Date   

Re: Looking for analog receiver suggestions (not necessarily modern nor ultralight)

mediumwavedx
 

Check out the Panasonic RF-562DD. Newer, outstanding sensitivity, Some drawbacks though.

Check out my extensive review at RADIO-TIMETRAVELLER.

https://radio-timetraveller.blogspot.com/2019/03/review-of-panasonic-rf-562dd-receiver.html

Bill


Re: Looking for analog receiver suggestions (not necessarily modern nor ultralight)

Todd
 

Hi Jay,

The Sangean PR-D3 does produce a degree of soft muting (probably equal to the Crane CC 2E). This is most noticeable when the PR-D3 is used 'barefoot'. Most non-DXer listeners use their radios without any additional antenna. Mainly fringe area listeners would receive somewhat compromised reception of weak AM signals. However, the situation with DXers is different. They know that serious DX reception is highly inefficient without at least a medium size loop, or FSL antenna used with a sensitive portable radio. 

When a medium size size loop antenna is tuned to resonance, and the radio is positioned next to the loop at the optimal distance, the soft mute feature is completely negated. The loop antenna high signal signal pickup effectively acts as the first RF stage. This is especially true with larger higher gain loop or FSL antennas. A faint signal reading 0 bar strength can dramatically increase to full bar strength when a loop is tuned to resonance. The most sensitive 'barefoot' portable radio in the world will be greatly outperformed by an average sensitivity radio inductively coupled to a high gain loop. This is why small differences in 'barefoot' RF AM sensitivity are not important for serious DXers. Selectivity, and overload-desensitization performance is more important.

I was able to compare the 'barefoot' RF sensitivity differences by tuning to a weak stable distant groundwave AM signal noon. The best time to do this testing is when there is a major power blackout where all house and street light power is temporarily off. Remote rural areas without power poles are also ideal. Not very practical, but ideally there should only be QRN (natural noise) when doing sensitivity comparison testing.

There is a drop in signal when even tuned only 1 KHz away from the center wanted AM channel. I assume this also applies to the Crane CC 2E. This is a disadvantage when attempting to 'slope tune' in order to obtain a better signal within the selectivity curve. The 1 KHz tuning offset signal drop is not as great on the Sangean PR-D15.

Again like the Crane CC 2E, the PR-D3 AM memory preset stations on AM will sometimes not optimally tune the twin-coil antenna system, hence the rotary 1 KHz step knob needs to be re-tuned back to get full signal. This slight inconvenience is worth tweaking to obtain the strongest signal.

The PR-D3 front display is exactly the same as the Crane CC 2E. The weather and two meter ham band markings are on the display, but of course do not light up.

The Crane CC 2E auto-alignment feature also works on the PR-D3.

Compared to the more bullet-proof superior RF MW design of the Sangean PR-D15, the PR-D3 and CC Crane 2E more easily desensitize when a loop is aimed towards a local MW transmitter site. This desensitization factor requires loop placement further away from the radio. Optimal inductive coupling varies with frequency. Higher frequencies such as 1575 KHz require closer loop placement. Optimal loop placement is obtained by trial and error for every unique mix of factors.

The Sangean PR-D15 (and possibly PR-D5) is exceptionally selective on AM. You may want to verify this for documenting on your website. A simple test is 10 KHz adjacent signal readability for a skywave signal next to a strong local.

Most portable radios should be operated by DC batteries for the lowest RF noise floor and associated higher sensitivity. AC power operation introduces a slight continuous buzz on the PR-D3. The PR-D15 buzz is much more dramatic.

I found the Panasonic DR-22 at the front of someone's house. It was thrown out with some other AM/SW portables. The DR-22 RF sensitivity is way down, hence needs alignment or switch contact clean maintenance. I don't know anyone near me that specializes in restoring old radios. I may someday attempt to align it using the service manual. But I don't see the point of using an old radio that doesn't offer accurate digital readout down to 1 KHz steps. 

Regards,

Todd

https://www.canohm.com.au/products/radios/sangean?view=article&id=593#downloads

https://www.canohm.com.au/images/product-ranges/Sangean/Sangean-AR-pdf/PR-D3G.pdf

https://www.canohm.com.au/images/product-ranges/Sangean/Sangean-AR-pdf/PR-D3_Manual.pdf


Re: Australian Stations - January 2020

Paul Blundell
 

Thanks for that. I did know that but forgot to remove them from the list.


