Date   

Not radio for prison; radio from prison!!

Dennis Gibson <wb6tnb@...>
 


Re: Brazilian DXers recent Lorena DX camp

Horacio Nigro <hanigrodx@...>
 

Do you want to see more? Here's the stuff from past years,

i.e: 2006,

http://www.amantesdoradio.com.br/5lorena/5lorena.htm

Include a not streaming video link and clickeable 180+ pics.

Horacio A. Nigro
Montevideo
Uruguay


--- El mar, 12/5/09, John H. Bryant escribió:


De: John H. Bryant Asunto: Re: [ultralightdx] Re: Brazilian DXers recent Lorena DX camp
Para: ultralightdx@...
Fecha: martes, 12 mayo, 2009 11:22

Horacio,

Thanks very much for posting the link to the Lorena DX camp. I've gone back there three times and find the differences between this Brazilian group and typical North American DX camps startling!  First, the size.... in North America, most of the MW/SW DX Camps or DXpeditions tend to be rather small. Say 4 to 6 DXers... tops 8 DXers.  The only real exception to this that I can think of is the long-running Ontario DX Association (ODXA) annual camp.  It has been about the size of the Lorena group at times.

The even bigger difference, though, is the huge number of loops, both ferrite and small air core.  Although there has been a minority use of small loops up here in recent years, they are absolutely not the norm... hobby-wide, especially at DX camps. At camps, normally they are selected for remote locations and large wire antennas, usually beverages, are the norm. Although we have seen the full range of antennas up here in recent years, the more popular antennas by decades would be something like:

40s-50s: Long Random Wires

60s and 70s Large Box loops and Random Wires

80s and 90s Beverages and Random Wires

00s Large Single-turn Loops and Beverages

There has been a MWDX sub-group (at times a large one) up here that focuses on DXing with portables since at least the 1970s... maybe going as far back as far as the early transistorized Trans-Oceanics around 1960...

Anyway, if the Lorena camp represents the current general practice of MW DXing in Latin America, they seem far better set up to do Ultralighting in the Unlimited Class than many of us up here. BRAVO!

Thanks for the report, Horacio.

John B.
I'd love to see some of the other NAm Mossbacks comment on the By Decade list above.









At 04:40 AM 5/12/2009 +0000, you wrote:


--- In ultralightdx@ yahoogroups. com, Horacio Nigro wrote:
>
> Despite there are no ULR at sight, here are interesting pics from Brazilian DXers recent gathering. Note that several use loops and ferrite boosters.
> http://www.sarmento .eng.br/Lorena20 09.htm
>
> Horacio A. Nigro
> Montevideo
> Uruguay
>



SRF-39FP, some notes

Horacio Nigro <hanigrodx@...>
 

Talking about loops and ferrite boosters, after the first weeks using the SRF-39FP I've noted that if I put my hands covering the receiver, in its upper side (near the antenna coils and the tuning capacitor) the signals tend to increase a bit. I've already noted some capacitance effects in the SRF 59, and read about that in this group.

Also with the SRF-39F I've experienced some nulling enhancements that I hadn't seen with the silvered case brother. I'm talking about taking it near a metallic curtain. At some distances or positions the nulling is better. Also as I've noted that the SRF-39FP's  reception is enhanced near the end side of my random wire, where the wire falls down at that point and I can bring it closer. Here the wire imposes its influence and the enhancement is mainly from the wire's direction (in my case from the North, i.e. Brazil). With a loop or ferrite booster, which is in my plan to build, I am certain expecting to increase the quality of DX reception, as most of us already have experimented



Horacio A. Nigro
Montevideo
Uruguay


--- El mar, 12/5/09, D1028Gary@... escribió:


De: D1028Gary@...
Asunto: Re: [ultralightdx] Re: Brazilian DXers recent Lorena DX camp
Para: ultralightdx@...
Fecha: martes, 12 mayo, 2009 1:20

Hello John and Horacio,
 
Although I'm nothing like a NAm Mossback :>) , I would certainly agree with John that MW loops, both of the ferrite and air core type, are pretty much overlooked in traditional DXpeditions here. For Ultralight radio DXers, however, these loops have great potential to provide absolutely thrilling DX for very little investment.
 
Both the Slider-tuned ferrite loops and the huge passive air core loops are ideal for ULR DXers, providing a cheap, easy way to make pocket radios extremely sensitive. Bringing these loops to an ocean beach almost always results in a thrilling experience. The figure-8 reception pattern is not ideal in some situations, but with extremely selective DSP-enhanced ULR's now being marketed, the challenge of overcoming domestic splatter may be easier.
 
One of the unique attributes of the larger PVC loops being tested here is the ability to make even relatively "deaf" ultralights perform like ultra-sensitive wonders, with only inductive coupling. DSP-enhanced radios like the new Degen DE1123 are typically not very sensitive on AM, but when coupled up to a 9 or 10 foot PVC loop, they run wild over any stock portable on the planet, even overloading on stations that a Slider E100 can barely receive. The combination of great DSP selectivity, a built-in MP3 recorder, and a massive sensitivity boost from a 10-foot PVC loop is tough to beat-- all for a total investment of about $150.
 
