Date   

Re: New Design (2019) FSL Antennas

Paul Blundell
 

Well done on all your work with these. It is great to see you continue to expand on the hobby and find ways to improve your tests. 

--
Paul - Moderator
UltralightDX


Re: Airport Friendly TP DX Equipment. The Tecsun experience

Tony King <dx4me2@...>
 

Great to read of the performance of Gary's FSL's with the Tecsun twins. Gary was very helpful to me in my early FSL experiences.
Having the real estate here I use my PL380 with  EWE antennae - switching - NE, E and SE from New  Zealand (all of the wires no higher than 12ft up  and 36 feet out; terminated at the end away from the receiver with an 820 ohm resistor to earth.) At the receive end the wire joins a pre wound coupler  on top of the PL380. So far this winter season for us  I've logged stations in Ecuador,  Brazil, Peru and Argentina from as early as 0430UTC - our late afternoon.
US stations come in after 0600. The 1khz bandwidth option is the winner with these receivers.

Tony King


Airport Friendly TP DX Equipment

C B
 

Several years ago Gary DeBock generously made a 3.5" FSL available to me to use on a few trips to spots on the PNW coast such as Kalaloch and Rockaway Beach. It was an immediate difference maker and designed such that it was practical for air travel. In March of 2017 I visited with Gary in Puyallup on my way to Kalaloch. I was just looking for an opportunity to have lunch with and glean some more insights from an accomplished TP DXer on my way back to Kalaloch. I mentioned that I would be going to Hawaii in April, planning to do some TP DXing from Princeville on Kauai and from the west side of the island of Hawaii. Much to my elated surprise, he offered a 5" FSL for me to try in Kalaloch, then Hawaii. At the time my receiver was a stock Tecsun PL-310. TP reception in Kalaloch was the best I had experienced there. Reception on Kauai was flat out astonishing. I felt I had a sampling of what the PNW DXers experienced when conditions were good. I was overwhelmed at the quantity and quality of Asian TP DX from Princeville. Hearing a Brazilian Portuguese broadcast on one of the Japanese big guns also stirred some interesting discussions within the PNW TP DX community. What amazed me was I don't think it had been reported before. DU TP DX from the west side of Hawaii was also quite good. Tuvalu and the Marshall Islands booming in was something I could get used to! Prior to my second trip to the island of Hawaii, I met up again with Gary. Once again he surprised me by providing me with a turbocharged Tecsun PL-380. In April of last year, I took a second trip to the island of Hawaii, staying right on the waterfront for several days. Using the turbocharged Tecsun PL-380 and the 5" FSL enabled reception of Trackside Radio in NZ of such quality that a KIWI DXer commented on it. While trying for More FM and 531pi on 531 at Rockworks last summer, I discovered my 5" FSL was showing signs of the mileage I had put on it as it was reluctant to tune down to 531. Gary to the rescue! He offered me a back up 5" FSL and took my limping FSL to repair it! Using the replacement 5" FSL More FM and 531pi were logged and recorded, as well as one of my personal TP DXing highlights: reception of Chinese Radio on 936, a 1 kW station in NZ! All possible thanks to Gary's innovative approach to enhanced ultralight TP DXing as well as his mantra of ongoing improvement. My hat's off to Gary for significantly elevating my travel TP DXing experience! Thanks Gary!!

73 and Good DX!

Craig Barnes
Wheat Ridge, CO


Re: New Design (2019) FSL Antennas

C B
 

Several years ago Gary generously made a 3.5" FSL available to me to use on a few trips to spots on the PNW coast such as Kalaloch and Rockaway Beach. It was an immediate difference maker and designed such that it was practical for air travel. In March of 2017 I visited with Gary in Puyallup on my way to Kalaloch. I was just looking for an opportunity to have lunch with and glean some more insights from an accomplished TP DXer on my way back to Kalaloch. I mentioned that I would be going to Hawaii in April, planning to do some TP DXing from Princeville on Kauai and from the west side of the island of Hawaii. Much to my elated surprise, he offered a 5" FSL for me to try in Kalaloch, then Hawaii. At the time my receiver was a stock Tecsun PL-310. TP reception in Kalaloch was the best I had experienced there. Reception on Kauai was flat out astonishing. I felt I had a sampling of what the PNW DXers experienced when conditions were good. I was overwhelmed at the quantity and quality of Asian TP DX from Princeville. Hearing a Brazilian Portuguese broadcast on one of the Japanese big guns also stirred some interesting discussions within the PNW TP DX community. What amazed me was I don't think it had been reported before. DU TP DX from the west side of Hawaii was also quite good. Tuvalu and the Marshall Islands booming in was something I could get used to! Prior to my second trip to the island of Hawaii, I met up again with Gary. Once again he surprised me by providing me with a turbocharged Tecsun PL-380. In April of last year, I took a second trip to the island of Hawaii, staying right on the waterfront for several days. Using the turbocharged Tecsun PL-380 and the 5" FSL enabled reception of Trackside Radio in NZ of such quality that a KIWI DXer commented on it. While trying for More FM and 531pi on 531 at Rockworks last summer, I discovered my 5" FSL was showing signs of the mileage I had put on it as it was reluctant to tune down to 531. Gary to the rescue! He offered me a back up 5" FSL and took my limping FSL to repair it! Using the replacement 5" FSL More FM and 531pi were logged and recorded, as well as one of my personal TP DXing highlights: reception of Chinese Radio on 936, a 1 kW station in NZ! All possible thanks to Gary's innovative approach to enhanced ultralight TP DXing as well as his mantra of ongoing improvement. My hat's off to Gary for significantly elevating my travel TP DXing experience! Thanks Gary!!

73 and Good DX!

Craig Barnes
Wheat Ridge, CO

On Thursday, June 6, 2019, 8:08:27 PM MDT, C B via Groups.Io <bevdxer@...> wrote:


Several years ago Gary generously made a 3.5" FSL available to me to use on a few trips to spots on the PNW coast such as Kalaloch and Rockaway Beach. It was an immediate difference maker and designed such that it was practical for air travel. In March of 2017 I visited with Gary in Puyallup on my way to Kalaloch. I was just looking for an opportunity to have lunch with and glean some more insights from an accomplished TP DXer on my way back to Kalaloch. I mentioned that I would be going to Hawaii in April, planning to do some TP DXing from Princeville on Kauai and from the west side of the island of Hawaii. Much to my elated surprise, he offered a 5" FSL for me to try in Kalaloch, then Hawaii. At the time my receiver was a stock Tecsun PL-310. TP reception in Kalaloch was the best I had experienced there. Reception on Kauai was flat out astonishing. I felt I had a sampling of what the PNW DXers experienced when conditions were good. I was overwhelmed at the quantity and quality of Asian TP DX from Princeville. Hearing a Brazilian Portuguese broadcast on one of the Japanese big guns also stirred some interesting discussions within the PNW TP DX community. What amazed me was I don't think it had been reported before. DU TP DX from the west side of Hawaii was also quite good. Tuvalu and the Marshall Islands booming in was something I could get used to! Prior to my second trip to the island of Hawaii, I met up again with Gary. Once again he surprised me by providing me with a turbocharged Tecsun PL-380. In April of last year, I took a second trip to the island of Hawaii, staying right on the waterfront for several days. Using the turbocharged Tecsun PL-380 and the 5" FSL enabled reception of Trackside Radio in NZ of such quality that a KIWI DXer commented on it. While trying for More FM and 531pi on 531 at Rockworks last summer, I discovered my 5" FSL was showing signs of the mileage I had put on it as it was reluctant to tune down to 531. Gary to the rescue! He offered me a back up 5" FSL and took my limping FSL to repair it! Using the replacement 5" FSL More FM and 531pi were logged and recorded, as well as one of my personal TP DXing highlights: reception of Chinese Radio on 936, a 1 kW station in NZ! All possible thanks to Gary's innovative approach to enhanced ultralight TP DXing as well as his mantra of ongoing improvement. My hat's off to Gary for significantly elevating my travel TP DXing experience! Thanks Gary!!