On Sun, Jan 19, 2020 at 11:33 AM Theo via Groups.Io <theod438=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
2XL/918 Cooma, NSW is no more.  They've gone to the Great FM Heaven in the sky.

Another group reports the tx switched off on 13 January.



--
Paul


--
Paul - Moderator
UltralightDX


Portable Ultralight Radio DXing Kit 2020

Paul Blundell
 

This is an update on my previous case which has now been improved.

Last year I was sent a baby 3" FSL aerial which I wanted to carry and protect, this was my main reason for changing how this case is setup. Recently I changed this and mounted the aerial to the lid of the case, basically using it upside down. After a week or so of using this I decided that it was not working, it was time to go back to the drawing board.

This afternoon I spent some time in the shed working on this, I removed the aerial, the wood that was supporting it and the extra piece I had added to the top to hold my clipboard and notes. I started by instead placing my clipboard holder under the bottom of the case and screwing this to the bottom of the case. Next, I cut a small amount off the PVC base for the aerial which allows it to fit better, it also gives me more room at the front to store my radios. Once I was happy with the placement, I screwed some timber to the inside bottom of the case and attached the aerial to this with some screws. Finally, I added some new foam to the inside of the lid to add another level of protection.

This setup has the benefits of protecting the 3" FSL aerial from damage, keeping it off the ground and also allowing me to lean my radio against it, this provides a great level of coupling to the aerial and leaving my hands free for logging. This setup is also a lot more stable as all the weight is on the bottom section.

Overall, I am very pleased with how well this case has come out, I am able to carry and store my baby 3" FSL plus two – three radios, log sheets, pens, notes, spare batteries and ear phones, everything I need for portable sessions. It is also a good size to fit in my back pack. 

While this case was designed for ultralight DXing the same ideas could be used for amateur radio, radio scanning or any other storage need.








 

--
Paul - Moderator
UltralightDX


Re: Australian Stations - January 2020

Theo <theod438@...>
 

2XL/918 Cooma, NSW is no more.  They've gone to the Great FM Heaven in the sky.

Another group reports the tx switched off on 13 January.


Re: New for 2020- Hand Held Radio + FSL DXing Combos

radiojayallen
 

Another impressive project!

Jay


Re: Looking for analog receiver suggestions (not necessarily modern nor ultralight)

radiojayallen
 

Todd,

I have a question and a comment. The question: Does the PR-D3 have any soft muting...can you slightly tune off center on AM and not lose any volume?

The comment: I agree that the CC-2E and the OEM version PR-D3 as well as the PR-D15 are hot radios but it's too bad your DR-22 is not...that clearly is not right. It should run neck and neck with your top radios. I know it is packed way in storage but tell me - do you recall if it is only slightly less sensitive or grossly so? I would think that if it was working properly you would love it. Can you or do you know someone near you who could bring it back to its full glory?

Jay
https://radiojayallen.com


Re: New for 2020- Hand Held Radio + FSL DXing Combos

Gary DeBock
 

Hi Paul,
 
<<<   Excellent work Gary. Are the radios attached to the frames or just sitting on them?    >>>
 
The radios will have a Velcro mounting system to the frames, which means they can either be attached securely for transport inside a backpack or plastic tote, or removed for optimal peaking of the tuned gain boost. For chasing DX on the higher MW frequencies the radios can simply be left in the securely mounted position, and the FSL tuned for maximum gain. On the middle and lower MW band frequencies the radio's distance from the FSL should be adjusted for the peak gain boost, and the multiple Velcro straps on the PVC frame will allow mounting of the radio at this optimal-gain position. 
 
For unattended DX signal recording, once the radio and FSL are tuned to the same frequency and the radio is secured at the optimal-gain position, the entire assembly can be deployed outside a window (to escape RFI) with a plug-in PVC mounting base attachment. For travel overseas to a location like Hong Kong, this capability should dramatically increase the long range transoceanic DXing potential around sunrise or sunset.
 
73, Gary     


Re: New for 2020- Hand Held Radio + FSL DXing Combos

Paul Blundell
 

Excellent work Gary. Are the radios attached to the frames or just sitting on them? 

