Date   

Long Term DX Project - 7/07/2020

Paul Blundell
 

Date: 7/07/2020
Time: 12:30
Location: St Georges Square, Launceston Tasmania
Notes: A portable session at St Georges Square around lunch time. Some good signals were logged around the bottom of the band and the use of my 3” FSL made a real difference with it lifting a few signals from average to good signal levels. 2CA on 1053khz which is the furthest station of this project really struggled and was a very poor signal with only traces heard.
 
 
Freq
Callsign
Logged
531
3GG
AVERAGE
549
2CR
POOR
594
3WV
GOOD
621
3RN
GOOD
774
3LO
AVERAGE
1053
2CA
POOR
1179
3RPH
POOR
1341
HPON GEELONG
GOOD
1422
HPON MELBOURNE
GOOD
1503
3KND
POOR


 
 
 


Re: Oren Elliot latest "0219" series variable cap?

Gary DeBock
 

<<<   Or the one with the 8:1 drive here: 
 
 
I’d like to substitute the one on my shiny new 5” FSL and see if I can detect any difference in performance. Glad that this secret leaked out—now about those lottery numbers….   >>>

Les,

Your new 5" FSL is one of the many ones built here during the Pandemic, and almost certainly has the latest variable cap installed. You can confirm this by noting the "0219" stamp on the back of the variable cap, after the "N50 384P" stamp.

For ordering, always purchase the 8:1 drive variable cap-- otherwise you will feel like you are at a casino when you try to tune in a station.

Gary



 


Re: Oren Elliot latest "0219" series variable cap?

Tom Crosbie G6PZZ <tom@...>
 

Dave,

I looked up DeOxit D5 from Amazon UK. Almost £30.00 for 142ml. This side of the pond we pay around £10.00 for 400ml of contact cleaner, with several good brands to choose from, excluding WD40, which I class as for mechanical use only! I guess your D5 is more of a pro product. This piqued my curiosity as last year I purchased three 500+500pf airspace variables with reduction drives, described as new old stock. That’s what I got wrapped in layers of tissue. A squirt of air duster took care of disintegrating tissue but you’ve made me think about hitting them with some isopropyl. Next time I find myself looking at them again!

 

Tom | G6PZZ

Nr Chesterfield | Derbyshire |UK | IO93he

HF250 | Sentinel 4 |RSPdx | RM50 | TR2 | ATS 808

15m MLB | MTA | D707

tom@...

 

 

 

 

From: main@UltralightDX.groups.io <main@UltralightDX.groups.io> On Behalf Of daiche via groups.io
Sent: 07 July 2020 00:29
To: main@UltralightDX.groups.io
Subject: Re: [UltralightDX] Oren Elliot latest "0219" series variable cap?

 

Gary and Steve,

I had noticed a difference in older vs newer Oren caps also, although I saw no physical difference between them. I tried something on the 'older' ones that seems to work to freshen them up. I have used DeOxit D5 and/or 91-99% alcohol on them to clean the blades, keeping away from the bearings and gearing. That seems to perk them up also. So maybe it is plain old corrosion from bad city air, causing a problem, rather than a new manufacturing technique. I have always used canned air to dry them off after a treatment, as a finishing touch. You might try one or both treatments on one of your old caps to see if that helps. I'd be interested to hear if my improvement method is real or imaginary. Ha!

73's

Dave Aichelman     N7NZH     Grants Pass, Oregon


Re: Oren Elliot latest "0219" series variable cap?

Les Rayburn
 

Looking on the Mike’s Electronics Parts web site, I see three different air variable capacitors. 

Is the desired part the 384 variable capacitor here: 



Or the one with the 8:1 drive here: 


I’d like to substitute the one on my shiny new 5” FSL and see if I can detect any difference in performance. Glad that this secret leaked out—now about those lottery numbers….



