Date   

Re: Received E100

lrdheat
 

I have noticed that the E100's display is off by 1 KHz...to correctly tune 640 KHz, one would have to tune in on 641 KHz. This is true on sw frequencies as well. Perhaps this explains the disapperance of the het that you heard on 640. On sw, the filter is pretty sharp. QRM that appears from stations 5 KHz away often are much reduced when taking the incorrect frequency being displayed into account (9410 KHz should be tuned as 9411KHz, for example).


--- On Wed, 5/14/08, Gary Kinsman wrote:
From: Gary Kinsman
Subject: [ultralightdx] Received E100
To: ultralightdx@...
Date: Wednesday, May 14, 2008, 11:18 PM

Hello all,

I received my E100 from Durham Radio today. It sure is small; it
looks like a shrunken E10 (yes, I have one of those too.)

Overall, I like the radio, but it does have some quirks. For one,
the tuning knob is very sensitive and "jumpy" -- it doesn't always
move in 1 kHz steps (sometimes 0, sometimes 2, sometimes -1). The
E10 does this too.

Also, when tuning from a low MW frequency to a high MW frequency,
there is a "chirpy" sound from the speaker (e.g., if the radio is
tuned to 550 kHz, then it is tuned by the keypad to 1700 kHz, or if
the radio is tuned to 520 kHz and the Down button is pressed to get
to 1710 kHz). Is this sound normal?

I really like the keypad and the 1 kHz tuning step. These are very
hard to find in such a small radio. KFI 640 has a nasty het on the
E100, but tuning to 641 gets rid of it. (Oddly, the DT-220V has no
het on 640.)

The E100 seems to be a little more sensitive than the DT-220V, but
only if the whip antenna is rotated away from the ferrite bar, as
Gary DeBock previously mentioned.

Oddly, the Quantum Q-Stick doesn't work well with the E100; it does
work well with the E10 and the 7600GR.

Regards,
Gary



Re: Transplants: Are We Missing Something Here?

John H. Bryant <bjohnorcas@...>
 

Gary,

I understand what you are saying - that with a small plastic radio and noise hitting the circuitry, shielding the loop stick is unlikely to improve rejection of noise from the local environment - and I think that you are likely correct. However, when I used that Ramsey unit that worked so well in Santiago, it was running my Eton E1, which is a plastic case crammed with circuitry, of course.....  That being the case... this is one test that I've just gotta try.

I think that I'll go "whole hog" as usual and use RG-174 mini-coax for the run between the circuit board and the bar... connecting the shield of the coax to the ground plane of the board and to  an aluminum foil shield on the bar.  The other reason that I gotta try this one is that the material costs are near zero and its an easy + very reversible test.  As you say, probably won't work, but I just gotta try.

ON ANOTHER ISSUE:
Gary, great catch on the influence of the whip antenna on the bar of the E100.  The easiest fix in the world, of course, is to unscrew that little Phillips screw at the antenna base (back side of the radio) and just lift that puppy outta there. It leaves `a hole in the case and destroys FM and SW, but if the radio is dedicated to MW DXing, it seems a winner all around.  Of course, to get back to factory specs, all you do is put the whip back in place and tighten the screw. I know that you are aware of all of this, Gary, but folks who haven't opened the back of the E100 may not be .

Is there something that I'm missing that is a problem with removing the whip... other than the loss of FM and SW??? Removing the whip gives me a perfect-sized hole to run those two pieces of mini-coax thru, of course.

John B.
 






At 03:38 AM 5/15/2008 -0400, you wrote:

John,
 
     Ultralight radios, by nature, are plastic-enclosed electronic devices subjehis is one that Ict to RF noise issues.  Shielding the leads to external ferrite bars wouldn't accomplish much, since the RF hash would still strike the external loopstick (or booster bar), as well as the internal circuitry (plastic usually doesn't shield anything).
    DXpeditioners desiring great Ultralight reception either need to have an RF-hash free room (like the famous Room 15) or get out of an RF-hash area, and walk toward the beach.
    During the last fruitless DXpedition to Westport with Guy Atkins (May 4), our room in Westport was full of RF hash, TV heterodynes, etc.  We ended up driving to the beach at Grayland (4 AM), only to find a steady stream of clam diggers proceeding to the beach in their RF-hash producing beater cars, hi.
 