My solution to keeping my kit together and making portable session's as easy as possible is this:


On Sat, 18 Jan 2020, 1:31 p.m. Gary DeBock via Groups.Io, <D1028Gary=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
     Last April during a trip to Hong Kong I was highly motivated to chase long range AM-DX, but there was a bizarre "Catch 22" problem-- all of the buildings had nasty indoor RFI, while almost all of the outdoor areas were overcrowded, and unsuitable for setting up an elevated 5 inch "Frequent Flyer" FSL antenna. For the entire week I pushed a 7.5 inch loopstick CC Skywave to the absolute limit, taking it on daytime DX trips to Macau and HK's plunging Cape D'Aguilar, as well as shoving it outside a 12th floor security window to escape the indoor RFI. For the first 5 days "long range DX" was a laughable term-- my farthest catch was 693-Bangladesh, at about 1,500 miles. 
 
     Finally I sacrificed some sleep and shoved the souped-up Ultralight outside the security window prior to sunrise, and somehow managed to track down 1431-Radio Sawa (Djibouti), 1413-BBC (Oman), 1413-Vesti FM (Moldova) and 1548-TWR (Moldova) on the 7.5" loopstick. The performance of the souped-up Ultralight was thrilling, but the harsh lessons of the Hong Kong trip had already been taken to heart. A fully portable, hand held DXing combo was needed which could provide more gain than a 7.5" loopstick, but which could be easily carried anywhere in a backpack, and which would not attract too much unwanted attention on crowded public beaches. In addition, it would need to routinely pass through TSA inspections at airports, and need to be capable of deployment outside of windows (with a PVC support system) in order to escape interior RFI.
 
     Only one type of hand held antenna could satisfy all of these requirements--- a portable radio + tuned FSL combination attached to a compact PVC frame. Since the TSA-friendly FSL's are all relatively lightweight, combining them with a compact portable radio on a common PVC frame is well within reason for hand held capability. Such a DXing combo would be the master of convenience-- it can track down MW-DX (with decent gain) while being held in the hands, placed on a picnic table, placed on a 5' PVC base, or even elevated to a higher level. The combo's PVC frame can be supported (with attachments) to provide decent DXing gain outside of an apartment window to escape indoor RFI. And even for those who usually have no interest in live DXing, it can check transoceanic propagation and even go after exotic targets prior to broadband antenna setup.
 
     Current experimentation has resulted in four different FSL sizes for combo frames (see photos)-- a 3 inch model (10 Russian surplus 100mm bars), a 3.5 inch model (13 bars), a 4 inch model (16 bars) and the standard 5 inch "frequent Flyer" model (20 bars). The latter FSL is the same model which was used a couple of months ago in Hawaii, tracking down AM-DX from all continents except Europe during sunrise and sunset sessions. The option of having one of these high gain FSL's in a go-anywhere, hand-held combo is pretty thrilling. Future experimentation will use some of the new R40C1 ferrite to make up another series of compact FSL's for this project, as well as drafting a few of the 3 inch "Baby FSL's" with Russian surplus 125mm ferrite rods into the effort. It's looking like an exciting experimental year is coming!
 
73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)

 


--
Paul - Moderator
UltralightDX


New for 2020- Hand Held Radio + FSL DXing Combos

Gary DeBock
 

     Last April during a trip to Hong Kong I was highly motivated to chase long range AM-DX, but there was a bizarre "Catch 22" problem-- all of the buildings had nasty indoor RFI, while almost all of the outdoor areas were overcrowded, and unsuitable for setting up an elevated 5 inch "Frequent Flyer" FSL antenna. For the entire week I pushed a 7.5 inch loopstick CC Skywave to the absolute limit, taking it on daytime DX trips to Macau and HK's plunging Cape D'Aguilar, as well as shoving it outside a 12th floor security window to escape the indoor RFI. For the first 5 days "long range DX" was a laughable term-- my farthest catch was 693-Bangladesh, at about 1,500 miles. 
 
