Date   

Re: Basic newbie questions

vk2gel
 


Re: Basic newbie questions

Jorge Garzón
 

Everything said here is valid and DXing can be a rewarding hobby when a potential DXer understand some facts related to:

1. The behaviour of the waves and basics of MW/FM propagation. 

This will bring general rules on radio propagation to the shack. An example of MW DXing... The furthest distance to achieve matches with the dark side of the planet. The receiving station and the transmitter must be in dark or at least in the Grey line. 

Regarding VHF BandII (FM), things are more complex, but we could say that DXing choices depend highly on the ionization of the atmospheric layers by the sun and changing meteo conditions (air density and humidity). I am writing a complete FM DXing guide in my blog, but in Spanish (google translation works well). It's here: https://iberiadx.wordpress.com/fm-dxing-banda-2-vhf/

2. Antenna and  receiver matching and its behaviour. 
Each band needs a different antenna, but it's much better to invest in or build a very good 'receiving aerial' that spend the money of a 'state-of-the-art' receiver unit. The existence of this group is a proof of that. But almost more important is how to match both. A state-of-the-art rec plus a short wire means mismatch, but an ULR with a 7 el yagi antenna means also overload=mismatch. 

In my opinion, a good DXer not have just to focus on hunting a signal, but have to understand the basics of the physic radio frequency laws, exploring new ways to achieve better conditions, then listen better to weak signals and share its knowledge with the community. And of course, spending the time with the earphones on, and on... surfing the waves. 
73 y buen DX. 

Jorge Garzón Gutiérrez "IberiaDX" 
(EB7EFA · EA1036 SWL · BDXC Member 1409) 
QTH: IN83ag / 43º15' N · 03º56' W
Urb. San Roque 95, casa 5 (Villasevil)
39698 Santiurde de Toranzo (ESPAÑA - SPAIN)
..................................................................................
Blog: IberiaDX  · Twitter: @IberiaDX


En domingo, 21 de marzo de 2021 11:18:08 CET, Ken Kizer <ken@...> escribió:


On Sun, 21 Mar 2021 01:46:34 -0700, "Jock Elliott via groups.io"
<jock.elliott=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:

>It was Robert Ross who set off this train of thought. He said: " The AM BCB Season is starting to wind down here now, and soon I’ll be switching over to FM DXing for the Spring and Summer. "
>
>I'm trying to assemble a set of basic assumptions about AM and FM dxing. I've come up with the following . . . please have a look and point me in the  right direction.
>
>AM DX
>Season: Fall/winter

I'd be hard pressed to say winter nights are always better than summer
nights. Days, yes. Once in a while really cold winter days can yield
excellent reception.

>Time: night/dawn

Reception can be great from approximately an hour before sunset to an
hour after sunrise, especially if you're close to a time zone
boundary. You can sometimes catch stations operating under different
power switch rules (based on their time zone)

I mostly dx around sunset now.

>Frequency "holes" where it is easier to search: 1540-1700 (fewer stations)

540 to about 900 or 1000 khz- stations propogate further at lower
frequencies, so there tend to be fewer in general.

Any of the former clear channel frequencies, especially if the station
is some distance from you. 1200 khz, for instance, used to be owned by
WOAI San Antonio, which is 1500 miles from me. The other former owner
is CFGO Ottawa, which apparently aims away from interfering with WOAI,
so they rarely show up here (Virginia- west coast stations will be
different). So there's no strong station in that slot close to me and
I've logged a dozen stations over the years (including the two above).

Adjacent frequencies to your local stations, if your receiver is
selective enough to avoid splatter.

>Location: near the ocean, if you can manage it

Quite phenomenal reception.


>FM DX
>Season: Spring/summer?

In general, but not absolute.

>Time: daytime?

Sometimes sunrise and a few hours after is like ducting. Or maybe it
is ducting.

>Frequency holes: ??

Again, adjacent frequencies to your local stations, if your receiver
has the selectivity.

Otherwise, get a good frequency list and dig through it to see how
stations are allocated. I use the FCC list, since it's the most
current and complete.
https://www.fcc.gov/media/radio/fm-query
(AM) transition.fcc.gov/fcc-bin/amq?x

I also use Radio-Locator because it's easier to navigate and can be
searched a variety of ways. www.radio-locator.com

>Location: highest elevation??

The most metal the highest you can get it is the mantra.

>Also: does ducting occur on the FM band? (I know it does on ham 2 meter).