73 and Good DX!

Craig Barnes
Wheat Ridge, CO

On Thursday, June 6, 2019, 6:54:32 PM MDT, Gary DeBock via Groups.Io <D1028Gary@...> wrote:


Hi Phil,

Thanks for your comment!

As far as I know the "384P" variable cap is still available online from Oren Elliot Products at the following link  www.orenelliottproducts.com/oep-capacitors/n-50-group/n50-384p-8-1-drive

73, Gary


Re: New Design (2019) FSL Antennas

C B
 

Several years ago Gary generously made a 3.5" FSL available to me to use on a few trips to spots on the PNW coast such as Kalaloch and Rockaway Beach. It was an immediate difference maker and designed such that it was practical for air travel. In March of 2017 I visited with Gary in Puyallup on my way to Kalaloch. I was just looking for an opportunity to have lunch with and glean some more insights from an accomplished TP DXer on my way back to Kalaloch. I mentioned that I would be going to Hawaii in April, planning to do some TP DXing from Princeville on Kauai and from the west side of the island of Hawaii. Much to my elated surprise, he offered a 5" FSL for me to try in Kalaloch, then Hawaii. At the time my receiver was a stock Tecsun PL-310. TP reception in Kalaloch was the best I had experienced there. Reception on Kauai was flat out astonishing. I felt I had a sampling of what the PNW DXers experienced when conditions were good. I was overwhelmed at the quantity and quality of Asian TP DX from Princeville. Hearing a Brazilian Portuguese broadcast on one of the Japanese big guns also stirred some interesting discussions within the PNW TP DX community. What amazed me was I don't think it had been reported before. DU TP DX from the west side of Hawaii was also quite good. Tuvalu and the Marshall Islands booming in was something I could get used to! Prior to my second trip to the island of Hawaii, I met up again with Gary. Once again he surprised me by providing me with a turbocharged Tecsun PL-380. In April of last year, I took a second trip to the island of Hawaii, staying right on the waterfront for several days. Using the turbocharged Tecsun PL-380 and the 5" FSL enabled reception of Trackside Radio in NZ of such quality that a KIWI DXer commented on it. While trying for More FM and 531pi on 531 at Rockworks last summer, I discovered my 5" FSL was showing signs of the mileage I had put on it as it was reluctant to tune down to 531. Gary to the rescue! He offered me a back up 5" FSL and took my limping FSL to repair it! Using the replacement 5" FSL More FM and 531pi were logged and recorded, as well as one of my personal TP DXing highlights: reception of Chinese Radio on 936, a 1 kW station in NZ! All possible thanks to Gary's innovative approach to enhanced ultralight TP DXing as well as his mantra of ongoing improvement. My hat's off to Gary for significantly elevating my travel TP DXing experience! Thanks Gary!!

73 and Good DX!

Craig Barnes
Wheat Ridge, CO

On Thursday, June 6, 2019, 6:54:32 PM MDT, Gary DeBock via Groups.Io <D1028Gary@...> wrote:


Hi Phil,

Thanks for your comment!

As far as I know the "384P" variable cap is still available online from Oren Elliot Products at the following link  www.orenelliottproducts.com/oep-capacitors/n-50-group/n50-384p-8-1-drive

73, Gary


Re: New Design (2019) FSL Antennas

Gary DeBock
 

Hi Phil,

Thanks for your comment!

As far as I know the "384P" variable cap is still available online from Oren Elliot Products at the following link  www.orenelliottproducts.com/oep-capacitors/n-50-group/n50-384p-8-1-drive

73, Gary


Re: New Design (2019) FSL Antennas

Phil Pasteur
 

Looks good Gary.
I think at one point a few months ago you mentioned having some of the newer variable caps on hand for resale. Is that still the case. I would like to try one out on my 7" FSL.
If available, how to I contact you. I thought there was a way on the forum to send an email, but I sure can't find it now...


Phil


New Design (2019) FSL Antennas

Gary DeBock
 

     Five years after introduction by the U.K.'s Graham Maynard the Ferrite Sleeve Loop antenna suddenly got a new design mission-- shrink down in size and weight to become the ultimate overseas traveling companion. As such, the ocean cliff-dwelling gain monsters suddenly fell out of favor, and a new breed of compact, TSA-friendly beach thrillers was launched.

      A relentless A/B testing program has continued for 3 years, trying every possible trick to make the "Frequent Flyers" more sensitive, lightweight and compact. Last summer at the Rockwork cliff Craig Barnes played a major part in this effort by informing me that his 5" Bar FSL had apparently accumulated a few too many air travel miles, and couldn't tune down to 531 kHz. This resulted in an all-out search for a variable cap replacement-- ending up with the much more effective "384P" component from Oren Elliot Products (and Mike's Electronic Parts).

      Augmented by the new, razor-sharp tuning variable cap, Craig's 5" FSL was running circles around my own models in detailed A/B testing here in Puyallup. The obvious choice was to replace the variable caps in all the 5" Bar Frequent Flyer FSL's-- including one which would go to Poipu, Hawaii in November. The transformation changed the tiny FSL into a compact DXing firecracker, which ended up tracking down MW-DX from Oman, Egypt, Iran, India, Bangladesh, Myanmar, Cambodia, Bonaire and many other exotic locations on the Poipu beach.

      But what about the ferrite rod "Frequent Flyers?" What would the new "384P" variable caps do for them? It turns out that the transformation has been just as thrilling, and has resulted in a new, compact 3 inch "Baby FSL" design, which packs a huge amount of performance into the smallest, most lightweight "Frequent Flyer" antenna yet.

      The plan is to thoroughly demonstrate the new 3 inch "Baby FSL" model at the IRCA convention this September, along with the new 4 inch Bar FSL antenna (using 17 of the Russian surplus 100mm x 20mm x 3mm bars) and various "supercharged" Ultralights (and several XHDATA D-808's). See you there!

73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)


April 2019 Hong Kong Ultralight DXpedition-- 531-594 kHz Loggings & MP3's

Gary DeBock
 


     For traveling DXers looking to set up gain antennas on salt water beaches, Hong Kong is about as bad as it gets. Because of the highest population density on the planet most of its beaches are either privately owned, inaccessible or overcrowded, with dubious security. The additional quirks of having loud RFI in many areas, five local AM pests and prolific mainland Chinese stations from 531-1593 kHz add to its "worst case scenario" DXing reputation.

      In order to make any real progress in Hong Kong AM-DXing it was necessary to "think outside of the box," taking Ultralight radios on daytime DXing trips to Macau, and Hong Kong's Rockwork-like plunging cliff of Cape D'Aguilar (the previous British administration's chosen site for the territory's long range communications antennas). A wild and wacky harbor side sunset skip session was tried on April 7th, resulting in some awesome Vietnamese, Thai and Bangladesh signals on a 5 inch FSL antenna (as well as a pretty bizarre crowd of staring Chinese onlookers). Finally, after a complete lack of long range DX on the first five days, the desperate measure of shoving a souped-up Ultralight radio outside the security window of our 12th floor apartment building around sunrise resulted in four surprising signals from eastern Europe, Africa and the Middle East.

      DXing in Hong Kong was a crash course in overcoming RFI, ultra-crowded beaches, five Chinese dialects and six Southeast Asian languages, but after a serious assist from the Real DX language experts the results were definitely worth the effort. Multiple unusual stations from Taiwan, Vietnam and Thailand pounded in at serious strength, many of which have never shown up on our west coast. 585-LNR in Laos managed an S9 signal, along with good signals from 1413-Oman and (briefly) 1431-Djibouti. Several mysteries from Hawaii DXing were solved by this Hong Kong trip, and vice versa. For west coast DXers looking for a close range investigation of exotic Southeast Asian targets, Hong Kong has a lot to offer-- once you get outside of the RFI-saturated motels.

