Date   

Ultra Ultra ultralight!!!

jjdobrikin@...
 

Hi.
Has any one tried a/the ULTRA ultra ultralight??
A Foxhole Radio or Galena Crystal/Cats Whisker Diode receiver.
73 de Jordan ve7jjd

 
 
 


Re: PL-390 vs. PL-310 & PL-380 [1 Attachment]

Russ Edmunds
 


There has long been a perception that conditions were better back in the day. I started DX'ing MW around 1958 - casually though. What I remember are several factors which differentiate the two eras:

Man-made electrical noise is much greater today
Saturation of stations in North America provide much more QRM today
The expansion of low-power nighttime service added to that.

I did some look backs a number of years ago at geomagnetic activity using the Ap index as a proxy, and what I find most intriguing is that today, we actually have seen fewer major auroras in the 2000's than we did in the 1960's and early 1970's, but more frequent smaller ones. Secondly, we don't see as many lengthy periods of quiet between those storms than we do today.

Combined with the above factors, it certainly does seem as though propagation was better.

But in looking back at receptions made in the 1930's and comparing them to the 1960's can create a similar impression, but once again the two primary factors of more station broadcasting more hours per day and higher man-made noise account for a lot of that.



Russ Edmunds
15 mi NW Phila
Grid FN20id
<wb2bjh@...>

AM: Modified Sony ICF2010's (4) barefoot w/whip
FM: Yamaha T-80 & T-85, each w/ Conrad RDS Decoder;
Onkyo T-450RDS; Tecsun PL-310 ( 4);
modified Sony ICF2010's (3) w/APS9B @ 15';
modified Sony ICF2010 w/whip


On Mon, Dec 12, 2016 at 11:49 AM, bill@... [ultralightdx] <ultralightdx@...> wrote:
 
[Attachment(s) from bill@... included below]

> There is some evidence that MW propagation was even better back in the
> 1950s and 60s.
> Todd
> Sydney, AU

Here is a butterfly diagram of sunspots showing just how active the Sun
was in the late 1950's and the early 60's.



Re: PL-390 vs. PL-310 & PL-380

bill@...
 

There is some evidence that MW propagation was even better back in the
1950s and 60s.
Todd
Sydney, AU
Here is a butterfly diagram of sunspots showing just how active the Sun
was in the late 1950's and the early 60's.


Re: PL-390 vs. PL-310 & PL-380

Todd
 

Thanks Gary, Chuck, and Jerry for the informative replies.

The small $65 PK Antennas loop is only 14 inches in diameter. The 40" side length PVC loop winding spacing are just over 3" (or 8 cm exact). That's nearly three diameters difference. Also, ~ 8" (PVC loop) vs. 1.5" (PK Loop) wire spacing. Night and day gain difference, but the PK and AN-200 mini loops are clever designs and well constructed. These small loops are indeed better than nothing, but the gain improvement will not be so readily noticed with an already unusually sensitive portable such as the Tecsun PL-310, 380, 390.

The PK Antennas $65 A-Loop-TAM consists of commonly available 1" diameter electrical wiring conduit to house the main tank coil. An electrical junction box is used to house a small variable capacitor. Two tuning ranges across 531 - 1600 are selected via a 2-way switch.

The gain of a 40" side length box loop is so high that it effectively re-sets the noise figure of a portable radio's front-end. Any internally generated hets are swamped by either QRM/QRN and/or genuine signals. These loops when tuned to resonance, effectively equalise portable radio sensitivity. For example, in the 1980s, with the 40" box loop, it was fairly routine at my Sydney home to receive 729 KHz S. Andre, Reunion (20 kW) at 5,700 miles on any radio in the house, regardless of its sensitivity. Another signal that was impossible to receive "barefoot" was the 10 kW 648 KHz WVUV Pago Pago, American Samoa TX at 2,730 miles. I used a Tandy Realistic-12-655-TRF-AM-Radio. This was one of the most sensitive portables available in the 1980s, but there was no trace of 648 KHz WVUV without the 40" box loop. With the loop, WVUV was loud and quite readable. I still have all the recordings.

