<End Quote

The eton E 100 i have has very good sound quality on FM. I DX with
the stock speaker highs are nice and crisp. Vocals ome thru very
clearly. bass is of course limited by speaker size. I have had some
excellent new tropo loggings with it and having a great fM tropo
season .


wznz 1460

lrdheat
 

Something of a record for me...I have heard both coasts via relatively modest 5 KW stations on my SRF-59 over the past 2 nights.:

 

Wed night-1080 KHz KSCO Santa Cruz, CA (KRLD 1080 50 KW off the air!)

Thur night-1460 KHZ WZNZ Jacksonville, FL

 

I am in Laredo, TX

 

Richard "Heatwave" Berler



Re: FM DXing with Ultralights-- The Top Models

Carl DeWhitt
 

--- I have not tried the external antenna idea with my E-100 but will
when i get the chance.In regards to audio,i disagree with Gary though
this is a matter of personal opinion perhaps.My audio on the FM on the
E-100 is acceptable for a ULR when using the Sony headphones i got
with my SRF-M37W.I have fm dx receptions from Oklahoma,Texas,Kansas
and Missouri with the E-100.
Carl DeWhitt
Ponca City,Oklahoma

In ultralightdx@..., Robert Ross <va3sw@...> wrote:

At 05:59 PM 7/17/2008, D1028Gary@... wrote:


4) Eton E100 With a built-in whip antenna and more memories than
you'll
ever need, it provides FM reception fairly similar to that of the
DT-200VX, although the reception can be improved dramatically by
placing
the whip antenna next to a decent FM external antenna lead-in wire.


Gary.....I can confirm what you say about placing the whip closer to an
External Antenna on the E-100 Model.

While I was on my Cruise 2 weeks ago....I did a lot of FM DX'ing
with the
Eton E-100 out on the Balcony of our room, late at night. I found
that by
Laying the Whip Antenna up against the METAL RAILING of the balcony
on the
ship...the signals I was receiving were easily Doubled in Strength!! I
think if one could attach the whip to a Good FM beam.......in a
location
with few locals to avoid overloading........you would be able to
haul in
some pretty good FM DX with this little ULR Radio!!!!

73.......ROB.


Robert S. Ross VA3SW
Box 1003, Stn. B.
London, Ontario
CANADA N6A5K1

Antique/Vintage Radio Enthusiast
Amateur Radio Stations VA3SW/VE3JFC

Defy Physics.....Play Table Tennis!! (Ping Pong with an Attitude)
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Re: FM DXing with Ultralights-- The Top Models

Gary DeBock
 

Hello Rob and Carl,
 
     Thank you both for your comments regarding the E100.  This model's FM capabilities are kind of a bonus when purchasing this fine radio, which also has superb AM-DX capabilities (as will be fully documented in the Ultralight Summertime Shootout).
 
     Actually, any FM radio (with either a whip or headphone antenna) can receive a tremendous signal boost, when placed next to the lead-in wire of a decent external FM antenna.  My own test example was a full-wave FM loop on top of a 40' tower, which receives many BC and Oregon stations like locals.  The whip-antenna Ultralights usually couple up better than the headphone-antenna Ultralights, however.  And the sensitive FM Ultralights couple up much better than the deaf ones, of course.  Rob, I'm happy to hear that you tried this out on your cruise.  When I was in the Navy, sailors would often place their FM radios next to all kinds of wires and cables, in hopes of a better signal out in the ocean.
 
     Carl, you are certainly correct that FM audio quality is a highly subjective subject.  Most of the recent FM-stereo Ultralights have some kind of bass-boosting circuitry, which the E100 lacks.  But I think for the $$, the E100 definitely provides as much AM and FM DXing excitement as anyone could want.  It has recently become the modified darling of the Washington State Ultralight contingent, receiving multiple TP's and DU's for three different AM-DXpeditioners this summer.
 
                                                                                         73,  Gary
 
                                                                                                    
 
                                                                                                 
 
    




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Re: FM DXing with Ultralights-- The Top Models

robert ross
 

At 05:59 PM 7/17/2008, D1028Gary@... wrote:

 
4)  Eton E100   With a built-in whip antenna and more memories than you'll ever need, it provides FM reception fairly similar to that of the DT-200VX, although the reception can be improved dramatically by placing the whip antenna next to a decent FM external antenna lead-in wire.



