Date   

927 khz

patrice.privat
 

Hi folks,

Logged Iran (Lorestan) last night on 927 khz.
I realized this was my 25 th frequency for that country over a 9-year period.
And decided I ought to offer myself a cheap award for that.

Good Listening.


Re: October 2020 Rockwork 2 Asia TP-DXpedition Article

Gary DeBock
 

On Fri, Dec 11, 2020 at 04:22 AM, Jorge Garzón wrote:
Thanks Gary for the report. I enjoy it very much indeed. Reflecting on this...
 
Now I realize that the ocean 'DXing cliff' is an ideal site because of:
 
1. Excellent conductivity of the sea surface.
2. An effective MW ground wave blocker of the stations inland.
3. (Perhaps) an enhance effect of the cliff itself to collect the signals coming from its perpendicular direction.
Am I true?
Yes, Jorge, all these facts are true about ocean side cliffs-- as long as the cliff is facing the same direction as your desired transoceanic DX stations.

<<<   I experience something similar in Cantabria, although our cliffs are not as high as Oregon ones (max. cliff height is 140 m high. I have not searched the best place to get the LPAM stations from the UK and the Nederlands, but even if they are not at thousands of km away, they are transmitting with just 10 to 100W and Spanish MW stations block most of the channels, so it's a real challenge. But this could be a real advantage for NDB listening facing Greenland and North America, for instance.   >>>

The ocean cliffs are very effective in blocking domestic station splatter and QRM from the back side, Jorge, which is why they are ideal for compact FSL antennas (which have a figure-8 reception pattern). Not only do the ocean cliffs provide a propagation boost to the transoceanic DX from the front, but they also cut down the unwanted local station noise from the back. On a flat ocean beach DXers typically need huge, acreage-dependent antennas with cardoid reception patterns to be effective, but on an ocean side cliff an FSL or small broadband loop can often be fully competitive (or more than competitive) with them.

<<<   I always have an enhanced reception on MW stations coming from the other side of the ocean besides the coastline but it is well known by everybody. But I am convinced that with a well choosen listening spot and a good and manageable loop (or FSL in this case) I could get not less resultas that with 300/400 m beverages, having in mind the number of MW stations we have in Iberia and other countries in Europe. We will see!!   >>>

I think that your estimation of FSL antenna potential on the Spanish coast is quite accurate, Jorge, especially if you can locate a plunging ocean side cliff facing in the northwest, west, or southwest direction.

On the Oregon state coast an FSL antenna was the first to receive many New Zealand MW signals at the Rockwork 4 cliff-- signals which had never been received at any flat ocean beach with any antenna on the west coast of North America. In 2014 a Perseus-SDR DXer tried setting up a very small broadband loop (about 3m x 4m) at Rockwork 4 to chase New Zealand DX, and he completely shattered the west coast record for NZ stations received during a DXpedition ( 87, compared to the previous record of 62 at Grayland, Washington).

<<<   On the other side, which are the best results of the Asian Cliff? Daylight DXing (ground -or marine- wave) or ionospheric ones? Which are the times you are listening to the signals? I am curious to know that.   >>>

The October DXpedition at Rockwork 2 (near Manzanita, Oregon and Mount Neahkahnie) was the very first one to attempt chasing Asian signals during the peak Asian DX season (in October). The DXing sessions were from 5 AM to 8 AM daily (1200 UTC to 1500 UTC). As you know, only two small FSL antennas (15cm diameter) were used for transoceanic DXing. Despite this two long range stations in Myanmar (576 and 594 kHz) were received, along with 675-AIR in India. The 594-Myanmar logging on October 16th was apparently a west coast first, along with 675-AIR on the same morning. Of course lots of Chinese, Japanese and Korean stations were received, but those are very routine DX on the west coast in October. 