Quite amazing that a  7.5 inch loopstick Tecsun PL-380 on the west coast USA can receive 10 kW transmitters from AU and NZ. I would to someday head up the north coast and try the 40" PVC loop on the coast facing the Pacific Ocean.

There is some evidence that MW propagation was even better back in the 1950s and 60s. In 1962, Australian DXer Graham Bowden received and recorded American MW signals at Norfolk Island, in the Pacific Ocean at some 1,000 miles north east of Sydney. A long overhead copper telephone wire antenna was used to receive 1090 KHz KING, Seattle, 1520 KHz KOMA Oklahoma City, 1160 KHz KSL Salt Lake City, Utah, 1190 KHz KEX Portland, 910 KHz KALL, Salt Lake City, Utah, 910 KHz KEWB Oakland, California, 940 KHz KFRE Fresno, California, and 990 KHz KHVH Honolulu, Hawaii. 

Open reel tape was used to record the signals which decades later were subsequently transferred to mp3 format. The signal strengths are sufficiently high that they sound like regular evening skywave propagation within the USA. Also, in the late 1950s, BBC England on MW was received in Melbourne, Australia using simple antenna systems in metro areas.

Regards,
 
Todd
Sydney, AU




Re: PL-390 vs. PL-310 & PL-380

Gary DeBock
 

Hi Todd (and Jerry),

Thanks for your very interesting post.

<<<    Trans-Pacific signals from Hawaii (mainly limited to KGU 760 KHz) were received by Sydney DXer Robert Copeman in the 1970s on portable radios without any additional antenna. In the 1980s I could only receive 590 KHz KSSK with a 40 inch side length tuned loop. Without the loop there was no trace of KSSK. So in summary, ULRs require narrow 2 KHz bandwidth, and high gain tunable FSL or PVC loop antennas to even stand a chance of hearing trans-Pacific MW DX at my location.   >>>

Here on the North American west coast Australian MW stations can be received with a barefoot stock ULR, but only under exceptional conditions, A listener must be on an ocean beach (or ocean cliff) around sunrise with excellent Australian propagation. and use a very sensitive pocket radio. Under these conditions (with a Sony SRF-T615 at Grayland, Washington in 2009) both the late John Bryant and I were able to receive 891-5AN on our SRF-T615's. We probably could have received several others like 702-2BL, 774-3LO and 1116-4BC except for the fact that the SRF-T615 has MW selectivity similar to that of a barn door. The "barefoot" 7.5 inch loopstick Tecsun PL-380 models routinely receive these Oz big guns and Kiwis like 531-PI, 567-RNZ and 657-Star at Oregon cliff sites, as well as a blowtorch signal from 738-Tahiti.

<<<   This is another discussion topic, but whatever the factors, Hawaii MW reception into eastern Australia was exponentially stronger in the 1970s compared to now. This could be due to reduced evening TX power, modified TX beam patterns, higher ambient local noise, or reduced propagation conditions.    >>>

Yes, Todd, those MW-DXers who chased Australian signals here on the west coast in the 70's have the same impression-- that Pacific transoceanic propagation was much better at that time. Patrick Martin of Seaside, Oregon is particularly outspoken about this. At the time I was unable to chase much DX, having enlisted in the U.S. Navy to receive electronics training (which made me such a wacky antenna tinkerer). 

<<<    This week another Sydney DXer called over and I was able to compare Gary's 40 inch side box loop vs. a PK antennas small loop. [1] The signal difference was night and day. The signal pickup from the PVC loop is very high as expected for a relatively large area antenna. The $65 PK loop barely made any difference to the two radios we tested (Sangean PR-D13, and Tecsun PL-390). One signal tested was 1035 KHz ZB Newstalk Wellington, New Zealand at some 1,390 miles. The PR-D13 indicated full bar LED signal strength with the 40" PVC loop, but barely any improvement with the small Australian-made PK MW loop. The larger size PR-13 portable seemed to provide stronger signal strength coupling when used with the 40" PVC loop. This is probably due to the PR-13's larger ferrite rod.     >>>

Thanks for the compliment on the 40 inch PVC loop performance, Todd. But in all fairness to the makers of the PK loop, these tunable air core loops get their sensitivity from their size, and even a small gain booster like the PK Loop or AN-200 is better than no gain booster at all. The vast majority of DXers have no ability or interest to make something like this, and as such these small commercial loops do serve a purpose. For those like you and me that can build something much more effective, though, they are indeed a waste of time and $$.