                                                                                         73,  Gary
 
    




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Re: E100 Alignment Quirks

Dennis Gibson <wb6tnb@...>
 

Fortunately my E10 does not suffer from this problem.

--- In ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com, "Gary DeBock" <D1028Gary@...> wrote:

First of all, Eton's design for this radio has a significant
gaffe, which leads to reduced AM-band sensitivity. The SW antenna
folds down in a position very close and parallel to the AM loopstick,
reducing the AM sensitivity greatly whenever the SW antenna is not in
a vertical position. For serious AM DXing, make sure the SW antenna
is vertical, and you will notice a significant gain in sensitivity.


E100 received

Gary Kinsman
 

Hello all,

I received my E100 from Durham Radio today. It sure is small; it
looks like a shrunken E10 (yes, I have one of those too.)

Overall, I like the radio, but it does have some quirks. For one,
the tuning knob is very sensitive and "jumpy" -- it doesn't always
move in 1 kHz steps (sometimes 0, sometimes 2, sometimes -1). The
E10 does this too.

Also, when tuning from a low MW frequency to a high MW frequency,
there is a "chirpy" sound from the speaker (e.g., if the radio is
tuned to 550 kHz, then it is tuned by the keypad to 1700 kHz, or if
the radio is tuned to 520 kHz and the Down button is pressed to get
to 1710 kHz). Is this sound normal?

I really like the keypad and the 1 kHz tuning step. These are very
hard to find in such a small radio. KFI 640 has a nasty het on the
E100, but tuning to 641 gets rid of it. (Oddly, the DT200VX has no
het on 640.)

The E100 seems to be a little more sensitive than the DT200VX, but
only if the whip antenna is rotated away from the ferrite bar, as
Gary DeBock previously mentioned.

Oddly, the Quantum Q-Stick doesn't work well with the E100; it does
work well with the E10 and the 7600GR.

Regards,
Gary


Re: Transplants: Are We Missing Something Here?

Gary DeBock
 

John,
 
     Ultralight radios, by nature, are plastic-enclosed electronic devices subject to RF noise issues.  Shielding the leads to external ferrite bars wouldn't accomplish much, since the RF hash would still strike the external loopstick (or booster bar), as well as the internal circuitry (plastic usually doesn't shield anything).
    DXpeditioners desiring great Ultralight reception either need to have an RF-hash free room (like the famous Room 15) or get out of an RF-hash area, and walk toward the beach.
    During the last fruitless DXpedition to Westport with Guy Atkins (May 4), our room in Westport was full of RF hash, TV heterodynes, etc.  We ended up driving to the beach at Grayland (4 AM), only to find a steady stream of clam diggers proceeding to the beach in their RF-hash producing beater cars, hi.
 
                                                                                         73,  Gary
 
    




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Re: Received E100

Gary DeBock
 

Hi Gary,
 
     Your comments on the Durham Radio E100 are pretty typical.  I've had four Durham E100's for alignment, and these all act about the same.  Out of the box, high-band sensitivity is usually very good, but low band is usually anemic.  Low-band alignment (on the loopstick) usually improves the performance, but on two of four radios, I've had to cut plastic mounting brackets to peak the loopstick coil on a 600 kHz signal.
     The chirpy sound is normal--  a digital tuning anomaly shared by the C.Crane SWP and other small digital designs.
     As you noted, the SW antenna on an E100 really needs to be in the vertical position, or AM-band sensitivity will be reduced considerably.  This is true of all E100's.
     The stock ferrite bar on an E100 is really a mediocre flat design, very skimpy on ferrite.  Presumably, this is the reason why a Q-stick doesn't couple up with it very well.  A 7" loopstick transplant (extremely easy to do, by the way) improves performance considerably.  Have fun with your new radio!
 