     Finally I sacrificed some sleep and shoved the souped-up Ultralight outside the security window prior to sunrise, and somehow managed to track down 1431-Radio Sawa (Djibouti), 1413-BBC (Oman), 1413-Vesti FM (Moldova) and 1548-TWR (Moldova) on the 7.5" loopstick. The performance of the souped-up Ultralight was thrilling, but the harsh lessons of the Hong Kong trip had already been taken to heart. A fully portable, hand held DXing combo was needed which could provide more gain than a 7.5" loopstick, but which could be easily carried anywhere in a backpack, and which would not attract too much unwanted attention on crowded public beaches. In addition, it would need to routinely pass through TSA inspections at airports, and need to be capable of deployment outside of windows (with a PVC support system) in order to escape interior RFI.
 
     Only one type of hand held antenna could satisfy all of these requirements--- a portable radio + tuned FSL combination attached to a compact PVC frame. Since the TSA-friendly FSL's are all relatively lightweight, combining them with a compact portable radio on a common PVC frame is well within reason for hand held capability. Such a DXing combo would be the master of convenience-- it can track down MW-DX (with decent gain) while being held in the hands, placed on a picnic table, placed on a 5' PVC base, or even elevated to a higher level. The combo's PVC frame can be supported (with attachments) to provide decent DXing gain outside of an apartment window to escape indoor RFI. And even for those who usually have no interest in live DXing, it can check transoceanic propagation and even go after exotic targets prior to broadband antenna setup.
 
     Current experimentation has resulted in four different FSL sizes for combo frames (see photos)-- a 3 inch model (10 Russian surplus 100mm bars), a 3.5 inch model (13 bars), a 4 inch model (16 bars) and the standard 5 inch "frequent Flyer" model (20 bars). The latter FSL is the same model which was used a couple of months ago in Hawaii, tracking down AM-DX from all continents except Europe during sunrise and sunset sessions. The option of having one of these high gain FSL's in a go-anywhere, hand-held combo is pretty thrilling. Future experimentation will use some of the new R40C1 ferrite to make up another series of compact FSL's for this project, as well as drafting a few of the 3 inch "Baby FSL's" with Russian surplus 125mm ferrite rods into the effort. It's looking like an exciting experimental year is coming!
 
73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)

 


Re: Other DXing Groups

Paul Blundell
 

Perfect, I will join up.


On Sat, Jan 18, 2020 at 6:12 AM Paul S. in CT <dxrx@...> wrote:
There is also World of Radio hosted by Glenn Hauser at groups io
https://groups.io/g/WOR

Glenn's been at this since the 70's writing the "Whats on Shortwave?" column for Pop. Electronics.

Regards
Paul S. in CT fn31nl





--
Paul


--
Paul - Moderator
UltralightDX


Re: Looking for analog receiver suggestions (not necessarily modern nor ultralight)

Paul Blundell
 

Excellent information Todd.


On Fri, Jan 17, 2020 at 10:40 PM Todd via Groups.Io <toddemslie=yahoo.com.au@groups.io> wrote:
Hello All,

I own the following portable radios:

Panasonic DR-22 (Australian version of the RF-2200).
Tandy Realistic TRF radio.
Tecsun PL-380 / 390.
Sangean PR-D3 (Australian version of the Crane CC 2E).
Sangean PR-D15.

My Panasonic DR-22, and Realistic TRF radios are insensitive compared to the other Tecsun and Sangean radios. Moreover, I don't bother using any radio that doesn't feature digital frequency readout to minimum 1 KHz steps. They are both packed away in storage.

My favourite radio for general MW DX reception from home is the Sangean PR-D3. When used 'barefoot' it is the most sensitive of all six radios. From a single 5 inch diameter speaker, it produces the best overall audio fidelity. As expected the CC Crane 2E reportedly also sounds excellent. The 200 mm length internal ferrite rod couples well to external air core loops. It features nominal 6 KHz wide, and 3 KHz narrow bandwidths. The SiLab 4734 3 KHz narrow bandwidth setting improves weak signal S/N. Narrow bandwidth also assists when peaking loop antenna. Optimal inductive signal pickup is when the radio is placed to the side centre of an air core loop. It doesn't suffer from any overload in my city area. Selectivity is good, but not as good as the PR-D15.