73,

Les Rayburn, N1LF
121 Mayfair Park
Maylene, AL 35114
EM63nf

NRC & IRCA Courtesy Program Committee Chairman
Member WTFDA, MWC

Perseus SDR, Elad FDM-S2 SDR, AirSpy + Discovery, SDRPlay RSP-2 Pro, Sony XDR-F1HD [XDR Guy Modified], Dennon TU-1500RD, Sangean HDT-1X, Ray Dees RDS Decoders, Korner 9.2 Antenna, FM-6 Antenna, Kitz Technologies KT-501 Pre-amps, Quantum Phaser, Wellbrook ALA1530 Loop, Wellbrook Flag, Clifton Labs Active Whip. 

“Nothing but blues and Elvis, and somebody else’s favorite song…” 

On Jul 6, 2020, at 6:29 PM, daiche via groups.io <daiche@...> wrote:

Gary and Steve,

I had noticed a difference in older vs newer Oren caps also, although I saw no physical difference between them. I tried something on the 'older' ones that seems to work to freshen them up. I have used DeOxit D5 and/or 91-99% alcohol on them to clean the blades, keeping away from the bearings and gearing. That seems to perk them up also. So maybe it is plain old corrosion from bad city air, causing a problem, rather than a new manufacturing technique. I have always used canned air to dry them off after a treatment, as a finishing touch. You might try one or both treatments on one of your old caps to see if that helps. I'd be interested to hear if my improvement method is real or imaginary. Ha!

73's

Dave Aichelman     N7NZH     Grants Pass, Oregon


Re: Oren Elliot latest "0219" series variable cap?

daiche
 

Gary and Steve,

I had noticed a difference in older vs newer Oren caps also, although I saw no physical difference between them. I tried something on the 'older' ones that seems to work to freshen them up. I have used DeOxit D5 and/or 91-99% alcohol on them to clean the blades, keeping away from the bearings and gearing. That seems to perk them up also. So maybe it is plain old corrosion from bad city air, causing a problem, rather than a new manufacturing technique. I have always used canned air to dry them off after a treatment, as a finishing touch. You might try one or both treatments on one of your old caps to see if that helps. I'd be interested to hear if my improvement method is real or imaginary. Ha!

73's

Dave Aichelman     N7NZH     Grants Pass, Oregon


Re: Oren Elliot latest "0219" series variable cap?

Gary DeBock
 

Hi Steve,

<<<   Where are you obtaining the latest 0219 variable caps--from the manufacturer or from Mike's Electronics? This is certainly a very interesting finding.
73, Steve >>>

During the Pandemic I have been doing a lot of FSL experimentation, and have been buying these new "N50 384P" variable caps from Mike's Electronic Parts in batches of 7. Around March I first noticed that one of 3" Baby FSL's recently constructed was outperforming one constructed in 2018, even though all of the components were exactly the same. The only difference was that the variable caps used in 2018 had a "0217" series number, while the new ones received in 2020 had a "0219" series number. Both of those were received from Mike's Electronic Parts, with Oren Elliott as the OEM. Kind of curious about this, I substituted another "0219" variable cap for a "0217" variable cap in another 2018 FSL design, and immediately got the same noticeable performance boost (sharper tuning, and a greater sensitivity peak when zeroed in on the radio's frequency, which only happened when you tuned the FSL to exactly the right point). This "0219" variable cap performance boost was most noticeable on the extreme low band frequencies (such as 530, 531 and 540), although it was detectable all the way up to 1700 kHz. The effect was enough to motivate this fanatical tinker to replace all the FSL variable caps headed for the Rockwork Cliff this summer, ensuring that they all have new "0219" upgrades.

This is the first time that I'm sharing this discovery with anyone, Steve-- I had actually considered keeping it a secret :-)

73, Gary



 


Re: FSL coil Q of 1162/46 and 660/46 Litz compared using HP4342A Q meter

Steve Ratzlaff
 

I just checked with Mike at https://www.mikeselectronicparts.com/ and he says his current caps are the latest version "0219" so I just ordered one to try.