Yes.

Also, trees will weaken FM reception.






Re: Basic newbie questions

K7DWI Art
 

Hi Jock,
I have been a Ham for 42 years and a Weak-Signal (VHF/UHF DX'er) enthusiast for about 40 years. 
In North Texas I worked 43 states and over 200 Grid Sqaures on 2 Meter SSB/CW.
Your mentioned 2 Meters. If you have an area repeater affected by Tropo or you hear a distant repeater, more than likely you will have an opportunity for FM DXing at the same time.
The opportunity usually is identified by warm/hot clear days followed a nice cooling after sundown. Fog and low/or clouds with no wind.
I have NO faith in Tropo prediction websites.
Nearby NEXRAD National Weather Service Radars are the best indicator outside of listening. No other system works.
http://weather.rap.ucar.edu/radar/displayRad.php?icao=KCXX&prod=n0r&bkgr=gray&endDate=&endTime=-1&duration=0
An area Radar for you. Look for False Echoes or heavy ground clutter.

Starting late April, Sporadic Es Propagation will fire up. It usually shows up on FMBC around the last week of May and will show up off and on until Mid August. It is extremely active from June 15 through July 10 or so. The season peaks at the Summer Solstice. For Es, you FMBC DX from the low end (88 MHz) and work your way up.
My Blog of some of the crazy stuff I did in Arizona.
http://ka5dwipropagation.blogspot.com/2018/07/fmbc-es-for-2018.html
I also have other posts on my escapades. I Ham first, but love FMBC DX'ing. A radio with RDS will highly enhance your fun.
I have DX'ed with Rabbit Ears spread at 120 degrees measured to frequency. A log-periodic or turnstile is much better.

As for AMBC DXing for the Summer, I Graveyard frequency DX. It's tough with a lack of sunlight and lightning.
I wait till October to do that for the most part.

Good luck. Have fun.
Art K7DWI now in Southern Oregon.


You know you live in a place with great Dx....

Paul B. Walker, Jr.
 

.. when you consider conditions kinda “meh” or blah because 4QD 1548, NewsTalk Zb 1035 And 4TAB 1008 are audible 6000-7000 Miles away but are noisy.


Re: Basic newbie questions

Ken Kizer
 

On Sun, 21 Mar 2021 01:46:34 -0700, "Jock Elliott via groups.io"
<jock.elliott=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:

It was Robert Ross who set off this train of thought. He said: " The AM BCB Season is starting to wind down here now, and soon I’ll be switching over to FM DXing for the Spring and Summer. "

I'm trying to assemble a set of basic assumptions about AM and FM dxing. I've come up with the following . . . please have a look and point me in the  right direction.

AM DX
Season: Fall/winter
I'd be hard pressed to say winter nights are always better than summer
nights. Days, yes. Once in a while really cold winter days can yield
excellent reception.

Time: night/dawn
Reception can be great from approximately an hour before sunset to an
hour after sunrise, especially if you're close to a time zone
boundary. You can sometimes catch stations operating under different
power switch rules (based on their time zone)

I mostly dx around sunset now.

Frequency "holes" where it is easier to search: 1540-1700 (fewer stations)
540 to about 900 or 1000 khz- stations propogate further at lower
frequencies, so there tend to be fewer in general.

Any of the former clear channel frequencies, especially if the station
is some distance from you. 1200 khz, for instance, used to be owned by
WOAI San Antonio, which is 1500 miles from me. The other former owner
is CFGO Ottawa, which apparently aims away from interfering with WOAI,
so they rarely show up here (Virginia- west coast stations will be
different). So there's no strong station in that slot close to me and
I've logged a dozen stations over the years (including the two above).

Adjacent frequencies to your local stations, if your receiver is
selective enough to avoid splatter.

Location: near the ocean, if you can manage it
Quite phenomenal reception.


FM DX
Season: Spring/summer?
In general, but not absolute.

Time: daytime?
Sometimes sunrise and a few hours after is like ducting. Or maybe it
is ducting.

Frequency holes: ??
Again, adjacent frequencies to your local stations, if your receiver
has the selectivity.

Otherwise, get a good frequency list and dig through it to see how
stations are allocated. I use the FCC list, since it's the most
current and complete.
https://www.fcc.gov/media/radio/fm-query
(AM) transition.fcc.gov/fcc-bin/amq?x

I also use Radio-Locator because it's easier to navigate and can be
searched a variety of ways. www.radio-locator.com

Location: highest elevation??
The most metal the highest you can get it is the mantra.