73, Gary         
 
In a message dated 5/12/2009 7:23:51 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time, bjohnorcas@rockisla nd.com writes:


Horacio,

Thanks very much for posting the link to the Lorena DX camp. I've gone back there three times and find the differences between this Brazilian group and typical North American DX camps startling!  First, the size.... in North America, most of the MW/SW DX Camps or DXpeditions tend to be rather small. Say 4 to 6 DXers... tops 8 DXers.  The only real exception to this that I can think of is the long-running Ontario DX Association (ODXA) annual camp.  It has been about the size of the Lorena group at times.

The even bigger difference, though, is the huge number of loops, both ferrite and small air core.  Although there has been a minority use of small loops up here in recent years, they are absolutely not the norm... hobby-wide, especially at DX camps. At camps, normally they are selected for remote locations and large wire antennas, usually beverages, are the norm. Although we have seen the full range of antennas up here in recent years, the more popular antennas by decades would be something like:

40s-50s: Long Random Wires

60s and 70s Large Box loops and Random Wires

80s and 90s Beverages and Random Wires

00s Large Single-turn Loops and Beverages

There has been a MWDX sub-group (at times a large one) up here that focuses on DXing with portables since at least the 1970s... maybe going as far back as far as the early transistorized Trans-Oceanics around 1960...

Anyway, if the Lorena camp represents the current general practice of MW DXing in Latin America, they seem far better set up to do Ultralighting in the Unlimited Class than many of us up here. BRAVO!

Thanks for the report, Horacio.

John B.
I'd love to see some of the other NAm Mossbacks comment on the By Decade list above.









At 04:40 AM 5/12/2009 +0000, you wrote:


--- In ultralightdx@ yahoogroups. com, Horacio Nigro wrote:
>
> Despite there are no ULR at sight, here are interesting pics from Brazilian DXers recent gathering. Note that several use loops and ferrite boosters.
> http://www.sarmento .eng.br/Lorena20 09.htm
>
> Horacio A. Nigro
> Montevideo
> Uruguay
>



SRF-39FP, some notes

Horacio Nigro <hanigrodx@...>
 

Talking about loops and ferrite boosters, after the first weeks using the SRF-39FP I've noted that if I put my hands covering the receiver, in its upper side (near the antenna coils and the tuning capacitor) the signals tend to increase a bit. I've already noted some capacitance effects in the SRF 59, and read about that in this group.

Also with the SRF-39F I've experienced some nulling enhancements that I hadn't seen with the silvered case brother. I'm talking about taking it near a metallic curtain. At some distances or positions the nulling is better. Also as I've noted that the SRF-39FP's  reception is enhanced near the end side of my random wire, where the wire falls down at that point and I can bring it closer. Here the wire imposes its influence and the enhancement is mainly from the wire's direction (in my case from the North, i.e. Brazil). With a loop or ferrite booster, which is in my plan to build, I am certain expecting to increase the quality of DX reception, as most of us already have experimented



Horacio A. Nigro
Montevideo
Uruguay


--- El mar, 12/5/09, D1028Gary@... escribió:


De: D1028Gary@...
Asunto: Re: [ultralightdx] Re: Brazilian DXers recent Lorena DX camp
Para: ultralightdx@...
Fecha: martes, 12 mayo, 2009 1:20

Hello John and Horacio,
 
Although I'm nothing like a NAm Mossback :>) , I would certainly agree with John that MW loops, both of the ferrite and air core type, are pretty much overlooked in traditional DXpeditions here. For Ultralight radio DXers, however, these loops have great potential to provide absolutely thrilling DX for very little investment.
 
Both the Slider-tuned ferrite loops and the huge passive air core loops are ideal for ULR DXers, providing a cheap, easy way to make pocket radios extremely sensitive. Bringing these loops to an ocean beach almost always results in a thrilling experience. The figure-8 reception pattern is not ideal in some situations, but with extremely selective DSP-enhanced ULR's now being marketed, the challenge of overcoming domestic splatter may be easier.
 
One of the unique attributes of the larger PVC loops being tested here is the ability to make even relatively "deaf" ultralights perform like ultra-sensitive wonders, with only inductive coupling. DSP-enhanced radios like the new Degen DE1123 are typically not very sensitive on AM, but when coupled up to a 9 or 10 foot PVC loop, they run wild over any stock portable on the planet, even overloading on stations that a Slider E100 can barely receive. The combination of great DSP selectivity, a built-in MP3 recorder, and a massive sensitivity boost from a 10-foot PVC loop is tough to beat-- all for a total investment of about $150.
 