531  BED34 ("I Go 531")   Tacheng, Taiwan   10 kW   Good level with TOH routine during daytime DX at HK's Cape D'Aguilar at 0800 on 4-6, including multiple "I Go" ID's and mention of Taipei over a weak co-channel (probably DZBR)  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/r78bqvi1iqiibrs6eu75ziylomf2bu5n

531  DZBR   Batangas, Philippines   10 kW   All alone at good level with TOH routine and "DZBR, Bible Radio" ID at 38 seconds at 1200 on 4-2; this was the dominant 531 station in the HK apartment during the evening  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/3jbfza194lc4dejwtzj3nj8lid2gymwk

531  Radio Thailand   Maha Sarakham, Thailand   25 kW   Dominating the frequency over an UnID Chinese (apparently Zhejiang, not Taiwan) during sunset skip on the Hong Kong waterfront at 1308 on 4-7 (thanks to Ken Alexander of Thailand for language identification)  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/wruzkxfrmgn11dc12uf7gj1t0nydlmq1

531  Zhejiang RGD Synchros   China   Rapid-paced female Mandarin speech slowly losing out to Taiwan's music program at 1623 on 4-6; this lady's voice matches that of a 531 Chinese UnID recorded in Poipu, Hawaii under JOQG, pretty much solving the mystery  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/yky03ppbd1i7janb9ync2ga34npk4unh

540  CNR1   Danzhou, Hainan?   Chinese opera // 639 mixing with female Thai from Bangkok at 1310 on 4-7; CNR1 is a daytimer at Hong Kong's Cape D'Aguilar, presumably from the 10 kW Hainan transmitter  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/i1m9bmnvlpae7bicn0j5zbk7il94hte4

540  DZWT   Baguio, Philippines   10 kW  Mixing with CNR1 during daytime DX at Hong Kong's Cape D'Aguilar at 0754 on 4-6, with a strong "DZWT" ID at 9 seconds; because of the overwhelming strength of CNR1, this was only received at Cape D'Aguilar  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/kt8r8aeoobpkcshgsb88sqnwuyipddi2

540  Yan Kraw   Bangkok, Thailand   5 kW   Thai female speech building up strength against CNR1 at 1310 on 4-7 (thanks to Jari Savolainen for language identification)  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/rvp67o0ezkjvuxzrgrodkwo3s6sxytv0

549  CNR5   Fujian, China   1200 kW   Daytime DX signal with female speech in Chinese dialect into HK's Cape D'Aguilar at 0803 on 4-6; the weak co-channel was identified by Alan Davies as VOV-2 from My Hao, and as such was the only Vietnamese daytime DX station received in Hong Kong  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/eqcne7yrac1ovms9hrlphomnt7jb78hd

549  VOV-2   My Hao, Vietnam   200 kW   Vietnamese opera and male Viet speech at overwhelming level on the Hong Kong waterfront at 1313 on 4-7; this station was the only Vietnam daytimer showing up at Hong Kong's Cape D'Aguilar. The weak co-channel at 1:08 was possibly the 1200 kW CNR5, also a daytimer at the Cape .Thanks to Jari Savolainen for Viet language identification   https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/9b46fabrtb3ri8rwrzja5pl2nfaobrb9

567  RTHK-3   Golden Hill, Hong Kong   20 kW   English format local station at overwhelming strength with 6-pip TOH routine at 0600 on 4-3 during a daytime DX trip to Macau (50 miles west of HK)  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/sa65kixhe4fi7ejutkhd145x5znyma9v    

The normally English local station was broadcasting a Nepali program at 1317 on 4-7, causing serious confusion during sunset skip DXing on the Hong Kong waterfront. Thanks to C.K. Raman, Jari Savolainen and Ken Alexander for sorting out the language and station identity of RTHK-3 in Nepali   https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/v429uic14cwinjce8op1slh9wn7up3em

567  UnID   From 25 seconds to 45 seconds in the above recording attempts were made to null out RTHK, resulting in a co-channel with a male voice, possibly from the 200 kW Lao station (although 567-LNR is not parallel with 585-LNR, so there was no way to be sure)  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/v429uic14cwinjce8op1slh9wn7up3em.

585  Lao National Radio   Savannakhet, Laos   20 kW   Distinctive female vocal music and Southeast Asian dialect received during sunset skip on the HK waterfront at 1329 on 4-7 was identified by the wife of Thailand's Ken Alexander (a native speaker) as being "Phu Thai," spoken only in the central border region of Laos and Thailand (where this LNR regional station is located), and not in the north and south parts of Thailand (where the two Thai stations on 585 are located). The distinctive multi-toned instrument in the music was also heard on 705 kHz in another recording, but 702-China was too strong to receive any other details at the time  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/yp6kjfbzb7b4510ln0b7657imo98p3ce

585  Southeast BC   Fuzhou, China   200 kW   Daytime DX signal into HK's Cape D'Aguilar at good strength at 0805 on 4-6; this Taiwan-directed station often features a female speaker with a soothing voice  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/iqi3nczbk8jucyljf87d1hvbr19vdlqo

Female Chinese speech mixing with LNR's music at 1321 on 4-7, most likely from China Southeast BC in Fuzhou (a daytimer at HK's Cape D'Aguilar)  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/a3is6xznwxg1o3elviga7hi8tmudea7y

585  UnID-Chinese   Two overlapping Chinese TOH routines received at good strength at 1700 on 4-6; according to PAL Southeast BC in Fuzhou signs off at 1650, so these two stations are a mystery-- any ID help?  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/w6p8dmhtge9yh1wl82mjn5ozo10myrsu

594  Fu Hsing BS  (multiple Taiwan stations)   Female Chinese speech at overwhelming level during daytime DX at HK's Cape D'Aguilar at 0807 on 4-6; the weak co-channel is possibly DZBB in Quezon City  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/9dmzar3h2typo4m8ifuf41xygagnyx6u

The dominant station at the beginning of this Hong Kong waterfront recording at 1336 on 4-7 (over VoV's male monotone) was tough to figure out, but it's most likely a Chinese dialect from this Taiwan broadcaster, a daytimer at HK's Cape D'Aguilar-- especially considering that Babul Gupta says that this is not Burmese from Radio Myanma. There is also a music station in the three station mix, which could be the UnID Filipino station also showing up as a daytimer at HK's Cape D'Aguilar  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/epl64nxiw7fly2xyp7rwzgi9dtekhbjm

594  VOV-1   Danang, Vietnam   50 kW   Opera and male Viet speech at overwhelming level at 1339 on 4-7; thanks to Mauno for language identification  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/d3s6l2ty9s69niien33tjvgmio75lbnh

594  UnID-Philippines   Daytime DX co-channel under Taiwan's Fu Hsing BS at HK's Cape D'Aguilar at 0807 on 4-6; although no identity clues seem apparent, DZBB in Quezon City would follow the Filipino reception pattern at the Cape  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/9dmzar3h2typo4m8ifuf41xygagnyx6u

(TO BE CONTINUED)


Re: Moving to the Great Northwest

Gary DeBock
 

Hello Art,

<<<   I hope I get to meet Gary up here in the great Northwest one day.
I know I will get to see Dave E. in the future.
For your info, I will be located at a new location in July. 
Grant's Pass, Oregon CN82ik
I hopefully will be back on in a limited capacity by August.
73 Art Jackson KA5DWI   >>>

We are honored to have you move to the Northwest, Art, and I'm sure that Dave will give you a nice welcome in Grants Pass!

A certain plunging cliff on the Oregon coast gets some serious attention from Washington state DXers the first week of every August, and you are more than welcome to join us as a "cliffhanger" if you get settled down by then, and feel in an adventurous mood. The ocean coast scenery around Manzanita is probably worth the trip all by itself.

73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)



 


Moving to the Great Northwest

K7DWI Art
 

Good morning all,
I hope I get to meet Gary up here in the great Northwest one day.
I know I will get to see Dave E. in the future.
For your info, I will be located at a new location in July. 
Grant's Pass, Oregon CN82ik
I hopefully will be back on in a limited capacity by August.
73 Art Jackson KA5DWI


891 kHz - unid.

Eduard
 


891 kHz, 21:32 – 23:47 UTC - unid station, sometimes mixed with Iran (Dena). African and European music, OM and YL talks. Algeria reactivated, Ethiopia extension or something else?



