Date   

Re: Daytime DX at Hong Kong's Dream Ocean Cliff Site

Gary DeBock
 

Thanks Chris, Paul and Jay,

Your comments are all greatly appreciated.

DXing in Hong Kong can be quite interesting once you get away from the downtown RFI zoo. I think that a lot of travelers write the place off for serious DXing purposes after trying to listen in downtown motel rooms, but there are a lot of isolated islands that have good potential for long range DX, assuming that a DXer can listen around sunrise (before many of the Mainland Chinese pests sign on).

73, Gary


Re: Daytime DX at Hong Kong's Dream Ocean Cliff Site

radiojayallen
 

Gary,

Thanks for "taking us" on your trip with you...what a great DX story!

Jay


Re: Daytime DX at Hong Kong's Dream Ocean Cliff Site

Paul Blundell
 

Excellent report and information as always Gary. 

--
Paul - Moderator
UltralightDX


Re: Daytime DX at Hong Kong's Dream Ocean Cliff Site

Chris Rogers
 

Thank you Gary for the Hong Kong MW band trail and information. Very little dxing is done from these countries so I find it very interesting.


Daytime DX at Hong Kong's Dream Ocean Cliff Site

Gary DeBock
 

     Long distance radio communication was extremely important in the 20th century, and Hong Kong's British government needed to choose the optimal site for the territory's Shortwave communication antennas-- both for military and civilian purposes. After an extensive search and detailed analysis they made their final choice-- Cape D'Aguilar, an awesome plunging cliff at the Southeast tip of Hong Kong island.

     By fortunate coincidence, my long term Hong Kong Chinese friend King Mo Sham (VR2GH, who was also the Best Man at our wedding in 1990) works at Hong Kong Telecom, and is very familiar with this entire area. It is semi-restricted because of security-related antennas at the site, but King Mo made sure that I was able to get the ocean cliff setup site offering the best daytime DX reception from both Taiwan and the Philippines. This required a one hour hike in the subtropical heat around midday, but every step was well worth it. Cape D'Aguilar is a plunging ocean side cliff in the same league as Oregon's Rockwork, although it has a somewhat curved shape like Oregon's Cape Perpetua, resulting in enhanced transoceanic DX from both the east (Taiwan) and the south (Philippines). No doubt this would be the ideal Hong Kong site for enhanced transoceanic DX from North America-- if only it had better access, so that antennas didn't need to be carried in with a back pack. Hong Kong's 518 kHz NAVTEX antenna is located on Cape D'Aguilar (see photo), but at a location far enough away so that RFI from that source isn't a serious problem on most MW frequencies.. 

     Anyway, after the one hour hike with VR2GH and his family on April 6th I was able to deploy my 7.5 inch loopstick CC Skywave SSB Ultralight right on the plunging slope of awesome Cape D'Aguilar, with a sweeping view of distant offshore islands in the South China Sea. Only a few days earlier I had thoroughly investigated low band daytime DX on the salt water beach of Macau (60 miles west) with the same modified Ultralight, so I did have a benchmark reference list of Asian stations to work with. But on the very first frequency of 531 kHz (which had no signals in Macau but a mix of BCC Taiwan and an UnID here), it became pretty obvious that the 20th Century British administrators had made the perfect antenna site choice! 549 also had two stations mixing, neither of which had shown up in Macau.

     Highlights were 12 Taiwan stations received from 531 to 810 kHz in bright daylight, with the solid rock cliff blocking enough of local 675-RTHK (6) to allow fair reception of Taiwan's Cheng Sheng BC on the same frequency. The Taiwan Fishery parallels 738-BEL2 and 1143-BEL3 were both at front end-crunching levels at over 390 miles (632 km) despite the bright sunlight. My wife and our friends thoughtfully left me at the site for a full hour as they enjoyed the Cape's other attractions-- more than enough time to track down multiple Taiwan and Philippine stations over hundreds of salt water miles well before sunset!