Thanks for this info, Gary.

73,

Steve

On 7/5/2020 11:05 PM, Gary DeBock via groups.io wrote:
Hi Steve,
To make matters even more interesting, Oren Elliott seems to have recently improved his manufacturing process in the later "N50 384P" variable caps, so that the N50 384P caps with a "0219" series number are clearly superior to those with a "0217" series number. I don't know if he has been improving the dielectric, rotor or stator, but these newest variable caps are extremely sharp performers-- to the extent that every FSL antenna heading for the Rockwork Cliff this summer will have one of the latest variable cap upgrades.

Gary


Re: Oren Elliot latest "0219" series variable cap?

Steve Ratzlaff
 

Hi Gary,

Where are you obtaining the latest 0219 variable caps--from the manufacturer or from Mike's Electronics? This is certainly a very interesting finding.

73,

Steve

On 7/5/2020 11:05 PM, Gary DeBock via groups.io wrote:


To make matters even more interesting, Oren Elliott seems to have recently improved his manufacturing process in the later "N50 384P" variable caps, so that the N50 384P caps with a "0219" series number are clearly superior to those with a "0217" series number. I don't know if he has been improving the dielectric, rotor or stator, but these newest variable caps are extremely sharp performers-- to the extent that every FSL antenna heading for the Rockwork Cliff this summer will have one of the latest variable cap upgrades. With Hawaii and all overseas travel temporarily scratched out because of the Pandemic, the Rockwork cliff should be a dream DXing venue for both Tom R. and yours truly, who both broke our records for South Pacific NDB-DX last August. Tom told me that he's still uncovering new South Pacific NDB-DX from that trip, in addition to his record-breaking haul already posted.

Gary


Re: FSL coil Q of 1162/46 and 660/46 Litz compared using HP4342A Q meter

Gary DeBock
 

Hi Steve,

Thanks for running these detailed "Q" tests between the 1162/46 and 660/46 Liz wire at various frequencies with the HP4342A Q meter. This kind of detailed test is something which would not be my first choice for using up my hobby time, but I'm happy that somebody did it! :-)

The 1162/46 Litz wire's 'Q" advantage on the low band covers the frequencies which are typically checked first during DXpeditions and band scans, so its substitution for the 660/46 Litz wire in 2014 may have given the impression that it was superior throughout the MW range, which apparently isn't so. But to be honest the recent replacement of the old "N50 365P" variable caps with the newer "N50 384P"variable caps seemed to provide a higher "Q" boost in the newer FSL's  than the switch in Litz wire, to the extent that it was the inspiration for the miniature "Frequent Flyer' FSL's which have tracked down long range DX in Hawaii and the Cook Islands.

To make matters even more interesting, Oren Elliott seems to have recently improved his manufacturing process in the later "N50 384P" variable caps, so that the N50 384P caps with a "0219" series number are clearly superior to those with a "0217" series number. I don't know if he has been improving the dielectric, rotor or stator, but these newest variable caps are extremely sharp performers-- to the extent that every FSL antenna heading for the Rockwork Cliff this summer will have one of the latest variable cap upgrades. With Hawaii and all overseas travel temporarily scratched out because of the Pandemic, the Rockwork cliff should be a dream DXing venue for both Tom R. and yours truly, who both broke our records for South Pacific NDB-DX last August. Tom told me that he's still uncovering new South Pacific NDB-DX from that trip, in addition to his record-breaking haul already posted.

Gary
 


Re: FSL coil Q of 1162/46 and 660/46 (added 330/46) Litz compared using HP4342A Q meter

Steve Ratzlaff
 

I wound a coil using 330/46 Litz to compare with the other two. 21 turns gave 273.3 uH, quite a bit higher than the other two due to the narrower width coil. Probably 1 or 2 turns should be removed for use in an actual FSL with 385 pF tuning cap.

