Date   

Re: sony srf-m37 vs Srf-59

Jay Heyl
 


On Wed, May 13, 2009 at 9:46 AM, BIOMET, Ingenieria Biomedica <biomet@...> wrote:

I want to buy a ULR radio but I really dont know wich is the best option
between SRF-59 analog radio and the SRF-M37 digital tunnig radio?

I wouldn't recommend the M37 for an urban area. The filter is VERY wide, almost to the point of non-existence. The more  powerful stations in the Chicago area (I'm about 40 miles away) consume 50kHz or more bandwidth during the day. It's not quite as bad at night, though reception of first adjacents is virtually impossible.

The SRF-59, on the other hand, has very tight filtering and reception of first adjacents to the locals is much easier. On the downside, you can't tell what frequency you have tuned except by feeling your way along the dial. And the tuning on the stock model is very stiff and touchy. (I've modified one of mine with a 10:1 reduction drive that makes tuning much easier.)

In an urban area I'd opt for the SRF-59. If you live far away from powerful transmitters, then the SRF-M37 might be a better choice.

  -- Jay


Re: Spinning the Sony M37W

Horacio Nigro <hanigrodx@...>
 


Sony M37W... so the W should be for wide not for weather.

Horacio A. Nigro
Montevideo
Uruguay


--- El mié, 13/5/09, satya@... escribió:


De: satya@...
Asunto: [ultralightdx] Spinning the Sony M37W
Para: ultralightdx@...
Fecha: miércoles, 13 mayo, 2009 11:30

Hi all:

I thought I would pass on what I found to be an amusing way to describe
this radio, which as many of us know is a good receiver but with stock
selectivity so wide it could probably sleep six comfortably. In the most
recent C Crane catalog, the receiver is listed as being "sensitive enough
that, if you're close to an AM broadcast antenna, you may notice some
bleeding into other adjacent stations on the dial."

Now THAT is a spin-master at work!

Kevin S
Bainbridge Island, WA



sony srf-m37 vs Srf-59

biometuy
 

Hi fellows:

I want to buy a ULR radio but I really dont know wich is the best option between SRF-59 analog radio and the SRF-M37 digital tunnig radio?

Which one is the best ? advantages and disadvantages? problems .. knowing issues?

I want to use it in a urban area with alot of QRM , who is the best in the scenario?

the m37 ues the same "marvelous" chip than the srf-59?

any one has the schematics or service manual to better understand the differences?

any help will be very appreciate

thanks and my best wishes to all colisters

Jorge Morales
Montevideo - Uruguay


Spinning the Sony M37W

satya@...
 

Hi all:

I thought I would pass on what I found to be an amusing way to describe
this radio, which as many of us know is a good receiver but with stock
selectivity so wide it could probably sleep six comfortably. In the most
recent C Crane catalog, the receiver is listed as being "sensitive enough
that, if you're close to an AM broadcast antenna, you may notice some
bleeding into other adjacent stations on the dial."

Now THAT is a spin-master at work!

Kevin S
Bainbridge Island, WA


Re: sony srf-m37 vs Srf-59

Gary DeBock
 

 
Hello Jorge,
 
A full competitive comparison of the SRF-59 and SRF-M37V (along with the Sangean DT-200VX and the Sony ICF-S10Mk2) was done previously, and posted at the above link on DXer.Ca. It will give you very detailed information on the comparison between these two Ultralight radios, and I hope you will enjoy reading it!
 
73 and Good DX, 
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA) 
 
In a message dated 5/13/2009 7:50:09 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time, biomet@... writes:


Hi fellows:

I want to buy a ULR radio but I really dont know wich is the best option
between SRF-59 analog radio and the SRF-M37 digital tunnig radio?

Which one is the best ? advantages and disadvantages? problems ..
knowing issues?

I want to use it in a urban area with alot of QRM , who is the best in
the scenario¿?

the m37 ues the same "marvelous" chip than the srf-59?

any one has the schematics or service manual to better understand the
differences?

any help will be very appreciate

thanks and my best wishes to all colisters

Jorge Morales
Montevideo - Uruguay


US State #38 Logged on Eton E-100

Kirk Allen <kirk74601@...>
 

Hi Guys and gals,

Sorry I've not posted anything here for quite a while. Believe me, I am reading everything posted here and enjoying it immensley. Yesterday's overnight DX'ing session brought me three new ULR stations, one of which was US state #38.