My next MW favourite is the Sangean PR-D15. Its main attribute is high MW selectivity when attempting to receive split channels (e.g. weak 1580 KBLA California next to strong Australian 1584 KHz), or a 9 KHz weak signal adjacent to a strong local. Selectivity is better than all six radios. SiLab 4731 chip default selectivity is ~ 4 KHz. The 200 mm length internal ferrite rod couples well to external air core loops. Fair audio quality. Optimal inductive signal pickup is when the radio is placed to the side centre of an air core loop. Signal overload rejection is better than all six radios.

Tecsun PL-380 / 390 are mainly used for their excellent digital signal strength meter. Potential applications include determining relative ambient RF noise on blank channels. Internally generated spurious hets are a disadvantage unique to these two radios. None of the other four radios generate signal spurs. Audio quality via the speaker is arguably relatively poor. Quality headphones would improve this. Shorter length internal ferrite rod inductive signal coupling is fair to air core loops.

FM:

The most sensitive radio: Sangean PR-D3.

The most selective radio: Sangean PR-D15.

Regards,

Todd
Sydney, AU



--
Paul


--
Paul - Moderator
UltralightDX


X-Band

Paul Blundell
 

I am starting to get interested in listening to the X-Band (1611 - 1702kHz). What I am trying to track down is a good list of the active stations in Australia on that band.


--
Paul - Moderator
UltralightDX


Re: Other DXing Groups

Paul S. in CT
 

There is also World of Radio hosted by Glenn Hauser at groups io
https://groups.io/g/WOR

Glenn's been at this since the 70's writing the "Whats on Shortwave?" column for Pop. Electronics.

Regards
Paul S. in CT fn31nl


Re: Looking for analog receiver suggestions (not necessarily modern nor ultralight)

Paul S. in CT
 

As for analog radios I have found these two are of good quality, good reception, and have LOOOOONG battery life (400+ hours). Each one US$20 or less depending upon vendor. For about US$25 you can add a Tecsun AN-200 Passive Loop to improve AM reception.

Tecsun R-9012 (Own this one about 3 years)
Tecsun R-911 (Owned one for 11 years, just replaced)

Both of these models have been in production a long time about 15 years. Similar models at a higher price include these 3, but may not be easy to find (usually US$25-30).

Kaito WRX-911
Tecsun R-9710
Tecsun R-912

Regards
Paul S. in CT fn31nl


Re: Looking for analog receiver suggestions (

Declan Mayock
 

Very interesting ewe antenna I'll be giving that a go myself do you adjust the variable resistor to achieve the desired null? 


On Fri, 17 Jan 2020 at 11:40, Todd via Groups.Io
<toddemslie@...> wrote:
Hello All,

I own the following portable radios:

Panasonic DR-22 (Australian version of the RF-2200).
Tandy Realistic TRF radio.
Tecsun PL-380 / 390.
Sangean PR-D3 (Australian version of the Crane CC 2E).
Sangean PR-D15.

My Panasonic DR-22, and Realistic TRF radios are insensitive compared to the other Tecsun and Sangean radios. Moreover, I don't bother using any radio that doesn't feature digital frequency readout to minimum 1 KHz steps. They are both packed away in storage.

My favourite radio for general MW DX reception from home is the Sangean PR-D3. When used 'barefoot' it is the most sensitive of all six radios. From a single 5 inch diameter speaker, it produces the best overall audio fidelity. As expected the CC Crane 2E reportedly also sounds excellent. The 200 mm length internal ferrite rod couples well to external air core loops. It features nominal 6 KHz wide, and 3 KHz narrow bandwidths. The SiLab 4734 3 KHz narrow bandwidth setting improves weak signal S/N. Narrow bandwidth also assists when peaking loop antenna. Optimal inductive signal pickup is when the radio is placed to the side centre of an air core loop. It doesn't suffer from any overload in my city area. Selectivity is good, but not as good as the PR-D15.

My next MW favourite is the Sangean PR-D15. Its main attribute is high MW selectivity when attempting to receive split channels (e.g. weak 1580 KBLA California next to strong Australian 1584 KHz), or a 9 KHz weak signal adjacent to a strong local. Selectivity is better than all six radios. SiLab 4731 chip default selectivity is ~ 4 KHz. The 200 mm length internal ferrite rod couples well to external air core loops. Fair audio quality. Optimal inductive signal pickup is when the radio is placed to the side centre of an air core loop. Signal overload rejection is better than all six radios.