Also: does ducting occur on the FM band? (I know it does on ham 2 meter).
Yes.

Also, trees will weaken FM reception.


Re: Basic newbie questions

Paul Blundell
 

That all sounds about right. I have found on the FM band that height is one of the most important factors.

Paul



On Sun, 21 Mar 2021, 19:46 Jock Elliott, <jock.elliott@...> wrote:

It was Robert Ross who set off this train of thought. He said: " The AM BCB Season is starting to wind down here now, and soon I’ll be switching over to FM DXing for the Spring and Summer. "

I'm trying to assemble a set of basic assumptions about AM and FM dxing. I've come up with the following . . . please have a look and point me in the  right direction.

AM DX
Season: Fall/winter
Time: night/dawn
Frequency "holes" where it is easier to search: 1540-1700 (fewer stations)
Location: near the ocean, if you can manage it

FM DX
Season: Spring/summer?
Time: daytime?
Frequency holes: ??
Location: highest elevation??
Also: does ducting occur on the FM band? (I know it does on ham 2 meter).



Basic newbie questions

Jock Elliott
 

It was Robert Ross who set off this train of thought. He said: " The AM BCB Season is starting to wind down here now, and soon I’ll be switching over to FM DXing for the Spring and Summer. "

I'm trying to assemble a set of basic assumptions about AM and FM dxing. I've come up with the following . . . please have a look and point me in the  right direction.

AM DX
Season: Fall/winter
Time: night/dawn
Frequency "holes" where it is easier to search: 1540-1700 (fewer stations)
Location: near the ocean, if you can manage it

FM DX
Season: Spring/summer?
Time: daytime?
Frequency holes: ??
Location: highest elevation??
Also: does ducting occur on the FM band? (I know it does on ham 2 meter).



792 Jeddah 5377 km and 1377 Mwanza 2638km Tecsun PL-360

Peter 1956
 

Barefoot ultralight. Received indoors in Botswana.
https://youtu.be/TksTEw92WYc
Peter Wilson


Re: Using Tuned Passive Loop Antennas

radiojayallen
 

Good overview.

Jay

On Fri, Mar 19, 2021 at 7:58 PM Phil EVG <phil@...> wrote:
 
hi 
All you wanted to know about Passive Loop Antennas and then some!

Using Tuned Passive Loop Antennas
http://www.dxing.info/equipment/passive_loop_antennas_schanilec.pdf  Using Tuned Passive Loop Antennas.
I’ve heard it said that successful Medium Wave DXing is 50% antenna and 50% receiver. In order to get the most out of the antenna factor, those with sufficient real estate will erect a EWE, Beverage, KAZ or other outdoor antenna. For those like me with little space or who have restrictive homeowners associations, one of the antennas of choice will likely be an indoor loop antenna. This might be a home-made box loop or a desktop ferrite loop such as the Quantum Loop. Those whose passion lies in using portable receivers, including the popular Ultralights, rely on the ferrite loop inside the receiver.
An often-overlooked asset is a tuned passive loop used to augment the primary loop antenna. A tuned passive loop is readily available commercially from manufacturers such as DXTools.com, Terk, Select-A-Tenna, and others. Alternately, one can be made quickly by the home hobbyist. This article is a summary of several techniques by which a tuned passive loop antenna can help DXers solve common problems.
Summary
Whether you are using a stock UltraLight or the Sony ICF-2010, judicious use of a passive loop (or two!) can make a huge difference. Additionally, for those like me who like to use a Quantum Loop or similar as the primary antenna for a communications receiver, all of these techniques are available. Optimum results are typically obtained when you employ the largest, most selective (highest Q) loop possible, your space and budget allowing. However, as described above, even an inexpensive commercial loop can be very effective. To find out more about loop design and construction, the document “Air Core Loop Designs” provides information on and links to a variety of different designs, and is available at the DXer.ca website in the Ultralight File Area. With all these tools in the toolbox, hopefully, one or two will work for you in a given situation.
Good DXing to you! Kevin S. Bainbridge Island, WA October 2008  satya(at)sounddsl.com


Re: Ultralight Radio DXing Go Case - March 2021

Paul Blundell
 

This is mostly just to stop the rods moving around too much. Gary does a great job of building these but I like to give it as much protection as possible.