540, WAUK, Milwaukee, WI, 0620-0700+, 5/12/09, Up and down among quite a few others. ID's hrd tent. @ 0630, then clear at 0700, "ESPN Milwaukee".

540, KNAK, Delta, UT, 0730, 5/12/09, quite surprised to luck into a really clear ID @ 0730 or close to that. One of those sudden pop-up IDs. I wrote down what I thought I'd hrd not investing much hope for it being correct. By Gumbie, it was accurate all letters! Topaz has this one listed as 30 watts night power. I can't help but wonder if that's true. (Apx 860 miles/1385 km from here)Have any of you guys in the northeast hrd this one by chance?

1030, WBZ, Boston, MA, 1000, 5/12/09, Really happy with finally nailing an ID from this one after trying to catch them for quite a while. I had the sta online for a help aid. Actually it turned out I didn't need the streaming audio. A nice reference was hrd at 1000 as "WBZ news..." Natch I did check the streaming ulr to help confirm...it was them with a long delay, about 25 seconds or so. New state for the ULR log here, #38. (station # 572)

It's taken about 9 months for me to reach the current totals here. I'll celebrate my first year of Ultralight listening in mid August.

HORACIO, I'd like to echo what John and others have said regarding posting the link to you guys' DX camp. Super pictures. Thanks very much!
73's to everyone!!

Kirk Allen
Ponca City, OK
Eton E-100 Slider
Select-a-Tenna


Re: Brazilian DXers recent Lorena DX camp

Alex
 

--- In ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com, Horacio Nigro <hanigrodx@...> wrote:

Do you want to see more? Here's the stuff from past years,

i.e: 2006,

http://www.amantesdoradio.com.br/5lorena/5lorena.htm

Include a not streaming video link and clickeable 180+ pics.

Horacio A. Nigro
Montevideo
Uruguay

Keep spreading the jealously thicker and thicker man!!! I wish we had that type of turn out!!! I have tryed for years to have a winter DX camp here in Ohio with the Cincinnati MONIX/ASOC clubs. But it's always "something" that throws "monkey wrench" in to the plan. Maybe we can do it before I go south to Floridia.


Thanks for sharing even more pictures!!!:)


Alex N8UCN/KOH8IG


Not radio for prison; radio from prison!!

Dennis Gibson <wb6tnb@...>
 


Re: Brazilian DXers recent Lorena DX camp

Horacio Nigro <hanigrodx@...>
 

Do you want to see more? Here's the stuff from past years,

i.e: 2006,

http://www.amantesdoradio.com.br/5lorena/5lorena.htm

Include a not streaming video link and clickeable 180+ pics.

Horacio A. Nigro
Montevideo
Uruguay


--- El mar, 12/5/09, John H. Bryant escribió:


De: John H. Bryant Asunto: Re: [ultralightdx] Re: Brazilian DXers recent Lorena DX camp
Para: ultralightdx@...
Fecha: martes, 12 mayo, 2009 11:22

Horacio,

Thanks very much for posting the link to the Lorena DX camp. I've gone back there three times and find the differences between this Brazilian group and typical North American DX camps startling!  First, the size.... in North America, most of the MW/SW DX Camps or DXpeditions tend to be rather small. Say 4 to 6 DXers... tops 8 DXers.  The only real exception to this that I can think of is the long-running Ontario DX Association (ODXA) annual camp.  It has been about the size of the Lorena group at times.

The even bigger difference, though, is the huge number of loops, both ferrite and small air core.  Although there has been a minority use of small loops up here in recent years, they are absolutely not the norm... hobby-wide, especially at DX camps. At camps, normally they are selected for remote locations and large wire antennas, usually beverages, are the norm. Although we have seen the full range of antennas up here in recent years, the more popular antennas by decades would be something like:

40s-50s: Long Random Wires

60s and 70s Large Box loops and Random Wires

80s and 90s Beverages and Random Wires

00s Large Single-turn Loops and Beverages

There has been a MWDX sub-group (at times a large one) up here that focuses on DXing with portables since at least the 1970s... maybe going as far back as far as the early transistorized Trans-Oceanics around 1960...

Anyway, if the Lorena camp represents the current general practice of MW DXing in Latin America, they seem far better set up to do Ultralighting in the Unlimited Class than many of us up here. BRAVO!

Thanks for the report, Horacio.