Tecsun PL-380 / 390 are mainly used for their excellent digital signal strength meter. Potential applications include determining relative ambient RF noise on blank channels. Internally generated spurious hets are a disadvantage unique to these two radios. None of the other four radios generate signal spurs. Audio quality via the speaker is arguably relatively poor. Quality headphones would improve this. Shorter length internal ferrite rod inductive signal coupling is fair to air core loops.

FM:

The most sensitive radio: Sangean PR-D3.

The most selective radio: Sangean PR-D15.

Regards,

Todd
Sydney, AU


Re: Looking for analog receiver suggestions (not necessarily modern nor ultralight)

Todd
 

Hello All,

I own the following portable radios:

Panasonic DR-22 (Australian version of the RF-2200).
Tandy Realistic TRF radio.
Tecsun PL-380 / 390.
Sangean PR-D3 (Australian version of the Crane CC 2E).
Sangean PR-D15.

My Panasonic DR-22, and Realistic TRF radios are insensitive compared to the other Tecsun and Sangean radios. Moreover, I don't bother using any radio that doesn't feature digital frequency readout to minimum 1 KHz steps. They are both packed away in storage.

My favourite radio for general MW DX reception from home is the Sangean PR-D3. When used 'barefoot' it is the most sensitive of all six radios. From a single 5 inch diameter speaker, it produces the best overall audio fidelity. As expected the CC Crane 2E reportedly also sounds excellent. The 200 mm length internal ferrite rod couples well to external air core loops. It features nominal 6 KHz wide, and 3 KHz narrow bandwidths. The SiLab 4734 3 KHz narrow bandwidth setting improves weak signal S/N. Narrow bandwidth also assists when peaking loop antenna. Optimal inductive signal pickup is when the radio is placed to the side centre of an air core loop. It doesn't suffer from any overload in my city area. Selectivity is good, but not as good as the PR-D15.

My next MW favourite is the Sangean PR-D15. Its main attribute is high MW selectivity when attempting to receive split channels (e.g. weak 1580 KBLA California next to strong Australian 1584 KHz), or a 9 KHz weak signal adjacent to a strong local. Selectivity is better than all six radios. SiLab 4731 chip default selectivity is ~ 4 KHz. The 200 mm length internal ferrite rod couples well to external air core loops. Fair audio quality. Optimal inductive signal pickup is when the radio is placed to the side centre of an air core loop. Signal overload rejection is better than all six radios.

Tecsun PL-380 / 390 are mainly used for their excellent digital signal strength meter. Potential applications include determining relative ambient RF noise on blank channels. Internally generated spurious hets are a disadvantage unique to these two radios. None of the other four radios generate signal spurs. Audio quality via the speaker is arguably relatively poor. Quality headphones would improve this. Shorter length internal ferrite rod inductive signal coupling is fair to air core loops.

FM:

The most sensitive radio: Sangean PR-D3.

The most selective radio: Sangean PR-D15.

Regards,

Todd
Sydney, AU


Re: Looking for analog receiver suggestions (not necessarily modern nor ultralight)

Paul Blundell
 

That was a very interested read.

Paul

On Fri, 17 Jan 2020, 7:02 p.m. Tony King, <dx4me2@...> wrote:
Interested to read Mike and Garcias comments on  receiver suggestions. I own a Realistic TRF and forty + years ago it was the pick of MW rx. Also owned a GE Model 2 and 3 which were superb for MW above 1600 and logged many US stations ast taht time. Today my line up are Tecsun PL380 and PL606 coil-coupled to EWE antennas. Down at the 1 khz bandwidth they excel in logging US, Central American and SA DX.
I attach the EWE antena design. They are simple , directional, small, and very effective.