73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
  
  


-----Original Message-----
From: jerry popiel jerry.popiel55@... [ultralightdx]
To: ultralightdx
Sent: Sat, Dec 10, 2016 4:29 am
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] PL-390 vs. PL-310 & PL-380

 
Todd, the PL-390 and the PL-398BT which I have does provide a tad better barefoot AM Reception than the PL-380.  The difference is that the Ferrite Bar is bigger in the PL-390 and PL-398BT than in the PL-380. There were some pictures showing this a few years ago but I can’t recall where this info was posted.

Thanks
Jerry

On Dec 9, 2016, at 3:59 PM, toddemslie@... [ultralightdx] <ultralightdx@...> wrote:


Hi,
 
It would be interesting to hear if anyone has compared the Tecsun PL-390 against the PL-310 and/or PL-380. Even though the PL-390 measures some 21 cubic inches, it can be considered virtually ULR size. The PL-390 has 1 KHz tuning steps and variable IF bandwidths. The 2 KHz bandwidth in particular is essential when attempting to resolve trans-Pacific Hawaii and USA signals into east coast Australia. With each signal hop, there is loss along the path. At my Sydney listening location, 590 KHz KSSK Hawaii has been the only trans-Pacific station that could be clearly heard with the default 6 KHz IF bandwidth. This is why earlier ULRs without DSP chip processing, were limited to 6 KHz IF bandwidth, hence trans-Pacific DX was generally not possible.
 
Trans-Pacific signals from Hawaii (mainly limited to KGU 760 KHz) were received by Sydney DXer Robert Copeman in the 1970s on portable radios without any additional antenna. In the 1980s I could only receive 590 KHz KSSK with a 40 inch side length tuned loop. Without the loop there was no trace of KSSK. So in summary, ULRs require narrow 2 KHz bandwidth, and high gain tunable FSL or PVC loop antennas to even stand a chance of hearing trans-Pacific MW DX at my location.
 
This is another discussion topic, but whatever the factors, Hawaii MW reception into eastern Australia was exponentially stronger in the 1970s compared to now. This could be due to reduced evening TX power, modified TX beam patterns, higher ambient local noise, or reduced propagation conditions.
 
This week another Sydney DXer called over and I was able to compare Gary's 40 inch side box loop vs. a PK antennas small loop. [1] The signal difference was night and day. The signal pickup from the PVC loop is very high as expected for a relatively large area antenna. The $65 PK loop barely made any difference to the two radios we tested (Sangean PR-D13, and Tecsun PL-390). One signal tested was 1035 KHz ZB Newstalk Wellington, New Zealand at some 1,390 miles. The PR-D13 indicated full bar LED signal strength with the 40" PVC loop, but barely any improvement with the small Australian-made PK MW loop. The larger size PR-13 portable seemed to provide stronger signal strength coupling when used with the 40" PVC loop. This is probably due to the PR-13's larger ferrite rod.
 
In terms of size (and possibly signal pickup), the $65 PK loop could be a proxy for the Tecsun AN-200 loop. If so, the AN-200 would be of no benefit at my listening location.
 
Regards,
 
Todd

Sydney, Australia
 

1. PK's Loop Antennas for superior radio reception wherever you are
 




Re: PL-390 vs. PL-310 & PL-380

jerry popiel
 

Todd, the PL-390 and the PL-398BT which I have does provide a tad better barefoot AM Reception than the PL-380.  The difference is that the Ferrite Bar is bigger in the PL-390 and PL-398BT than in the PL-380. There were some pictures showing this a few years ago but I can’t recall where this info was posted.