John B.
I'd love to see some of the other NAm Mossbacks comment on the By Decade list above.









At 04:40 AM 5/12/2009 +0000, you wrote:


--- In ultralightdx@ yahoogroups. com, Horacio Nigro wrote:
>
> Despite there are no ULR at sight, here are interesting pics from Brazilian DXers recent gathering. Note that several use loops and ferrite boosters.
> http://www.sarmento .eng.br/Lorena20 09.htm
>
> Horacio A. Nigro
> Montevideo
> Uruguay
>



SRF-39FP, some notes

Horacio Nigro <hanigrodx@...>
 

Talking about loops and ferrite boosters, after the first weeks using the SRF-39FP I've noted that if I put my hands covering the receiver, in its upper side (near the antenna coils and the tuning capacitor) the signals tend to increase a bit. I've already noted some capacitance effects in the SRF 59, and read about that in this group.

Also with the SRF-39F I've experienced some nulling enhancements that I hadn't seen with the silvered case brother. I'm talking about taking it near a metallic curtain. At some distances or positions the nulling is better. Also as I've noted that the SRF-39FP's  reception is enhanced near the end side of my random wire, where the wire falls down at that point and I can bring it closer. Here the wire imposes its influence and the enhancement is mainly from the wire's direction (in my case from the North, i.e. Brazil). With a loop or ferrite booster, which is in my plan to build, I am certain expecting to increase the quality of DX reception, as most of us already have experimented



Horacio A. Nigro
Montevideo
Uruguay


--- El mar, 12/5/09, D1028Gary@... escribió:


De: D1028Gary@...
Asunto: Re: [ultralightdx] Re: Brazilian DXers recent Lorena DX camp
Para: ultralightdx@...
Fecha: martes, 12 mayo, 2009 1:20

Hello John and Horacio,
 
Although I'm nothing like a NAm Mossback :>) , I would certainly agree with John that MW loops, both of the ferrite and air core type, are pretty much overlooked in traditional DXpeditions here. For Ultralight radio DXers, however, these loops have great potential to provide absolutely thrilling DX for very little investment.
 
Both the Slider-tuned ferrite loops and the huge passive air core loops are ideal for ULR DXers, providing a cheap, easy way to make pocket radios extremely sensitive. Bringing these loops to an ocean beach almost always results in a thrilling experience. The figure-8 reception pattern is not ideal in some situations, but with extremely selective DSP-enhanced ULR's now being marketed, the challenge of overcoming domestic splatter may be easier.
 
One of the unique attributes of the larger PVC loops being tested here is the ability to make even relatively "deaf" ultralights perform like ultra-sensitive wonders, with only inductive coupling. DSP-enhanced radios like the new Degen DE1123 are typically not very sensitive on AM, but when coupled up to a 9 or 10 foot PVC loop, they run wild over any stock portable on the planet, even overloading on stations that a Slider E100 can barely receive. The combination of great DSP selectivity, a built-in MP3 recorder, and a massive sensitivity boost from a 10-foot PVC loop is tough to beat-- all for a total investment of about $150.
 
73, Gary         
 
In a message dated 5/12/2009 7:23:51 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time, bjohnorcas@rockisla nd.com writes:


Horacio,

Thanks very much for posting the link to the Lorena DX camp. I've gone back there three times and find the differences between this Brazilian group and typical North American DX camps startling!  First, the size.... in North America, most of the MW/SW DX Camps or DXpeditions tend to be rather small. Say 4 to 6 DXers... tops 8 DXers.  The only real exception to this that I can think of is the long-running Ontario DX Association (ODXA) annual camp.  It has been about the size of the Lorena group at times.

The even bigger difference, though, is the huge number of loops, both ferrite and small air core.  Although there has been a minority use of small loops up here in recent years, they are absolutely not the norm... hobby-wide, especially at DX camps. At camps, normally they are selected for remote locations and large wire antennas, usually beverages, are the norm. Although we have seen the full range of antennas up here in recent years, the more popular antennas by decades would be something like:

40s-50s: Long Random Wires

60s and 70s Large Box loops and Random Wires

80s and 90s Beverages and Random Wires

00s Large Single-turn Loops and Beverages

There has been a MWDX sub-group (at times a large one) up here that focuses on DXing with portables since at least the 1970s... maybe going as far back as far as the early transistorized Trans-Oceanics around 1960...