531  "I Go 531" (BCC) + UnID   Taipei, Taiwan   10 kW   Strong TOH routine at 0800 UTC with female Mandarin mention of "Taipei" at 16 seconds and "I Go" ID at 25 seconds; UnID station underneath (possibly DZBR in the Philippines, which dominated in the evenings)  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/r78bqvi1iqiibrs6eu75ziylomf2bu5n

540  CNR1 + DZWT   Baguio City, Philippines  10 kW   Wild S9 mix at 0754 UTC with a DZWT ID at 9 seconds, pestered by CNR1 in Mandarin Chinese from a presumed Danzhou, Hainan location (received in Macao, without a trace of DZWT)  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/kt8r8aeoobpkcshgsb88sqnwuyipddi2

549  CNR5 + UnID   Putian, China   1200 kW   This mix of two Chinese stations at 0803 UTC almost certainly includes the mega-blaster directed at Taiwan in a female-spoken dialect, but the other male speaker in apparent Mandarin is a mystery (Zhengzhou would seem to be out of daytime DX range)  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/eqcne7yrac1ovms9hrlphomnt7jb78hd

567  RTHK (3)   Golden Hill, Hong Kong   20 kW  The local pest was featuring sports play-by-play in English at 0804 UTC  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/a3nnmji9f5yduxhrxz7ourdpmeg9gy1c

585  Southeast BC   Fuzhou, China   200 kW   Another Taiwan-directed propaganda blaster, it was all alone at a fair level at 0805 UTC with female Mandarin (typically spoken in a soft, soothing voice)  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/iqi3nczbk8jucyljf87d1hvbr19vdlqo

594  Fu Hsing BC + UnID   Taipei, Taiwan   10 kW   The S9 female Chinese station at 0807 UTC is obviously Fu Hsing (the Mainland stations are well out of daytime DX range), but the male speaker underneath is likely DZBB in Quezon City  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/9dmzar3h2typo4m8ifuf41xygagnyx6u

603  DZVV   Vigan, Philippines   5 KW   Ideally positioned at the northern tip of Luzon, this "Bombo Radio" station was pounding in to the cliff at an S9 level all alone at 0809 (thanks to Jari S. for ID assistance)  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/30bgv6q67vn44bar7iz29k01id0t7krx

612  Zhuhai Diantai + UnID   Zhuhai, China   (Power Unknown)   This mainland Mandarin-format station across the border from Macau wasn't nearly as strong through the solid rock cliff in SE Hong Kong at 0810 UTC, which allowed a fair level Philippine station to slide in as a co-channel (DWSP?)  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/7k9hbpikvmv20cz4plxoo3sgxszq93w9

621  RTHK (Mandarin)   Golden Hill, Hong Kong   20 kW   Another HK local with female Mandarin speech at 0812  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/o8vlc2oprnkilsokbkdzpu4643ecot5w

630  Taiwan BC   Sungling, Taiwan   10 kW   Presumed the one with non-news format (in non-Mandarin dialect) and more southerly location at 0815 UTC; some minor noise (NAVTEX-related?) on the frequency  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/0x2xncc1v25vze7mix96wioxapepdcky

639  UnID's   This frequency was marginal because of apparent NAVTEX-related noise, but as far as I can tell there are two weak stations in the recording at 0817-- one female Chinese and one male non-Chinese. 639-DZRL was received on this frequency in Macau (without the noise)  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/mnp37veny0j68s92k580t8uznmklg0uk

648  Guangzhou, China + UnID   50 kW   Strong Mandarin music over a weak UnID (BCC Taiwan?) and NAVTEX noise at 0818 UTC  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/s6zs2k0u6ginorwgyqxgei2hafcczbdh

657  Cheng Sheng BC (2)   Taichung, Taiwan   20 kW   Strong S9 signal all alone with male-female conversation in Taiwanese at 0821  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/0w74sghm2uyj7oyt3yecklcqke8dl3la

675  RTHK (6) + Cheng Sheng BC   Peng Chau, Hong Kong   10 kW/ Peikang, Taiwan   5 kW   The solid rock ocean cliff blocks enough signal of the local Mandarin pest to allow the 5 kW Taiwan station to sneak in at a fair level underneath with Taiwanese at 0825 -- pretty amazing  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/w5xeg2ajhimo3uyl5feeuiogyejm30m7

693  Han Sheng BC   Tainan, Taiwan   10 kW   All alone with male-voice Chinese opera at a good level over minor NAVTEX noise at 0827  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/qliditfuais7vetllslgoirtw5zuv6zk

711  V.O. Kuanghua + UnID   Hsinfeng, Taiwan   250 kW   Another wild mix with the Mainland-directed propaganda blaster dominant with Chinese male conversation over an UnID Philippine station playing "We Are the Champions" at 0828 UTC  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/7mgl5zjf53gfy274wl228jn5ms8fmcqy