73, Gary         
 
In a message dated 5/12/2009 7:23:51 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time, bjohnorcas@rockisla nd.com writes:


Horacio,

Thanks very much for posting the link to the Lorena DX camp. I've gone back there three times and find the differences between this Brazilian group and typical North American DX camps startling!  First, the size.... in North America, most of the MW/SW DX Camps or DXpeditions tend to be rather small. Say 4 to 6 DXers... tops 8 DXers.  The only real exception to this that I can think of is the long-running Ontario DX Association (ODXA) annual camp.  It has been about the size of the Lorena group at times.

The even bigger difference, though, is the huge number of loops, both ferrite and small air core.  Although there has been a minority use of small loops up here in recent years, they are absolutely not the norm... hobby-wide, especially at DX camps. At camps, normally they are selected for remote locations and large wire antennas, usually beverages, are the norm. Although we have seen the full range of antennas up here in recent years, the more popular antennas by decades would be something like:

40s-50s: Long Random Wires

60s and 70s Large Box loops and Random Wires

80s and 90s Beverages and Random Wires

00s Large Single-turn Loops and Beverages

There has been a MWDX sub-group (at times a large one) up here that focuses on DXing with portables since at least the 1970s... maybe going as far back as far as the early transistorized Trans-Oceanics around 1960...

Anyway, if the Lorena camp represents the current general practice of MW DXing in Latin America, they seem far better set up to do Ultralighting in the Unlimited Class than many of us up here. BRAVO!

Thanks for the report, Horacio.

John B.
I'd love to see some of the other NAm Mossbacks comment on the By Decade list above.









At 04:40 AM 5/12/2009 +0000, you wrote:


--- In ultralightdx@ yahoogroups. com, Horacio Nigro wrote:
>
> Despite there are no ULR at sight, here are interesting pics from Brazilian DXers recent gathering. Note that several use loops and ferrite boosters.
> http://www.sarmento .eng.br/Lorena20 09.htm
>
> Horacio A. Nigro
> Montevideo
> Uruguay
>



Re: Brazilian DXers recent Lorena DX camp

John H. Bryant <bjohnorcas@...>
 

Horacio,

Thanks very much for posting the link to the Lorena DX camp. I've gone back there three times and find the differences between this Brazilian group and typical North American DX camps startling!  First, the size.... in North America, most of the MW/SW DX Camps or DXpeditions tend to be rather small. Say 4 to 6 DXers... tops 8 DXers.  The only real exception to this that I can think of is the long-running Ontario DX Association (ODXA) annual camp.  It has been about the size of the Lorena group at times.

The even bigger difference, though, is the huge number of loops, both ferrite and small air core.  Although there has been a minority use of small loops up here in recent years, they are absolutely not the norm... hobby-wide, especially at DX camps. At camps, normally they are selected for remote locations and large wire antennas, usually beverages, are the norm. Although we have seen the full range of antennas up here in recent years, the more popular antennas by decades would be something like:

40s-50s: Long Random Wires

60s and 70s Large Box loops and Random Wires

80s and 90s Beverages and Random Wires

00s Large Single-turn Loops and Beverages

There has been a MWDX sub-group (at times a large one) up here that focuses on DXing with portables since at least the 1970s... maybe going as far back as far as the early transistorized Trans-Oceanics around 1960...

Anyway, if the Lorena camp represents the current general practice of MW DXing in Latin America, they seem far better set up to do Ultralighting in the Unlimited Class than many of us up here. BRAVO!

Thanks for the report, Horacio.

John B.
I'd love to see some of the other NAm Mossbacks comment on the By Decade list above.









At 04:40 AM 5/12/2009 +0000, you wrote:


--- In ultralightdx@..., Horacio Nigro wrote:
>
> Despite there are no ULR at sight, here are interesting pics from Brazilian DXers recent gathering. Note that several use loops and ferrite boosters.
> http://www.sarmento.eng.br/Lorena2009.htm
>
> Horacio A. Nigro
> Montevideo
> Uruguay
>


Probable new UL Graveyarder- WSTV-1340

John Cereghin <jcereghin@...>
 

Pretty sure I had WSTV-1340 in Stuebenville, Ohio on May 11 at 2130-2200 with the Pittsburgh Penguins post-game show. Yes, the Mighty Washington Capitals pulled out the overtime win last night. No ID but WSTV is listed as a Penguins affiliate and there are no listed stations on 1340 that carry the Caps, so probably was WSTV. If it pans out, it would be my 536th ultralight station and my 38th graveyarder, heard on the DT-400W barefoot. WSTV would be a new UL station but I already have them in my master log. A 276-mile catch.

Go Caps (since my Orioles are tanking :( )!!!

John Cereghin
Smyrna DE


Re: Brazilian DXers recent Lorena DX camp

Gary DeBock
 

Hello John and Horacio,
 
Although I'm nothing like a NAm Mossback :>) , I would certainly agree with John that MW loops, both of the ferrite and air core type, are pretty much overlooked in traditional DXpeditions here. For Ultralight radio DXers, however, these loops have great potential to provide absolutely thrilling DX for very little investment.
 