On 7/5/2020 3:46 PM, STEVE wrote:

This experiment compares a ferrite sleeve coil of 1162/46 Litz with a ferrite sleeve coil of 660/46, both 21 turns with final coil diameter about 6 3/8", using 140 mm ferrite rods in the ferrite sleeve. The same ferrite sleeve was used for both coils, with the coils centered on the sleeve for peak inductance. The 1162/46 coil measured 236.5 uH; the 660/46 coil measured 253 uH for the same 21 turns for each. (The fatter Litz will have a little less inductance compared to the thinner Litz for the same number of turns due to being a wider coil.)

Each ferrite sleeve coil was suspended 7" above the Q meter deck, oriented horizontally; each coil had about 12" of pigtail length. The HP4342A Q meter capacitor (very high Q) was used to resonate each coil. Solid copper lugs were used on the ends of each coil to connect the coil to the Q meter. Coil Q should directly relate to signal level coupled to the receiver with higher Q giving higher signal level. Since the Q meter's variable capacitor was used, which has much higher Q than any external variable capacitor I'm aware of, this removes the external capacitor Q effects from the experimental results, only comparing the two Litz types.

73,

Steve AA7U

                          1162/46    660/46    330/46

1700 kHz  305Q        310Q     263Q

1600 kHz  345Q        350Q     300Q

1500 kHz  385Q        395Q     340Q

1400 kHz  440Q        445Q     380Q

1300 kHz  500Q        500Q     433Q

1200 kHz  565Q        570Q     490Q

1100 kHz  643Q        645Q     555Q

1000 kHz  740Q        730Q     630Q

900 kHz   840Q        835Q     710Q

800 kHz   955Q        930Q     785Q

700 kHz   1116Q       1084Q    860Q

600 kHz   1246Q       1144Q    910Q

550 kHz   1301Q       1173Q    925Q

520 kHz   1332Q       1186Q    925Q

510 kHz---------------1188Q    928Q (340 pF for 330/46)


Re: FSL coil Q of 1162/46 and 660/46 Litz compared using HP4342A Q meter

Steve Ratzlaff
 

I should add that my 140mm ferrite rods are Chinese rods, not Russian rods, and that the results may be different using Russian rods. I don't have enough Russian rods to do the experiment using them. Gary's latest 6" FSL with Russian rods used 19 turns of the 1162/46 Litz where mine used 21 turns.

Steve AA7U

On 7/5/2020 3:46 PM, STEVE wrote:

This experiment compares a ferrite sleeve coil of 1162/46 Litz with a ferrite sleeve coil of 660/46, both 21 turns with final coil diameter about 6 3/8", using 140 mm ferrite rods in the ferrite sleeve. The same ferrite sleeve was used for both coils, with the coils centered on the sleeve for peak inductance. The 1162/46 coil measured 236.5 uH; the 660/46 coil measured 253 uH for the same 21 turns for each. (The fatter Litz will have a little less inductance compared to the thinner Litz for the same number of turns due to being a wider coil.)

Each ferrite sleeve coil was suspended 7" above the Q meter deck, oriented horizontally; each coil had about 12" of pigtail length. The HP4342A Q meter capacitor (very high Q) was used to resonate each coil. Solid copper lugs were used on the ends of each coil to connect the coil to the Q meter. Coil Q should directly relate to signal level coupled to the receiver with higher Q giving higher signal level. Since the Q meter's variable capacitor was used, which has much higher Q than any external variable capacitor I'm aware of, this removes the external capacitor Q effects from the experimental results, only comparing the two Litz types.