Regards Tony NZ


On Fri, 17 Jan 2020 at 12:30, Mike Sanburn <mikesanburn@...> wrote:
C.Crane seems to be pretty awesome these days.....I still have my old analog dial G.E. Superadio 2 that I bought in the 80s, it is a dx champ for the money....Its modern version is the RCA Superadio which sensitivity wise is not as good but does cover the entire X Band......My first ever ULTRALIGHT was a Sony M40W (no longer made) which lasted for 20 years (1989-2009) it was a hand held DX champ. (drawback again was it only tuned up to 1670 but the absence of the upper three new frequencies was more than made up on the rest of the band).   For many years Sony made the ICF2010 (digital) which had many bells and whistles and was a bit more pricey but a great DX investment.  Finally, when Radio Shack ruled, they had the little Realistic TRF small AM portable (analog) Super performance with tuned RF filter and I think it was in the $30 or less range. Maybe these are still making the rounds on eBay or flea markets.....Good luck and good DX!!!  73  

Mike Sanburn
Lakewood CA


From: main@UltralightDX.groups.io <main@UltralightDX.groups.io> on behalf of h. garcia <pu3hag.l@...>
Sent: Thursday, January 16, 2020 11:57 AM
To: main@UltralightDX.groups.io <main@UltralightDX.groups.io>
Subject: [UltralightDX] Looking for analog receiver suggestions (not necessarily modern nor ultralight)
 
Hello everyone,

Too long, wont read version 😊 I'm looking for suggestions of ultralight or mid-sized analog portable receivers that you recall having very good performance in both AM and FM. Feel free to recommend models from 60-70-80s as well.

I really like to listen to AM and FM weak stations. My main receivers include an ultralight (C.Crane Skywave), a booksized one (XHData-808) and a car stereo (GM media center, lots of exciting findings commuting to/from work)

However, I'm a bit either nostalgic or bored with the digital VFO steps and DSP behaviour. At home, most of the time I end up using an analog Sony ICF-38. It's is a joy to the ears listening stations slowing and softly coming in and out of of the IF passband. ICF-38 sensitivity is very good, however its filter __wiiiiiiiide__ in AM and FM. Local stations easily obliterate 2 channels below and 2 channels above the nominal frequency. 

Stephen Grossklass ( http://stephan.win31.de/rx-eval.htm ) mentioned the Panasonic RF-B11 as a good analog receiver. It uses ceramic filters in both AM and FM sections Its competitor - Sony ICF-SW11 - does a good job on LW, MW and SW (tuned frontend+ceramic filter), but FM is subpar (Stephen explains Sony decided standard LC filtering in FM in SW11).

Have a great one!

pu3hag garcia


--
Paul - Moderator
UltralightDX


Re: Looking for analog receiver suggestions (not necessarily modern nor ultralight)

Tony King <dx4me2@...>
 

Interested to read Mike and Garcias comments on  receiver suggestions. I own a Realistic TRF and forty + years ago it was the pick of MW rx. Also owned a GE Model 2 and 3 which were superb for MW above 1600 and logged many US stations ast taht time. Today my line up are Tecsun PL380 and PL606 coil-coupled to EWE antennas. Down at the 1 khz bandwidth they excel in logging US, Central American and SA DX.
I attach the EWE antena design. They are simple , directional, small, and very effective.

Regards Tony NZ


On Fri, 17 Jan 2020 at 12:30, Mike Sanburn <mikesanburn@...> wrote:
C.Crane seems to be pretty awesome these days.....I still have my old analog dial G.E. Superadio 2 that I bought in the 80s, it is a dx champ for the money....Its modern version is the RCA Superadio which sensitivity wise is not as good but does cover the entire X Band......My first ever ULTRALIGHT was a Sony M40W (no longer made) which lasted for 20 years (1989-2009) it was a hand held DX champ. (drawback again was it only tuned up to 1670 but the absence of the upper three new frequencies was more than made up on the rest of the band).   For many years Sony made the ICF2010 (digital) which had many bells and whistles and was a bit more pricey but a great DX investment.  Finally, when Radio Shack ruled, they had the little Realistic TRF small AM portable (analog) Super performance with tuned RF filter and I think it was in the $30 or less range. Maybe these are still making the rounds on eBay or flea markets.....Good luck and good DX!!!  73  

Mike Sanburn
Lakewood CA


From: main@UltralightDX.groups.io <main@UltralightDX.groups.io> on behalf of h. garcia <pu3hag.l@...>
Sent: Thursday, January 16, 2020 11:57 AM
To: main@UltralightDX.groups.io <main@UltralightDX.groups.io>
Subject: [UltralightDX] Looking for analog receiver suggestions (not necessarily modern nor ultralight)
 
Hello everyone,

Too long, wont read version 😊 I'm looking for suggestions of ultralight or mid-sized analog portable receivers that you recall having very good performance in both AM and FM. Feel free to recommend models from 60-70-80s as well.