Both the Slider-tuned ferrite loops and the huge passive air core loops are ideal for ULR DXers, providing a cheap, easy way to make pocket radios extremely sensitive. Bringing these loops to an ocean beach almost always results in a thrilling experience. The figure-8 reception pattern is not ideal in some situations, but with extremely selective DSP-enhanced ULR's now being marketed, the challenge of overcoming domestic splatter may be easier.
 
One of the unique attributes of the larger PVC loops being tested here is the ability to make even relatively "deaf" ultralights perform like ultra-sensitive wonders, with only inductive coupling. DSP-enhanced radios like the new Degen DE1123 are typically not very sensitive on AM, but when coupled up to a 9 or 10 foot PVC loop, they run wild over any stock portable on the planet, even overloading on stations that a Slider E100 can barely receive. The combination of great DSP selectivity, a built-in MP3 recorder, and a massive sensitivity boost from a 10-foot PVC loop is tough to beat-- all for a total investment of about $150.
 
73, Gary         
 
In a message dated 5/12/2009 7:23:51 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time, bjohnorcas@... writes:


Horacio,

Thanks very much for posting the link to the Lorena DX camp. I've gone back there three times and find the differences between this Brazilian group and typical North American DX camps startling!  First, the size.... in North America, most of the MW/SW DX Camps or DXpeditions tend to be rather small. Say 4 to 6 DXers... tops 8 DXers.  The only real exception to this that I can think of is the long-running Ontario DX Association (ODXA) annual camp.  It has been about the size of the Lorena group at times.

The even bigger difference, though, is the huge number of loops, both ferrite and small air core.  Although there has been a minority use of small loops up here in recent years, they are absolutely not the norm... hobby-wide, especially at DX camps. At camps, normally they are selected for remote locations and large wire antennas, usually beverages, are the norm. Although we have seen the full range of antennas up here in recent years, the more popular antennas by decades would be something like:

40s-50s: Long Random Wires

60s and 70s Large Box loops and Random Wires

80s and 90s Beverages and Random Wires

00s Large Single-turn Loops and Beverages

There has been a MWDX sub-group (at times a large one) up here that focuses on DXing with portables since at least the 1970s... maybe going as far back as far as the early transistorized Trans-Oceanics around 1960...

Anyway, if the Lorena camp represents the current general practice of MW DXing in Latin America, they seem far better set up to do Ultralighting in the Unlimited Class than many of us up here. BRAVO!

Thanks for the report, Horacio.

John B.
I'd love to see some of the other NAm Mossbacks comment on the By Decade list above.









At 04:40 AM 5/12/2009 +0000, you wrote:


--- In ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com, Horacio Nigro .> wrote:
>
> Despite there are no ULR at sight, here are interesting pics from Brazilian DXers recent gathering. Note that several use loops and ferrite boosters.
> http://www.sarmento.eng.br/Lorena2009.htm
>
> Horacio A. Nigro
> Montevideo
> Uruguay
>


Re: Brazilian DXers recent Lorena DX camp

Alex
 

--- In ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com, Horacio Nigro <hanigrodx@...> wrote:

Despite there are no ULR at sight, here are interesting pics from Brazilian DXers recent gathering. Note that several use loops and ferrite boosters.
http://www.sarmento.eng.br/Lorena2009.htm

Horacio A. Nigro
Montevideo
Uruguay
Thanks, for sharing that Horacio! It looks like they all were having a great time. I wish I was there, that and I wish could write,read and speak Portuguese and/or Spanish. It looked like a I would have had a ball!! I was suprised to see English publications in use such as CQ and Popular Mechanics magazines, plus English additions of the World Radio and Television Handbook in use.

I would love to read about their "catches" and ideas techniqes of monitoring.



Alex N8UCN/KOH8IG


Re: GS Ultralight Loggings May 10, 2009

Greg Shoom <shoomg@...>
 

Hi Kevin,

Thanks. Basically I started ultralight DXing in September 2008. My first ULR logging was in Jan. 2008 (a new station I heard on my then-new SRF-59) but I didn't log anything else on it until Sept. I got started in Sept. because I had just logged Radio Rebelde from Cuba on 1180 kHz on a Kaito KA-1103 and on an impulse I decided to see if I could hear it on the SRF-59. I was amazed to hear it almost as well on the little Sony, and thus an ultralight DXer was born.

Actually I had been thinking for several months to start doing it, as I was inspired by Robert Ross's posts to the ODXA reflector. It was that logging of R. Rebelde that pushed me into action.

Basically it has taken me 8 months to get to 298. I sure hope to reach 300 soon because I want to turn my attention to other things in radio for a while, but I want to get to 300 before I make that pause.

I did the first 200 using the Sony SRF-59. I'm still logging new stations with that Sony, but most of my ULR activities now are divided equally between the Eton E-100 and the Sangean DT-400W. I'm also still doing all this "barefoot".