<<<   Perhaps the good results of the Neahkahnie viewpoints are just more than physics, as in the ancient times when that area was also part of that Spanish territory called "New Spain Kingdom", gold treasure was buried there and they could reflect the waves coming from the sea ;-)
I found this:
"The most widely circulated treasure story describes an early Spanish wreck on the Nehalem spit at the base of Neahkahnie Mountain. Thirty survivors made it to the beach, ferrying the ship's treasure ashore in a longboat. The men dragged the treasure chest up onto the mountain's slopes and dug a hole. Knowing that Indians feared disturbing the graves of the dead, the captain shot his black Caribbean slave and buried him on top of the treasure. Then the captain shot or drove away the crew members who wouldn't fit in the ship's longboat, and he ordered the remainder to row him back across the ocean toward Mexico."   >>>

Yes, the Mount Neahkahnie and Rockwork Cliff area is very famous for its Spanish explorer history, with rumors of Spanish buried treasure in the caves below the cliffs. Many people have searched for the hidden Spanish treasure, but my only success is in receiving the treasure of good transoceanic DX. However I feel very honored to chase DX at the famous historical site of Spanish explorers, Jorge! Sometimes you need to be as courageous as they were, because of unpredictable ocean cliff weather :-)

73, Gary



 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 


Re: Building a FSL antenna

Gary DeBock
 

On Sat, Dec 12, 2020 at 12:11 AM, Jorge Garzón wrote:
Thanks Gary. I also have the FSL 5" document, full of useful info. 
 
What about ferrite providers? 
Jorge,

If you wish to build a 5" FSL antenna using the same 125mm x 8mm ferrite rods that my design uses, the Russian surplus ferrite rods are available at this link  6 pcs Ferrite Rod NiZn 8 x 125mm for Amateur and Crystal Radio Coils, AM SW USSR | eBay
The seller in the Ukraine says that he only has 5 lots of 6 rods available, but he typically lists more identical rods immediately after these are sold.

Gary


Re: Building a FSL antenna

Jorge Garzón
 

Thanks Gary. I also have the FSL 5" document, full of useful info. 

What about ferrite providers? 

Jorge Garzón Gutiérrez "IberiaDX" 
(EB7EFA · EA1036 SWL · BDXC Member 1409) 
QTH: IN83ag / 43º15' N · 03º56' W
Urb. San Roque 95, casa 5 (Villasevil)
39698 Santiurde de Toranzo (ESPAÑA - SPAIN)
..................................................................................
Blog: IberiaDX  · Twitter: @IberiaDX


En viernes, 11 de diciembre de 2020 11:12:57 CET, Gary DeBock via groups.io <d1028gary@...> escribió:


On Fri, Dec 11, 2020 at 01:23 AM, Jorge Garzón wrote:
Sorry, I wanted to say 5 inches FSL (not 3,5" as I did)
 
Hello Jorge,

Attached is a design photo of an effective 5 inch (12cm) diameter FSL antenna, which provides powerful gain in a compact size. One of these FSL models was recently sent to Paul Walker in Alaska, and he is tracking down lots of long range DX with it.

<<<   1. The core of the FSL, has to be foamed or can be just a non conductive cylinder-shaped object? What about PVC?   >>>

The core of the FSL needs to be a dielectric (insulating) material, and should also be soft enough to provide some protection for fragile ferrite rods or bars. My own FSL models use a PVC frame, with a PVC pipe through the center of the ferrite sleeve, through a rubber plumbing coupler packed with soft pipe insulation and a swimming floatation aid. This kind of FSL design is waterproof, tough and survivable in risky environments like ocean side cliffs. But if you just want to use your FSL in a safe indoor shack, you can use almost any kind of inner core, as long as it is a good insulator.

<<<   2. I am interested in NDB and MW band, so my interest would be from 150 to 1750 (more or less). Which kind of variable capacitor do I need? I know it depend on the diameter of the aerial. Maybe a 3" baby loop or even a 5" are suitable for me as a first project. My portables are DEGEN DE1103 and Tecsun PL-330.    >>>

If you want to keep your FSL antenna compact and relatively lightweight there are some ideal 384 pF variable caps, which provide vernier tuning so that it's easier to peak the antenna's gain boost. But a 384 pF variable cap will not cover the frequency range from 150 kHz to 1750 kHz unless you have separate, switched Longwave and Medium Wave coils. My advice would be to have separate Longwave and Medium Wave FSL antennas with 384 pF variable caps, since there are different types of ideal Litz wire for the two different bands. But there are some larger FSL designs with the LW-MW coverage you desire, although the variable caps will be much larger, and trickier to tune with such a wide frequency range.