Gary.....I can confirm what you say about placing the whip closer to an External Antenna on the E-100 Model.

While I was on my Cruise 2 weeks ago....I did a lot of FM DX'ing with the Eton E-100 out on the Balcony of our room, late at night. I found that by Laying the Whip Antenna up against the METAL RAILING of the balcony on the ship...the signals I was receiving were easily Doubled in Strength!! I think if one could attach the whip to a Good FM beam.......in a location with few locals to avoid overloading........you would be able to haul in some pretty good FM DX with this little ULR Radio!!!!

73.......ROB.


Robert S. Ross VA3SW
Box 1003, Stn. B.
London, Ontario
CANADA N6A5K1

Antique/Vintage Radio Enthusiast
Amateur Radio Stations VA3SW/VE3JFC

Defy Physics.....Play Table Tennis!! (Ping Pong with an Attitude)
«¤»¥«¤»§«¤»¥«¤»§«¤»¥«¤»§«¤»¥«¤»§«¤»¥«¤»§«¤»¥«¤»¥«¤»§«¤»¥«


Re: FM DXing with Ultralights-- The Top Models

Russ Edmunds <wb2bjh@...>
 

--- On Thu, 7/17/08, D1028Gary@... <D1028Gary@...> wrote:

 
3)  Sangean DT-200VX   This black colored-model has great FM-DX capabilities, using circuitry apparently identical to the DT-400W, but Sangean has either improved the alignment or components in the new 400W model, providing a shade more FM sensitivity (at least in my review model).  Otherwise, the performance is identical to the above 400W description, with decent capabilities for both AM and FM DXing.  It retails for $49.99 from Amazon, with free shipping.
 

*** Realizing there is often a lot of unit-to-unit variation, I have to say that my DT200VX is quite different from whatever Gary tested. It does have decent sensitivity, but its selectivity, which is perhaps more important if you're DX'ing from any heavily-populated area, is very much average, as is its ability to deal with IBOC hiss.

I should also point out that the non-Ultralight Sony 2010 is as bad in both departments. Although there is an article out there dealing with replacing the IF filters with narrower ones, it's written by a Japanese who either had somewhat limited English or else the translator had. And worse yet, neither the article nor the 2010 manual is at all clear on just where these filters are physically located. The individual who rebuilt the one I now have was adept enough on the AM and SW side but also had no clue about the FM filters...

I haven't yet had the time to fully test out my SRF-59 on FM, and in fact have spent so little time on that I'm not even going to venture an opinion at this point.


Russ Edmunds
Blue Bell, PA ( 360' ASL )
[15 mi NNW of Philadelphia]
40:08:45N; 75:16:04W, Grid FN20id
<wb2bjh@...>
FM: Yamaha T-80 & Onkyo T-450RDS w/ APS9B @15'
AM: Modified Sony ICF 2010 barefoot
Sony SRF-59
Sangean DT-200vx


KSCO 1080

lrdheat
 

KLRD (50 KW) 1080 KHz was off the air last night...as result, coast to coast faded in several times on my SRF-59 in Laredo, TX from KSCO, Santa Cruz, CA, 5 KW, 1458 miles away!


FM DXing with Ultralights-- The Top Models

Gary DeBock
 

Hello Guys,
 
     Although we were all originally attracted to Ultralight radios because of their overachieving AM-DX capabilities, it has recently become abundantly clear that many Ultralight AM-DXers are also Ultralight FM-DXers (like me), and there have been several requests for a "quick and dirty" recommendation of the FM-DX capabilities of the top models.  So, in order to show that these portables' amazing capabilities are not limited to medium wave, here is the "executive summary" of the top performers:
 
1)  Sangean DT-220V    This silver-colored model with built-in stereo earphones is an absolute turkey on AM, but is a screaming eagle on FM (I always wondered what the $53.26 price was for).  The FM sensitivity is amazing, with decent reception of both Victoria, BC stations (98.5 and 100.3), and passable reception of some Vancouver, BC (95.3 and 101.1) stations, as well as a couple of Portland, OR stations (101.9 and 103.3).  It has only five memory presets and no bass-boosting system, but audio quality is not bad (although plug-in stereo headphones are far more comfortable).  Using a whip antenna, for raw FM sensitivity, it is tops in the pocket radio class. It retails for $53.26 from Amazon, with free shipping.
 