73, Eduard.


Re: DXing in Hong Kong-- the Overall Verdict

C B
 

Steve,

I have been fortunate enough to nab a few TAs here in CO. When conditions are favorable the LWs seem to be a bit more frequent. Thanks to Steve Ratzlaff for opening my eyes to LW possibilities here. Trail Ridge? Hmmm. I have played with the possibility of running a few beverages in the Walden area. Not much up there. Could be a fun place for FSLs as well. I was completely enamored with calling A3Z a “regular” at Rockworks and in Hawaii. I understand health issues. Fortunately mine are quiescent at this time. I have much TP and TA DXing to do! I will probably enlarge my 72 x 18 KAZ to 96 x 25 which should max out my available real estate (reg city lot). Thank goodness for TP recordings!

73,

Craig Barnes
Wheat Ridge, CO 


On May 20, 2019, at 6:03 PM, Stephen P. McGreevy <stephenpmcgreevy1@...> wrote:

Hello Gary and Craig (and of course the UL group),

Kindest and big thanks for replying - for a spell I saw nothing on the group topics and I thought: "hhmmm, I hope they aren't rejecting this 'dumb Californian' native DXer from uppity Marin (I LOVE the landscape here but I am really bummed at the craziness of CA of late and remember the mellower times as a kid and no traffic, etc., for certain)...  but the good stuff too - it is a duality...

Hey I'd rather DX TPs from inland Bevs in the deep desert than have to try to DX TPs in Marin County what with the huge amount of RF field strength(s) emanating from the SF Bay Area today in-compare to the wonderful early 80s before the clear-channel busters came on (I recall 880 KIXI Mercer Isl., WA went on by late 1982 and ruined the once totally clear-channel 882 - when 1YA NZ faded in, the S-meter held totally STEADY w/o SAHs, and I was incredulous as a 19 year old too-used to S-meter jiggle and wiggle due to co-channel QRM SAHs.  Then the slight "wiggle" from fading-in 882 4BH "Bright and Beautiful Music" via Brisbane later, then off went NZ and - well what do you know, 4BH was SAH free... unless Asian condx. were in. Craig, yeah you are inland far but you have a better shot at TAs than out here too.  AND, Colorado has been PROVEN superior for natural-radio captures compared vastly to here (thanks to efforts of Shawn Korgan at Trail Ridge - fellow ELF-VLF listener as I have been obsessed with, along with my MW DX...

Health reasons are keeping me closer to home - otherwise it certainly would be an honor to be a part of your UL group - I suppose it would be cool to compare a "standard" loop coupling to my Sonys vs. your FSLs and CC UL radios with the BIG loopsticks!  An A/B comparison, say to convince folks out there that, indeed, superior tech./FSLs, and DXing methods have helped to raise the fine-art of MW TP DXing from the WCNA (and way farther away) to new heights despite the band-cram...  but for now I must stay close to home...  so I just drool at you folks efforts.  Funny stories and fascinating to the max, too, gents!

Thanks for your acceptance and responses, gentlemen!  I hope we may meet on the coast someday... 

Best Regards,

Steve McGreevy, Keeler, CA - N6NKS

www.auroralchorus.com
Natural VLF Radio and Travel



On Mon, May 20, 2019 at 4:11 PM C B via Groups.Io <bevdxer=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Steve!

Thanks for chiming in! I did a bit of FSL equipped (thanks Gary!) TP DXing near Princeville a couple of years ago, followed by a stay on the west side of the big island. As a landlocked TP DXer I am not as well versed in TP DXing as the PNW folks. I was told I didn't do too bad with the northern Asian stations from my Princeville location by more experienced folks. The impact of HNL stations was a bit more limited there. Thanks to the folks who put the AZ Project together, which provided me with azimuthal projections which I used to help select my Hawaii locations. DU TP DX from the west side of the big island was pretty decent, which I suspected when I planned my trip.  Northern Asians, not so much from my slightly inland location. I may need to revisit Princeville. Hopefully they have repaired their roads after last year's catastrophic flooding the north side of Kauai. A few years back I tried some FSL equipped TP DXing from Gualala. It struck me as a bit close to the Bay Area, as reflected by my limited results. For this year, I am eagerly anticipating another session at Rockworks on the OR coast as well as a TP DXing session in Poipu with a few PNW TP Dxers. I always learn a lot from those folks. I have fantasized about setting up a variety of antennae in different spots in Hawaii. The southwest corner of the Big Island comes to mind. I wouldn't mind returning to Tofino also, if I could just persuade those in charge of MW propagation to treat me more generously than they did last fall, hi!

73,

Craig Barnes
Wheat Ridge, CO (reading NHP's recent daily logs with much empathy!)

On Monday, May 20, 2019, 4:26:29 PM MDT, Gary DeBock via Groups.Io <D1028Gary=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:


Welcome Steve,

Thanks for the very interesting report of your overseas DXing activities, and sorry for the delayed posting of your message (the Groups.io system requires moderator approval for a new member message on the first day, to avoid spam messages).

<<<   In November 2013 I spent 3 nights in HK after concluding a 12-day Mainland China tour.  I agree with Gary that HK is so crowded and too many "observers watching" that rolling out a Bev. antenna on an HK beach (as I have loved to do 100s of times in Hawaii when I lived there between '86 to '91 on and off) and elsewhere is nigh impossible.  So loops -- for their gain/directivity/noise-nulling abilities are wonderful and have nulling capabilities "on the fly" that Bevs do not.  In Hawaii, a ong Bev. really knocks down the high-angle Honolulu cram of signals to the point that DX overwhelms them in comparison to a loop or short-wire "A/B" testing I did there.   >>>

Hong Kong is really a tough venue for long range AM-DXing, and I had multiple warnings form Japanese, Australian and NZ DXers to lower my expectations. "Conventional" DXing with sensitive portables in a motel room is unlikely to accomplish very much, and attempting to set up a gain antenna on a public beach will definitely make you the "center of attraction" for multiple onlookers (some of whom may not have your best interests in mind). In addition to all of this are the 5 Hong Kong Locals, and a maze of Mainland Chinese stations plastering the band from 531-1593 KHz.

On the last couple of days I discovered that if I stuck the 7.5 inch loopstick CC Skywave SSB model outside the security window of our 12th floor apartment in a Shatin high rise building I could track down long range DX from Eastern Europe (1413-Vesti FM and 1548-TWR), Africa (1431-Radio Sawa in Djibouti) and the Middle East (1413-BBC in Oman) around sunrise. If I had known that trick from the beginning the long range DX results would have been much better-- but we do plan a return trip next April :-)

<<<   Back to HK DXing:  I found it fascinating to DX in HK with just via a barefoot Sony ICF-SW7600GR (all I could take - three recorders/two radios but no loop, alas) but never heard the farther out stuff Gary scored there simply as I was just recording what MWDX just sounded like in HK w/o trying for exotic DX (the novelty!!).  Just would "stumble" upon it as I band-scanned.  I did enjoy several clear receptions of Philippine Island DX in HK  (Kowloon) and that was really neat (711/1350/etc.)!   >>>

Yes the Philippine stations are fairly easy to track down in HK, as long as you choose frequencies that aren't plastered by Chinese locals. Many of the Philippine stations were daytimes on the Cape D'Aguilar ocean cliff (at the southeast tip of HK island), and on the somewhat polluted public beach of Macau. But several Philippine stations (on 666, 702 and 1530) became real pests in covering up long range targets around sunrise, since they tend to boom in with their salt water propagation path.