<<<   
3. Is it possible avoid the variable capacitor adding a pre-amp to get a broadband FSL?   >>>

This type of design was tried back in 2013, but the results were poor. The FSL antenna's effectiveness is related to its High-Q tuned circuit, which optimizes one single frequency very sharply, providing excellent gain for its small size. When you take away this important advantage you are basically left with a mediocre replacement antenna that receives all frequencies poorly.

Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA) 

    
       


Re: Batteries

Paul Blundell
 

Thanks Peter. The batteries I use are 2000 or 2200.


On Sat., 12 Dec. 2020, 07:33 Peter Laws, <plaws0@...> wrote:
On Fri, Dec 11, 2020 at 2:10 PM Paul Blundell <tanger32au@...> wrote:
>
> Thanks for the replies.
>
> I have heard a lot about those, do they have a lower mAh rating due to this?
>

Who knew there was a fan site for Eneloops?  Not me.

https://eneloop101.com/batteries/complete-lineup/

No idea what "generation" mine are old enough to be Sanyo branded
(Panasonic took a controlling interest in Sanyo a few years back) and
made in Japan (China production is more recent).

I think all of mine (I should check!) are "HR-3UTGA" and rated at a
"minimum" of 1900 mAh.


--
Peter Laws | N5UWY | plaws plaws net | Travel by Train!






WCPH 1220 Etowah, TN HOLIDAY DX TEST DEC 26 and JAN 2

Les Rayburn
 


George Hudson, owner of WCPH and The Courtesy Program Committee (CPC) of the NRC and IRCA are pleased to announce two special upcoming DX Tests on both December 26 and January 2nd, 2021. Both tests will be late night Saturday/Early Sunday morning from 2 AM Eastern Time until 4 AM Eastern (0700-0900 UTC). 

WCPH 1220 AM will be doing maintenance testing at their full daytime power of 1,000 watts using their daytime pattern. The station will transmit station identifications in voice, singing jingles, and Morse Code. In addition, they will transmit sweep tones, 1 kHz long tones, and other sound effects. 

WCPH is currently celebrating their 65th anniversary of serving Southeastern Tennessee. The station’s branding is “Homegrown 1220” and “Southeast Tennessee’s Oldies Station.” Their nighttime power is normally limited to 109 watts on a very crowded channel—so this test represents a unique chance to log this one. 

Joe Miller, KJ8O is designing a special 65th Anniversary QSL card, which will be available to those who successfully log this holiday test. Exact details on how QSL reports will be handled are still being worked out with the station, and will be announced shortly. 

For now, plan your holiday activities around these two great opportunities to log Homegrown 1220 in Etowah, TN! 



WCPH AM Coverage Map



73,

Les Rayburn, N1LF
121 Mayfair Parka
Maylene, AL 35114
EM63nf

NRC & IRCA Courtesy Program Committee Chairman
Member WTFDA, MWC

Perseus SDR, Elad FDM-S2 SDR, AirSpy + Discovery, SDRPlay RSP-2 Pro, Sony XDR-F1HD [XDR Guy Modified], Dennon TU-1500RD, Sangean HDT-1X, Ray Dees RDS Decoders, Korner 9.2 Antenna, FM-6 Antenna, Kitz Technologies KT-501 Pre-amps, Quantum Phaser, Wellbrook ALA1530 Loop, Wellbrook Flag, Clifton Labs Active Whip. 

“Nothing but blues and Elvis, and somebody else’s favorite song…” 


Re: Batteries

Richard Line
 

I’ve seen leaky Duracell’s too but if that’s all you use you won’t see another brand leak !