2)  Sangean DT-400W    This is a new yellow-colored model that will be fully reviewed in the Midsummer Shooutout for AM capabilities, but its FM performance is definitely worth noting.  Just a shade less sensitive than the DT-220V, it can provide decent reception of the two Victoria stations (98.5 and 100.3), but reception of the Vancouver, BC or Portland, OR stations depends on your propagation luck. It has outstanding audio quality and no fewer than 16 FM memories, and for stereo music enthusiasts, is a runaway winner in listening pleasure.  Unique among the top FM-DXing models, it uses the plug-in stereo headphones as an antenna (not a built-in whip antenna).  For this reason, a substitute plug-in antenna is provided for speaker operation.  For those considering a purchase, the AM capabilities are identical to those of the DT-200VX (not bad at all, although not up to the level of the SRF-T615 in sensitivity, or E100 in selectivity).  It retails for $54.75 from Amazon, with free shipping.
 
3)  Sangean DT-200VX   This black colored-model has great FM-DX capabilities, using circuitry apparently identical to the DT-400W, but Sangean has either improved the alignment or components in the new 400W model, providing a shade more FM sensitivity (at least in my review model).  Otherwise, the performance is identical to the above 400W description, with decent capabilities for both AM and FM DXing.  It retails for $49.99 from Amazon, with free shipping.
 
4)  Eton E100   As long as you don't care much about audio quality, this somewhat overdesigned (and discontinued) portable will provide a lot of FM-DXing excitement.  With a built-in whip antenna and more memories than you'll ever need, it provides FM reception fairly similar to that of the DT-200VX, although the reception can be improved dramatically by placing the whip antenna next to a decent FM external antenna lead-in wire.  Stock sensitivity is sufficient for reception of Victoria, BC (98.5 and 100.3), with ghost-like reception of Vancouver, BC and Portland, OR powerhouses.  The big drawback of this model is somewhat nasty audio, which is not really helped by the pedestrian high-low switch control.  FM stereo-headphones plugged into this model cannot improve the harsh audio, which borders on the irritating.  Aside from this, the E100 has the FM sensitivity to provide a few thrills, especially for those who think FM-DXing should not be confused with FM-stereo listening.  The E100 has been discontinued by Eton, but is still routinely available as an NOS unit from many sources (including a current Durham Radio promotion on dxer.ca at $44 U.S.)
 
     Hopefully this basic information will be a helpful starting point for those interested in FM-DXing with Ultralights.  If there is sufficient interest in this Ultralight FM-DXing concept, a more detailed "Shootout" might be possible in the future.
 
                                                             73 and Best Wishes,
 
                                                             Gary DeBock      




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Guy's Recent Message from Oregon

John H. Bryant <bjohnorcas@...>
 

Somehow, the formatting on Guy's extraordinary message from the Oregon coast got all screwed up an difficult to read. Here is a cleaner version:

After three mornings of getting skunked on TPs/DUs with my hotrodded Eton E100, I finally hit paydirt this morning. I've been on a family vacation to Yachats, Oregon since last Friday and have been trying to sneak in some DXing.
 
The electrical grid surrounding our rental house is just too noisy for recording the band with my Perseus SDR (I tried *five* configurations of a Wellbrook ALA100 without success). However, noise-free beachfront overlooks and scenic-view parking lots are a short distance away, which is where I've been trying the modified Eton E100. This receiver has a 16.8" long X 1.0" diameter ferrite rod antenna mounted on a camera tripod purchased via Ebay for this purpose, and a 2.4 kHz, metal-cased Murata filter which is a high grade unit perfectly suited to TP/DU chasing in a band crowded with domestic channels.
 
I found no 9 kHz signals prior to 1210 UTC, but after that the band became alive with TPs and DUs up until 1300 (6 a.m. local; sunrise today was 5:30 a.m. local). Both low and midband Aussie and Japanese stations were in at fair to very good levels, and South Korea and Thailand were also noted on the high band.
 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
531    An extremely weak signal noted here 1210-1300, with just snippets of audio. Looped to the SW; with the other Aussies coming in, I presume this must have been 2PM Kempsey trying to make an appearance.
 