                                                                                              73,  Gary DeBock
 
 
    




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Updated First and Records List is on dxer.ca

John H. Bryant <bjohnorcas@...>
 


I've just uploaded an updated Firsts and Records list to the Ultralight Files area of DXer.ca. Records as of mid-May 2008. Only one change in the past month: Allen Willie of Newfoundland was the first to hear Jordan as a TA on an Ultralight: Radio Jordan on 1494 kHz. *** Congratulations, Allen!!!*****

Ultralighters in the Pacific Northwest of the US and Canada are getting geared up for their DownUnder season, so more Firsts and Records may be established on that front in the next couple of months. Stand By!

I was impressed that 145 DXers had downloaded the April 18 update of the Firsts and Records! Obviously, there are a lot more folks interested in Ultralighting than there are members on this group. Glad to hear it.  I guess the other option would be that one DXer had the mad desire to wall paper his shack with multiple copies of our Firsts and Records List :>)

Linda and I are headed out for the Northwest at dawn on Friday, after I spend most of tomorrow down in Oklahoma City. We'll be on the road about a week, spending some time in the interior of Wyoming and hitting Yellowstone National Park.  The week or so before Memorial Day, they plow the roads and open the lodge for crew training and accept the few guests that arrive.  The animals are mostly down in the low country, since the high country is still snow-packed.  There are only a few guests in the park and its sort of magical. Buffalo, grizzlies and elk don't QSL regularly, but they sure are fun to watch!

Even the Old Faithful Lodge has Wi-Fi, so I'll be checking into my other addiction from time to time.

John B.
Stillwater, Oklahoma, USA
Rcvrs: WiNRADiO 313e, Eton e1, NRD-535(kiwa-mods) + Flocka Ultralights
Antennas: 700' NE/SW mini-Bev, Wellbrook Phased Array (pre-production version)


Transplants: Are We Missing Something Here?

John H. Bryant <bjohnorcas@...>
 

When I went to Easter Island last year, I took with me a Ramsey active antenna based on a 5/8" x 6" ferrite rod. The Ramsey PR bragged about its Faraday shielding and the fact that the antenna operated in the magnetic realm, isolated from most urban, man-made noise. I bought the thing to use during my time in Santiago, Chile, knowing full well the reputation of older Latin American cities as being RF noise swamps. Santiago was a wonderful city (I want to go back) but the radio dial was just as advertised.... constant S-9 noise from the power grid and other stuff. The Ramsey antenna was a real revelation.... it worked like a bandit and I was able to DX, almost noise-free.

On the way home, I had to tear the antenna apart to rid myself of the PVC housing (another story). The shielding was simply a rectangle of aluminum foil laid on the coil and bar, with a 1/8" gap running longitudinally down the bar. An electrical connection to the ground plane of the little amp/control box and thence to the radio was made by a paper clip inserted under the foil, with the ground wire soldered to the paper clip. There was probably a piece of paper as insulation between the foil and the bar.

That was my first experience with a shielded loop antenna and there was a lot to love about it in an urban environment. Are we missing a bet by not shielding our external bars, even if they are a Booster Bar??????

John B.













John B.
Stillwater, Oklahoma, USA
Rcvrs: WiNRADiO 313e, Eton e1, NRD-535(kiwa-mods)
Antennas: 700' NE/SW mini-Bev, Wellbrook Phased Array (pre-production version)


Re: Eton E100 Performs Well with 7" Loopstick Transplant

Gary DeBock
 

Hi John,

Dirty rat, indeed! :>)

Right after I posted my E100 7" transplant progress report, I
noticed photos of your E100 12" transplant project. This was after I
had increased the loopstick length of my own E100 transplant to
13.25"... purely by coincidence, of course.

The 13.25" loopstick E100 is kind of a mixed bag, with increased
sensitivity over the 7" model, but also with increased urban RF
issues (slop and spurs). The Vancouver RF pounding Orcas Island will
probably not be very well-mannered in your 12" model, I would surmise.