<<<   BTW, re. Hawaii - get land blockage to Honolulu by all means to knock down the obnoxious amount of those "locals" there - Kona is not good for that nor Poipu either (re. HNL overload) - I used to go to east Hawaii - Kamoamoa (now gone under lava!) or the fab MacKenzie SP (still there for now!) and rolled out Bevs to k/o Honolulu signals *dramatically.*
BUT, Malaekahana Bay on Oahu's north Shore near Kahuku/Laie is wonderful to get rid of HNL overload and have DX as fine as on an Outer Island locale (but NOT facing a water-path to Honolulu!) and quick and cheap to get to (I spent one week in a tent at Malaekahana (Friends of Mal. Bay CG - private) and no noise/quiet and easy to taxi too). There in the north Oahu shore, the groundwaves from HNL are really attenuated and DX creams them!   Not in Kona though, but Kona is wonderful for DU DX unlike North Oahu's windward side (island attenuation to big there for DU).   >>>

Honolulu QRM is a major issue throughout the Hawaiian islands, and after two trips to Kona and one to Poipu, I can almost tell you the formats of all the Hawaiian pests. No Hawaiian location is perfect for DXing in all directions, although Poipu is fairly unique in having a straight salt water shot to most long range DX continents, as well as a far westerly location to take advantage of extended sunrise enhancement into the Middle East and Africa. Poipu does also have a salt water path to the Oahu pests, but I discovered that very late in sunrise enhancement pests like 690-KHNR do taper off enough to track down DX like 693-Bangladesh. On the frequencies with no Honolulu pests you can really run wild in Poipu, with Oman, Egypt, Iran, India, Bangladesh, Myanmar, Cambodia etc. all received last November. This coming November we plan a major effort with 3 American DXers (Craig Barnes, Chris Black and yours truly) and one Australian DXer (Chris from the Melbourne area). All of these DXers will have the latest "Frequent Flyer" FSL's, PVC bases and souped-up Ultralight radios to play with, so we should score some serious fun :-)

73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)



 
 
 


Re: DXing in Hong Kong-- the Overall Verdict

Stephen P. McGreevy
 

Hello Gary and Craig (and of course the UL group),

Kindest and big thanks for replying - for a spell I saw nothing on the group topics and I thought: "hhmmm, I hope they aren't rejecting this 'dumb Californian' native DXer from uppity Marin (I LOVE the landscape here but I am really bummed at the craziness of CA of late and remember the mellower times as a kid and no traffic, etc., for certain)...  but the good stuff too - it is a duality...

Hey I'd rather DX TPs from inland Bevs in the deep desert than have to try to DX TPs in Marin County what with the huge amount of RF field strength(s) emanating from the SF Bay Area today in-compare to the wonderful early 80s before the clear-channel busters came on (I recall 880 KIXI Mercer Isl., WA went on by late 1982 and ruined the once totally clear-channel 882 - when 1YA NZ faded in, the S-meter held totally STEADY w/o SAHs, and I was incredulous as a 19 year old too-used to S-meter jiggle and wiggle due to co-channel QRM SAHs.  Then the slight "wiggle" from fading-in 882 4BH "Bright and Beautiful Music" via Brisbane later, then off went NZ and - well what do you know, 4BH was SAH free... unless Asian condx. were in. Craig, yeah you are inland far but you have a better shot at TAs than out here too.  AND, Colorado has been PROVEN superior for natural-radio captures compared vastly to here (thanks to efforts of Shawn Korgan at Trail Ridge - fellow ELF-VLF listener as I have been obsessed with, along with my MW DX...

Health reasons are keeping me closer to home - otherwise it certainly would be an honor to be a part of your UL group - I suppose it would be cool to compare a "standard" loop coupling to my Sonys vs. your FSLs and CC UL radios with the BIG loopsticks!  An A/B comparison, say to convince folks out there that, indeed, superior tech./FSLs, and DXing methods have helped to raise the fine-art of MW TP DXing from the WCNA (and way farther away) to new heights despite the band-cram...  but for now I must stay close to home...  so I just drool at you folks efforts.  Funny stories and fascinating to the max, too, gents!

Thanks for your acceptance and responses, gentlemen!  I hope we may meet on the coast someday... 

Best Regards,

Steve McGreevy, Keeler, CA - N6NKS

www.auroralchorus.com
Natural VLF Radio and Travel



On Mon, May 20, 2019 at 4:11 PM C B via Groups.Io <bevdxer=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Steve!

Thanks for chiming in! I did a bit of FSL equipped (thanks Gary!) TP DXing near Princeville a couple of years ago, followed by a stay on the west side of the big island. As a landlocked TP DXer I am not as well versed in TP DXing as the PNW folks. I was told I didn't do too bad with the northern Asian stations from my Princeville location by more experienced folks. The impact of HNL stations was a bit more limited there. Thanks to the folks who put the AZ Project together, which provided me with azimuthal projections which I used to help select my Hawaii locations. DU TP DX from the west side of the big island was pretty decent, which I suspected when I planned my trip.  Northern Asians, not so much from my slightly inland location. I may need to revisit Princeville. Hopefully they have repaired their roads after last year's catastrophic flooding the north side of Kauai. A few years back I tried some FSL equipped TP DXing from Gualala. It struck me as a bit close to the Bay Area, as reflected by my limited results. For this year, I am eagerly anticipating another session at Rockworks on the OR coast as well as a TP DXing session in Poipu with a few PNW TP Dxers. I always learn a lot from those folks. I have fantasized about setting up a variety of antennae in different spots in Hawaii. The southwest corner of the Big Island comes to mind. I wouldn't mind returning to Tofino also, if I could just persuade those in charge of MW propagation to treat me more generously than they did last fall, hi!

73,

Craig Barnes
Wheat Ridge, CO (reading NHP's recent daily logs with much empathy!)

On Monday, May 20, 2019, 4:26:29 PM MDT, Gary DeBock via Groups.Io <D1028Gary=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:


Welcome Steve,

Thanks for the very interesting report of your overseas DXing activities, and sorry for the delayed posting of your message (the Groups.io system requires moderator approval for a new member message on the first day, to avoid spam messages).

<<<   In November 2013 I spent 3 nights in HK after concluding a 12-day Mainland China tour.  I agree with Gary that HK is so crowded and too many "observers watching" that rolling out a Bev. antenna on an HK beach (as I have loved to do 100s of times in Hawaii when I lived there between '86 to '91 on and off) and elsewhere is nigh impossible.  So loops -- for their gain/directivity/noise-nulling abilities are wonderful and have nulling capabilities "on the fly" that Bevs do not.  In Hawaii, a ong Bev. really knocks down the high-angle Honolulu cram of signals to the point that DX overwhelms them in comparison to a loop or short-wire "A/B" testing I did there.   >>>

Hong Kong is really a tough venue for long range AM-DXing, and I had multiple warnings form Japanese, Australian and NZ DXers to lower my expectations. "Conventional" DXing with sensitive portables in a motel room is unlikely to accomplish very much, and attempting to set up a gain antenna on a public beach will definitely make you the "center of attraction" for multiple onlookers (some of whom may not have your best interests in mind). In addition to all of this are the 5 Hong Kong Locals, and a maze of Mainland Chinese stations plastering the band from 531-1593 KHz.

On the last couple of days I discovered that if I stuck the 7.5 inch loopstick CC Skywave SSB model outside the security window of our 12th floor apartment in a Shatin high rise building I could track down long range DX from Eastern Europe (1413-Vesti FM and 1548-TWR), Africa (1431-Radio Sawa in Djibouti) and the Middle East (1413-BBC in Oman) around sunrise. If I had known that trick from the beginning the long range DX results would have been much better-- but we do plan a return trip next April :-)

<<<   Back to HK DXing:  I found it fascinating to DX in HK with just via a barefoot Sony ICF-SW7600GR (all I could take - three recorders/two radios but no loop, alas) but never heard the farther out stuff Gary scored there simply as I was just recording what MWDX just sounded like in HK w/o trying for exotic DX (the novelty!!).  Just would "stumble" upon it as I band-scanned.  I did enjoy several clear receptions of Philippine Island DX in HK  (Kowloon) and that was really neat (711/1350/etc.)!   >>>

Yes the Philippine stations are fairly easy to track down in HK, as long as you choose frequencies that aren't plastered by Chinese locals. Many of the Philippine stations were daytimes on the Cape D'Aguilar ocean cliff (at the southeast tip of HK island), and on the somewhat polluted public beach of Macau. But several Philippine stations (on 666, 702 and 1530) became real pests in covering up long range targets around sunrise, since they tend to boom in with their salt water propagation path.