The Costco batterie’s are made by Duracell, much better pricing for probably the same thing.

 

                                          Rich


Re: Batteries

Carl
 

Kirkland alkaline batteries are made by Duracell. Watch for fake duracells. There are many out there. They do leak!

Tips to identify authentic Duracell Batteries:

- The label on authentic Duracell batteries will not peel off. If the label peels off, you have a counterfeit battery.

- Authentic Duracell batteries have a batch number laser-etched or stamped into the plastic label. It is rough to the touch -- not printed.

- Duracell uses recycled paper in their packaging. If you look at the back of the package, the card-stock should look dull, or similar to a newspaper. If it's bright white, it's suspect.

- Duracell batteries are packed flush to the bottom of the card-stock. You should be able to stand authentic battery packs upright without them falling.

- Duracell states that authentic batteries may be manufactured in Belgium, Germany, China and the United States.

- Other possible signs of counterfeit batteries include spelling errors on the package or poor picture quality.



On 12/11/2020 Friday 1:50 PM, Phil Pasteur wrote:
I agree about the Eneloops. I have (literally) 18 radios that I keep Eneloops in. 12 of those live mostly in their cases in a drawer. I take those out every 6 months or so and cycle the batteries for freshly charged Eneloops. 
A coup[le of those radios are in excess of 15 years old.  I have never had one of the batteries leak. In fact, even with frequenting places that discuss batteries often, I have never yet heard of a NiMH battery leaking. That doesn't mean that they don', but I think it is exceptionally rare.
I do find that I get slightly less runtime out of them versus a fresh set of  alkaline batteries. But it is not a real problem, as I always keep a charged set on hand.

I have gone through and replaced nearly all of the AA cells in all my devices with the NiMH cells. I have gotten real tired of going to use a device and having to clean it up, or discard  it dues to cell leakage. 
I have tried all of the major brands and had all of them leak. I think that Duracell are the worst, with the "Kirkland"  batteries from Costco coming in a very close second.

--
“Socialism is a philosophy of failure, the creed of ignorance, and the gospel of envy, its inherent virtue is the equal sharing of misery.” ― Winston S. Churchill


Re: Batteries

Peter Laws
 

On Fri, Dec 11, 2020 at 2:10 PM Paul Blundell <tanger32au@gmail.com> wrote:

Thanks for the replies.

I have heard a lot about those, do they have a lower mAh rating due to this?
Who knew there was a fan site for Eneloops? Not me.

https://eneloop101.com/batteries/complete-lineup/

No idea what "generation" mine are old enough to be Sanyo branded
(Panasonic took a controlling interest in Sanyo a few years back) and
made in Japan (China production is more recent).

I think all of mine (I should check!) are "HR-3UTGA" and rated at a
"minimum" of 1900 mAh.


--
Peter Laws | N5UWY | plaws plaws net | Travel by Train!


Re: Batteries

Paul Blundell
 

Thanks for the replies.

I have heard a lot about those, do they have a lower mAh rating due to this?

On Sat., 12 Dec. 2020, 05:10 Peter Laws, <plaws0@...> wrote:
I have had very good experience with Eneloop (from Panasonic) brand AA
NiMH cells.  When I was taking my radio scanner to work I was
regularly cycling some through that but now that I work from home
(since March) I basically go to work in my radio room, so ... not so
much battery stuff.

Regardless, no leakage.  I charge them in a MAHA 4-cell charger so no
over-charging.  The cells are of a design that has very low
self-discharge so when you get them, they are usable and if you let
the sit for months (as I have been doing lately!), they retain a more
than usable charge.




--
Peter Laws | N5UWY | plaws plaws net | Travel by Train!