I really like to listen to AM and FM weak stations. My main receivers include an ultralight (C.Crane Skywave), a booksized one (XHData-808) and a car stereo (GM media center, lots of exciting findings commuting to/from work)

However, I'm a bit either nostalgic or bored with the digital VFO steps and DSP behaviour. At home, most of the time I end up using an analog Sony ICF-38. It's is a joy to the ears listening stations slowing and softly coming in and out of of the IF passband. ICF-38 sensitivity is very good, however its filter __wiiiiiiiide__ in AM and FM. Local stations easily obliterate 2 channels below and 2 channels above the nominal frequency. 

Stephen Grossklass ( http://stephan.win31.de/rx-eval.htm ) mentioned the Panasonic RF-B11 as a good analog receiver. It uses ceramic filters in both AM and FM sections Its competitor - Sony ICF-SW11 - does a good job on LW, MW and SW (tuned frontend+ceramic filter), but FM is subpar (Stephen explains Sony decided standard LC filtering in FM in SW11).

Have a great one!

pu3hag garcia


Re: Looking for analog receiver suggestions (

keith beesley
 

I second the recommendation for the Tecsun 920 for something ultralight size (for AM and SW, not especially for FM). I have had good luck with all three versions of the GE Superadio. Several Radio Shack models from the 80's and 90's are good. Just about any analog Sony or Panasonic model is good.

Keith Beesley


On Thu, Jan 16, 2020 at 3:30 PM, Mike Sanburn
<mikesanburn@...> wrote:
C.Crane seems to be pretty awesome these days.....I still have my old analog dial G.E. Superadio 2 that I bought in the 80s, it is a dx champ for the money....Its modern version is the RCA Superadio which sensitivity wise is not as good but does cover the entire X Band......My first ever ULTRALIGHT was a Sony M40W (no longer made) which lasted for 20 years (1989-2009) it was a hand held DX champ. (drawback again was it only tuned up to 1670 but the absence of the upper three new frequencies was more than made up on the rest of the band).   For many years Sony made the ICF2010 (digital) which had many bells and whistles and was a bit more pricey but a great DX investment.  Finally, when Radio Shack ruled, they had the little Realistic TRF small AM portable (analog) Super performance with tuned RF filter and I think it was in the $30 or less range. Maybe these are still making the rounds on eBay or flea markets.....Good luck and good DX!!!  73  

Mike Sanburn
Lakewood CA


From: main@UltralightDX.groups.io <main@UltralightDX.groups.io> on behalf of h. garcia <pu3hag.l@...>
Sent: Thursday, January 16, 2020 11:57 AM
To: main@UltralightDX.groups.io <main@UltralightDX.groups.io>
Subject: [UltralightDX] Looking for analog receiver suggestions (not necessarily modern nor ultralight)
 
Hello everyone,

Too long, wont read version 😊 I'm looking for suggestions of ultralight or mid-sized analog portable receivers that you recall having very good performance in both AM and FM. Feel free to recommend models from 60-70-80s as well.

I really like to listen to AM and FM weak stations. My main receivers include an ultralight (C.Crane Skywave), a booksized one (XHData-808) and a car stereo (GM media center, lots of exciting findings commuting to/from work)

However, I'm a bit either nostalgic or bored with the digital VFO steps and DSP behaviour. At home, most of the time I end up using an analog Sony ICF-38. It's is a joy to the ears listening stations slowing and softly coming in and out of of the IF passband. ICF-38 sensitivity is very good, however its filter __wiiiiiiiide__ in AM and FM. Local stations easily obliterate 2 channels below and 2 channels above the nominal frequency. 

Stephen Grossklass ( http://stephan.win31.de/rx-eval.htm ) mentioned the Panasonic RF-B11 as a good analog receiver. It uses ceramic filters in both AM and FM sections Its competitor - Sony ICF-SW11 - does a good job on LW, MW and SW (tuned frontend+ceramic filter), but FM is subpar (Stephen explains Sony decided standard LC filtering in FM in SW11).

Have a great one!

pu3hag garcia

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