576    Low audio in English around max sunrise. 2RN Sydney?
 
585    Scraps of Aussie-sounding accented English at 1245. Best bet here is 7RN Hobart, but not much to go on.
 
666    Faint bits of Japanese lang., mixing with English. JOBK Osaka probably, but who was in English?
 
675    Weak English and EZL music 1220. 2CO Corowa?
 
693    JOAB Tokyo, at fair to good levels with Japanese talk 1230
 
702    2BL Sydney, good signal at 1220, then very good at 1240 recheck
 
738    2NR Grafton with good to very good signal at 1210 to 1240
 
747    JOIB Sapporo with a good signal throughout the 1210-1300 period
 
774    JOUB Akita with a good signal throughout, peaking very good at 1245
 
792    4RN Brisbane heard with a good level 1230
 
891    5AN Adelaide-- the clearest of all the Aussies with no QRM from 890 or 900. Good to very good signal; noted ID "5AN Adelaide, ABC" at 1244.
 
954    JOKR Tokyo, presumed with weak Japanese talk and music.
 
1017   Unid., weak signal here, possibly Japanese language at 1245.
 
1134    JOQR Tokyo, heard with a fair to good signal around 1230-1235. Japanese lang. and music.
 
1287   JOHR Sapporo, with fair to good talk in Japanese.
 
1314    JOUF Osaka, presumed here with a low level signal in Japanese.
 
1566    HLAZ in presumed Chinese at fair level prior to 1230; much stronger after 1240 with Japanese language.
 
1575    VOA Ayutthaya in pres. Laotian language at fair to good level between 1240 and 1300. 1575 was the last TP signal heard on the band when it dropped like a clamshell at 1300.
 
---------------------------------------------------------------
 
Well, that was a pretty good haul for a single Eton E100 in less than an hour!
 
Guy Atkins
Puyallup, WA USA
DXing from Yachats, OR
www.perseus-sdr.blogspot.com
 
 
 
 


Great TP/DU Morning for Ultralights

Guy Atkins
 

After three mornings of getting skunked on TPs/DUs with my hotrodded Eton E100, I finally hit paydirt this morning. I've been on a family vacation to Yachats, Oregon since last Friday and have been trying to sneak in some DXing.
 
The electrical grid surrounding our rental house is just too noisy for recording the band with my Perseus SDR (I tried *five* configurations of a Wellbrook ALA100 without success). However, noise-free beachfront overlooks and scenic-view parking lots are a short distance away, which is where I've been trying the modified Eton E100. This receiver has a 16.8" long X 1.0" diameter ferrite rod antenna mounted on a camera tripod purchased via Ebay for this purpose, and a 2.4 kHz, metal-cased Murata filter which is a high grade unit perfectly suited to TP/DU chasing in a band crowded with domestic channels.
 
I found no 9 kHz signals prior to 1210 UTC, but after that the band became alive with TPs and DUs up until 1300 (6 a.m. local; sunrise today was 5:30 a.m. local). Both low and midband Aussie and Japanese stations were in at fair to very good levels, and South Korea and Thailand were also noted on the high band.
 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
531    An extremely weak signal noted here 1210-1300, with just snippets of audio. Looped to the SW; with the other Aussies coming in, I presume this must have been 2PM Kempsey trying to make an appearance.
 
576    Low audio in English around max sunrise. 2RN Sydney?
 
585    Scraps of Aussie-sounding accented English at 1245. Best bet here is 7RN Hobart, but not much to go on.
 
666    Faint bits of Japanese lang., mixing with English. JOBK Osaka probably, but who was in English?
 
675    Weak English and EZL music 1220. 2CO Corowa?
 
693    JOAB Tokyo, at fair to good levels with Japanese talk 1230
 
702    2BL Sydney, good signal at 1220, then very good at 1240 recheck
 
738    2NR Grafton with good to very good signal at 1210 to 1240
 
747    JOIB Sapporo with a good signal throughout the 1210-1300 period
 
774    JOUB Akita with a good signal throughout, peaking very good at 1245
 
792    4RN Brisbane heard with a good level 1230
 
891    5AN Adelaide-- the clearest of all the Aussies with no QRM from 890 or 900. Good to very good signal; noted ID "5AN Adelaide, ABC" at 1244.
 