Thanks
Jerry

On Dec 9, 2016, at 3:59 PM, toddemslie@... [ultralightdx] <ultralightdx@...> wrote:


Hi,
 
It would be interesting to hear if anyone has compared the Tecsun PL-390 against the PL-310 and/or PL-380. Even though the PL-390 measures some 21 cubic inches, it can be considered virtually ULR size. The PL-390 has 1 KHz tuning steps and variable IF bandwidths. The 2 KHz bandwidth in particular is essential when attempting to resolve trans-Pacific Hawaii and USA signals into east coast Australia. With each signal hop, there is loss along the path. At my Sydney listening location, 590 KHz KSSK Hawaii has been the only trans-Pacific station that could be clearly heard with the default 6 KHz IF bandwidth. This is why earlier ULRs without DSP chip processing, were limited to 6 KHz IF bandwidth, hence trans-Pacific DX was generally not possible.
 
Trans-Pacific signals from Hawaii (mainly limited to KGU 760 KHz) were received by Sydney DXer Robert Copeman in the 1970s on portable radios without any additional antenna. In the 1980s I could only receive 590 KHz KSSK with a 40 inch side length tuned loop. Without the loop there was no trace of KSSK. So in summary, ULRs require narrow 2 KHz bandwidth, and high gain tunable FSL or PVC loop antennas to even stand a chance of hearing trans-Pacific MW DX at my location.
 
This is another discussion topic, but whatever the factors, Hawaii MW reception into eastern Australia was exponentially stronger in the 1970s compared to now. This could be due to reduced evening TX power, modified TX beam patterns, higher ambient local noise, or reduced propagation conditions.
 
This week another Sydney DXer called over and I was able to compare Gary's 40 inch side box loop vs. a PK antennas small loop. [1] The signal difference was night and day. The signal pickup from the PVC loop is very high as expected for a relatively large area antenna. The $65 PK loop barely made any difference to the two radios we tested (Sangean PR-D13, and Tecsun PL-390). One signal tested was 1035 KHz ZB Newstalk Wellington, New Zealand at some 1,390 miles. The PR-D13 indicated full bar LED signal strength with the 40" PVC loop, but barely any improvement with the small Australian-made PK MW loop. The larger size PR-13 portable seemed to provide stronger signal strength coupling when used with the 40" PVC loop. This is probably due to the PR-13's larger ferrite rod.
 
In terms of size (and possibly signal pickup), the $65 PK loop could be a proxy for the Tecsun AN-200 loop. If so, the AN-200 would be of no benefit at my listening location.
 
Regards,
 
Todd

Sydney, Australia
 

1. PK's Loop Antennas for superior radio reception wherever you are
 





PL-390 vs. PL-310 & PL-380

Todd
 

Hi,
 
It would be interesting to hear if anyone has compared the Tecsun PL-390 against the PL-310 and/or PL-380. Even though the PL-390 measures some 21 cubic inches, it can be considered virtually ULR size. The PL-390 has 1 KHz tuning steps and variable IF bandwidths. The 2 KHz bandwidth in particular is essential when attempting to resolve trans-Pacific Hawaii and USA signals into east coast Australia. With each signal hop, there is loss along the path. At my Sydney listening location, 590 KHz KSSK Hawaii has been the only trans-Pacific station that could be clearly heard with the default 6 KHz IF bandwidth. This is why earlier ULRs without DSP chip processing, were limited to 6 KHz IF bandwidth, hence trans-Pacific DX was generally not possible.
 
Trans-Pacific signals from Hawaii (mainly limited to KGU 760 KHz) were received by Sydney DXer Robert Copeman in the 1970s on portable radios without any additional antenna. In the 1980s I could only receive 590 KHz KSSK with a 40 inch side length tuned loop. Without the loop there was no trace of KSSK. So in summary, ULRs require narrow 2 KHz bandwidth, and high gain tunable FSL or PVC loop antennas to even stand a chance of hearing trans-Pacific MW DX at my location.
 
This is another discussion topic, but whatever the factors, Hawaii MW reception into eastern Australia was exponentially stronger in the 1970s compared to now. This could be due to reduced evening TX power, modified TX beam patterns, higher ambient local noise, or reduced propagation conditions.
 