Best,
Greg S.

Hey Greg:

Good going! Some time this week will be the magic 300 no doubt.

I plan to re-zero my log book and start over in the fall - how long
did it take you to get this far? Here on the West Coast it may take
a while...

Kevin S
Bainbridge Island, WA
--
$
$ Greg Shoom - shoom@sympatico.ca
$ Toronto, Ontario, Canada
$


Re: New Sony ULR spotted on eBay: the ICF-40

satya@...
 

Thanks Brett - I saw that earlier to day as well. I noticed that it has a
tuning LED as the S10-MK2 has, and both are powered by two batteries (2
AAA for the ICF-40, 2 AA for the S10-MK2). So, given that they are at the
same price point, and about the same size, I wonder if it they are in fact
the same inside.

Hopefully someone will chime in here that has used the ICF-40???

Kevin S
Bainbridge Island, WA

You can download a multi-language user's manual for that radio at this
URL:

http://safemanuals.com/user-guide-instructions-owner-manual/SONY/ICF-40-_3

It doesn't provide much information, but it does list the AM range as
526.5-1605.5 kHz,

Brett


Re: New Sony ULR spotted on eBay: the ICF-40

Brett Saylor <bds2@...>
 

You can download a multi-language user's manual for that radio at this URL:

http://safemanuals.com/user-guide-instructions-owner-manual/SONY/ICF-40-_3

It doesn't provide much information, but it does list the AM range as
526.5-1605.5 kHz,

Brett


Re: New Sony ULR spotted on eBay: the ICF-40

dhsatyadhana <satya@...>
 

Hey Mike:

You're right - the two battery feature makes it stick out, although the single battery models (SRF-59, M37V) don't have a speaker to drive, so perhaps the two batteries are for the speaker models?

As an analog set, aligning it out to 1700 khz is probably quite doable. The longer tuning dial looks like a good feature, and the "Bordeaux Red" versions common in Europe are, well, fetching!

I'm always the optimist, but my fear is that it shares the same circuitry as the S10-MK2, that rather dismal pocket radio that Sony still manages to market.

Kevin S
Bainbridge Island, WA

--- In ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com, "m_a_schuster" <schuster@...> wrote:

Nice catch!

Since it uses two AAA batteries, it's a good bet the circuit design differs from the SRF-x9 series which operate on a single cell. Also, being a non-NAM model it does not seem to cover the expanded MW band - at least from the dial markings. Perhaps a tracking adjustment could fix that!

--- In ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com, satya@ wrote:

Hi all:

I've seen this elsewhere outside North America, but the ICF-40 is now for
sale on eBay, $36.99 delivered from an apparently reputable dealer out of
Korea. See item number 130305820932. The seller has three listed, so who
knows how many he actually has.

The ICF-40 is an analog set with speaker. If it's the SRF-39 or 59 with a
larger tuning dial and speaker, it could be an appealing unit! It's also
styled a bit more elegant than most. Based on the listed size and
apparent lack of esoteric features, this appears to be an ULR that meets
the definitions, so it would be interesting to hear if anyone has any
first- (or second-) hand knowledge of this!

Kevin S
Bainbridge Island, WA


Re: New Sony ULR spotted on eBay: the ICF-40

m_a_schuster
 

Nice catch!

Since it uses two AAA batteries, it's a good bet the circuit design differs from the SRF-x9 series which operate on a single cell. Also, being a non-NAM model it does not seem to cover the expanded MW band - at least from the dial markings. Perhaps a tracking adjustment could fix that!

--- In ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com, satya@... wrote:

Hi all:

I've seen this elsewhere outside North America, but the ICF-40 is now for
sale on eBay, $36.99 delivered from an apparently reputable dealer out of
Korea. See item number 130305820932. The seller has three listed, so who
knows how many he actually has.

The ICF-40 is an analog set with speaker. If it's the SRF-39 or 59 with a
larger tuning dial and speaker, it could be an appealing unit! It's also
styled a bit more elegant than most. Based on the listed size and
apparent lack of esoteric features, this appears to be an ULR that meets
the definitions, so it would be interesting to hear if anyone has any
first- (or second-) hand knowledge of this!

Kevin S
Bainbridge Island, WA


Re: South Africans Break Most of the Distance Records

Vincent Stevens <vince999@...>
 

Hi John & everybody

Firstly congrats to Gary Deacon on cracking just about all the records!!! There's was only ever gonna be one 'winner' out of the 4 of us down in SA and that was Gary..Unfortunately my inland location just doesn't hack it compared to Gary's coastal DX paradise.. So in a way I feel bad that I haven't put the ULR's to better use. I intend to put that to rights over the next few mid-winter months though. There's a DXpedition in August and hopefully I can do a few evening trips to Gary in Fish Hoek...

cheers

Vince

John H. Bryant wrote:

Several months ago, Guy Atkins, Gary DeBock and I mounted a campaign to persuade four of our MW DXing buddies in South Africa to become involved in Ultralighting. We whad several motives. First, these folks were friends of ours of some standing from other venues and we genuinely wanted to share the joy that we've all found in ultralighting with our friends. Secondly, we felt that having some of them join us here at ultralightdx would be a real bebefit for the whole community... their perspective on propagation and such plus their DXing experiences could really enrich our discussions. That has certainly come to pass. Thirdly, though, we really hoped that they could give the rest of us some competition in the World Records of Ultralighting.. Perhaps too many of the distance records were held by Northwestern DXers and maybe Allen Willie was a little lonely atop the Countries Heard list. Well, the South Africans have been so busty logging DX with their ultralights that they have rarely found time to prepare submissions for Records or Awards. Well, I decided to apply a bit of behind-the-scenes persuasion to our South African contingent. That just bore fruit.... more than I might have wished for :>)
Congratulations to Gary Deacon !!! He just sent what follows to Rob Ross and me. Since Allen Willie is now the Custodian of the Records <vo1_001_swl@yahoo.ca> I'll send him a copy of this as Gary's official submission.
NOW HOW 'BOUT GARY AND YOU OTHER THREE GIVING ME SOME WORK IN THE AWARDS DEPARTMENT???
John Bryant
Jealous in Stillwater, USA
HERE IS GARY'S NOTE:

Hi Guys
John B. kindly emailed the ULR worldwide reception stats and suggested that I submit the results from this part of the world.
All stations apart from 1660 WWRU (Seefontein) and 1420 WHK (Noordhoek) were received at Fish Hoek. *Worldwide Reception
Longest Distance Reception -Worldwide Reception
* 12372 km/7684 miles Kevin Schanilec, Kenai Pen., AK 3LO-774, Melbourne, Australia 9/17/2008 (E100)
13 776 km /8 560 miles KMOX-1120, St.Louis, MO (50 kw) 1/24/2009 (barefoot SRF-M37V) **13255 km/8230 miles* *John Bryant, Grayland, WA 5AN-891 Adelaide, SA 5/29/2008 (**E100)
**14 462 km/8 986 miles JOAR-1053, Nagoya, Japan (50kw) 4/2/2009 (SRF-M37V and 220 metre BOG) *Longest Distance Reception @ 50 kW. -Worldwide Reception
* 12372 km/7684 miles Kevin Schanilec, Kenai Pen., AK 3LO-774, Melbourne, Australia
13 776 km /8 560 miles KMOX-1120, St.Louis, MO (50 kw) 1/24/2009 (barefoot SRF-M37V) **13255 km/8230 miles* *John Bryant, Grayland, WA 5AN-891 Adelaide, SA 5/29/2008 (**E100
**14 462 km/8 986 miles JOAR-1053, Nagoya, Japan (50kw) 4/2/2009 (SRF-M37V and 220 metre BOG) *Longest Distance Reception @ 10 kW. -Worldwide Reception
* 8398 km/5218 miles Allen Willie St.Johns, NF R.Kuwait-1341 via Magwa Relay 2/6/2009 (SRF-M37)
12 455 km/7 739 miles WWRU-1660, Elizabeth, NJ (9 kw) 3/18/2009 (barefoot SRF-M37V) **11777 km/7318 miles* *John Bryant, Grayland, WA Nat.R.-675, Christchurch, NZ 5/30/2008 (**E100
**14 157 km/8 797 miles KTWG-801, Agana, Guam (10 kw) 4/28/2009 (SRF-M37V and 220 metre BOG)
*Longest Distance Reception @ 5 kW. -Worldwide Reception
* * * 9035 km/ 5614 miles Allen Willie, St. Johns, NF R B. Nuevas-1610, Argentina 2/2/2008 (SRF-37V)
10 144/6 303 miles 5AA-1395 Adelaide SA (5 kw) 5/6/2998 (barefoot SRF-M37V)
**11483 km/7135 miles* *John Bryant, Grayland, WA 4TAB-891 Townsville, QLD 5/29/2008 (**E100
**13 164 km/8 179 miles WHK Cleveland, OH (5 kw) 1/16/2009 (SRF-M37V and 220 metre BOG)
*Longest Distance Reception @ 1 kW. -Worldwide Reception
* 7706 km/ 4789 miles Paul Logan, Lisnaskea, N. Ireland, KVNS-1700 Bville, TX 10/10/2008(SRF-59)
**6802 km/4227 miles John Bryant, Grayland, WA, JOTS-1368 Wakkanai, Japan 10/8/2008 (**E100)
**8 593 km /5 339 miles Vision Radio, Bunbury WA (1 kw) 4/15/2009 (SRF-M37V and 220 metre BOG)
*Longest Distance Reception @ 500 W. -Worldwide Reception
* 1437 km/893 miles Kevin Schanilec, Bainbridge Is. WA, KLSQ, Whitney, NV 1/23/2008 (SRF-39FP)
* * 6064 km/3768 miles Radio Continental, Rio de Janeiro (500 watts) 4/13/2009 (barefoot SRF-M37V)
* ***1099km/683 miles* *John Bryant, Stillwater, OK, XEMF-780, Monclova, CO, MX 2/8/2008 (SRF-T516**)
** 8 775 km/5 452 miles 6NM-1215 Northam (500 watts) SRF-37V and 220 metre BOG
*Longest Distance Reception @ 250 W. -Worldwide Reception
* 1540 km/957 miles John Callarman, Krum, TX, XEUACH-1610 Chapingo,TE, MX 1/6/2008 (SRF-37V)
**1609 km/1000 miles John Bryant, Stillwater, OK, XETI-750, Tempoal VC, MX 2/9/2008 (SRF-T615**)
**9 979 km/6 200 miles 5LN-1485, Port Lincoln, SA (200 watts) SRF-37V and 220 metre BOG