954    JOKR Tokyo, presumed with weak Japanese talk and music.
 
1017   Unid., weak signal here, possibly Japanese language at 1245.
 
1134    JOQR Tokyo, heard with a fair to good signal around 1230-1235. Japanese lang. and music.
 
1287   JOHR Sapporo, with fair to good talk in Japanese.
 
1314    JOUF Osaka, presumed here with a low level signal in Japanese.
 
1566    HLAZ in presumed Chinese at fair level prior to 1230; much stronger after 1240 with Japanese language.
 
1575    VOA Ayutthaya in pres. Laotian language at fair to good level between 1240 and 1300. 1575 was the last TP signal heard on the band when it dropped like a clamshell at 1300.
 
---------------------------------------------------------------
 
Well, that was a pretty good haul for a single Eton E100 in less than an hour!
 
Guy Atkins
Puyallup, WA USA
DXing from Yachats, OR
www.perseus- <http://www.perseus-sdr.blogspot.com> sdr.blogspot.com
 
 
 

Sent via BlackBerry from T-Mobile


Re: E100 Alignment Notes + Stuff

bbwrwy
 

When I mentioned E100 sensitivity improved when the antenna was moved
away from the receiver, I was referring to the ferrite rod not the
whip. I had already dispensed with the whip. I'm sorry for any
misunderstanding.

It appears the receiver's sensitivity can be improved by simply
removing the ferrite rod antenna to the top of the case. It should be
possible to move it there without clipping the wires, passing them
through a small hole. I definitely observed an improvement when it
was separated from the circuit board. I imagine using better ferrite
material would result in improved sensitvity. But then it might mean
an increase in side-band slop from local stations.

This morning, I compared the aligned receiver with a newer factory
aligned E100. The one I aligned was a tad better throughout the band.

Richard Allen,
DXing since 1960.


Re: E100 Alignment Notes + Stuff

bbwrwy
 

I did an alignment on my E100.

Following John and Gary's article, disassembly/assembly of the E100
was simple. Removing the wax and glue from the antenna in my example
was much easier than I thought it would be. I did find it necessary to
secure the batteries with a strip of Scotch tape during alignment.
Otherwise they kept popping out.

There was little improvement on the lower end of the band following
alignment. In that portion of the band, my E100 example is still not
near as sensitive as the SRF-39FP or SRF-T615. Leaving the antenna
attached all I could get was a barely audible signal from KXSP-590 (5
kW/563 km.). However, when I unclipped the antenna and separated it
about 1.25 cm. away from the circuit board KXSP became readable. I
imagine it would be even better if the distance was increased further.

Now if I can figure out how to reassemble my old Grundig Satellit 500!

Good DX.

Richard Allen,
DXing since 1960.


Re: E100 Alignment Notes + Stuff

Gary DeBock
 

Hello Richard,
 
     There are a couple of issues related to the stock E100 loopstick, which adversely affect low-band performance.  First of all, the folded SW whip antenna runs parallel to the loopstick with very little separation, causing a significant AM signal loss whenever the whip antenna is folded down.  Simply moving the whip antenna into a vertical position usually improves AM sensitivity (or better yet, remove it completely if you don't need the SW or FM capabilities).
 
     Secondly, the thin, flat design of the E100 loopstick is extremely skimpy on ferrite, making low-band reception modest at best.  I have aligned about 7 E100's, and none of them ever came close to the SRF-T615 in low-band sensitivity.  The E100 stock loopstick just doesn't have enough ferrite to do the job on low-band DX (although it is usually an outstanding performer on high band).
 
     Serious hot-rodders have obtained booming results by replacing the skimpy stock loopstick with an Amidon 7.5" x .5" ferrite bar, containing a single "sliding coil" peaking system.  This simple antenna has proven sensitive enough to receive multiple AM stations in Australia and New Zealand recently.
 
                                                                                            73,  Gary 




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3 New Ultralight Loggings.....A New Season Starts???.......

robert ross
 

Hi Guys:

Well after not really doing much DX'ing on the Ultralights since last
April....due to Noise, lack of good conditions, and other Summer
activities, I decided to look around the band and see what was doing.

Some late night/early morning listening, resulted in 3 New Loggings for the
ULR Log!! This brings my ULR Log Totals to 454 Stations Heard!!

Perhaps this signals the start of a New AM BCB Season for me on the
Ultralight Receivers!! As I am off on Sick Leave for the next month or
so.....I think I will make a concerted effort to try and spend some time at
the dials in an effort to get my Totals on ULR Radios up to the Magic 500
Stations Heard!!