A full daytime "shootout" was conducted between the analog 14"
SRF-39FP and the digital 13.25" E100. The hot-rodded Prison Radio
easily sentenced the Expanded Eton to second place, in sensitivity.
The E100 was more competitive with the SRF-39FP on the high end,
however. Selectivity was a tradeoff, with the E100 showing better
selectivity on the low end, and the SRF-39FP on the high end. The
E100 has more spurious mixing products, and a nuclear-powered KSUH-
1450 image on 540 (absent on the Prison Radio).

For those hobbyists considering an E100 loopstick transplant,
the 7" model provides a lot of "bang for the buck." It will increase
sensitivity greatly, while maintaining good selectivity and spurious
rejection. 14" and 21" models should be reserved for hard-core
DXpedition fanatics, who seek out isolated ocean beaches in the
ultimate quest for Ultralight excitement, IMHO. The E100 has some
very good points (with 200 memories and digital tuning convenience),
and its extreme convenience for loopstick transplants makes it an
obvious first choice for anyone dreaming of super Ultralight
sensitivity.

73, Gary

--- In ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com, "John H. Bryant"
<bjohnorcas@...> wrote:

Gary, you dirty rat!

I had hoped to beat you to one of the transplants... as you say,
the
easiest, the E100. Unfortunately, packing for our migration to the
Northwest has stalled progress on my 12" transplant, using my last
Big Bar.. I did get the base and mounting board done, though and
have posted two pictures to our Photo Section. Its the second
album
in line right now.
http://ph.groups.yahoo.com/group/ultralightdx/photos

I hope to make this thing somewhat modular, so I can plug in the
E100
or pop it out and, using the same board, bar and coil, plug in a
tuning cap and use it as an external booster bar for other
radios...
may take some external electronic trickery or may not work at all.

In any case, I'll be able to compare a stock E100 riding on my
existing 12" external booster bar with this set up where the 12"
bar
is integral to the unit.

Frankly, I expect this thing to be swamped in the RF cesspool of
Victoria/Vancouver, but I'm very hopeful for success at Grayland.

Congratulations on the E100 transplant and continuing to break new
ground for us, Gary!

John B.




At 03:47 AM 5/12/2008 +0000, you wrote:

Hello Guys,

It what was probably the easiest AM-DX loopstick transplant ever
performed, a 7" loopstick from a Channel Master Super Fringe (model
6515) was soldered into an E100, resulting in greatly improved
sensitivity (and apparently maintaining great selectivity).

For a variety of reasons, this transplant is extremely easy to
accomplish, even for those who feel intimidated by a soldering
iron.
There are only two connections to the stock loopstick, both easily
accessible on the back circuit board. The stock loopstick is
removed
very easily with an exacto knife, or even a flat screwdriver.

If you are lucky enough to get a Channel Master Super Fringe
model 6515 off of eBay (one went for $8 this morning), you don't
even
need an LCR meter to do the transplant. The stock coil has an
inductance of .297mh, almost the same as the Channel Master long
coil, on the 7" ferrite bar. Simply solder in the Channel Master
long coil on the 7" loopstick, and peak it on a 600 kHz signal, as
described in John Bryant's E100 alignment file.

The 7" loopstick E100 "smokes" a stock unit in DXing, and
provides stiff competition for the 6.25" Sangean DT-200VX model. It
will shortly receive a couple more 7" blank bars, to face the
ultimate RF overload test. If its superior selectivity holds up, it
may well be the great combination of Ultralight sensitivity and
selectivity that we DXpeditioners have been looking for.

73, Gary DeBock


Re: Eton E100 Performs Well with 7" Loopstick Transplant

John H. Bryant <bjohnorcas@...>
 

Gary, you dirty rat!

I had hoped to beat you to one of the transplants... as you say, the easiest, the E100. Unfortunately, packing for our migration to the Northwest has stalled progress on my 12" transplant, using my last Big Bar..  I did get the base and mounting board done, though and have posted two pictures to our Photo Section.  Its the second album in line right now.    http://ph.groups.yahoo.com/group/ultralightdx/photos

I hope to make this thing somewhat modular, so I can plug in the E100 or pop it out and, using the same board, bar and coil, plug in a tuning cap and use it as an external booster bar for other radios... may take some external electronic trickery or may not work at all.