Anyway, if the Lorena camp represents the current general practice of MW DXing in Latin America, they seem far better set up to do Ultralighting in the Unlimited Class than many of us up here. BRAVO!

Thanks for the report, Horacio.

John B.
I'd love to see some of the other NAm Mossbacks comment on the By Decade list above.









At 04:40 AM 5/12/2009 +0000, you wrote:


--- In ultralightdx@ yahoogroups. com, Horacio Nigro wrote:
>
> Despite there are no ULR at sight, here are interesting pics from Brazilian DXers recent gathering. Note that several use loops and ferrite boosters.
> http://www.sarmento .eng.br/Lorena20 09.htm
>
> Horacio A. Nigro
> Montevideo
> Uruguay
>



SRF-39FP, some notes

Horacio Nigro <hanigrodx@...>
 

Talking about loops and ferrite boosters, after the first weeks using the SRF-39FP I've noted that if I put my hands covering the receiver, in its upper side (near the antenna coils and the tuning capacitor) the signals tend to increase a bit. I've already noted some capacitance effects in the SRF 59, and read about that in this group.

Also with the SRF-39F I've experienced some nulling enhancements that I hadn't seen with the silvered case brother. I'm talking about taking it near a metallic curtain. At some distances or positions the nulling is better. Also as I've noted that the SRF-39FP's  reception is enhanced near the end side of my random wire, where the wire falls down at that point and I can bring it closer. Here the wire imposes its influence and the enhancement is mainly from the wire's direction (in my case from the North, i.e. Brazil). With a loop or ferrite booster, which is in my plan to build, I am certain expecting to increase the quality of DX reception, as most of us already have experimented



Horacio A. Nigro
Montevideo
Uruguay


--- El mar, 12/5/09, D1028Gary@... escribió:


De: D1028Gary@...
Asunto: Re: [ultralightdx] Re: Brazilian DXers recent Lorena DX camp
Para: ultralightdx@...
Fecha: martes, 12 mayo, 2009 1:20

Hello John and Horacio,
 
Although I'm nothing like a NAm Mossback :>) , I would certainly agree with John that MW loops, both of the ferrite and air core type, are pretty much overlooked in traditional DXpeditions here. For Ultralight radio DXers, however, these loops have great potential to provide absolutely thrilling DX for very little investment.
 
Both the Slider-tuned ferrite loops and the huge passive air core loops are ideal for ULR DXers, providing a cheap, easy way to make pocket radios extremely sensitive. Bringing these loops to an ocean beach almost always results in a thrilling experience. The figure-8 reception pattern is not ideal in some situations, but with extremely selective DSP-enhanced ULR's now being marketed, the challenge of overcoming domestic splatter may be easier.
 
One of the unique attributes of the larger PVC loops being tested here is the ability to make even relatively "deaf" ultralights perform like ultra-sensitive wonders, with only inductive coupling. DSP-enhanced radios like the new Degen DE1123 are typically not very sensitive on AM, but when coupled up to a 9 or 10 foot PVC loop, they run wild over any stock portable on the planet, even overloading on stations that a Slider E100 can barely receive. The combination of great DSP selectivity, a built-in MP3 recorder, and a massive sensitivity boost from a 10-foot PVC loop is tough to beat-- all for a total investment of about $150.
 
73, Gary         
 
In a message dated 5/12/2009 7:23:51 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time, bjohnorcas@rockisla nd.com writes:


Horacio,

Thanks very much for posting the link to the Lorena DX camp. I've gone back there three times and find the differences between this Brazilian group and typical North American DX camps startling!  First, the size.... in North America, most of the MW/SW DX Camps or DXpeditions tend to be rather small. Say 4 to 6 DXers... tops 8 DXers.  The only real exception to this that I can think of is the long-running Ontario DX Association (ODXA) annual camp.  It has been about the size of the Lorena group at times.

The even bigger difference, though, is the huge number of loops, both ferrite and small air core.  Although there has been a minority use of small loops up here in recent years, they are absolutely not the norm... hobby-wide, especially at DX camps. At camps, normally they are selected for remote locations and large wire antennas, usually beverages, are the norm. Although we have seen the full range of antennas up here in recent years, the more popular antennas by decades would be something like:

40s-50s: Long Random Wires

60s and 70s Large Box loops and Random Wires

80s and 90s Beverages and Random Wires

00s Large Single-turn Loops and Beverages

There has been a MWDX sub-group (at times a large one) up here that focuses on DXing with portables since at least the 1970s... maybe going as far back as far as the early transistorized Trans-Oceanics around 1960...