This week another Sydney DXer called over and I was able to compare Gary's 40 inch side box loop vs. a PK antennas small loop. [1] The signal difference was night and day. The signal pickup from the PVC loop is very high as expected for a relatively large area antenna. The $65 PK loop barely made any difference to the two radios we tested (Sangean PR-D13, and Tecsun PL-390). One signal tested was 1035 KHz ZB Newstalk Wellington, New Zealand at some 1,390 miles. The PR-D13 indicated full bar LED signal strength with the 40" PVC loop, but barely any improvement with the small Australian-made PK MW loop. The larger size PR-13 portable seemed to provide stronger signal strength coupling when used with the 40" PVC loop. This is probably due to the PR-13's larger ferrite rod.
 
In terms of size (and possibly signal pickup), the $65 PK loop could be a proxy for the Tecsun AN-200 loop. If so, the AN-200 would be of no benefit at my listening location.
 
Regards,
 
Todd

Sydney, Australia
 

1. PK's Loop Antennas for superior radio reception wherever you are

 



American morning on the AM band

patrice.privat
 

Hiya

 

lots of good propagation from North America this morning 06-07 UTC (07-08 hours French Time) on my Tecsun ultralight :

 

*1560 khz religious talks and hymns, tentative WFME New York City "family radio"

 

*1600 khz ranchera music, announces in Spanish WUNR Brookline, Boston,MA // Website synchro

 

*1390 khz English news, presumed WEGP Presqu'ile ME

 

*1570 khz pop songs, no talk, presumed CJLV Laval, CAN

 

*1400 khz news in English , presumed CBG Gander, NLD, CAN

 

*1510 khz, unid sports in English

 

*1520 khz presumed WWKB Buffalo

 

*1430 khz presumed CHKT Toronto, CAN

 

patrice (Beauvais)

 

 

 


Re: Eligible Radios

Guy Atkins
 

​In addition, I believe the rules also specify that the radio cannot have SSB or have a retail cost of over $100 USD. This is because the intent of the Ultralight category is for pursuing the challenges of DXing with a simple "consumer grade" portable, not a specialized hobby radio
.


Initially, radios with multiple bandwidths were excluded, but with the introduction of the DSP-based portables with 3, 4, or 5 bandwidths this requirement was eliminated.

Anyway, that's my Ultralight story and I'm sticking to it! Full details and Ultralight requirements can be found in the early messages of this Yahoo group, or possibly as a document in the Files section.

73,

Guy Atkins
​Puyallup, WA

4a

Re: Eligible Radios

Wed Dec 7, 2016 7:49 pm (PST) . Posted by:

ferrite61

Basically, the "rules" are defined in inches, Height X Width X Depth has to be 20 or less (20 cubic inches or less).
For cm its 328cc or less.

Regards
Paul S. in CT FN31nl


Re: Eligible Radios

Paul S. in CT
 

Basically, the "rules" are defined in inches, Height X Width X Depth has to be 20 or less (20 cubic inches or less).
For cm its 328cc or less.