<<<   BTW, re. Hawaii - get land blockage to Honolulu by all means to knock down the obnoxious amount of those "locals" there - Kona is not good for that nor Poipu either (re. HNL overload) - I used to go to east Hawaii - Kamoamoa (now gone under lava!) or the fab MacKenzie SP (still there for now!) and rolled out Bevs to k/o Honolulu signals *dramatically.*
BUT, Malaekahana Bay on Oahu's north Shore near Kahuku/Laie is wonderful to get rid of HNL overload and have DX as fine as on an Outer Island locale (but NOT facing a water-path to Honolulu!) and quick and cheap to get to (I spent one week in a tent at Malaekahana (Friends of Mal. Bay CG - private) and no noise/quiet and easy to taxi too). There in the north Oahu shore, the groundwaves from HNL are really attenuated and DX creams them!   Not in Kona though, but Kona is wonderful for DU DX unlike North Oahu's windward side (island attenuation to big there for DU).   >>>

Honolulu QRM is a major issue throughout the Hawaiian islands, and after two trips to Kona and one to Poipu, I can almost tell you the formats of all the Hawaiian pests. No Hawaiian location is perfect for DXing in all directions, although Poipu is fairly unique in having a straight salt water shot to most long range DX continents, as well as a far westerly location to take advantage of extended sunrise enhancement into the Middle East and Africa. Poipu does also have a salt water path to the Oahu pests, but I discovered that very late in sunrise enhancement pests like 690-KHNR do taper off enough to track down DX like 693-Bangladesh. On the frequencies with no Honolulu pests you can really run wild in Poipu, with Oman, Egypt, Iran, India, Bangladesh, Myanmar, Cambodia etc. all received last November. This coming November we plan a major effort with 3 American DXers (Craig Barnes, Chris Black and yours truly) and one Australian DXer (Chris from the Melbourne area). All of these DXers will have the latest "Frequent Flyer" FSL's, PVC bases and souped-up Ultralight radios to play with, so we should score some serious fun :-)

73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)



 
 
 


Re: DXing in Hong Kong-- the Overall Verdict

C B
 

Hi Steve!

Thanks for chiming in! I did a bit of FSL equipped (thanks Gary!) TP DXing near Princeville a couple of years ago, followed by a stay on the west side of the big island. As a landlocked TP DXer I am not as well versed in TP DXing as the PNW folks. I was told I didn't do too bad with the northern Asian stations from my Princeville location by more experienced folks. The impact of HNL stations was a bit more limited there. Thanks to the folks who put the AZ Project together, which provided me with azimuthal projections which I used to help select my Hawaii locations. DU TP DX from the west side of the big island was pretty decent, which I suspected when I planned my trip.  Northern Asians, not so much from my slightly inland location. I may need to revisit Princeville. Hopefully they have repaired their roads after last year's catastrophic flooding the north side of Kauai. A few years back I tried some FSL equipped TP DXing from Gualala. It struck me as a bit close to the Bay Area, as reflected by my limited results. For this year, I am eagerly anticipating another session at Rockworks on the OR coast as well as a TP DXing session in Poipu with a few PNW TP Dxers. I always learn a lot from those folks. I have fantasized about setting up a variety of antennae in different spots in Hawaii. The southwest corner of the Big Island comes to mind. I wouldn't mind returning to Tofino also, if I could just persuade those in charge of MW propagation to treat me more generously than they did last fall, hi!

73,

Craig Barnes
Wheat Ridge, CO (reading NHP's recent daily logs with much empathy!)

On Monday, May 20, 2019, 4:26:29 PM MDT, Gary DeBock via Groups.Io <D1028Gary@...> wrote:


Welcome Steve,

Thanks for the very interesting report of your overseas DXing activities, and sorry for the delayed posting of your message (the Groups.io system requires moderator approval for a new member message on the first day, to avoid spam messages).

<<<   In November 2013 I spent 3 nights in HK after concluding a 12-day Mainland China tour.  I agree with Gary that HK is so crowded and too many "observers watching" that rolling out a Bev. antenna on an HK beach (as I have loved to do 100s of times in Hawaii when I lived there between '86 to '91 on and off) and elsewhere is nigh impossible.  So loops -- for their gain/directivity/noise-nulling abilities are wonderful and have nulling capabilities "on the fly" that Bevs do not.  In Hawaii, a ong Bev. really knocks down the high-angle Honolulu cram of signals to the point that DX overwhelms them in comparison to a loop or short-wire "A/B" testing I did there.   >>>

Hong Kong is really a tough venue for long range AM-DXing, and I had multiple warnings form Japanese, Australian and NZ DXers to lower my expectations. "Conventional" DXing with sensitive portables in a motel room is unlikely to accomplish very much, and attempting to set up a gain antenna on a public beach will definitely make you the "center of attraction" for multiple onlookers (some of whom may not have your best interests in mind). In addition to all of this are the 5 Hong Kong Locals, and a maze of Mainland Chinese stations plastering the band from 531-1593 KHz.

On the last couple of days I discovered that if I stuck the 7.5 inch loopstick CC Skywave SSB model outside the security window of our 12th floor apartment in a Shatin high rise building I could track down long range DX from Eastern Europe (1413-Vesti FM and 1548-TWR), Africa (1431-Radio Sawa in Djibouti) and the Middle East (1413-BBC in Oman) around sunrise. If I had known that trick from the beginning the long range DX results would have been much better-- but we do plan a return trip next April :-)

<<<   Back to HK DXing:  I found it fascinating to DX in HK with just via a barefoot Sony ICF-SW7600GR (all I could take - three recorders/two radios but no loop, alas) but never heard the farther out stuff Gary scored there simply as I was just recording what MWDX just sounded like in HK w/o trying for exotic DX (the novelty!!).  Just would "stumble" upon it as I band-scanned.  I did enjoy several clear receptions of Philippine Island DX in HK  (Kowloon) and that was really neat (711/1350/etc.)!   >>>

Yes the Philippine stations are fairly easy to track down in HK, as long as you choose frequencies that aren't plastered by Chinese locals. Many of the Philippine stations were daytimes on the Cape D'Aguilar ocean cliff (at the southeast tip of HK island), and on the somewhat polluted public beach of Macau. But several Philippine stations (on 666, 702 and 1530) became real pests in covering up long range targets around sunrise, since they tend to boom in with their salt water propagation path.

<<<   BTW, re. Hawaii - get land blockage to Honolulu by all means to knock down the obnoxious amount of those "locals" there - Kona is not good for that nor Poipu either (re. HNL overload) - I used to go to east Hawaii - Kamoamoa (now gone under lava!) or the fab MacKenzie SP (still there for now!) and rolled out Bevs to k/o Honolulu signals *dramatically.*
BUT, Malaekahana Bay on Oahu's north Shore near Kahuku/Laie is wonderful to get rid of HNL overload and have DX as fine as on an Outer Island locale (but NOT facing a water-path to Honolulu!) and quick and cheap to get to (I spent one week in a tent at Malaekahana (Friends of Mal. Bay CG - private) and no noise/quiet and easy to taxi too). There in the north Oahu shore, the groundwaves from HNL are really attenuated and DX creams them!   Not in Kona though, but Kona is wonderful for DU DX unlike North Oahu's windward side (island attenuation to big there for DU).   >>>

Honolulu QRM is a major issue throughout the Hawaiian islands, and after two trips to Kona and one to Poipu, I can almost tell you the formats of all the Hawaiian pests. No Hawaiian location is perfect for DXing in all directions, although Poipu is fairly unique in having a straight salt water shot to most long range DX continents, as well as a far westerly location to take advantage of extended sunrise enhancement into the Middle East and Africa. Poipu does also have a salt water path to the Oahu pests, but I discovered that very late in sunrise enhancement pests like 690-KHNR do taper off enough to track down DX like 693-Bangladesh. On the frequencies with no Honolulu pests you can really run wild in Poipu, with Oman, Egypt, Iran, India, Bangladesh, Myanmar, Cambodia etc. all received last November. This coming November we plan a major effort with 3 American DXers (Craig Barnes, Chris Black and yours truly) and one Australian DXer (Chris from the Melbourne area). All of these DXers will have the latest "Frequent Flyer" FSL's, PVC bases and souped-up Ultralight radios to play with, so we should score some serious fun :-)

73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)



 
 
 


Re: DXing in Hong Kong-- the Overall Verdict

Gary DeBock
 

Welcome Steve,

Thanks for the very interesting report of your overseas DXing activities, and sorry for the delayed posting of your message (the Groups.io system requires moderator approval for a new member message on the first day, to avoid spam messages).