Anyway, if the Lorena camp represents the current general practice of MW DXing in Latin America, they seem far better set up to do Ultralighting in the Unlimited Class than many of us up here. BRAVO!

Thanks for the report, Horacio.

John B.
I'd love to see some of the other NAm Mossbacks comment on the By Decade list above.









At 04:40 AM 5/12/2009 +0000, you wrote:


--- In ultralightdx@ yahoogroups. com, Horacio Nigro wrote:
>
> Despite there are no ULR at sight, here are interesting pics from Brazilian DXers recent gathering. Note that several use loops and ferrite boosters.
> http://www.sarmento .eng.br/Lorena20 09.htm
>
> Horacio A. Nigro
> Montevideo
> Uruguay
>



Re: Brazilian DXers recent Lorena DX camp

John H. Bryant <bjohnorcas@...>
 

Horacio,

Thanks very much for posting the link to the Lorena DX camp. I've gone back there three times and find the differences between this Brazilian group and typical North American DX camps startling!  First, the size.... in North America, most of the MW/SW DX Camps or DXpeditions tend to be rather small. Say 4 to 6 DXers... tops 8 DXers.  The only real exception to this that I can think of is the long-running Ontario DX Association (ODXA) annual camp.  It has been about the size of the Lorena group at times.

The even bigger difference, though, is the huge number of loops, both ferrite and small air core.  Although there has been a minority use of small loops up here in recent years, they are absolutely not the norm... hobby-wide, especially at DX camps. At camps, normally they are selected for remote locations and large wire antennas, usually beverages, are the norm. Although we have seen the full range of antennas up here in recent years, the more popular antennas by decades would be something like:

40s-50s: Long Random Wires

60s and 70s Large Box loops and Random Wires

80s and 90s Beverages and Random Wires

00s Large Single-turn Loops and Beverages

There has been a MWDX sub-group (at times a large one) up here that focuses on DXing with portables since at least the 1970s... maybe going as far back as far as the early transistorized Trans-Oceanics around 1960...

Anyway, if the Lorena camp represents the current general practice of MW DXing in Latin America, they seem far better set up to do Ultralighting in the Unlimited Class than many of us up here. BRAVO!

Thanks for the report, Horacio.

John B.
I'd love to see some of the other NAm Mossbacks comment on the By Decade list above.









At 04:40 AM 5/12/2009 +0000, you wrote:


--- In ultralightdx@..., Horacio Nigro wrote:
>
> Despite there are no ULR at sight, here are interesting pics from Brazilian DXers recent gathering. Note that several use loops and ferrite boosters.
> http://www.sarmento.eng.br/Lorena2009.htm
>
> Horacio A. Nigro
> Montevideo
> Uruguay
>


Probable new UL Graveyarder- WSTV-1340

John Cereghin <jcereghin@...>
 

Pretty sure I had WSTV-1340 in Stuebenville, Ohio on May 11 at 2130-2200 with the Pittsburgh Penguins post-game show. Yes, the Mighty Washington Capitals pulled out the overtime win last night. No ID but WSTV is listed as a Penguins affiliate and there are no listed stations on 1340 that carry the Caps, so probably was WSTV. If it pans out, it would be my 536th ultralight station and my 38th graveyarder, heard on the DT-400W barefoot. WSTV would be a new UL station but I already have them in my master log. A 276-mile catch.

Go Caps (since my Orioles are tanking :( )!!!

John Cereghin
Smyrna DE


Re: Brazilian DXers recent Lorena DX camp

Gary DeBock
 

Hello John and Horacio,
 
Although I'm nothing like a NAm Mossback :>) , I would certainly agree with John that MW loops, both of the ferrite and air core type, are pretty much overlooked in traditional DXpeditions here. For Ultralight radio DXers, however, these loops have great potential to provide absolutely thrilling DX for very little investment.
 
Both the Slider-tuned ferrite loops and the huge passive air core loops are ideal for ULR DXers, providing a cheap, easy way to make pocket radios extremely sensitive. Bringing these loops to an ocean beach almost always results in a thrilling experience. The figure-8 reception pattern is not ideal in some situations, but with extremely selective DSP-enhanced ULR's now being marketed, the challenge of overcoming domestic splatter may be easier.
 