In any case, I'll be able to compare a stock E100 riding on my existing 12" external booster bar with this set up where the 12" bar is integral to the unit.

Frankly, I expect this thing to be swamped in the RF cesspool of Victoria/Vancouver, but I'm very hopeful for success at Grayland.

Congratulations on the E100 transplant and continuing to break new ground for us, Gary!

John B.




At 03:47 AM 5/12/2008 +0000, you wrote:

Hello Guys,

It what was probably the easiest AM-DX loopstick transplant ever
performed, a 7" loopstick from a Channel Master Super Fringe (model
6515) was soldered into an E100, resulting in greatly improved
sensitivity (and apparently maintaining great selectivity).

For a variety of reasons, this transplant is extremely easy to
accomplish, even for those who feel intimidated by a soldering iron.
There are only two connections to the stock loopstick, both easily
accessible on the back circuit board. The stock loopstick is removed
very easily with an exacto knife, or even a flat screwdriver.

If you are lucky enough to get a Channel Master Super Fringe
model 6515 off of eBay (one went for $8 this morning), you don't even
need an LCR meter to do the transplant. The stock coil has an
inductance of .297mh, almost the same as the Channel Master long
coil, on the 7" ferrite bar. Simply solder in the Channel Master
long coil on the 7" loopstick, and peak it on a 600 kHz signal, as
described in John Bryant's E100 alignment file.

The 7" loopstick E100 "smokes" a stock unit in DXing, and
provides stiff competition for the 6.25" Sangean DT-200VX model. It
will shortly receive a couple more 7" blank bars, to face the
ultimate RF overload test. If its superior selectivity holds up, it
may well be the great combination of Ultralight sensitivity and
selectivity that we DXpeditioners have been looking for.

73, Gary DeBock










Re: Eton E100 Performs Well with 7" Loopstick Transplant

Dennis Gibson <wb6tnb@...>
 

I know it's not an ultralight but has anyone been inside an E10? The
MW could use a little help.

--- In ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com, D1028Gary@... wrote:

Hey Kevin,

I remember that stuck loopstick of your E100 very well. The
good news
is that any stuck, crippled, mangled or broken loopstick is a
**perfect**
candidate for a transplant! And the E100 is undoubtedly the
easiest Ultralight
upon which to perform a loopstick transplant-- it's almost like
somebody
designed it for just that purpose.

There is only one coil with two, easily accessible connections.
Contrast that with the SRF-39FP (four tight connections to a tapped
double-coil
arrangement) and the DT-200VX (four micro-circuit connections to a
piggybacked
double-coil arrangement).

Transplanting a loopstick into the E100 is so simple, I could
probably
teach my 8-year old son to do it. If any one has ever dreamed of
doing a
loopstick transplant, THIS is the radio to guarantee success. Just
secure your
7" replacement loopstick on eBay (Channel Master Super Fringe model
6515), and
perform two easy solder connections. The performance improvement is
fantastic, because the stock loopstick is really a flat, mediocre
design extremely
skimpy on ferrite. The 530-Tacoma TIS that sounds so pathetic on a
stock unit
has a nuclear-level signal on the 7" loopstick :>)

73, Gary


Re: Eton E100 Performs Well with 7" Loopstick Transplant

dhsatyadhana <satya@...>
 

Hey Gary:

Any guesses as to whether this applies to the e100 version I have
with the immovable coil? I am hoping that if the basic circuitry is
the same, maybe the transplanted loopstick (0.297 mH) is the same as
well...

It was nice of the old Channel Master radios to leave their
harvestable organs to science!!!

Thanks - Kevin S
Bainbridge Island, WA


--- In ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com, "Gary DeBock" <D1028Gary@...>
wrote:

Hello Guys,

It what was probably the easiest AM-DX loopstick transplant
ever
performed, a 7" loopstick from a Channel Master Super Fringe (model
6515) was soldered into an E100, resulting in greatly improved
sensitivity (and apparently maintaining great selectivity).