Re: Batteries

Peter Laws
 

On Fri, Dec 11, 2020 at 12:50 PM Phil Pasteur <ppasteur@q.com> wrote:

A coup[le of those radios are in excess of 15 years old. I have never had one of the batteries leak. In fact, even with frequenting places that discuss batteries often, I have never yet heard of a NiMH battery leaking. That doesn't mean that they don', but I think it is exceptionally rare.
I do find that I get slightly less runtime out of them versus a fresh set of alkaline batteries. But it is not a real problem, as I always keep a charged set on hand.
I think that's right - surely there is a situation where they will
leak, but it appears that you have to work at it to get any damage.
:-)

Yes, pretty much any rechargeable cell will have less run-time than a
fresh alkaline. But you don't throw away your investment at the end
of the cell's life, you pop it in the charger and go through it all
again. And again and again. Cheaper in the long run for you, not
nearly as many cells in the landfill for your grandchildren to
scavenge and barter to Jeff Bezos' robot replacement for food pellets,
many hours of listening without running to a store (assuming you have
more than one set of NiMHs, which you should).

Eneloops aren't the right answer for every type of device but they
sure work swell in radios.





--
Peter Laws | N5UWY | plaws plaws net | Travel by Train!


Re: Batteries

Phil Pasteur
 

I agree about the Eneloops. I have (literally) 18 radios that I keep Eneloops in. 12 of those live mostly in their cases in a drawer. I take those out every 6 months or so and cycle the batteries for freshly charged Eneloops. 
A coup[le of those radios are in excess of 15 years old.  I have never had one of the batteries leak. In fact, even with frequenting places that discuss batteries often, I have never yet heard of a NiMH battery leaking. That doesn't mean that they don', but I think it is exceptionally rare.
I do find that I get slightly less runtime out of them versus a fresh set of  alkaline batteries. But it is not a real problem, as I always keep a charged set on hand.

I have gone through and replaced nearly all of the AA cells in all my devices with the NiMH cells. I have gotten real tired of going to use a device and having to clean it up, or discard  it dues to cell leakage. 
I have tried all of the major brands and had all of them leak. I think that Duracell are the worst, with the "Kirkland"  batteries from Costco coming in a very close second.


Re: Batteries

Peter Laws
 

I have had very good experience with Eneloop (from Panasonic) brand AA
NiMH cells. When I was taking my radio scanner to work I was
regularly cycling some through that but now that I work from home
(since March) I basically go to work in my radio room, so ... not so
much battery stuff.

Regardless, no leakage. I charge them in a MAHA 4-cell charger so no
over-charging. The cells are of a design that has very low
self-discharge so when you get them, they are usable and if you let
the sit for months (as I have been doing lately!), they retain a more
than usable charge.




--
Peter Laws | N5UWY | plaws plaws net | Travel by Train!


Re: North East US-Canada Aurora

radiojayallen
 

AH! You brought back Connecticut memories for me as i worked within view of Rattlesnake Mountain (WRC's tower) up until I retired. I miss the old radio ranch!

Jay (now a Kentucky resident)


Re: Batteries

radiojayallen
 

I agree that Duracells have been widely known to have leakage problems for at least the several past few years but I have not used them so cannot attest to that from my own experience.

As far as how good other alkalines are the major companies redo/upgrade their formulations all the time so specific tests of one brand versus another can change over time and can even be different for AA's vs AAA's vs D's. I have used Energizers with good results and also for many ears I have been buying my alkalines in bulk at the warehouse clubs and have had great results with them. I also have had no problems with Amazon Basics batteries...they seem like a good deal to me.

Jay


Re: October 2020 Rockwork 2 Asia TP-DXpedition Article

Jorge Garzón
 

Thanks Gary for the report. I enjoy it very much indeed. Reflecting on this...

Now I realize that the ocean 'DXing cliff' is an ideal site because of:

1. Excellent conductivity of the sea surface.
2. An effective MW ground wave blocker of the stations inland.
3. (Perhaps) an enhance effect of the cliff itself to collect the signals coming from its perpendicular direction.
Am I true?

I experience something similar in Cantabria, although our cliffs are not as high as Oregon ones (max. cliff height is 140 m high. I have not searched the best place to get the LPAM stations from the UK and the Nederlands, but even if they are not at thousands of km away, they are transmitting with just 10 to 100W and Spanish MW stations block most of the channels, so it's a real challenge. But this could be a real advantage for NDB listening facing Greenland and North America, for instance.