One of the unique attributes of the larger PVC loops being tested here is the ability to make even relatively "deaf" ultralights perform like ultra-sensitive wonders, with only inductive coupling. DSP-enhanced radios like the new Degen DE1123 are typically not very sensitive on AM, but when coupled up to a 9 or 10 foot PVC loop, they run wild over any stock portable on the planet, even overloading on stations that a Slider E100 can barely receive. The combination of great DSP selectivity, a built-in MP3 recorder, and a massive sensitivity boost from a 10-foot PVC loop is tough to beat-- all for a total investment of about $150.
 
73, Gary         
 
In a message dated 5/12/2009 7:23:51 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time, bjohnorcas@... writes:


Horacio,

Thanks very much for posting the link to the Lorena DX camp. I've gone back there three times and find the differences between this Brazilian group and typical North American DX camps startling!  First, the size.... in North America, most of the MW/SW DX Camps or DXpeditions tend to be rather small. Say 4 to 6 DXers... tops 8 DXers.  The only real exception to this that I can think of is the long-running Ontario DX Association (ODXA) annual camp.  It has been about the size of the Lorena group at times.

The even bigger difference, though, is the huge number of loops, both ferrite and small air core.  Although there has been a minority use of small loops up here in recent years, they are absolutely not the norm... hobby-wide, especially at DX camps. At camps, normally they are selected for remote locations and large wire antennas, usually beverages, are the norm. Although we have seen the full range of antennas up here in recent years, the more popular antennas by decades would be something like:

40s-50s: Long Random Wires

60s and 70s Large Box loops and Random Wires

80s and 90s Beverages and Random Wires

00s Large Single-turn Loops and Beverages

There has been a MWDX sub-group (at times a large one) up here that focuses on DXing with portables since at least the 1970s... maybe going as far back as far as the early transistorized Trans-Oceanics around 1960...

Anyway, if the Lorena camp represents the current general practice of MW DXing in Latin America, they seem far better set up to do Ultralighting in the Unlimited Class than many of us up here. BRAVO!

Thanks for the report, Horacio.

John B.
I'd love to see some of the other NAm Mossbacks comment on the By Decade list above.









At 04:40 AM 5/12/2009 +0000, you wrote:


--- In ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com, Horacio Nigro .> wrote:
>
> Despite there are no ULR at sight, here are interesting pics from Brazilian DXers recent gathering. Note that several use loops and ferrite boosters.
> http://www.sarmento.eng.br/Lorena2009.htm
>
> Horacio A. Nigro
> Montevideo
> Uruguay
>


Re: Brazilian DXers recent Lorena DX camp

Alex
 

--- In ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com, Horacio Nigro <hanigrodx@...> wrote:

Despite there are no ULR at sight, here are interesting pics from Brazilian DXers recent gathering. Note that several use loops and ferrite boosters.
http://www.sarmento.eng.br/Lorena2009.htm

Horacio A. Nigro
Montevideo
Uruguay
Thanks, for sharing that Horacio! It looks like they all were having a great time. I wish I was there, that and I wish could write,read and speak Portuguese and/or Spanish. It looked like a I would have had a ball!! I was suprised to see English publications in use such as CQ and Popular Mechanics magazines, plus English additions of the World Radio and Television Handbook in use.

I would love to read about their "catches" and ideas techniqes of monitoring.



Alex N8UCN/KOH8IG


Re: GS Ultralight Loggings May 10, 2009

Greg Shoom <shoomg@...>
 

Hi Kevin,

Thanks. Basically I started ultralight DXing in September 2008. My first ULR logging was in Jan. 2008 (a new station I heard on my then-new SRF-59) but I didn't log anything else on it until Sept. I got started in Sept. because I had just logged Radio Rebelde from Cuba on 1180 kHz on a Kaito KA-1103 and on an impulse I decided to see if I could hear it on the SRF-59. I was amazed to hear it almost as well on the little Sony, and thus an ultralight DXer was born.

Actually I had been thinking for several months to start doing it, as I was inspired by Robert Ross's posts to the ODXA reflector. It was that logging of R. Rebelde that pushed me into action.

Basically it has taken me 8 months to get to 298. I sure hope to reach 300 soon because I want to turn my attention to other things in radio for a while, but I want to get to 300 before I make that pause.