Paul

On Sat, 20 Mar 2021, 20:06 Jorge Garzón via groups.io, <iberiaDX=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I see your FSL antenna partially wrapped with American Tape on one side. Did you have any mechanical issue or just extra protection? 

Jorge

Jorge Garzón Gutiérrez "IberiaDX" 
(EB7EFA · EA1036 SWL · BDXC Member 1409) 
QTH: IN83ag / 43º15' N · 03º56' W
Urb. San Roque 95, casa 5 (Villasevil)
39698 Santiurde de Toranzo (ESPAÑA - SPAIN)
..................................................................................
Blog: IberiaDX  · Twitter: @IberiaDX


En viernes, 19 de marzo de 2021 03:25:05 CET, Paul Blundell <tanger32au@...> escribió:


I have recently updated and improved my "Ultralight Radio DXing Go Case". As my radio collection has increased, I have needed to find a suitable way to carry my radios while still providing them with a good level of protection.

I ended up placing my 3" FSL at one end and using a piece of pine to divide this off, to the top of this I have attached a small piece of foam wrap, this goes over the top of my 3" FSL and provides some extra protection to this.

On the left hand side, I have added some dividers to keep my radios in place, this is thick cardboard which has been wrapped in duct tape, this is about the best tradeoff I could make for weight / protection. I also have my earphones, spare batteries, log sheets and notebook on this side. As my radio collection increases, I can keep adding more dividers as needed.

Overall, I am very pleased with how well this case has come out, I am able to carry and store multiple radios, log sheets, pens, notes, spare batteries and ear phones, everything I need for portable sessions. It is also small enough to fit in my backpack. For $30 it provides a great level of protection. 


While this case was designed for ultralight DXing the same ideas could be used for amateur radio, radio scanning or any other radio storage need.

 

 







Re: DX'er Interviewed On air By Station He Logged

Jock Elliott
 

Well done! Nice catch, excellent interview.


Re: Ultralight Radio DXing Go Case - March 2021

Jorge Garzón
 

I see your FSL antenna partially wrapped with American Tape on one side. Did you have any mechanical issue or just extra protection? 

Jorge

Jorge Garzón Gutiérrez "IberiaDX" 
(EB7EFA · EA1036 SWL · BDXC Member 1409) 
QTH: IN83ag / 43º15' N · 03º56' W
Urb. San Roque 95, casa 5 (Villasevil)
39698 Santiurde de Toranzo (ESPAÑA - SPAIN)
..................................................................................
Blog: IberiaDX  · Twitter: @IberiaDX


En viernes, 19 de marzo de 2021 03:25:05 CET, Paul Blundell <tanger32au@...> escribió:


I have recently updated and improved my "Ultralight Radio DXing Go Case". As my radio collection has increased, I have needed to find a suitable way to carry my radios while still providing them with a good level of protection.

I ended up placing my 3" FSL at one end and using a piece of pine to divide this off, to the top of this I have attached a small piece of foam wrap, this goes over the top of my 3" FSL and provides some extra protection to this.

On the left hand side, I have added some dividers to keep my radios in place, this is thick cardboard which has been wrapped in duct tape, this is about the best tradeoff I could make for weight / protection. I also have my earphones, spare batteries, log sheets and notebook on this side. As my radio collection increases, I can keep adding more dividers as needed.

Overall, I am very pleased with how well this case has come out, I am able to carry and store multiple radios, log sheets, pens, notes, spare batteries and ear phones, everything I need for portable sessions. It is also small enough to fit in my backpack. For $30 it provides a great level of protection. 


While this case was designed for ultralight DXing the same ideas could be used for amateur radio, radio scanning or any other radio storage need.

 

 







Tecsun PL-360 MWDX compilation 19th March 2021 evening

Peter 1956
 

Barefoot ultralight DX. 1053 Romania 8027km 540 Hungary 8013km 1350 Armenia 7550km 1431 Djibouti 4496km Received in Botswana
https://youtu.be/UjgN-tTLkB8

Peter Wilson


Re: DX'er Interviewed On air By Station He Logged

Timothy Zamora
 

Love these moments where distance barriers are bridged.

Timothy 


On Mar 19, 2021, at 11:08 PM, Paul Blundell <tanger32au@...> wrote:


Great job Paul.

On Sat, 20 Mar 2021, 12:43 Paul B. Walker, Jr., <walkerbroadcasting@...> wrote:
I picked up 1233kHz 2NC Newcastle, NSW, Aus from 7220 miles/12000KM away in McGRath, Alaska and recorded an interview with them a day later that aired during their afternoon show.