I always have an enhanced reception on MW stations coming from the other side of the ocean besides the coastline but it is well known by everybody. But I am convinced that with a well choosen listening spot and a good and manageable loop (or FSL in this case) I could get not less resultas that with 300/400 m beverages, having in mind the number of MW stations we have in Iberia and other countries in Europe. We will see!!

On the other side, which are the best results of the Asian Cliff? Daylight DXing (ground -or marine- wave) or ionospheric ones? Which are the times you are listening to the signals? I am curious to know that.

Perhaps the good results of the Neahkahnie viewpoints are just more than physics, as in the ancient times when that area was also part of that Spanish territory called "New Spain Kingdom", gold treasure was buried there and they could reflect the waves coming from the sea ;-)

I found this:
"The most widely circulated treasure story describes an early Spanish wreck on the Nehalem spit at the base of Neahkahnie Mountain. Thirty survivors made it to the beach, ferrying the ship's treasure ashore in a longboat. The men dragged the treasure chest up onto the mountain's slopes and dug a hole. Knowing that Indians feared disturbing the graves of the dead, the captain shot his black Caribbean slave and buried him on top of the treasure. Then the captain shot or drove away the crew members who wouldn't fit in the ship's longboat, and he ordered the remainder to row him back across the ocean toward Mexico." 

The rol of Spaniards in the independence of the USA was so important that our two countries had to be much more involved each other in a cultural way. Actually all of us come from the same tree roots.

¡Saludos desde España!

Jorge Garzón Gutiérrez "IberiaDX" 
(EB7EFA · EA1036 SWL · BDXC Member 1409) 
QTH: IN83ag / 43º15' N · 03º56' W
Urb. San Roque 95, casa 5 (Villasevil)
39698 Santiurde de Toranzo (ESPAÑA - SPAIN)
..................................................................................
Blog: IberiaDX  · Twitter: @IberiaDX


En viernes, 11 de diciembre de 2020 11:25:41 CET, Gary DeBock via groups.io <d1028gary@...> escribió:


On Fri, Dec 11, 2020 at 02:08 AM, Paul Blundell wrote:
Excellent report as always and you have done a great job with these LOGGINGS, including getting some confirmation via Facebook.
 
Paul
Thanks Paul,

Any time you can combine salt water and a plunging ocean cliff the transoceanic DX results are likely to be thrilling, as long as the ocean cliff is facing in your desired DX direction. This assumes that the ocean cliff weather isn't equally thrilling.

I'm sure that Tasmania has some excellent ocean beaches on its east coast where you could really push your long range DXing luck around sunset, and probably track down various Pacific islands. When I was in the Cook Islands in 2018 (April) the long range DX would start showing up from North and South America up to two hours prior to sunset, and the east coast of Kauai (Hawaii) was the same way. Finding an ocean cliff can also really cut down the noise and splatter from domestic stations on the back side.

Gary

  


Re: October 2020 Rockwork 2 Asia TP-DXpedition Article

Gary DeBock
 

On Fri, Dec 11, 2020 at 02:08 AM, Paul Blundell wrote:
Excellent report as always and you have done a great job with these LOGGINGS, including getting some confirmation via Facebook.
 
Paul
Thanks Paul,

Any time you can combine salt water and a plunging ocean cliff the transoceanic DX results are likely to be thrilling, as long as the ocean cliff is facing in your desired DX direction. This assumes that the ocean cliff weather isn't equally thrilling.

I'm sure that Tasmania has some excellent ocean beaches on its east coast where you could really push your long range DXing luck around sunset, and probably track down various Pacific islands. When I was in the Cook Islands in 2018 (April) the long range DX would start showing up from North and South America up to two hours prior to sunset, and the east coast of Kauai (Hawaii) was the same way. Finding an ocean cliff can also really cut down the noise and splatter from domestic stations on the back side.