For a variety of reasons, this transplant is extremely easy to
accomplish, even for those who feel intimidated by a soldering iron.
There are only two connections to the stock loopstick, both easily
accessible on the back circuit board. The stock loopstick is
removed
very easily with an exacto knife, or even a flat screwdriver.

If you are lucky enough to get a Channel Master Super Fringe
model 6515 off of eBay (one went for $8 this morning), you don't
even
need an LCR meter to do the transplant. The stock coil has an
inductance of .297mh, almost the same as the Channel Master long
coil, on the 7" ferrite bar. Simply solder in the Channel Master
long coil on the 7" loopstick, and peak it on a 600 kHz signal, as
described in John Bryant's E100 alignment file.

The 7" loopstick E100 "smokes" a stock unit in DXing, and
provides stiff competition for the 6.25" Sangean DT-200VX model.
It
will shortly receive a couple more 7" blank bars, to face the
ultimate RF overload test. If its superior selectivity holds up,
it
may well be the great combination of Ultralight sensitivity and
selectivity that we DXpeditioners have been looking for.

73, Gary DeBock


Re: Eton E100 Performs Well with 7" Loopstick Transplant

Gary DeBock
 

Hey Kevin,
 
     I remember that stuck loopstick of your E100 very well.  The good news is that any stuck, crippled, mangled or broken loopstick is a **perfect** candidate for a transplant!  And the E100 is undoubtedly the easiest Ultralight upon which to perform a loopstick transplant-- it's almost like somebody designed it for just that purpose.
 
     There is only one coil with two, easily accessible connections.  Contrast that with the SRF-39FP (four tight connections to a tapped double-coil arrangement) and the DT-200VX (four micro-circuit connections to a piggybacked double-coil arrangement).
 
    Transplanting a loopstick into the E100 is so simple, I could probably teach my 8-year old son to do it.  If any one has ever dreamed of doing a loopstick transplant, THIS is the radio to guarantee success.  Just secure your 7" replacement loopstick on eBay (Channel Master Super Fringe model 6515), and perform two easy solder connections.  The performance improvement is fantastic, because the stock loopstick is really a flat, mediocre design extremely skimpy on ferrite.  The 530-Tacoma TIS that sounds so pathetic on a stock unit has a nuclear-level signal on the 7" loopstick  :>)
 
                                                                              73,  Gary   




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Eton E100 Performs Well with 7" Loopstick Transplant

Gary DeBock
 

Hello Guys,

It what was probably the easiest AM-DX loopstick transplant ever
performed, a 7" loopstick from a Channel Master Super Fringe (model
6515) was soldered into an E100, resulting in greatly improved
sensitivity (and apparently maintaining great selectivity).

For a variety of reasons, this transplant is extremely easy to
accomplish, even for those who feel intimidated by a soldering iron.
There are only two connections to the stock loopstick, both easily
accessible on the back circuit board. The stock loopstick is removed
very easily with an exacto knife, or even a flat screwdriver.

If you are lucky enough to get a Channel Master Super Fringe
model 6515 off of eBay (one went for $8 this morning), you don't even
need an LCR meter to do the transplant. The stock coil has an
inductance of .297mh, almost the same as the Channel Master long
coil, on the 7" ferrite bar. Simply solder in the Channel Master
long coil on the 7" loopstick, and peak it on a 600 kHz signal, as
described in John Bryant's E100 alignment file.

The 7" loopstick E100 "smokes" a stock unit in DXing, and
provides stiff competition for the 6.25" Sangean DT-200VX model. It
will shortly receive a couple more 7" blank bars, to face the
ultimate RF overload test. If its superior selectivity holds up, it
may well be the great combination of Ultralight sensitivity and
selectivity that we DXpeditioners have been looking for.

73, Gary DeBock


E100 Auxillary Power

John H. Bryant <bjohnorcas@...>
 


I'm planning to power my E100 two D cells under some circumstances, through the DC input port on the side. That port is also used for wall warts, of course. the size of plug is 4.0 mm outside dia. and 1.7 mm inside dia.    The Radio shack plug standard nomenclature is "B." What I often do is by the little plug tip that works with their universal wall-wart system and solder to the little prongs.... I insulate the prongs with heat shrink and wah-la, a cheap plug.  If its going to get heavy use, I then encase the thing is epoxy paste, making a moulded plug.

