Date   

Re: Batteries

gordrstaples
 

Indeed.  I have even had new Duracell AA batteries that the bottoms have rotted out and they had a shelf life of 2025!


On Mon, Dec 14, 2020, 10:20 AM radiojayallen <radiojayallen@...> wrote:
Just to be clear, any battery can leak but generally speaking typical alkaline or carbon zinc cells do not leak until they are depleted and the outer case has been reduced in thickness and perhaps corroded. I too have had good luck with Energizers and never had one leak on me but I once bought a piece of used equipment which contained long dead Energizers in it and they had indeed leaked.

But this discussion about Duracells is a completely different thing because in the past few years they have been known to leak even when new and definitely before they were used up, which is something we haven't seen in other batteries.

Jay


Re: TECSUN DR-920C

Paul Blundell
 

Thanks Bruce, seems to be much the same experience as I have found so far.


On Sat., 19 Dec. 2020, 02:39 bsherman11, <bsherman4@...> wrote:
I purchased this radio more than 10 years ago.  The backlash on tuning is suggestive of dial and string tuning, something that should have been retired long ago.  Selectivity and  sensitivity  were pedestrian, to be generous.

After several weeks, the radio failed to operate at all.  I returned it to the store from which it was purchased for a full refund.  Easily the worst digital readout portable I ever owned.

Bruce 

KI4PAC


Re: TECSUN DR-920C

bsherman11
 

I purchased this radio more than 10 years ago.  The backlash on tuning is suggestive of dial and string tuning, something that should have been retired long ago.  Selectivity and  sensitivity  were pedestrian, to be generous.

After several weeks, the radio failed to operate at all.  I returned it to the store from which it was purchased for a full refund.  Easily the worst digital readout portable I ever owned.

Bruce 

KI4PAC


Re: Building a FSL antenna

Gary DeBock
 

On Fri, Dec 18, 2020 at 02:21 AM, Jorge Garzón wrote:
Well, I have ordered whatever I need for my 5" inches FSL but the Litz wire. Jist a question... Do I need 40 inches or 40 feet. I am not used to imperial units system and I do not want to get confused with 'inches', 'feet' or their symbols like ' " etc...
Stay healthy!
J
Hello Again Jorge,

40 feet (12.2m) of Litz wire will be enough to wind the coil on a 5 inch (12.7cm) diameter FSL antenna.
It will actually be enough to wind the coil for almost any diameter of FSL antenna, since the smaller FSL's simply have more coil turns to result in the same approximate inductance.

One important thing to remember is that proper tinning and soldering of 1162/46 Litz wire requires a very hot soldering iron or gun, with at least 60 watts of power. This is necessary to thoroughly melt the solder throughout each individual Litz wire strand on both ends of the coil. This process generates quite a lot of unhealthy solder smoke, so it's best to do this soldering outside your house, with a fan to blow the smoke away as you make the connections.

73, Gary

  


Re: Building a FSL antenna

Jorge Garzón <iberiaDX@...>
 

Well, I have ordered whatever I need for my 5" inches FSL but the Litz wire. Jist a question... Do I need 40 inches or 40 feet. I am not used to imperial units system and I do not want to get confused with 'inches', 'feet' or their symbols like ' " etc...
Stay healthy!
J


TECSUN DR-920C

Paul Blundell
 

Hi all.

My TECSUN DR-920C has just arrived, does anybody have any experience with this? I am not sure if I am missing something but it does not seem to work very well at all... Before I look at if it is faulty, is this experience normal?
- The tuning jumps around. On both AM and FM, it is hard to get it on frequency and to stay there.
- The reception on AM and FM is shocking. The HPON station which is just over 9km away struggles. On FM, the low power CBD translators are MIA. Is this normal?

Paul 


FM Loggings - 17/12/2020

Paul Blundell
 

Radio: Digitech AR-1733

Aerial: 1M Rabbit Ears as a dipole

Location: Windmill Hill Park East Launceston and West Launceston Communications Site, Launceston Tasmania.

Time: 17:20 – 18:10

FREQUENCY

CALLSIGN

WINDMILL HILL

WEST LTON

87.6

TOTE SPORT RADIO

5

5

87.8

LC FM

5

5

88

RELIGIOUS STATIONS

5

5

89.3

LA FM

5

5

90.1

CHILLI FM

5

5

90.9

TRIPLE J

5

5

91.7

ABC NORTHERN TASMANIA

5

5

92.5

ABC NEWS RADIO

5

5

93.3

ABC CLASSIC FM

5

5

94.1

ABC RADIO NATIONAL

5

5

95.3

TAMAR FM

3

4

96.5

CITY PARK RADIO

4

5

96.9

MEANDER VALLEY FM

2

1

98.9

7AD

2

0

100.3

LA FM (CBD TRANSLATOR)

5

5

101.1

CHILLI FM (CBD TRANSLATOR

5

5

102.7

ABC NORTHERN TASMANIA (TRANSLATOR)

5

5

103.7

CITY PARK RADIO

5

5

105.3

WAY FM

5

5

106.9

RPH LAUNCESTON

5

5

107.7

SEA FM

2

0

 

 




Radio DXing Case - December 2020

Paul Blundell
 

With my focus on DXing on the FM band, I have just built up a new radio DXing case, this is designed to hold the equipment I need for FM DXing.
 