Take a listen here


Re: DX'er Interviewed On air By Station He Logged

Paul Blundell
 

Great job Paul.


On Sat, 20 Mar 2021, 12:43 Paul B. Walker, Jr., <walkerbroadcasting@...> wrote:
I picked up 1233kHz 2NC Newcastle, NSW, Aus from 7220 miles/12000KM away in McGRath, Alaska and recorded an interview with them a day later that aired during their afternoon show.

Take a listen here


DX'er Interviewed On air By Station He Logged

Paul B. Walker, Jr.
 

I picked up 1233kHz 2NC Newcastle, NSW, Aus from 7220 miles/12000KM away in McGRath, Alaska and recorded an interview with them a day later that aired during their afternoon show.

Take a listen here


Re: Ultralight Radio DXing Go Case - March 2021

Paul Blundell
 

Sadly given all the issues around COVID-19, I think it will be a while before I am undertaking any air travel.

Paul

On Fri, 19 Mar 2021, 20:58 Michael.2E0IHW via groups.io, <blumu=btinternet.com@groups.io> wrote:
Your hunting is always impressive, Paul!

I wonder what  happens at airports when they see the uranium rods . . .

Michael UK

On 19/03/2021 02:25, Paul Blundell wrote:

I have recently updated and improved my "Ultralight Radio DXing Go Case".






Re: Ultralight Radio DXing Go Case - March 2021

Paul Blundell
 

Tomorrow will be its first real world test.

Paul

On Fri, 19 Mar 2021, 20:30 Alex K., <rifleman336@...> wrote:
"And it will soon be "Standard Issue"  to all Double O's in the field".......  :D 


On Thu, Mar 18, 2021 at 10:25 PM, Paul Blundell

I have recently updated and improved my "Ultralight Radio DXing Go Case". As my radio collection has increased, I have needed to find a suitable way to carry my radios while still providing them with a good level of protection.

I ended up placing my 3" FSL at one end and using a piece of pine to divide this off, to the top of this I have attached a small piece of foam wrap, this goes over the top of my 3" FSL and provides some extra protection to this.

On the left hand side, I have added some dividers to keep my radios in place, this is thick cardboard which has been wrapped in duct tape, this is about the best tradeoff I could make for weight / protection. I also have my earphones, spare batteries, log sheets and notebook on this side. As my radio collection increases, I can keep adding more dividers as needed.

Overall, I am very pleased with how well this case has come out, I am able to carry and store multiple radios, log sheets, pens, notes, spare batteries and ear phones, everything I need for portable sessions. It is also small enough to fit in my backpack. For $30 it provides a great level of protection. 


While this case was designed for ultralight DXing the same ideas could be used for amateur radio, radio scanning or any other radio storage need.

 

 







Re: Ultralight Radio DXing Go Case - March 2021

Michael.2E0IHW
 

Your hunting is always impressive, Paul!

I wonder what  happens at airports when they see the uranium rods . . .

Michael UK

On 19/03/2021 02:25, Paul Blundell wrote:

I have recently updated and improved my "Ultralight Radio DXing Go Case".






Re: Ultralight Radio DXing Go Case - March 2021

Alex
 

"And it will soon be "Standard Issue"  to all Double O's in the field".......  :D 


On Thu, Mar 18, 2021 at 10:25 PM, Paul Blundell
<tanger32au@...> wrote:

I have recently updated and improved my "Ultralight Radio DXing Go Case". As my radio collection has increased, I have needed to find a suitable way to carry my radios while still providing them with a good level of protection.

I ended up placing my 3" FSL at one end and using a piece of pine to divide this off, to the top of this I have attached a small piece of foam wrap, this goes over the top of my 3" FSL and provides some extra protection to this.

On the left hand side, I have added some dividers to keep my radios in place, this is thick cardboard which has been wrapped in duct tape, this is about the best tradeoff I could make for weight / protection. I also have my earphones, spare batteries, log sheets and notebook on this side. As my radio collection increases, I can keep adding more dividers as needed.

Overall, I am very pleased with how well this case has come out, I am able to carry and store multiple radios, log sheets, pens, notes, spare batteries and ear phones, everything I need for portable sessions. It is also small enough to fit in my backpack. For $30 it provides a great level of protection. 


While this case was designed for ultralight DXing the same ideas could be used for amateur radio, radio scanning or any other radio storage need.

 

 






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