ALL YE BEWARE, THE E100 TAKES A NEGATIVE CENTER TIP rather than the almot ujniversal positive.  Its marked on the case.... just don't forget.


John B.
Stillwater, Oklahoma, USA
Rcvrs: WiNRADiO 313e, Eton e1, NRD-535(kiwa-mods)
Antennas: 700' NE/SW mini-Bev, Wellbrook Phased Array (pre-production version)


Re: E100 Alignment Quirks

John H. Bryant <bjohnorcas@...>
 

Gary,

I've had quite a different experience with the three E100s that I've aligned in the past week. Only one of them came from Durham, BTW.  On two of the three, I got a significant improvement on the 1400 alignment.  I set the signal generator for a mid-strength steady signal and then had to use a small metal screw driver to turn the interior of the trimmer (this was true on all three, they just mangled my plastic alignment tools, and did not turn..... so, I turned the trimmer about 10 degrees at a time with the metal screw driver and then backed way off where nothing was affecting the trimmer to check the signal strength and kept doing that until the signal meter either went up or down.  Then I peaked it in the proper direction.  Both the ones that made serious improvements needed about 30 degrees to the right, erh, clockwise.

On the 600 peaking with the coil on the ferrite bar, I continue to find it easier to pop the ferrite bar out of its retainers. Removing the glue on those retainers is easy with an exacto. I also take out the two screws of the upper circuit board so that there is a bit more room to work. However, in two of the three cases, when I did the alignment, there wasn't any improvement over the stock position. Is there a pattern to the movement you are making???  Is the peak toward the center of the bar or the nearby outer edge or does it vary.  My one improvement instance was moving the coil about 1/8" toward the center. You've mentioned twice about sometimes having to remove a bit of plastic to move the coil far enough.... is this the nearby plastic in the corner or is it part of the retaining clips???

Obviously, not all E-100s are quite alike.... there are also clear production run differences... the plastic inner frame-chassis is black in some, gray in others, for instance.


John B.











At 03:25 AM 5/11/2008 +0000, you wrote:

Hello Guys,

After receiving two more Eton E100's from Durham Radio via eBay
today (at $49 plus shipping), they were immediately tested and
aligned.
First of all, Eton's design for this radio has a significant
gaffe, which leads to reduced AM-band sensitivity. The SW antenna
folds down in a position very close and parallel to the AM loopstick,
reducing the AM sensitivity greatly whenever the SW antenna is not in
a vertical position. For serious AM DXing, make sure the SW antenna
is vertical, and you will notice a significant gain in sensitivity.
Of the two units aligned today, one required cutting of the
right plastic bracket to peak the loopstick coil on a 600 kHz signal
(the second time in five E100 alignments this was necessary), and the
other unit had a somewhat mangled loopstick, with fixed gaps between
the coil windings. This unit never did attain the low-band
sensitivity of the other units, and if you have a similar unit, your
only recourse may be to replace the loopstick (maybe with a 20"
monster?)
The high-band alignment (on a 1400 kHz signal) rarely increases
high-band sensitivity on a factory unit, but the low-band alignment
(moving the coil along the loopstick to peak a 600 kHz signal) ALWAYS
has had a major effect on sensitivity here (in five out of five
alignments). For those intimidated by major disassembly of the unit
to gain access to the 1400 kHz trimming capacitor, performing the low-
band alignment only should provide the greatest benefit in increased
sensitivity.
The E100 has an unfortunate image reception issue, which
detracts from its otherwise stellar urban-RF performance. With the
exception of this problem, the E100 has a very well-behaved receiver,
which should handle the extreme RF levels of a huge loopstick very
well. Its selectivity and high-band sensitivity are unsurpassed
among the Ultralight radios, and its many features make it a true
bargain at the $49 Durham Radio price.