Recently I was at my local Kmart store when I came across this tool case for $8, it was a good size to hold my FM aerial and would have enough space to also hold some radios.
 
After getting it home and testing a few setups, with the use of some small containers which I already was using with my mediumwave kit, I can now easily switch between the two cases, depending on what my DXing focus is at the time. I can also just take out one of the smaller containers with me if my focus is to go "bare foot".
 
Overall it works very well for the price and give me the flexibility to take as much or as little of my kit as I want to.
 


Long Term DX Project - 16/12/2020

Paul Blundell
 

Date: 16/12/2020
Time: 10:45 PM
Location: Home, Launceston Tasmania
Notes: A late night session at home. Using my TEAC PR130 “bare foot” produced some interesting results. All signals were down compared to the session from the previous night with only 3LO on 774kHz hitting “excellent” signal levels. Both the NSW and ACT stations were badly effected and signals on both of these frequencies were weak / poor, with 2CA on 1053kHz suffering from some bad fading. The HPON station also struggled and only hit “average” signal levels. Given the use of only the internal aerial, these results were to be expected.

 

FREQ

CALLSIGN

LOGGED

DATE

RADIO

AERIAL

531

3GG

AVERAGE

16/12/2020

TEAC PR130

Internal

549

2CR

WEAK

16/12/2020

TEAC PR130

Internal

594

3WV

GOOD

16/12/2020

TEAC PR130

Internal

621

3RN

GOOD

16/12/2020

TEAC PR130

Internal

774

3LO

EXCELLENT

16/12/2020

TEAC PR130

Internal

1053

2CA

POOR

16/12/2020

TEAC PR130

Internal

1179

3RPH

WEAK

16/12/2020

TEAC PR130

Internal

1341

HPON GEELONG

AVERAGE

16/12/2020

TEAC PR130

Internal

1422

HPON MELBOURNE

AVERAGE

16/12/2020

TEAC PR130

Internal

1503

3KND

WEAK

16/12/2020

TEAC PR130

Internal

 


Re: FM Loggings - 13/12/2020

Paul Blundell
 

Thanks Art.

Now that the weather is "meant" to be improving, I will be getting out and about more. I have a DXing (MW and FM) planned for later on and hope this will produce some good results.

Paul

On Thu, Dec 17, 2020 at 5:27 AM K7DWI Art <k7dwicn82@...> wrote:

Hi Paul and others,
A reminder....
You are now at the peak of the Spring/Summer Sporadic Es Season (Summer Solstice) Down Under.
When you DX the FMBC bands, I would extend the arms of the Rabbit Ears 45 degrees or more to make them directional. Polarization on Es does not matter, so using it as a Dipole does.
Use a radio that can utilizes RDS. It makes life easier to identify. 
In addition, start in the lower part of the band and work your way up as conditions improve.
With Es, the frequency (MUF) increases as it intensifies. You see it at 87 MHz before 108.
I would love to do that from where you are located. It would be so much fun.

You want to read what I have done just playing around, my Blog post on DXing FMBC with a $17 US RTL-SDR:
http://ka5dwipropagation.blogspot.com/2017/11/using-software-defined-radio-sdr-on-fm.html
Enjoy, have fun.
Art Jackson K7DWI  in Southern Oregon, formerly central Arizona and north Texas 



--
Paul


Re: FM Loggings - 13/12/2020

K7DWI Art
 

Hi Paul and others,
A reminder....
You are now at the peak of the Spring/Summer Sporadic Es Season (Summer Solstice) Down Under.
When you DX the FMBC bands, I would extend the arms of the Rabbit Ears 45 degrees or more to make them directional. Polarization on Es does not matter, so using it as a Dipole does.
Use a radio that can utilizes RDS. It makes life easier to identify. 
In addition, start in the lower part of the band and work your way up as conditions improve.
With Es, the frequency (MUF) increases as it intensifies. You see it at 87 MHz before 108.
I would love to do that from where you are located. It would be so much fun.