720  BCC (N)   Taichung, Taiwan   10 kW   Presumed the one (primarily because of strong Taiwan propagation) with female Mandarin conversation over some NAVTEX noise at 0830 UTC  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/68sg5h1hq91reszi05mt9t11piot9w10

738  BEL2   Penghu, Taiwan  100 kW   Definitely the unforgettable signal of the entire session at 0845 UTC. Chinese female vocal music at an overwhelming level on 738 kHz (for the first 50 seconds) and then the 1143-BEL3 parallel (starting at 51 seconds, after the short pause). S9+ strength over 390 miles in bright daylight!  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/73t1nkfw91uc13pc2vd2cw69kki91g6g

747  CNR1 + UnID   Shanwei, China   10 kW   S9 level Chinese female speech on CNR1 // 756 was dominant over another female Chinese station (Heyuan, Guangdong?) at 0839 UTC  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/4z87mlrnj8b3jw12t85gw1bnq8lholbl

756  CNR1 + UnID's   Guangzhou, China   50 kW   This was probably the wackiest mix recorded in Hong Kong. At 0841 the CNR1 Mandarin-speaking lady // 747 is mixing with at least two other Chinese stations, neither of which seem to be in parallel (although only CNR1 is listed for China on this frequency). One is almost certainly the 20 kW Shengli zhi Sheng in Taiwan, but the other must be a poorly synchronized Guangdong CNR1 relay  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/k7l85rbtz7xmwsk5olbdw3vypkdg2gr2

774  UnID-Taiwan + UnID   Another interesting mix at 0843 UTC, made more challenging by some NAVTEX noise accompaniment. One of the stations is almost certainly one of the 20 kW transmitters from Taiwan (my guess is the female conversation, in an apparent Chinese dialect), while the male vocalist may also be from Taiwan, since the Mainland stations would seem to be out of daytime DX range  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/wx4myuteuw223d3mkplje3whreq1r5ql

783  RTHK (5)   Golden Hill, Hong Kong   20 kW   Cantonese-speaking female on this local pest at 0844, with some weak music underneath (apparently part of the program, and not a co-channel)  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/4l7loxnmzojif2ays5j9d29jw00vgsvf

801  V.O. Kuanghua   Hsinfeng, Taiwan   250 kW   Another Mainland-directed propaganda blaster all alone with some type of radio drama in a Chinese dialect (apparently not Mandarin) at 0845 UTC  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/t9d3402tiizs06cf9edjx4mxou37h8ez

810  Kuo Sheng BC   Changhua, Taiwan   10 kW   All alone with female speech in a Chinese dialect (apparently not Mandarin) at 0847 UTC  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/gm2cwf4uwe23ah94vxgfqxgnsnex049c

73 and Good DX,

Gary DeBock (DXing at Cape D'Aguilar ocean cliff on Hong Kong island on April 6, 2019)

All receptions made with a stand-alone 7.5 inch loopstick C.Crane Skywave SSB Ultralight


Macau, China Daytime DX Band Scan and MP3's on April 3

Gary DeBock
 

     Any DXer who makes an overseas trip to an area with a huge number of MW broadcast stations will immediately be confronted with a tricky problem-- since all of the stations are unfamiliar, how do you determine what is good DX, and what isn't?

      The first step would be to run a daytime DX band check, and determine which stations are your locals. In downtown Hong Kong even this is tricky, however, since the RF noise level at the base of the high rise buildings is typically off of the charts. You can receive the Hong Kong mega-pests, but little else. In order to run a decent daytime DX band scan it was necessary to get away from the downtown Hong Kong RFI zoo, and set up at two different salt water-enhanced venues that would provide a decent analysis of weak daytime DX signals.

     The first site chosen for this mission was the ex-Portuguese enclave of Macau, located about 50 miles west of downtown Hong Kong across a very expensive new bridge-- built at great cost by the Beijing government in an attempt to encourage Hong Kong citizens to feel patriotic about being forced to come under one-party Communist rule in 1997 (good luck). Macau has no local MW stations, and survives as a "Special Administrative Region" in China because of revenue from huge gambling casinos, where ultra-rich Mainland and Hong Kong visitors can indulge in a practice essentially forbidden in both home areas. It also has some old Portuguese buildings visited by tourists, but this industry pales in significance to the 24/7 gambling activity, which Beijing is pleased to tolerate as long as it gets a huge cut of the profits.