73,

Steve AA7U

                            1162/46    660/46

1700 kHz  305Q        310Q

1600 kHz  345Q        350Q

1500 kHz  385Q        395Q

1400 kHz  440Q        445Q

1300 kHz  500Q        500Q

1200 kHz  565Q        570Q

1100 kHz  643Q        645Q  Q's are equal at this frequency

1000 kHz  740Q        730Q  Fatter Litz begins to have better Q

900 kHz   840Q        835Q

800 kHz   955Q        930Q

700 kHz   1116Q       1084Q

600 kHz   1246Q       1144Q

550 kHz   1301Q       1173Q

520 kHz   1332Q       1186Q

1162/46 Litz--385 pF, 516 kHz, 1333Q (max capacitance of variable cap Gary uses)

510 kHz               1188Q

660/46 Litz--385 pF, 502 kHz, 1189Q (max capacitance of variable cap Gary uses)


FSL coil Q of 1162/46 and 660/46 Litz compared using HP4342A Q meter

Steve Ratzlaff
 

This experiment compares a ferrite sleeve coil of 1162/46 Litz with a ferrite sleeve coil of 660/46, both 21 turns with final coil diameter about 6 3/8", using 140 mm ferrite rods in the ferrite sleeve. The same ferrite sleeve was used for both coils, with the coils centered on the sleeve for peak inductance. The 1162/46 coil measured 236.5 uH; the 660/46 coil measured 253 uH for the same 21 turns for each. (The fatter Litz will have a little less inductance compared to the thinner Litz for the same number of turns due to being a wider coil.)

Each ferrite sleeve coil was suspended 7" above the Q meter deck, oriented horizontally; each coil had about 12" of pigtail length. The HP4342A Q meter capacitor (very high Q) was used to resonate each coil. Solid copper lugs were used on the ends of each coil to connect the coil to the Q meter. Coil Q should directly relate to signal level coupled to the receiver with higher Q giving higher signal level. Since the Q meter's variable capacitor was used, which has much higher Q than any external variable capacitor I'm aware of, this removes the external capacitor Q effects from the experimental results, only comparing the two Litz types.

73,

Steve AA7U

                            1162/46    660/46

1700 kHz  305Q        310Q

1600 kHz  345Q        350Q

1500 kHz  385Q        395Q

1400 kHz  440Q        445Q

1300 kHz  500Q        500Q

1200 kHz  565Q        570Q

1100 kHz  643Q        645Q  Q's are equal at this frequency

1000 kHz  740Q        730Q  Fatter Litz begins to have better Q

900 kHz   840Q        835Q

800 kHz   955Q        930Q

700 kHz   1116Q       1084Q

600 kHz   1246Q       1144Q

550 kHz   1301Q       1173Q

520 kHz   1332Q       1186Q

1162/46 Litz--385 pF, 516 kHz, 1333Q (max capacitance of variable cap Gary uses)

510 kHz               1188Q

660/46 Litz--385 pF, 502 kHz, 1189Q (max capacitance of variable cap Gary uses)


Re: Gary's New 6" FSL Design

Todd
 

Thanks Gary for the detailed response.

When endeavoring to obtain the highest resonant signal output at a given frequency, the Q needs to be high as practicable. The audio fidelity will be somewhat compromised, but this can be partially improved by slightly tuning the FSL antenna to peak 1 or 2 KHz above the carrier frequency. This is why the 8:1 reduction drive is essential. 

High Q FSL antennas are the only way to obtain similar RF gain and selectivity in a small package that favorably compares to large 4 - 6 foot air core box loops. This means a 6 inch FSL can be positioned pretty much anywhere within the house. A 6 ft air core box loop positioned on the kitchen bench top is not practical. But a 6" FSL would easily sit there.

The 6" FSL with 1162/46 Litz wire will likely be more expensive for DXers outside the USA and China. I estimate the total cost for me would be around AU $250 including parts postage.

For those DXers that seek weak signals only 9 or 10 KHz adjacent to very strong locals, the high Q FSL is ideal from a 3 dB bandwidth perspective. The disadvantage is no tilting provision for reducing local signals by > 60 dB. This Kiwa loop tilting mechanism was very good for obtaining the critical tilt angle for nulling a local signal.

One possibility is to video a 6" FSL comparison test against the large 9 foot air core loop. If the results are comparable, that will be an amazing achievement in itself. Interesting to see what your most distant daytime MW groundwave signal that can be obtained with both antennas.