I did the first 200 using the Sony SRF-59. I'm still logging new stations with that Sony, but most of my ULR activities now are divided equally between the Eton E-100 and the Sangean DT-400W. I'm also still doing all this "barefoot".

Best,
Greg S.

Hey Greg:

Good going! Some time this week will be the magic 300 no doubt.

I plan to re-zero my log book and start over in the fall - how long
did it take you to get this far? Here on the West Coast it may take
a while...

Kevin S
Bainbridge Island, WA
--
$
$ Greg Shoom - shoom@sympatico.ca
$ Toronto, Ontario, Canada
$


Re: New Sony ULR spotted on eBay: the ICF-40

satya@...
 

Thanks Brett - I saw that earlier to day as well. I noticed that it has a
tuning LED as the S10-MK2 has, and both are powered by two batteries (2
AAA for the ICF-40, 2 AA for the S10-MK2). So, given that they are at the
same price point, and about the same size, I wonder if it they are in fact
the same inside.

Hopefully someone will chime in here that has used the ICF-40???

Kevin S
Bainbridge Island, WA

You can download a multi-language user's manual for that radio at this
URL:

http://safemanuals.com/user-guide-instructions-owner-manual/SONY/ICF-40-_3

It doesn't provide much information, but it does list the AM range as
526.5-1605.5 kHz,

Brett


Re: New Sony ULR spotted on eBay: the ICF-40

Brett Saylor <bds2@...>
 

You can download a multi-language user's manual for that radio at this URL:

http://safemanuals.com/user-guide-instructions-owner-manual/SONY/ICF-40-_3

It doesn't provide much information, but it does list the AM range as
526.5-1605.5 kHz,

Brett


Re: New Sony ULR spotted on eBay: the ICF-40

dhsatyadhana <satya@...>
 

Hey Mike:

You're right - the two battery feature makes it stick out, although the single battery models (SRF-59, M37V) don't have a speaker to drive, so perhaps the two batteries are for the speaker models?

As an analog set, aligning it out to 1700 khz is probably quite doable. The longer tuning dial looks like a good feature, and the "Bordeaux Red" versions common in Europe are, well, fetching!

I'm always the optimist, but my fear is that it shares the same circuitry as the S10-MK2, that rather dismal pocket radio that Sony still manages to market.

Kevin S
Bainbridge Island, WA

--- In ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com, "m_a_schuster" <schuster@...> wrote:

Nice catch!

Since it uses two AAA batteries, it's a good bet the circuit design differs from the SRF-x9 series which operate on a single cell. Also, being a non-NAM model it does not seem to cover the expanded MW band - at least from the dial markings. Perhaps a tracking adjustment could fix that!

--- In ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com, satya@ wrote:

Hi all:

I've seen this elsewhere outside North America, but the ICF-40 is now for
sale on eBay, $36.99 delivered from an apparently reputable dealer out of
Korea. See item number 130305820932. The seller has three listed, so who
knows how many he actually has.

The ICF-40 is an analog set with speaker. If it's the SRF-39 or 59 with a
larger tuning dial and speaker, it could be an appealing unit! It's also
styled a bit more elegant than most. Based on the listed size and
apparent lack of esoteric features, this appears to be an ULR that meets
the definitions, so it would be interesting to hear if anyone has any
first- (or second-) hand knowledge of this!

Kevin S
Bainbridge Island, WA


Re: New Sony ULR spotted on eBay: the ICF-40

m_a_schuster
 

Nice catch!

Since it uses two AAA batteries, it's a good bet the circuit design differs from the SRF-x9 series which operate on a single cell. Also, being a non-NAM model it does not seem to cover the expanded MW band - at least from the dial markings. Perhaps a tracking adjustment could fix that!

--- In ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com, satya@... wrote:

Hi all:

I've seen this elsewhere outside North America, but the ICF-40 is now for
sale on eBay, $36.99 delivered from an apparently reputable dealer out of
Korea. See item number 130305820932. The seller has three listed, so who
knows how many he actually has.

The ICF-40 is an analog set with speaker. If it's the SRF-39 or 59 with a
larger tuning dial and speaker, it could be an appealing unit! It's also
styled a bit more elegant than most. Based on the listed size and
apparent lack of esoteric features, this appears to be an ULR that meets
the definitions, so it would be interesting to hear if anyone has any
first- (or second-) hand knowledge of this!

Kevin S
Bainbridge Island, WA