     While my wife, her brother and her friend went off to see the old Portuguese buildings I was able to sneak off for an hour of Daytime DXing at the polluted Macau waterfront, where industrial chemicals from various Chinese factories seemed to have found their permanent home. Ignoring the yellowish tinge and weird smell of the harbor water I pulled out my 7.5" loopstick CC Skywave SSB model and was able to record all the daytime DX signals up to 756 kHz-- before my wife and the others dragged me off to a rather lackluster lunch in the overpriced tourist district. With many solid Daytime DX signals received from both Taiwan and the Philippines over hundreds of miles at 2 PM I was at first convinced that the industrial pollutants in the foul-smelling Macau harbor were somehow providing a killer propagation boost in addition to salt water enhancement, although this hypothesis went down in flames a couple of days later when an ocean side cliff on the southeast tip of Hong Kong island (Cape D'Aguilar) provided Daytime DX results that completely blew Macau out of the (polluted) water. Macau was a nice place to get oriented for future DXing, though, and get used to the bizarre idea of chasing DX from both Taiwan and the Philippines in bright sunlight around the middle of the day. Best catch would have to be the 1 kW Philippine station 639-DZRL, with a fair signal across 550 miles of salt water at 2:25 PM local time!

 

540  CNR1   Danzhou, Hainan?  10 kW   Weak with CNR ID at 23 seconds, followed by music at 0557 on 4-3  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/srasvu9tn2ktsp2pqf6733g2plowrbmc

567  RTHK (3)   Golden Hill, Hong Kong   20 kW   Local pest with English-language format including 6 time pips at 0600 TOH on 4-3  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/sa65kixhe4fi7ejutkhd145x5znyma9v

594  Fu Hsing BS   (Taiwan Synchros)   Fair level with female Mandarin speech at 0605 on 4-3; trace of probable   Philippines underneath  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/pxadq6pcjb6gpix21ox1v55eazswtgj4

603  DZVV   Vigan, Philippines   5 kW   Ideally positioned at the northern tip of Luzon, with mix of English and Tagalog at good level at 0607 on 4-3  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/nrm1yu93n8uquf3d67cxkdzqaanwagk8

612  Zhuhai Diantai   Zhuhai, China   (Power Unknown)   Guangdong local Mandarin station with various ID's as "High FM" by whispering female from 10-27 seconds in the recording at 0610 on 4-3  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/trqclqlz7ha4g2c06ehp38y616e0ax4y

621  RTHK (Mandarin)   Golden Hill, Hong Kong   20 kW   Another local pest with Mandarin programming at 0614 on 4-3, as opposed to the usual English or Cantonese programming on other HK stations  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/6i1oywwrascxy8ff93mbwfjqb1mxx4yc

630  Taiwan BC   Sungling, Taiwan   10 kW   Presumed the one with music and speech in Chinese dialect (not Mandarin) at 0617 on 4-3; the other Taiwan station has a news format  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/n7tllfm63ki5yuybnvtixyb93s7psgm5

639  DZRL   Batac, Philippines   1 kW   Ideally positioned at the northern tip of Luzon, this low powered station managed a fairly decent signal across 550 miles of salt water at 2:25PM local time (0625 UTC on 4-3)  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/o7bqdkphbzkjp64ckdqak1oky2fxil0r

648  Guangdong Weixing Guangbo   Guangzhou, China   50 kW   Strong with male speech at 0630 on 4-3  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/6yi924a960frbhgerfq8c00y4hi1nivu

675  RTHK (6)   Peng Chau, Hong Kong   10 kW   Yet another Hong Kong local with Mandarin speech at 0631 on 4-3  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/xna4cugs13nb8emabsh5u6yk4mntxrlw

693  Han Sheng BC   Taiwan Synchros   10 kW/ 10 kW   Presumably the only Mandarin broadcasters within daytime DX range with fair signals at 0635 on 4-3  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/1dz0b07d7ozfiylsh2pt4p3puv616i8o

702  CRI News Radio   Zhuhai, China   (Power Unknown)   Semi-local Mainland station with strong Mandarin male-female conversation at 0636 on 4-3  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/uebzspe8by9w3ze3067ybfp6gup58pgx

711  V.O. Kuanghua-UnID Philippines   This is a wild one. The male Mandarin speaker is almost certainly the 250 kW Voice of Kuanghua in Hsinfeng, Taiwan, but there is also a dominant Tagalog radio drama from an UnID (one of four) Philippine stations  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/obqx6nr2dszi16lgejm7s90x05blrfap