Below is the 3 stations heard early this morning bringing my Totals up to
454..........

Radio used was a SONY SRF-T615 Barefoot.

73...................ROB.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
1610 CJWI Montreal, QUE. July/15/08 0220 EDT FF FR
Man & Woman spoke FRENCH. Several mentions of Montreal. and a Nice
Station ID as "CJWI" by Female @ 0227.Into FF Vocal Music.

Relog.........NEW TO ULR LOG 1 KW
ROSS, ONT.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
1050 WEPN New York, NY July/15/08 0230 EDT EE GD
ID by Male DJ as "All Sports ESPN Radio". Into Sports talk. NBA Basketball
talk. In CHUM Null. Should have heard this long ago.......but they
must really be protecting CHUM's Pattern.

Relog......NEW CALL LETTERS ......NEW TO ULR LOG 50 KW
ROSS, ONT.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
640 WNNZ Westfield, MASS. July/15/08 0330 EDT EE GD
BBC Radio Pgm @ 0320-0330. "PRI ID @ 0330. Also ID as "640 AM WNNZ".
Also mentioned "wspr.org".....which turns out to be the "Western States Public
Radio" Homepage. Into BBC News @ 0330 EDT.

Relog.............NEW TO ULR LOG 1 KW
ROSS, ONT.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

73............ROB.


Robert S. Ross VA3SW
Box 1003, Stn. B.
London, Ontario
CANADA N6A5K1

Antique/Vintage Radio Enthusiast
Amateur Radio Stations VA3SW/VE3JFC

Defy Physics.....Play Table Tennis!! (Ping Pong with an Attitude)
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Re: E100 Alignment Notes + Stuff

bbwrwy
 

Thanks John, that helps.

Richard Allen,
DXing since 1960.


Re: E100 Alignment Notes + Stuff

John H. Bryant <bjohnorcas@...>
 

Richard,

Sorry, I've been outta town and then weekend house guests have thrown me way behind in e-mail.  I have no idea what the problem is with speaker audio on your E-100.... beats me.  On dealing with the ferrite loopstick and its coil, Gary DeBock and I approach things just a bit differently.  We both use No.11 blades in Exacto knives. Gary is generally able to remove enough wax by careful scraping, with the bar in place, to loosen the coil and peak it up on 600... )and yes, you can use any weak station in the 550 to 700 kHz. area... the closer to the standard 600, the better, but its pretty forgiving.)

The difference between Gary's approach and mine is that I always first prise the bar out of its retainer clips..  I don't unsolder the wires, just prise the bar out of its clips and lay it atop the circuit board.  The bar is held in the clips with just a bit of some brown glue similar to strong rubber cement.  I remove as much of that as is easily possible and then carefully work the bar up and out with the Exacto. I just find it easier to free up that coil if I have more room to work.  Usually, all you need do is remove the surface wax and give the coil a firm push with a small blunt object and its free. However, on one of my E100s the wax pot must have been turned up on high and the wax was too fluid.... It ran clear under the length of the coil on one side and about half way on the other.... between the coil and the surface of the bar.  With the bar lifted up where I could really get at it, I took the Exacto blade out of the handle, held it flat against the surface of the bar and slowly forced it under the coil.  That eventually freed things up.

By the way, the buttons are pretty well marked on the circuit board, so once you get the batteries back in your naked E100, its pretty easy to turn it on and change the frequencies during alignment.

Hope this helps, Richard!

John B.
Orcas Island, WA, USA
Rcvrs: WiNRADiO 313e, Eton e1, Ultralights
Antennas: Two 70' x 100' Conti Super Loops, West and Northwest










At 03:51 PM 7/14/2008 +0000, you wrote:

I don't think I'll have any difficulty aligning the E100. I peeked
inside and it's less daunting than the Grundig Satellit 500 I'm
currently working on. Tecsun did a good job designing the little
receiver.

I do have questions however. What's the best way to remove the excess
wax holding the movable coil on the ferrite rod? I'm guessing it's
scraped away with something like an Exacto knife. Is that correct?

Since I don't have an audible daytime station on 600 kHz, is it all
right to use either 590 or 610?