<<<   In November 2013 I spent 3 nights in HK after concluding a 12-day Mainland China tour.  I agree with Gary that HK is so crowded and too many "observers watching" that rolling out a Bev. antenna on an HK beach (as I have loved to do 100s of times in Hawaii when I lived there between '86 to '91 on and off) and elsewhere is nigh impossible.  So loops -- for their gain/directivity/noise-nulling abilities are wonderful and have nulling capabilities "on the fly" that Bevs do not.  In Hawaii, a ong Bev. really knocks down the high-angle Honolulu cram of signals to the point that DX overwhelms them in comparison to a loop or short-wire "A/B" testing I did there.   >>>

Hong Kong is really a tough venue for long range AM-DXing, and I had multiple warnings form Japanese, Australian and NZ DXers to lower my expectations. "Conventional" DXing with sensitive portables in a motel room is unlikely to accomplish very much, and attempting to set up a gain antenna on a public beach will definitely make you the "center of attraction" for multiple onlookers (some of whom may not have your best interests in mind). In addition to all of this are the 5 Hong Kong Locals, and a maze of Mainland Chinese stations plastering the band from 531-1593 KHz.

On the last couple of days I discovered that if I stuck the 7.5 inch loopstick CC Skywave SSB model outside the security window of our 12th floor apartment in a Shatin high rise building I could track down long range DX from Eastern Europe (1413-Vesti FM and 1548-TWR), Africa (1431-Radio Sawa in Djibouti) and the Middle East (1413-BBC in Oman) around sunrise. If I had known that trick from the beginning the long range DX results would have been much better-- but we do plan a return trip next April :-)

<<<   Back to HK DXing:  I found it fascinating to DX in HK with just via a barefoot Sony ICF-SW7600GR (all I could take - three recorders/two radios but no loop, alas) but never heard the farther out stuff Gary scored there simply as I was just recording what MWDX just sounded like in HK w/o trying for exotic DX (the novelty!!).  Just would "stumble" upon it as I band-scanned.  I did enjoy several clear receptions of Philippine Island DX in HK  (Kowloon) and that was really neat (711/1350/etc.)!   >>>

Yes the Philippine stations are fairly easy to track down in HK, as long as you choose frequencies that aren't plastered by Chinese locals. Many of the Philippine stations were daytimes on the Cape D'Aguilar ocean cliff (at the southeast tip of HK island), and on the somewhat polluted public beach of Macau. But several Philippine stations (on 666, 702 and 1530) became real pests in covering up long range targets around sunrise, since they tend to boom in with their salt water propagation path.

<<<   BTW, re. Hawaii - get land blockage to Honolulu by all means to knock down the obnoxious amount of those "locals" there - Kona is not good for that nor Poipu either (re. HNL overload) - I used to go to east Hawaii - Kamoamoa (now gone under lava!) or the fab MacKenzie SP (still there for now!) and rolled out Bevs to k/o Honolulu signals *dramatically.*
BUT, Malaekahana Bay on Oahu's north Shore near Kahuku/Laie is wonderful to get rid of HNL overload and have DX as fine as on an Outer Island locale (but NOT facing a water-path to Honolulu!) and quick and cheap to get to (I spent one week in a tent at Malaekahana (Friends of Mal. Bay CG - private) and no noise/quiet and easy to taxi too). There in the north Oahu shore, the groundwaves from HNL are really attenuated and DX creams them!   Not in Kona though, but Kona is wonderful for DU DX unlike North Oahu's windward side (island attenuation to big there for DU).   >>>

Honolulu QRM is a major issue throughout the Hawaiian islands, and after two trips to Kona and one to Poipu, I can almost tell you the formats of all the Hawaiian pests. No Hawaiian location is perfect for DXing in all directions, although Poipu is fairly unique in having a straight salt water shot to most long range DX continents, as well as a far westerly location to take advantage of extended sunrise enhancement into the Middle East and Africa. Poipu does also have a salt water path to the Oahu pests, but I discovered that very late in sunrise enhancement pests like 690-KHNR do taper off enough to track down DX like 693-Bangladesh. On the frequencies with no Honolulu pests you can really run wild in Poipu, with Oman, Egypt, Iran, India, Bangladesh, Myanmar, Cambodia etc. all received last November. This coming November we plan a major effort with 3 American DXers (Craig Barnes, Chris Black and yours truly) and one Australian DXer (Chris from the Melbourne area). All of these DXers will have the latest "Frequent Flyer" FSL's, PVC bases and souped-up Ultralight radios to play with, so we should score some serious fun :-)

73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)



 
 
 


Re: DXing in Hong Kong-- the Overall Verdict

Stephen P. McGreevy
 

Hello Gary and the UL group. 

Although I don't have some of the newer "UL" portables (save for some very tiny but amazingly sensitive portables such as a "TIVDIO v-111" obtained on eBay for USD10! I cannot figure  out how to get it to go to 9 kHz steps, alas!)

I have had (since the early 80s) various good/exc. quality Sony portables (ICF-7600D/SW7600GR, etc.). I have two of the ICF-SW7600GR portables and I can say they are truly great and reliable enough for me for my so-called "UL-DXing."

Like Gary, I have extensively traveled abroad and in North America, using my Sonys either just barefoot (such as hotel-room DXing in CHina and HK) and Europe/Russia/etc.  ) or coupled to a loop or even wire via a loop and wire coupling turn for hi-Q results. Not really so hi-performance as a FSL though.

As such, this group and specifically, Gary's presentations amaze me - so great and cool to see what is going on in this ever-changing realm of portable DXpeditioning and the small radios and new loop designs!.

In November 2013 I spent 3 nights in HK after concluding a 12-day Mainland China tour.  I agree with Gary that HK is so crowded and too many "observers watching" that rolling out a Bev. antenna on an HK beach (as I have loved to do 100s of times in Hawaii when I lived there between '86 to '91 on and off) and elsewhere is nigh impossible.  So loops -- for their gain/directivity/noise-nulling abilities are wonderful and have nulling capabilities "on the fly" that Bevs do not.  In Hawaii, a ong Bev. really knocks down the high-angle Honolulu cram of signals to the point that DX overwhelms them in comparison to a loop or short-wire "A/B" testing I did there.

So much of my own "UL" DXpeditioning has been barefoot SOnys and or small loops I cna pack in my suitcase but not ferrite-based loops with their large field for size, so I have to compromise with weight and other limitations while traveling.

I used to extensively TP DX at Point Reyes - perhaps many here have seen my Internet Archive pages on this.  With that written, Gary's present efforts at the "Kiwi site" i.e. Oregon clifff-side DX is a new take on DXpeditioning and should be heartily praised.

Back to HK DXing:  I found it fascinating to DX in HK with just via a barefoot Sony ICF-SW7600GR (all I could take - three recorders/two radios but no loop, alas) but never heard the farther out stuff Gary scored there simply as I was just recording what MWDX just sounded like in HK w/o trying for exotic DX (the novelty!!).  Just would "stumble" upon it as I band-scanned.  I did enjoy several clear receptions of Philippine Island DX in HK  (Kowloon) and that was really neat (711/1350/etc.)!

Keep up the amazing reports and great job, Gary and friends here... I think in August it would so cool to join a DXped. to Rocklands, Oregon (I lived in Lakeview for 1 year in 1996-7 and even there the TP DX was superior by far to Inyo County, CA (not really pleased at the band-cram down here nor the area or CA in general, save for a few fine secret desert DX places not over-run by "tourists" hi! (I see no one even on the 3-day holidays!)