720  UnID-Philippines   Weak Tagalog format all alone at 0640 on 4-3, but tough to dig out identity clues  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/g0fut00i6j3u78focx4jxws5dffoqigt

738  BEL2   Penghu, Taiwan   100 kW   The overwhelming star of the daytime DX session-- an awesome S9 signal with Mandarin Chinese music and speech over a 7 minute period at 0648 on 4-3  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/v6nvygtnvlaw5xtqzm77um4gkuyzitp8

747  CNR1   China Synchros   (Shanwei 10 kW?)   S9 level Mandarin speech and music // 756 at 0652 on 4-3  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/22n1gpv3elep64y7ck5w6l3akutdwfwv

756  CNR1   China Synchros   (Guangzhou 50 kW/)   S9+ level female Mandarin speech and music // 747 at 0655 on 4-3  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/jap0rn5kzzpezacc9wtyclr1kx86dpnc

73 and Good DX,

Gary DeBock (DXing in Hong Kong and Macau from April 2-9)

All recordings made with a stand alone 7.5 inch loopstick C.Crane Skywave SSB Ultralight on the Macau, China waterfront


Re: DXing in Hong Kong-- the Overall Verdict

Gary DeBock
 

Paul, Keith and Dennis,

Thank you for your comments on the Hong Kong trip, which are all very much appreciated.

Crowded foreign cities like Hong Kong make it tough to set up gain antennas for serious DXing, but the opportunity for exciting long range DX is there for an Ultralight radio DXer who understands propagation. Sometimes your biggest DXing thrills come from finding a way to turn a bad situation into a good one!

73, Gary





 


Re: XHDATA 9kHz

Chris Black <n1cp@...>
 

Thanks much, I forgot radio had to be off😿


On Apr 19, 2019, at 8:27 AM, dave_m1ctk <amstereofan@...> wrote:

Very simple. When the radio is off press the 0 key for a second. Display will flash MW 10khz (or 9khz!) Press 0 again to change to 9khz (or 10khz) display will flash again showing 9 or 10khz...wait a few seconds then switch on...job done. 

On Fri, 19 Apr 2019, 16:05 Chris Black, <n1cp@...> wrote:
anybody know how to change between 9 and 10 step?
there is a button but doesn’t do anything, just shows “P00 Load”?


Re: XHDATA 9kHz

dave_m1ctk
 

Very simple. When the radio is off press the 0 key for a second. Display will flash MW 10khz (or 9khz!) Press 0 again to change to 9khz (or 10khz) display will flash again showing 9 or 10khz...wait a few seconds then switch on...job done. 


On Fri, 19 Apr 2019, 16:05 Chris Black, <n1cp@...> wrote:
anybody know how to change between 9 and 10 step?
there is a button but doesn’t do anything, just shows “P00 Load”?


XHDATA 9kHz

Chris Black <n1cp@...>
 

anybody know how to change between 9 and 10 step?
there is a button but doesn’t do anything, just shows “P00 Load”?


Re: DXing in Hong Kong-- the Overall Verdict

Dennis Breda
 

Gary,  A very interesting report.  I'm learning a lot from your reports.  Thank you. Dennis B.


On Apr 18, 2019, at 6:49 PM, Gary DeBock via Groups.Io <D1028Gary@...> wrote:

     Most DXers are aware that Hong Kong is extremely overcrowded, with the highest population density on the planet. When the British administration turned the territory over to China in 1997 its residents became somewhat unwilling participants in a deal beyond their control, and expressed their dissatisfaction with Beijing's rule in notorious "Umbrella" demonstrations in 2014. Beijing's response to Hong Kong's dissatisfaction has been to use the "Tibet and Sinkiang" solution-- flood the enclave with Mainland Chinese supportive of Beijing's one-party rule. This has made a bad housing situation much worse.

     For a DXer looking to set up gain antennas on salt water beaches, Hong Kong is about as bad as it gets. Almost every beach is either privately owned and/ or restricted, and the ones that aren't are typically overcrowded, with almost no privacy and dubious security. Although I had brought along a 5 inch "Frequent Flyer" FSL antenna and 4 foot PVC base, because of the difficulties mentioned above these were only deployed on 1 night out of 7-- to a public park on the Hong Kong waterfront.