You want to read what I have done just playing around, my Blog post on DXing FMBC with a $17 US RTL-SDR:
http://ka5dwipropagation.blogspot.com/2017/11/using-software-defined-radio-sdr-on-fm.html
Enjoy, have fun.
Art Jackson K7DWI  in Southern Oregon, formerly central Arizona and north Texas 


Long Term DX Project - 15/12/2020

Paul Blundell
 

Date: 15/12/2020
Time: 10:30 PM
Location: Home, Launceston Tasmania
Notes: A late night session at home. A good mix of signals were received and overall the band performed as I expected.

FREQ

CALLSIGN

LOGGED

DATE

RADIO

AERIAL

531

3GG

GOOD

15/12/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL

549

2CR

AVERAGE

15/12/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL

594

3WV

EXCELLENT

15/12/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL

621

3RN

EXCELLENT

15/12/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL

774

3LO

EXCELLENT

15/12/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL

1053

2CA

WEAK

15/12/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL

1179

3RPH

AVERAGE

15/12/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL

1341

HPON GEELONG

GOOD

15/12/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL

1422

HPON MELBOURNE

GOOD

15/12/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL

1503

3KND

AVERAGE

15/12/2020

AR-1733

3" FSL

 


Re: Batteries

Jerry H. Neves
 

About 3 years.


Re: Batteries

radiojayallen
 

Ha!!!!! Point well taken....


Re: FM Loggings - 13/12/2020

Paul Blundell
 

Thanks for the links, I will have a good look at them.

Paul

On Tue, Dec 15, 2020 at 2:47 PM Richard Allen via groups.io <dx747j=me.com@groups.io> wrote:
Have checked out the information at 

Also:

Richard.


On Dec 14, 2020, at 21:30, Paul Blundell <tanger32au@...> wrote:


Thanks Richard. If I can get over 50-75 stations at this point, I will be very happy.
._,_



--
Paul


Re: FM Loggings - 13/12/2020

Richard Allen
 

On Dec 14, 2020, at 21:30, Paul Blundell <tanger32au@...> wrote:


Thanks Richard. If I can get over 50-75 stations at this point, I will be very happy.
._,_


Re: FM Loggings - 13/12/2020

Paul Blundell
 

Thanks Richard. If I can get over 50-75 stations at this point, I will be very happy.


On Tue, Dec 15, 2020 at 2:21 PM Richard Allen via groups.io <dx747j=me.com@groups.io> wrote:
Paul:

To date, I have logged 878 FM stations using a barefoot ultralight receiver, primarily a Tecsun PL-606.  Of the stations heard, 354 stations were propagated by sporadic-E (Es).  The most distance signal was 2346 km, from KKRZ, 100.3 MHz, Portland, Oregon.  My longest distance signal by meteor reflection (Ms) is KRNS, 95.1 MHz, Kinston, North Carolina, at 1815 km.  I’ve also heard KRNS via Es.

All it requires is checking the band at the right time and a lot of patience.  It’s somewhat easier in North America because of the overwhelming number of stations.

Good DX.

Richard Allen,
near Perry OK USA.







--
Paul


Re: FM Loggings - 13/12/2020

Richard Allen
 

Paul:

To date, I have logged 878 FM stations using a barefoot ultralight receiver, primarily a Tecsun PL-606. Of the stations heard, 354 stations were propagated by sporadic-E (Es). The most distance signal was 2346 km, from KKRZ, 100.3 MHz, Portland, Oregon. My longest distance signal by meteor reflection (Ms) is KRNS, 95.1 MHz, Kinston, North Carolina, at 1815 km. I’ve also heard KRNS via Es.

All it requires is checking the band at the right time and a lot of patience. It’s somewhat easier in North America because of the overwhelming number of stations.

Good DX.

Richard Allen,
near Perry OK USA.


Re: Batteries

Paul Blundell
 

Thanks Jerry, how old are these Imedion batteries?


On Tue, Dec 15, 2020 at 1:46 PM Jerry H. Neves via groups.io <jhneves7=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hello to all,
I also use Eneloop batteries in most of my radios with no problems. Want to mention that I have some IMEDION  D batteries that I use in some radios, they work fine, but the negative end always develops some corrosion which almost looks like rust! I usually use fine sandpaper to clean their NEGATIVE ends.
Still they charge up fine and work properly. Never leak at least nip to now.
Wonder if others have experienced this.
Jerry



--
Paul


Planning a Portable Ultralight FM Radio Session – December 2020

Paul Blundell
 


 

For some people this could be as easy as grabbing a radio as you head out the door; I have found that some more planning is required to get the most from my portable Ultralight  FM radio sessions. This is especially important now with COVID-19 restrictions in some areas and changes due to this. I am now making a point of keeping a good distance away from people and limiting how much time I am out and about in public. I am now focusing on more remote / less used areas. For those in areas with current COVID-19 restrictions, it is vital that all rules and guidelines are followed. Local health advice must be the overriding decider on what you are able to do.