Regards,

Todd


KGB 760

Mike Sanburn
 

Call change is logged on my little Sangean DT160. Heard spot for San Diego Honda dealers and promo for Mark Larson Show. 0800 PDT top of hour call letter ID read very quickly then into CBS news. Former KFMB for decades. 
Mike Sanburn
Lakewood CA 


Re: Gary's New 6" FSL Design

Gary DeBock
 

<<<   Hi Gary,
Your new 6 inch FSL is a step towards higher gain in a relatively small package. I look forward to a YouTube review.   >>>

Thanks Todd,

The master plan behind this new 6" FSL design was to use all the high-Q components discovered in the compact, airport-friendly FSL experimentation and combine them with powerful ferrite gain. The performance results do seem worthy of the effort, and I'll try to post a demo video soon.

<<<   Regarding 1162/46 Litz wire used in the 6" FSL, what is the cheapest source of supply that you have found so far?   >>>  

I always use the 1162/46 Litz wire from the eBay seller "Mkmak222," which runs US$1 per foot. Of course this is pretty expensive for the average experimenter, who will need about 32 feet to make a Medium Wave FSL, not to mention the 60-watt soldering iron required for proper installation. There are many cheaper varieties of Litz wire available such as 660/46 and 330/46, and unless a DXer absolutely needs the highest sensitivity in the most compact antenna (such as for overseas air travel, etc.), the cheaper Litz wire is OK in most applications.

<<<   On AU eBay, 1162/46 Litz wire is quite expensive. Assuming 19 turns in your design, when I build one, there should be at least 1 or 2 extra turns to allow ferrite rod permeability variation.
21(6 x 3.1416) = 396 inches or 33 feet of wire.    >>>

Yes, 33 feet would probably be the minimum safe length of 1162/46 Litz wire to use for an MW coil if you are not sure how all the manufacturing differences will shake out in the final tuning range. It's no fun to wind an MW coil, and then find out that it won't tune down to 530 kHz because your variable cap doesn't have as much capacitance as your previous model.

<<<   The cheapest 1162/46 Litz wire on AU eBay is US $88 for 60 feet. No smaller minimum 33 feet length is available.
   >>>

Yes, this type of Litz wire should be reserved for fanatical DXer projects, in which you tweak a tiny antenna into an outrageously sensitive, ridiculously effective gain monster for the tiny size. I've posted a 3" Baby FSL video to show this effect. But the expense of this Litz wire is steep, and probably unnecessary unless you absolutely must have a tiny little DXing "firecracker."

<<<   With tank coil Q > 500, the bandwidth will average only 2 KHz or less. The audio fidelity will be compromised as a result. Resonant tuning peak will also be sharper. Higher Q = narrower RF signal bandwidth, degraded high frequency audio response, but high signal strength when tuned to resonance.   >>>

All certainly true, Todd. The highest "Q" FSL antennas have the narrowest bandwidth, which causes some loss of high frequency audio from a DX station. This compromised audio can be somewhat improved by audio processing software, but a razor-sharp-tuning FSL antenna will always clip off some high frequency audio when its frequency matches that of a weak DX station on an Ultralight radio. It's part of the game, and you learn to use the audio processing software to compensate.

<<<   During the process of testing various early design FSLs, what did you find by using lower resistance wires regarding varying degrees of S/N readability, bandwidth, and audio quality? For an air core loop with 1000 Q, the audio will be quite muffled at 531 KHz.   >>>

The early FSL's had pretty low Q, wimpy sensitivity from their smaller Litz wire and relatively good audio from the Ultralight radios. The latest high Q gain monsters sacrifice some audio quality in an all-out pursuit of the highest sensitivity, and their 1162/46 Litz wire will drain your bank account. But all is forgiven when an S9+ Kiwi DX signal thunders across the ocean at over 7,000 miles when you are on an ocean side cliff-- especially one which rarely shows up at all on a flat ocean beach.