     It was an interesting experience, in more ways than one. Groups of Chinese onlookers stared me down at their leisure, with several of them curious enough to sit and watch. Park joggers ran right next to my makeshift DXing setup, causing me to grab the "Frequent Flyer" FSL before it took a terminal flight. Concentrating on security made concentration on DXing pretty tough, but during the 90 minute session (starting an hour after local sunset) I was able to record Southeast Asian stations from 531-729 kHz, using the gain boost from the 5" FSL antenna during sunset skip from Vietnam to Bangladesh.

     Overall the waterfront experience was a memorable one, but it retrospect, I would have to conclude that Hong Kong is the perfect DXing environment for a 7.5" loopstick-enhanced Ultralight, which for me tracked down decent signals all the way from Japan (729-JOCK) to Africa (1431-Djibouti), including 1413-Oman, !413-Moldova and 1548-Moldova. An FSL gain boost works wonders when almost all your DX is long range, but in Hong Kong a lot of the interesting DX is short range, and a hot-rodded Ultralight is definitely the most convenient tool for the job-- especially when you don't want to be the "center of attraction" on a public beach.

     With a 7.5" loopstick CC Skywave SSB Ultralight I could do almost everything I wanted to do in Hong Kong-- stick it away in a backpack to make daytime DX trips to Macau and HK's awesome Cape D'Aguilar, investigate sunset skip across Southeast Asia in the evening, and stick it outside the jail-like security window on the 15th floor of our high-rise apartment to track down long range signals from Eastern Europe, Africa and the Middle East around sunrise. The overall DXing results from the trip were much better than expected, given the severely overcrowded venue, the overload of Chinese signals on almost every MW frequency and the impracticality of deploying gain antennas on salt water beaches.  

     In retrospect, Hong Kong is far from the ideal DXing venue, but it is a great place to investigate the exotic Southeast Asian stations, eat some awesome food and enjoy a fascinating culture. For a DXer with a sensitive AM-DXing portable (or a hot-rodded Ultralight) willing to get up around sunrise enhancement, it will give you all the long range DXing excitement you can handle!

 

73 and Good DX,

Gary DeBock (DXing in Hong Kong from April 2-9)


New member saying hi

Simon C <symen79@...>
 

Hi all,

I am Simon VK6MSC, from Perth Western Australia. I have been semi serious about chasing MW dx for the last few years, but am taking it a bit further lately :)

Was a member of the yahoo group for ages, but never posted, as didn’t have any content to share.
Here is a clip of the tecsun 2p3 kit I completed yesterday - https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Tik9SP5iMcU
My other ultralight is a tecsun PL380, and I will post any decent dx reports as they arise.

Cheers!

Simon.


Re: DXing in Hong Kong-- the Overall Verdict

keith beesley
 

Glad you enjoyed your trip, Gary.


On Fri, Apr 19, 2019 at 12:52 AM, Paul Blundell
<tanger32au@...> wrote:
It is great to hear about your adventures.

--
Paul - Moderator
UltralightDX


Re: DXing in Hong Kong-- the Overall Verdict

Paul Blundell
 

It is great to hear about your adventures.

--
Paul - Moderator
UltralightDX


DXing in Hong Kong-- the Overall Verdict

Gary DeBock
 

     Most DXers are aware that Hong Kong is extremely overcrowded, with the highest population density on the planet. When the British administration turned the territory over to China in 1997 its residents became somewhat unwilling participants in a deal beyond their control, and expressed their dissatisfaction with Beijing's rule in notorious "Umbrella" demonstrations in 2014. Beijing's response to Hong Kong's dissatisfaction has been to use the "Tibet and Sinkiang" solution-- flood the enclave with Mainland Chinese supportive of Beijing's one-party rule. This has made a bad housing situation much worse.

     For a DXer looking to set up gain antennas on salt water beaches, Hong Kong is about as bad as it gets. Almost every beach is either privately owned and/ or restricted, and the ones that aren't are typically overcrowded, with almost no privacy and dubious security. Although I had brought along a 5 inch "Frequent Flyer" FSL antenna and 4 foot PVC base, because of the difficulties mentioned above these were only deployed on 1 night out of 7-- to a public park on the Hong Kong waterfront.

     It was an interesting experience, in more ways than one. Groups of Chinese onlookers stared me down at their leisure, with several of them curious enough to sit and watch. Park joggers ran right next to my makeshift DXing setup, causing me to grab the "Frequent Flyer" FSL before it took a terminal flight. Concentrating on security made concentration on DXing pretty tough, but during the 90 minute session (starting an hour after local sunset) I was able to record Southeast Asian stations from 531-729 kHz, using the gain boost from the 5" FSL antenna during sunset skip from Vietnam to Bangladesh.