Gary

  


Re: Building a FSL antenna

Gary DeBock
 

On Fri, Dec 11, 2020 at 01:23 AM, Jorge Garzón wrote:
Sorry, I wanted to say 5 inches FSL (not 3,5" as I did)
 
Hello Jorge,

Attached is a design photo of an effective 5 inch (12cm) diameter FSL antenna, which provides powerful gain in a compact size. One of these FSL models was recently sent to Paul Walker in Alaska, and he is tracking down lots of long range DX with it.

<<<   1. The core of the FSL, has to be foamed or can be just a non conductive cylinder-shaped object? What about PVC?   >>>

The core of the FSL needs to be a dielectric (insulating) material, and should also be soft enough to provide some protection for fragile ferrite rods or bars. My own FSL models use a PVC frame, with a PVC pipe through the center of the ferrite sleeve, through a rubber plumbing coupler packed with soft pipe insulation and a swimming floatation aid. This kind of FSL design is waterproof, tough and survivable in risky environments like ocean side cliffs. But if you just want to use your FSL in a safe indoor shack, you can use almost any kind of inner core, as long as it is a good insulator.

<<<   2. I am interested in NDB and MW band, so my interest would be from 150 to 1750 (more or less). Which kind of variable capacitor do I need? I know it depend on the diameter of the aerial. Maybe a 3" baby loop or even a 5" are suitable for me as a first project. My portables are DEGEN DE1103 and Tecsun PL-330.    >>>

If you want to keep your FSL antenna compact and relatively lightweight there are some ideal 384 pF variable caps, which provide vernier tuning so that it's easier to peak the antenna's gain boost. But a 384 pF variable cap will not cover the frequency range from 150 kHz to 1750 kHz unless you have separate, switched Longwave and Medium Wave coils. My advice would be to have separate Longwave and Medium Wave FSL antennas with 384 pF variable caps, since there are different types of ideal Litz wire for the two different bands. But there are some larger FSL designs with the LW-MW coverage you desire, although the variable caps will be much larger, and trickier to tune with such a wide frequency range.

<<<   
3. Is it possible avoid the variable capacitor adding a pre-amp to get a broadband FSL?   >>>

This type of design was tried back in 2013, but the results were poor. The FSL antenna's effectiveness is related to its High-Q tuned circuit, which optimizes one single frequency very sharply, providing excellent gain for its small size. When you take away this important advantage you are basically left with a mediocre replacement antenna that receives all frequencies poorly.

Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA) 

    
       


Re: October 2020 Rockwork 2 Asia TP-DXpedition Article

Paul Blundell
 

Excellent report as always and you have done a great job with these LOGGINGS, including getting some confirmation via Facebook.

Paul

On Fri., 11 Dec. 2020, 17:02 Gary DeBock via groups.io, <D1028Gary=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
In mid-October my wife and I made a four day ocean beach trip to Manzanita, Oregon-- which by sneaky plan just happened to be only 2 miles (3 km) away from the Rockwork ocean cliff complex. I had another sneaky plan in the works-- test out Asian TP-DXing at the Rockwork 2 plunging cliff, which has an Asia-directed face as well as a DU-directed face. Helicopter and drone photos had revealed that this Rockwork 2 cliff had an outstanding sea level cove at its base facing Asia, just like the Rockwork 4 cliff has such a cove facing New Zealand. Was this Rockwork 2 cliff another prime DXing venue waiting to be discovered, offering enhanced Asian reception like Rockwork 4's enhanced Kiwi reception?

To test out this theory I chased Asian DX at Rockwork 2 for all four days with a couple of very small 6 inch (15cm) FSL antennas and "supercharged" portables. By blind luck, the dates chosen (October 14-17) turned out to feature some of the best Asian propagation of the entire DX season, and by some more blind luck, Walt was up in Masset at the same time, so we could compare notes on exotic DX catches. With the ocean cliff boost the tiny live DXing gear pulled off some serious stunners, tracking down 576-Myanmar (language confirmed by C. K. Raman), 594-Myanmar (// 576, which Walt also was able to do in Masset), 675-AIR in Itanagar, India (confirmed by the announcer), and probable reception of 729-Myanmar and 918-Cambodia. The entire experience seemed like something straight out of a science fiction novel. A 12-page article describing this very first Rockwork 2 Asian DXpedition is posted at the following link, including 96 Asian TP-DX recording links from 76 different Asian stations, as well as multiple photos and a description of the theory behind the DXpedition. The "Asia Cliff" provides a fascinating new option for DXers with a sense of adventure!  
https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/nindb6n19ed8v7ow1o69hchxps94eb7e