Regards
Paul S. in CT FN31nl


Longwave Loop Antenna

Jordan Dobrikin <jjdobrikin@...>
 

Hi
The Addaware is the new kid on the block adding Longwave.
73 de Jordan ve7jjd



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
A38LMS  $17.99 
A38-LMS active loop antenna (LW, MW AND SW )
Description: 
This “Active Loop Antenna” is able to tune and amplify the LW, MW and SW frequency band, thereby enhancing signal reception quality and increasing your overall radio listening experience. Use the “TUNING” knob to fine tune the reception signal, and attenuate the signal by adjusting the “LEVEL CONTROL” knob if there is interference caused by a signal that is too strong.  
Specification: 
Frequency Range: 
LW: 120 ~ 400 kHz 
MW: 520 ~ 1710 kHz 
SW: 3.50 ~ 20.00 MHz 
Power source: 2 x AAA battery (not included) 
Power consumption: 8 mAh 
Instructions: 
1.   Take out the parts and place the suction cup (7) onto the clean glass of the window. 
2.   Extend the wire antenna loop of the amplifier (2) by using the extension rod (6), then hang it on the hook of the suction cup or fasten it to the curtain using the clip (8). 
3.   Insert two batteries (AAA, UM4) into the control box (1) and close the battery cover. Place it beside your radio, plug one end of the cable (5) into the amplifier and the other end into the control box. 
4.   Select your desired band from the amplifier, then push the “POWER” switch of the control box to “ON” position; the power indicator LED turns green.   
For SW: 
If your radio has an SW antenna input jack, connect the 3.5mm plug of the control box into it; if not, then connect the 3.5mm plug of the control box into the black and red connector clips (4). Fasten the red clip to the telescopic antenna of the radio and the black clip to a self-made grounding line.
For LW/MW:
If your radio has an MW antenna input jack, connect the 3.5mm plug of the control box into it; if not, then connect the 3.5mm plug of the control box to the ferrite bar antenna coupler (3) and place it near the built-in MW antenna of the radio. For pocket sized radios, you can use the base station (9) to keep the ferrite bar antenna coupler near the MW antenna.
5.   Dial the “TUNING” knob of the control box up/down for better signal reception.
6.   Dial the “LEVEL CONTROL“ knob of the control box up/down if the radio signal is too strong and causes a distorted sound.
Included items:
1.   Control box
2.   Amplifier
3.   Ferrite bar antenna coupler (for LW/MW)
4.   Black and red connector clips 
5.   Cable with 3.5mm plugs
6.   Loop extension rod for wire antenna 
7.   Suction cup 
8.   Hanging clip 
9.   Base station: for pocket radio  
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
DE31MS $13.99
DETAILS  
Description: 
The DE31MS is an active loop antenna for MW & SW reception. This antenna is specially designed for world receivers for enhancing signal reception. The small size and light weight is perfect for carrying around, traveling or simply for use at home and in the office. 
Specification: 
Frequency Range:  
MW: 531 ~ 1602 kHz 
SW: 3.90 ~ 22.00 MHz 
Power source: 2 x AAA battery 
Power consumption: 6 mAh 
Operation: 
1.   Take out the unit and place the suction cup onto the clean glass of the window. 
2.   Drag all the soft antenna loops of the telescopic antenna, hang it onto the hook of the suction cup or fasten it to the curtain using the clips. 
3.     Insert two batteries (AAA size) into the controlling box and close the lid of the battery compartment. Put it beside the radio. Plug one end of the connecting cable into the amplifier box and the other end into the controlling box. 
4.  If the radio has the antenna input socket, plug the output port of the controlling box into the antenna input socket of the radio. Otherwise, plug it into the socket of the connector. Fasten the white clip of the connector to the telescopic antenna of the radio and fasten the black clip to the grounding line (connecting grounding line is very good for receiving signals) of the radio. 
5.     After connecting correctly, turn on the power of the controlling box. The power indicator of the controlling box is bright. 
--
73 de Jordan VE7JJD


Re: Addaware A38-LMS Loop Antenna

Hans Stam
 

Yes you are right.. I also have here the Degen DE31MS and it is  working fine ..cheap and does the job..

Anon Co is a very good company..has a good name!

 

Hans

 

Van: ultralightdx@... [mailto:ultralightdx@...]
Verzonden: woensdag 7 december 2016 01:33
Aan: ICF 2010; Loop Antennas; primetimeshortwave; shortwave-radio; shortwave-swl-antenna; Shortwaveradios; ultralightdx; RICK WALD
Onderwerp: [ultralightdx] Addaware A38-LMS Loop Antenna

 

 

Hi

Does anyone have Schematics and/or know what is going on with the switch on the Antenna Module?

What is it switching, Loops or an inductor??

73 de Jordan ve7jjd

 

Addaware vs et.al.  

From SWL Post: 

"There is a new, re-designed antenna that was based off the TG34 (and KA33,  no longer in production). Since I wrote this Guest Post, I have ordered the Addaware A38-LMS from Anon Co. in China. The A38-LMS is said to have more durable (thicker) wires than the TG34, it now has a dial to control “Gain” and the bands are now separated in three vice two (LW, MW, SW switch). Since I really like the TG34, I’m hopeful this new A38-LMS is even better.

The best deal is the Degen DE31MS, Kaito KA33, TG34, Kestrel W31MS. These are all the same antennas, under different name brands and models. It's an active MW/SW loop. It's a winner."  