 

When I am planning a portable Ultralight FM radio session, my first step is to arrange a suitable day and time. Work and family responsibilities play a large part in this.

Once a suitable day and time has been found the next step is to check the weather forecast for that day. In the past when I was involved in the amateur radio / radio scanning hobby, I used to undertake quite a bit of out and about scanning which involved sitting on hill tops, lookouts, mountains and so on, from doing this I learnt two VERY important lessons:
- Sitting in the sun for hours at a time is not fun and this reduces your enjoyment of the hobby.
- Sitting in the cold for hours at a time is not fun and this reduces your enjoyment hobby.

 

Based on this I like to make sure the weather will be suitable. While the cold can be overcome with extra clothes, being too hot is much harder to control and in extreme cases this can be quite bad for your health (dehydration, sun stroke and so on). Storms and other weather extremes are also not fun to be out in so I like to try and avoid these if possible. During our Australian summer, bush fires are a very real risk and given most locations are prime fire spots, the fire danger rating (FDR) and a safe access / escape are very important to consider.

Next you need to decide on a location, I like to have a mix of new locations and some proven ones. Some are quite close and others are quite a distance to drive. The things I consider when deciding on a location include:
- Distance to drive (The cost of fuel is a factor in this, as is the amount of time I have for my DXing session)
- Access (some areas are locked after hours)
- RF profile (Some locations are better due to distance from high power transmitters)
- Comforts (Shops, toilets, etc.)
- Personal Security / Safety (See notes below) 

 

With my focus on the FM band, height is one of the most important elements and this guides me on the most suitable locations. I balance this out against the distance to travel. I am testing a few locations at the moment.

 

All these points are fairly easy to assess except for personal security, yet this is the most important.

 

The city I live in is fairly safe and crime it is not always the first thing I think of, yet personal security and safety is very important. Sitting in your car or walking in the bush with multiple radios, by yourself, around and after dark, in locations such as lookouts or hill tops, beaches, parks or car parks can expose you to an increased risk to your personal safety. These locations at times can be used by people for a number of reasons which may not be legal or which may cause you to witness things you don't want to witness. Some of these locations are used for drug dealing, exchanges or people meeting others whom they are not married to in a "lover’s lane" type situation. Generally locations with a good level of passing traffic or close to houses are better than isolated spots.  Good lighting is also a benefit as is having multiple entry and exits points. The best advice is to keep your doors locked if in your car and to be aware of your surroundings both in your car and while on foot. If you feel unsafe or uneasy it is better to cut your session short than get caught up in somebody else's problems or risk your personal safety. Having a torch and a mobile phone plus telling somebody where you will be and when you will be home are all good safety tips. Some larger torches can be used as a weapon is the most serious of situations.

 

My planning really starts the night before or early in the morning when I prepare everything I am going to take, charge batteries and pack up my gear. My normal kit consists of this:
- Receivers (1, 2, 3 or more in my carry case)
- Batteries (Fully recharged and also some spare alkaline AA's and AAA’s)

- Aerials – The size and weight of these can vary and needs to be considered.
- Head phones (I prefer the ear bud type and these are easier to carry)
- Log book / sheets and pen + spares
- Torch (Now using my phone / torch in my radio)
- List of all frequencies
- Multi-tool
- Blanket (if it is cold)
- Spare jacket / vest
- Digital camera (I am now using my phone)
- Food and drinks
- Band-Aids and a small towel
- Mobile phone
- Identification such as a driver’s licence (which you should be carrying anyway if you are driving)

 

In the past I have used digital camera bags and hard ABS type cases, these types of cases / bags each have advantages and disadvantages. ABS cases standout and make it look like you are carrying expensive equipment, which might not be a great idea in some remote locations. Soft cases on the other hand don’t provide enough protection in some circumstances. I have created a custom carry case based off a standard tool box which I can easily place inside a backpack if I need to or which I can just as easily carry by itself. This is the best of both worlds and provides a great level of protection to my radios.

 

Before leaving home, I check my kit and confirm I have everything I need. When I arrive onsite I do a quick recon of the area to make sure it is safe, no dodgy people around and I feel comfortable. Then I do a quick scan of the bands and check for the normal stations, now I can sit back, relax and get serious about logging. I also try to eat something and drink to keep my fluids up. I like to also get some photos each time I go out for the report on my blog. If I am going portable I like to try a few different spots and also interact with anybody I see, even if this is just a passing hello on a track. 

 

On returning home I make sure I spend some time with my wife and children before checking my loggings and entering these in to my frequency database.

https://ultralightradiodxing.blogspot.com/2020/12/planning-portable-ultralight-fm-radio.html

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