Gary DeBock (DXing at the Rockwork 2 ocean cliff from October 14-17)
Puyallup, WA, USA


Re: Building a FSL antenna

Jorge Garzón
 

Sorry, I wanted to say 5 inches FSL (not 3,5" as I did)

Stay safe!

Jorge Garzón Gutiérrez "IberiaDX" 
(EB7EFA · EA1036 SWL · BDXC Member 1409) 
QTH: IN83ag / 43º15' N · 03º56' W
Urb. San Roque 95, casa 5 (Villasevil)
39698 Santiurde de Toranzo (ESPAÑA - SPAIN)
..................................................................................
Blog: IberiaDX  · Twitter: @IberiaDX


En jueves, 10 de diciembre de 2020 22:44:43 CET, Jorge Garzón via groups.io <iberiadx@...> escribió:


Well, finally I would like to build a 3'5" FSL antenna and I would like some easy advice. 

1. How many ferriterods do I need for 10mm thick rods? 
2. I have seen 10 cm long, 12 or 14 cm long. Any advice of this? 
3. I have discovered some suppliers. Preferences? 
a) https://www.rapidonline.com/Electrical-Power/100 mm-Ferrariite-Rod-Aerial-88-3098
b) https://www.ebay.com/itm/6-pcs-Ferrite-Rod-NiZn-8-x-125mm-for-Amateur-and-Crystal-Radio-Coils-AM-SW-USSR/202472305698?_trkparms=aid=555021&algo=PL.SIMRVI&ao=1&asc=225086&meid=e016db1db03d403397c81ab528bbeeff&pid=100752&rk=2&rkt=8&mehot=ag&sd=124092146554&itm=202472305698&pmt=1&noa=0&pg=2047675&algv=SimplRVIAMLv5WebWithPLRVIOnTopCombiner&_trksid=p2047675.c100752.m1982&redirect=mobile
c) Any other supplier? 

Thank you in advance! 

Jorge Garzón Gutiérrez "IberiaDX" 
(EB7EFA · EA1036 SWL · BDXC Member 1409) 
QTH: IN83ag / 43º15' N · 03º56' W
Urb. San Roque 95, casa 5 (Villasevil)
39698 Santiurde de Toranzo (ESPAÑA - SPAIN)
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Blog: IberiaDX  · Twitter: @IberiaDX


En sábado, 14 de noviembre de 2020 16:56:28 CET, Jorge Garzón via groups.io <iberiadx@...> escribió:


Maybe there is a post (or several) regarding this but I have some questions that I would like to share with you:

1. The core of the FSL, has to be foamed or can be just a non conductive cylinder-shaped object? What about PVC?
2. I am interested in NDB and MW band, so my interest would be from 150 to 1750 (more or less). Which kind of variable capacitor do I need? I know it depend on the diameter of the aerial. Maybe a 3" baby loop or even a 5" are suitable for me as a first project. My portables are DEGEN DE1103 and Tecsun PL-330. 
3. Is it possible avoid the variable capacitor adding a pre-amp to get a broadband FSL?

I am thinking to purchase ferrites in the same place where Graham (Maynard) got the ones he used. Any other suggestion?

Thank you very much in advance!

--
Jorge Garzón (EB7EFA · EA1036 SWL) 
QTH: IN83ag / 43º15' N · 03º56' W
Urb. San Roque 95, casa 5 (Villasevil)
39698 Santiurde de Toranzo (ESPAÑA - SPAIN)
..................................................................................
Blog: IberiaDX  · Twitter: @IberiaDX

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