I will reconfirm countries heard, TA's etc. as time permits.
73 and good dxing,
Gary
Gary Deacon
Fish Hoek
Cape Peninsula
South Africa
www.capedx.blogspot.com <http://www.capedx.blogspot.com>


New Sony ULR spotted on eBay: the ICF-40

satya@...
 

Hi all:

I've seen this elsewhere outside North America, but the ICF-40 is now for
sale on eBay, $36.99 delivered from an apparently reputable dealer out of
Korea. See item number 130305820932. The seller has three listed, so who
knows how many he actually has.

The ICF-40 is an analog set with speaker. If it's the SRF-39 or 59 with a
larger tuning dial and speaker, it could be an appealing unit! It's also
styled a bit more elegant than most. Based on the listed size and
apparent lack of esoteric features, this appears to be an ULR that meets
the definitions, so it would be interesting to hear if anyone has any
first- (or second-) hand knowledge of this!

Kevin S
Bainbridge Island, WA


Re: Degen DE15 ULR sighted on eBay

Gary DeBock
 

Hi Mike,
 
Thanks for your comments.
 
In general, the recent new Ultralight models from Degen have not been very impressive in AM sensitivity, although they have made some very noteworthy innovations with DSP signal processing for great selectivity. Nulling ability is also superb in the DE1123, something that I didn't mention yesterday. The design priority in the DE1123 certainly seems slanted toward the FM band, and the radio has exceptional FM sensitivity for its size.
 
Like you mentioned, it's certainly possible for an Ultralight to have good AM sensitivity with a small loopstick, such as in the SRF-T615 and other models. In these cases, the superior RF front end design compensates for the small loopstick-- to produce exceptional weak-signal capability. In the case of the DE1123, however, neither the loopstick nor the AM RF front end is particularly effective, causing the superior DSP-provided selectivity to be almost wasted.
 
Because of the superb selectivity, a radio like the DE1123 can be effective in AM DXing if the loopstick is replaced with a much larger Slider model, or if an effective active or passive tuned loop system is inductively coupled to the tiny loopstick (maybe a 10' PVC loop? :>)
 
73, Gary       
 
In a message dated 5/11/2009 5:06:05 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time, schuster@... writes:


Gary, thanks for the preview. Perhaps there have been design changes
between the DE1123 and DE15; I guess we will find out. Hope that this
does not bode poorly for the performance of the new Grundig analog
mini we've been discussing here.

Antenna gain is paramount, of course, but within limits a smaller
antenna need not be fatal; witness the fairly respectable performance
(for size) of the tiny Sony 1AAA analog sets (e.g. SRF-S84) based on
the SRF-x9 design.
--mike

--- In ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com, D1028Gary@... wrote:
>
> Hello Mike, George and Others,
>
> The DE1123 DSP radio with the built-in MP3 recorder (upon which the
DE15 is > based) has already been purchased and fully evaluated for
the 2009 > Shootout. Assuming that the DE15 has identical circuitry
except for the MP3 > function, you may be interested in the
"executive summary" of the DE1123 > performance.
>
> The DE1123 does indeed have exceptional AM selectivity because of
the DSP > capability, which elevates its selectivity into a class far
superior to that > of any other Ultralight, and roughly equivalent
to that of a Murata > CFJ455K5- filter modified E100. Despite this,
the outstanding AM selectivity of > the DE1123 is greatly
compromised by anemic sensitivity, so that the model
> has difficulty receiving any of the common fringe DX testing
stations here > in western Washington. A DXer purchasing this model
(or, presumably, the > DE15) would be greatly disappointed in the
mediocre sensitivity, and despite > the stellar DSP-provided
selectivity, would find himself logging less actual > DX that he
would with a $9 Tecsun R9012. >
> The DE1123 (and presumably the DE15) would have the potential to
become a > great modified Ultralight if the DXer replaced the
miserable stock loopstick > with a far more effective Slider model,
assuming some minor technical > ability on the part of the owner.
Unfortunately, Degen typically designs its > models to be difficult
to disassemble without a proprietary service manual,
> and has multiple claws and latches in both the DE1123 and DE1105 to
> discourage snooping. This will not stop a fanatic from getting at
the loopsticks, > but may be a deterrent to those who spend around
$80 and don't want to > damage any of the plastic cabinet locking
tabs. >
> 73, Gary


Re: Degen DE15 ULR sighted on eBay

m_a_schuster
 

Gary, thanks for the preview. Perhaps there have been design changes
between the DE1123 and DE15; I guess we will find out. Hope that this
does not bode poorly for the performance of the new Grundig analog
mini we've been discussing here.