If I goof up, I have a backup E100 available. From the outside it
appears to be from a different (later) production run. Already the
sound through the speaker of the first E100 has become distorted. I
have no idea how to fix that problem. Luckily, the audio is OK
through headphones.

Thanks all.

Richard Allen
DXing since 1960.


Re: E100 Notes + Stuff

ronshire2000
 

in my opinion the speakers in these e100's are very poor, to make mine
sound better i moved the tone switch to the low position

Already the
sound through the speaker of the first E100 has become distorted. I
have no idea how to fix that problem. Luckily, the audio is OK
through headphones.

Thanks all.

Richard Allen
DXing since 1960.


Committee Announces New Ultralight MW DXing Awards Program

Gary DeBock
 

The Ultralight DXing Awards Committee is pleased to announce a new and on-going Awards Program for the Ultralight MW DXing Community.  The Program is unique in several respects; first, it is the only Awards Program that is restricted to MW DXing accomplishments achieved with commonly available, inexpensive, entertainment-grade "Ultralight" pocket radios.  Secondly, the program is totally web-based.  Applications for awards are accepted by e-mail only and award certificates that are suitable for framing are distributed to the recipients as printable digital image files.  Thirdly, these certificates feature digitally re-mastered images of some of the most remarkable radio art from the first decade of broadcast radio.
 
The comprehensive Ultralight DX Awards Program features awards at various levels for Stations Heard, U.S. States Heard, Canadian Provinces Heard, Latin American Stations Heard, Trans-Atlantic Stations Heard, Trans-Pacific Stations Heard, Countries Heard and Continents Heard.  In each category, when a DXer reaches beyond what is normally considered high achievement, special "Master DXer" certificates are awarded;  for instance, in the Stations Heard category, certificates are available for stations heard at the 100, 200, 300, etc. station levels.  At 500 stations heard on an Ultralight receiver, an extraordinary achievement, a "Master Ultralight DXer Award" is conferred.
 
A complete description of the Ultralight DX Awards Program is available for download from the Ultralight Files area at http://www.dxer.ca/ or directly from Rob Ross of the Awards Committee at va3sw@...
 
If you have yet to experience the renewed thrill of DXing with an inexpensive Ultralight receiver, we invite you to share the excitement and satisfaction that comes from success in pocket radio DX.  Emphasizing DXing skill and knowledge over equipment innovation, Ultralight Radio DXing brings special rewards in proportion to the special challenges-- and has restored the original thrill of AM DXing to many radio enthusiasts.  The Ultralight Files area of dxer.ca has an extensive set of information and resources on the many aspects of Ultralight Radios, and enthusiasts' activities.  We hope you will accept the challenge, join in the fun, and share in the rewards!
 
The Ultralight DX Awards Committee:  Gary DeBock,  Rob Ross and John Bryant 




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Re: E100 Notes + Stuff

bbwrwy
 

I don't think I'll have any difficulty aligning the E100. I peeked
inside and it's less daunting than the Grundig Satellit 500 I'm
currently working on. Tecsun did a good job designing the little
receiver.

I do have questions however. What's the best way to remove the excess
wax holding the movable coil on the ferrite rod? I'm guessing it's
scraped away with something like an Exacto knife. Is that correct?

Since I don't have an audible daytime station on 600 kHz, is it all
right to use either 590 or 610?

If I goof up, I have a backup E100 available. From the outside it
appears to be from a different (later) production run. Already the
sound through the speaker of the first E100 has become distorted. I
have no idea how to fix that problem. Luckily, the audio is OK
through headphones.

Thanks all.

Richard Allen
DXing since 1960.


Re: digital display for $10.00

Gary DeBock
 

Hello Russ,
 
     Both the DT-200VX and the Eton E100 typically could use some tweaking out of the box, a fact that we didn't know so well back in January. Even when aligned (which involves significant disassembly on both units), these digital models typically favor either high or low band in sensitivity, but not both.  The SRF-59/39FP models have more broad-banded sensitivity, which is almost certainly related to the different way that analog and digital "front ends" process incoming RF signals.
 
     After considering how to solve this problem on the E100, the "sliding coil" loopstick was created (almost jointly, by John Bryant and me).  This solves the lack of digital broadband sensitivity by "aligning" the loopstick on each selected frequency--  thereby making the modified E100 far more sensitive than the stock unit.
 
                                                                                                    73,  Gary       




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