     Overall the waterfront experience was a memorable one, but it retrospect, I would have to conclude that Hong Kong is the perfect DXing environment for a 7.5" loopstick-enhanced Ultralight, which for me tracked down decent signals all the way from Japan (729-JOCK) to Africa (1431-Djibouti), including 1413-Oman, !413-Moldova and 1548-Moldova. An FSL gain boost works wonders when almost all your DX is long range, but in Hong Kong a lot of the interesting DX is short range, and a hot-rodded Ultralight is definitely the most convenient tool for the job-- especially when you don't want to be the "center of attraction" on a public beach.

     With a 7.5" loopstick CC Skywave SSB Ultralight I could do almost everything I wanted to do in Hong Kong-- stick it away in a backpack to make daytime DX trips to Macau and HK's awesome Cape D'Aguilar, investigate sunset skip across Southeast Asia in the evening, and stick it outside the jail-like security window on the 15th floor of our high-rise apartment to track down long range signals from Eastern Europe, Africa and the Middle East around sunrise. The overall DXing results from the trip were much better than expected, given the severely overcrowded venue, the overload of Chinese signals on almost every MW frequency and the impracticality of deploying gain antennas on salt water beaches.  

     In retrospect, Hong Kong is far from the ideal DXing venue, but it is a great place to investigate the exotic Southeast Asian stations, eat some awesome food and enjoy a fascinating culture. For a DXer with a sensitive AM-DXing portable (or a hot-rodded Ultralight) willing to get up around sunrise enhancement, it will give you all the long range DXing excitement you can handle!

 

73 and Good DX,

Gary DeBock (DXing in Hong Kong from April 2-9)


Re: Just bought a pristine Sangean ATS818

chipbutty
 

Looks like a nice radio. Lots of buttons and knobs to twiddle.


Re: Hong Kong 7.5 inch Loopstick European, African and Middle East DX

kevin asato <kc6pob@...>
 

That has not stopped my relatives or my wife's! It was always fun to see my dad arguing with his older sisters with the argument sometimes ending, "they don't accept California money in Hawaii". The older ones usually won out or the one who went to the restroom first. Now I am of that age that where I get into it with my cousins when I visit.
73,
kevin
kc6pob

On Saturday, April 13, 2019, 12:11:10 AM PDT, Gary DeBock via Groups.Io <D1028Gary@...> wrote:


<<<   Yes having Yum Cha - with relatives that you have not seen for a while can take up plenty of time
Tony VK2IC   >>>

<<<   Nothing more sporting than going to Dim Sum and watching family and friends battle over the bill! Especially when you are too stuffed to move.
73, kevin
kc6pob    >>>

Tony,

Once my wife and her friends got into an HK teahouse the concept of time went out the window (I think you know the routine). I usually chased DX around local midnight, after the last subway train left the teahouse area.

As for fighting over the bill, Kevin, I found out that if a "Gweilo" (foreign devil) uses his Chinese to ask the waitress in advance for the bill, he stands a decent chance of finally ending up with it-- assuming that none of the Chinese diners has beat him to the punch with an earlier request.

73, Gary

 
   


Re: Just bought a pristine Sangean ATS818

radiojayallen
 

Can't beat that deal. I once had one of those and it was a very solidi feeling radio.


Re: Just bought a pristine Sangean ATS818

Dan Merta
 

That's great! Always good to snap up radios when they can be found for a low price. 


Re: Hong Kong 7.5 inch Loopstick European, African and Middle East DX

Gary DeBock
 

<<<   Yes having Yum Cha - with relatives that you have not seen for a while can take up plenty of time
Tony VK2IC   >>>

<<<   Nothing more sporting than going to Dim Sum and watching family and friends battle over the bill! Especially when you are too stuffed to move.
73, kevin
kc6pob    >>>

Tony,

Once my wife and her friends got into an HK teahouse the concept of time went out the window (I think you know the routine). I usually chased DX around local midnight, after the last subway train left the teahouse area.

As for fighting over the bill, Kevin, I found out that if a "Gweilo" (foreign devil) uses his Chinese to ask the waitress in advance for the bill, he stands a decent chance of finally ending up with it-- assuming that none of the Chinese diners has beat him to the punch with an earlier request.

73, Gary

 
   

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