73, Gary
















John B.
Stillwater, Oklahoma, USA
Rcvrs: WiNRADiO 313e, Eton e1, NRD-535(kiwa-mods)
Antennas: 700' NE/SW mini-Bev, Wellbrook Phased Array (pre-production version)


E100 Alignment Quirks

Gary DeBock
 

Hello Guys,

After receiving two more Eton E100's from Durham Radio via eBay
today (at $49 plus shipping), they were immediately tested and
aligned.
First of all, Eton's design for this radio has a significant
gaffe, which leads to reduced AM-band sensitivity. The SW antenna
folds down in a position very close and parallel to the AM loopstick,
reducing the AM sensitivity greatly whenever the SW antenna is not in
a vertical position. For serious AM DXing, make sure the SW antenna
is vertical, and you will notice a significant gain in sensitivity.
Of the two units aligned today, one required cutting of the
right plastic bracket to peak the loopstick coil on a 600 kHz signal
(the second time in five E100 alignments this was necessary), and the
other unit had a somewhat mangled loopstick, with fixed gaps between
the coil windings. This unit never did attain the low-band
sensitivity of the other units, and if you have a similar unit, your
only recourse may be to replace the loopstick (maybe with a 20"
monster?)
The high-band alignment (on a 1400 kHz signal) rarely increases
high-band sensitivity on a factory unit, but the low-band alignment
(moving the coil along the loopstick to peak a 600 kHz signal) ALWAYS
has had a major effect on sensitivity here (in five out of five
alignments). For those intimidated by major disassembly of the unit
to gain access to the 1400 kHz trimming capacitor, performing the low-
band alignment only should provide the greatest benefit in increased
sensitivity.
The E100 has an unfortunate image reception issue, which
detracts from its otherwise stellar urban-RF performance. With the
exception of this problem, the E100 has a very well-behaved receiver,
which should handle the extreme RF levels of a huge loopstick very
well. Its selectivity and high-band sensitivity are unsurpassed
among the Ultralight radios, and its many features make it a true
bargain at the $49 Durham Radio price.

73, Gary


Re: Grundig G6 Aviator

John H. Bryant <bjohnorcas@...>
 

Gary,

There are others involved in the Definitions Committee and the Solomoniac decisions about what is and what is not an Ultralight, but I was party to much of the discussion as chairman of Firsts and Records. There was a real effort on the part of the Committee to separate the "enthusiast radios" from the "entertainment radios" with the latter being the only ones considered legit for Ultralight competitions, records, etc.  The reason to split these two categories was that there are several multi-hundred dollar very sophisticated communications receivers or tranceivers that fit in a shirt pocket. These enthusiast radios were deemed too sophisticated to fairly compete with the likes of the SRF-39FP.  One of the characteristics mentioned that identified an enthusiast radio was the reception of SSB signals... That would appear to rule out the Grundig G6 Aviator as an Ultralight for competitions and records, etc.  A great little radio from what I hear, tho'.


John B.
Stillwater, Oklahoma, USA
Rcvrs: WiNRADiO 313e, Eton e1, NRD-535(kiwa-mods)
Antennas: 700' NE/SW mini-Bev, Wellbrook Phased Array (pre-production version)

At 07:19 PM 5/10/2008 +0000, you wrote:

Hello all,

Has anyone tried a Grundig G6 Aviator? It appears to be slightly
smaller than an E100, it's dual conversion, and it has SSB. If it
performs well, it seems like it would be a good addition to the
Ultralight group.

Regards,
Gary















John B.
Stillwater, Oklahoma, USA
Rcvrs: WiNRADiO 313e, Eton e1, NRD-535(kiwa-mods)
Antennas: 700' NE/SW mini-Bev, Wellbrook Phased Array (pre-production version)


Grundig G6 Aviator

Gary Kinsman
 

Hello all,

Has anyone tried a Grundig G6 Aviator? It appears to be slightly
smaller than an E100, it's dual conversion, and it has SSB. If it
performs well, it seems like it would be a good addition to the
Ultralight group.

Regards,
Gary


laredo log

lrdheat
 

SRF-59

May 5, 2008 1:00 am XEWN 1270 KHz 150 watts 708 miles from Laredo. Solid id of station call.


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