BTW - those invasive RVers whom park overnight and snarl at your Rocklands DX-site group have **no right to do so** - you can tell them they are illegally parking and you are 'radio engineers' (true!) checking station strengths as "work" (true sorta) and if they get snarly then warn them in this... - just a thought - politely but firmly of course...) RVers are an invasive species of "campers" -- too many of whom are too uppity (INMNSHO) and "hate" tent/car campers... weird... so I have heard dozens of times... alas.

BTW, re. Hawaii - get land blockage to Honolulu by all means to knock down the obnoxious amount of those "locals" there - Kona is not good for that nor Poipu either (re. HNL overload) - I used to go to east Hawaii - Kamoamoa (now gone under lava!) or the fab MacKenzie SP (still there for now!) and rolled out Bevs to k/o Honolulu signals *dramatically.*

BUT, Malaekahana Bay on Oahu's north Shore near Kahuku/Laie is wonderful to get rid of HNL overload and have DX as fine as on an Outer Island locale (but NOT facing a water-path to Honolulu!) and quick and cheap to get to (I spent one week in a tent at Malaekahana (Friends of Mal. Bay CG - private) and no noise/quiet and easy to taxi too). There in the north Oahu shore, the groundwaves from HNL are really attenuated and DX creams them!   Not in Kona though, but Kona is wonderful for DU DX unlike North Oahu's windward side (island attenuation to big there for DU).

Some initial thoughts... thanks much for this fasc. group!

73 for now - Steve McGreevy - N6NKS


(Sort of) Long Range DXing in Hong Kong

Gary DeBock
 

     Prior to our April trip multiple warnings had been received from Japan, Australia and New Zealand that Hong Kong was a very tough DXing environment, and that long range expectations should be modest at best. Upon arrival in the ultra-crowded environment I was getting a crash course in RFI noise, restricted private beaches and the almost total lack of privacy and security at public beaches around sunrise or sunset. Medium wave DXing as a hobby didn't seem to exist in Hong Kong, and despite the numerous eBay sellers offering Ultralight radios, a very thorough search couldn't turn up any such radios for sale in local stores.

     A huge collection of Mainland Chinese and Hong Kong pests plastered the entire band from top to bottom, to the extent that I hadn't even been able to track down a single station from either Japan or Korea for the first five days.  After five days (out of seven) my results were limited to Hong Kong, China, Taiwan, the Philippines, Vietnam, Thailand, Kampuchea and Bangladesh. Setting up the 5" FSL around sunrise or sunset would have been a great idea, except that there was no accessible public beach offering decent security or privacy for the idea-- and the other Hong Kong venues seemed saturated with tall buildings and RFI. It was a Catch 22 situation that seemed to rule out any gain antenna setup, which in turn would probably rule out any long range results.  No wonder why the vast majority of visiting hobbyists write the place off for serious DXing!

     There was still one wacky idea that could be tried, however. I had brought along a 7.5 inch loopstick C.Crane Skywave SSB model as my main receiver, and by desperate experimentation I had discovered that if I stuck the entire radio outside of the jail-like security window of our 12th story apartment in a downtown high rise building I could somehow escape all of the RFI emanating from the entire building. I had absolutely no idea which DXing direction was optimized by this wild maneuver, and even after sticking the Ultralight out of the window the radio was still surrounded by apartment buildings on all four sides (see photo). But since two DXing friends in Japan (Hiroyuki Okamura and Satoshi Miyauchi) had courteously supplied me with a list of big gun Middle East, African and European MW stations that they typically can receive in Japan around sunrise with decent gain antennas on favorable ocean beaches, what did I have to lose by going after them with a 7.5 inch loopstick in the downtown Hong Kong concrete jungle?

     Hiroyuki-san and Satoshi-san's list included such exotic fare as 702-BBC (Oman), 720-BBC (Cyprus), 917-Nigeria, 936-Iran, 990-Radio Sawa (Cyprus), 999-TWR (Moldova), 1134-Kuwait, 1233-Monte Carlo, 1413-Vesti FM (Moldova), 1413-BBC (Oman), 1431-Radio Sawa (Djibouti), 1449-Iran and 1548-TWR (Moldova). It's probably safe to say that no other 7.5 inch loopstick in radio history has ever been drafted into such a wildly optimistic long range DXing adventure.

     As I stuck the souped-up Ultralight outside the window at 6 AM local time (2200 UTC) on April 6th I gave a try for anything on 702, 1413 or 1530 kHz (which was one of my own wildly optimistic additions, VOA in Sao Tome). 702 was plastered by China and a Filipino, and 1530 was ruined by another Filipino with horrible audio. But 1413 had something relatively weak in a Slavic language, which didn't sound Asian at all. After recording the station and posting it on Real DX the language was identified by Mauno and Dmitry as Russian, which matched the language format of Vesti FM in Grigoriopol. Moldova (at 4,869 miles/ 7,835 km). There was some confusion because I still didn't know that a morning session in Hong Kong at 0600 local time on April 7th was actually 2200 UTC on April 6th UTC time, but wow, what a shocker!

    After this confirmation that a souped-up Ultralight could indeed be competitive in the Hong Kong concrete jungle for receiving Eastern European DX around sunrise, I went for broke the next early morning, tracking down decent signals from 1413-BBC in Pashto from Oman at 1828 UTC, 1431-Radio Sawa in Arabic from Djibouti (East Africa) at 2143 UTC, and a somewhat weaker signal from 1548-TWR in Bulgarian from Moldova just after sign on at 1900 UTC. Time was running out for the Hong Kong trip, however, and despite great eagerness to go after more wacky and wild DX like this all the gear needed to be packed away for the return trip shortly thereafter. I guess the moral of the story is that no matter how hopeless your DXing situation seems, never hesitate to push your luck for all it is worth-- your radio just might pull off some shocking receptions against the odds.

 73 and Good DX,

Gary DeBock (DXing in Hong Kong from April 2-8)

All receptions made by a stand-alone 7.5" loopstick C.Crane Skywave SSB Ultralight           


1413 BBC A'Seela, Oman (800 kW)    BBC foreign service program in Pashto featuring a male/ female format with strong interval music from 8 seconds to 23 seconds: (thanks to C.K. Raman for the language and station identification) https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/a3z0gtbvmyd434lrjjck24akzvsx3knl

 1413 Vesti FM Grigoriopol. Moldova (500 kW)    Russian language at a modest level at 2205 on 4-6 (thanks to Mauno and Dmitry for the language and station identification)  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/38vm67oda2jysgwlbyn03ra0etnrakv9

 1431 Radio Sawa Djibouti (600 kW)    Female in fairly strong Arabic at 2143 on 4-7 with "Radio Sawa" ID at 5 seconds (thanks to Chuck and Bill W. for the language and station identification)  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/tuke49dichs8erpycbb9mivkr9dx45fo

 1548 TWR Grigoriopol, Moldova (500 kW)    Presumed Bulgarian at a modest level at 1903 on 4-7 after apparent sign on at 1900 UTC (thanks to Jari S. and Mauno for station information)  https://dreamcrafts.box.com/s/6vbkqauxw6l3bsa0t9fha5ewk8t0v4jy

 


Re: Daytime DX at Hong Kong's Dream Ocean Cliff Site

Gary DeBock
 

Thanks Chris, Paul and Jay,

Your comments are all greatly appreciated.

DXing in Hong Kong can be quite interesting once you get away from the downtown RFI zoo. I think that a lot of travelers write the place off for serious DXing purposes after trying to listen in downtown motel rooms, but there are a lot of isolated islands that have good potential for long range DX, assuming that a DXer can listen around sunrise (before many of the Mainland Chinese pests sign on).

73, Gary


Re: Daytime DX at Hong Kong's Dream Ocean Cliff Site

radiojayallen
 

Gary,

Thanks for "taking us" on your trip with you...what a great DX story!

Jay

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