Antenna gain is paramount, of course, but within limits a smaller
antenna need not be fatal; witness the fairly respectable performance
(for size) of the tiny Sony 1AAA analog sets (e.g. SRF-S84) based on
the SRF-x9 design.
--mike

--- In ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com, D1028Gary@... wrote:

Hello Mike, George and Others,

The DE1123 DSP radio with the built-in MP3 recorder (upon which the
DE15 is > based) has already been purchased and fully evaluated for
the 2009 > Shootout. Assuming that the DE15 has identical circuitry
except for the MP3 > function, you may be interested in the
"executive summary" of the DE1123 > performance.

The DE1123 does indeed have exceptional AM selectivity because of
the DSP > capability, which elevates its selectivity into a class far
superior to that > of any other Ultralight, and roughly equivalent
to that of a Murata > CFJ455K5- filter modified E100. Despite this,
the outstanding AM selectivity of > the DE1123 is greatly
compromised by anemic sensitivity, so that the model
has difficulty receiving any of the common fringe DX testing
stations here > in western Washington. A DXer purchasing this model
(or, presumably, the > DE15) would be greatly disappointed in the
mediocre sensitivity, and despite > the stellar DSP-provided
selectivity, would find himself logging less actual > DX that he
would with a $9 Tecsun R9012. >
The DE1123 (and presumably the DE15) would have the potential to
become a > great modified Ultralight if the DXer replaced the
miserable stock loopstick > with a far more effective Slider model,
assuming some minor technical > ability on the part of the owner.
Unfortunately, Degen typically designs its > models to be difficult
to disassemble without a proprietary service manual,
and has multiple claws and latches in both the DE1123 and DE1105 to
discourage snooping. This will not stop a fanatic from getting at
the loopsticks, > but may be a deterrent to those who spend around
$80 and don't want to > damage any of the plastic cabinet locking
tabs. >
73, Gary


Re: GS Ultralight Loggings May 10, 2009

satya@...
 

Hey Greg:

Good going! Some time this week will be the magic 300 no doubt.

I plan to re-zero my log book and start over in the fall - how long did it
take you to get this far? Here on the West Coast it may take a while...

Kevin S
Bainbridge Island, WA

Ultralight loggings for Sun. May. 10, 2009. All stations logged from
Toronto, ON. Dates and times in UTC.

One more station and one more Canadian province (Nova Scotia) added to
the ultralight log. Total ultralight count is now: 298. Total Canadian
province count: is now 5.


GS Ultralight Loggings May 10, 2009

Greg Shoom <shoomg@...>
 

Ultralight loggings for Sun. May. 10, 2009. All stations logged from Toronto, ON. Dates and times in UTC.

One more station and one more Canadian province (Nova Scotia) added to the ultralight log. Total ultralight count is now: 298. Total Canadian province count: is now 5.

780 CFDR NS Halifax - 10-May-2009 0620-0701 UTC - Country and western music heard underneath WBBM. Inaudible most of the time, but occasionally rose up enough to allow me to compare the music with CFDR's webcast at www.780kixx.ca. Every time I checked it for over half an hour the music matched up (the two sounded like they were out of synch, with the webcast lagging quite a bit). I also heard a brief voice announcement once that I couldn't make out, and when I checked the webcast a moment later I heard a 780 KIXX ID in similar cadences. So it seems pretty certain that this is CFDR. 50 / 15 kW. Sangean DT-400 and then Eton E-100. (Very poor).
--> Not a new station to the overall log, but this is the first time I've heard CFDR from Ontario. The only other logging I have of this station is from Trinity, Newfoundland in 2007.

Best,
Greg Shoom
VE3LXL


GS Ultralight Loggings May 7, 2009

Greg Shoom <shoomg@...>
 

Ultralight loggings for Thurs. May. 7, 2009. All stations logged from Toronto, ON. Dates and times in UTC.

Two more stations added to the ultralight log. Total ultralight count is now: 297.

1610 CJWI QC Montreal - 07-May-2009 0145 UTC - Two men talking in Carribean-accented French. In null of local CHHA. 1 kW. Sony SRF-59. (Poor).

1290 WHIO OH Dayton - 07-May-2009 0204 UTC - Fox news followed by WHIO ID. Heard Michael Savage show earlier which I think was the same station. 5 kW. Sony SRF-59. (Poor).

Best,
Greg Shoom
VE3LXL