Gary



 

 

    

         
   


Re: Soldering Litz Wire Method

kevin asato
 

Thanks for saying what I was thinking!

Isn't this just a variation to the solder pot?
73,
kevin
kc6pob

On Fri, Jul 3, 2020 at 6:52 PM Paul Blundell <tanger32au@...> wrote:
Great post and interesting comment on the wife finding the spoon, I think some might prefer we were doing drugs and not playing radios.

On Sat, 4 Jul 2020, 2:26 a.m. lamontcranston17, <nojunk@...> wrote:
Just a comment about soldering litz wire after seeing Gary's comment
about a 65 watt iron..

  I have a had success using a stainless steel spoon set on a burner of
the stove.

You will probably need to bend it or rest it on something to get it ti
set level on the burner.

I set the burner on high and melt a  enough solder in the spoon that I
can dip the end of the Litz wire into it at an angle.

That temp setting may me able to be reduced, but it needs to be hot.
Experiment.

I make sure to use rosin flux on the Litz wire. It is basically a small
solder pot that does a good job.

It is a little tricky because your fingers can only stay near the hot
burner so long!

Take the spoon when the wife's not looking and do not return it.

If she finds the spoon with a burned rosin stain, she will question
whether you are shooting drugs.


                          Mikek


--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus





Re: Soldering Litz Wire Method

Paul Blundell
 

Great post and interesting comment on the wife finding the spoon, I think some might prefer we were doing drugs and not playing radios.


On Sat, 4 Jul 2020, 2:26 a.m. lamontcranston17, <nojunk@...> wrote:
Just a comment about soldering litz wire after seeing Gary's comment
about a 65 watt iron..

  I have a had success using a stainless steel spoon set on a burner of
the stove.

You will probably need to bend it or rest it on something to get it ti
set level on the burner.

I set the burner on high and melt a  enough solder in the spoon that I
can dip the end of the Litz wire into it at an angle.

That temp setting may me able to be reduced, but it needs to be hot.
Experiment.

I make sure to use rosin flux on the Litz wire. It is basically a small
solder pot that does a good job.

It is a little tricky because your fingers can only stay near the hot
burner so long!

Take the spoon when the wife's not looking and do not return it.

If she finds the spoon with a burned rosin stain, she will question
whether you are shooting drugs.


                          Mikek


--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus





Soldering Litz Wire Method

lamontcranston17
 

Just a comment about soldering litz wire after seeing Gary's comment
about a 65 watt iron..

 I have a had success using a stainless steel spoon set on a burner of
the stove.

You will probably need to bend it or rest it on something to get it ti
set level on the burner.

I set the burner on high and melt a  enough solder in the spoon that I
can dip the end of the Litz wire into it at an angle.

That temp setting may me able to be reduced, but it needs to be hot.
Experiment.

I make sure to use rosin flux on the Litz wire. It is basically a small
solder pot that does a good job.

It is a little tricky because your fingers can only stay near the hot
burner so long!

Take the spoon when the wife's not looking and do not return it.

If she finds the spoon with a burned rosin stain, she will question
whether you are shooting drugs.


                         Mikek


--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus


Re: Long Term DX Project - 27/06/2020

Dan Merta
 

Ah ok. Iv'e been hearing 4QL from Longreach coming in at night lately. I'll listen in during the day. 


Long Term DX Project - 1/07/2020

Paul Blundell
 

Date: 1/07/2020
Time: 19:30
Location: Home, Launceston Tasmania
Notes: Early evening session at home.
 
 
Freq
Callsign
Logged
531
3GG
GOOD
549
2CR
GOOD
594
3WV
EXCELLENT
621
3RN
EXCELLENT
774
3LO
EXCELLENT
1053
2CA
AVERAGE
1179
3RPH
POOR
1341
HPON GEELONG
GOOD
1422
HPON MELBOURNE
GOOD
1503
3KND
AVERAGE
 
 

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