--

73 de Jordan VE7JJD


Oklahoma TP DX 12/7/16

bbwrwy
 

Asian signals didn't fare well traveling overland to here this morning. JOUB-774 with fair at 1205 soon fading away. It faded in and out with brief barely audible traces afterward, last heard briefly at 1338 (LSR at 1330). Other than a weak het on 828 kHz, no other signals were noted.

Richard Allen,
near Perry OK USA,
Skywave + 8-inch FSL.
--
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Re: HF/SWL Ferrite Loop Antenna

steve tomlinson
 

On Dec 6, 2016 7:11 PM, "Jordan Dobrikin jjdobrikin@... [ultralightdx]" <ultralightdx@...> wrote:
 

Hi 
I am seeking advice  assistance and comment.
I am trying to design and build a HF/SWl Ferrite Loopstick Antenna, for use in retrofitting Radios and the C.Crane Twin Coil Antenna. 
It is my understanding that I should use heavier gage wire, wound evenly spaced on a long ferrite rod to get low inductance with maximum surface area. Litz apparrently poops out above 2 MHz.
Plan A  would have a plug connector on the loop assembly to plug into a radio's external antenna jack. 
Plan B would be to open the Radio and connect the new antenna in parallel with the existing Loop antenna or to bypass the existing loop antenna.
With  respect to the C.Crane a similar plan of attack; opening the Antenna Module to access the existing coil connection to the amplifier. 
73 de Jordan ve7jjd


Addwards A38LMS vs.Degen Kaito Loop Antennas

Jordan Dobrikin <jjdobrikin@...>
 


HF/SWL Ferrite Loop Antenna

Jordan Dobrikin <jjdobrikin@...>
 

Hi 
I am seeking advice  assistance and comment.
I am trying to design and build a HF/SWl Ferrite Loopstick Antenna, for use in retrofitting Radios and the C.Crane Twin Coil Antenna. 
It is my understanding that I should use heavier gage wire, wound evenly spaced on a long ferrite rod to get low inductance with maximum surface area. Litz apparrently poops out above 2 MHz.
Plan A  would have a plug connector on the loop assembly to plug into a radio's external antenna jack. 
Plan B would be to open the Radio and connect the new antenna in parallel with the existing Loop antenna or to bypass the existing loop antenna.
With  respect to the C.Crane a similar plan of attack; opening the Antenna Module to access the existing coil connection to the amplifier. 
73 de Jordan ve7jjd


new logging

keith beesley
 

CKOM 650, Saskatoon, SK at 1:30am PST 12/6/16. ID "News Talk Six-Fifty CKOM" into "Coast-To-Coast AM." Only my second Saskatchewan station from Seattle! First was about 10 years ago. 

Receiver: PL-390 barefoot. 

Cheers, 

Keith Beesley
Seattle WA USA


Addaware A38-LMS Loop Antenna

Jordan Dobrikin <jjdobrikin@...>
 

Hi
Does anyone have Schematics and/or know what is going on with the switch on the Antenna Module?
What is it switching, Loops or an inductor??
73 de Jordan ve7jjd

Addaware vs et.al.  
From SWL Post: 
"There is a new, re-designed antenna that was based off the TG34 (and KA33,  no longer in production). Since I wrote this Guest Post, I have ordered the Addaware A38-LMS from Anon Co. in China. The A38-LMS is said to have more durable (thicker) wires than the TG34, it now has a dial to control “Gain” and the bands are now separated in three vice two (LW, MW, SW switch). Since I really like the TG34, I’m hopeful this new A38-LMS is even better.
The best deal is the Degen DE31MS, Kaito KA33, TG34, Kestrel W31MS. These are all the same antennas, under different name brands and models. It's an active MW/SW loop. It's a winner."  
--
73 de Jordan VE7JJD


Re: Eligible Radios

Neil Bell <neil.neilbell@...>
 

Yes, but the antenna can require a truck for transport! Even if it fits in your pocket it can't have a feature like SSB. Weird I know, but rules are rules I guess.

Neil Bell, KJ6FBA


Oklahoma TP DX 12/6/16

bbwrwy
 

There's not much to report today, much different from yesterday. Only JOUB-774 had a barely audible to poor signal at 1157-1221 GMT, fading away and not heard afterward. No other TP MW signal was detected this morning. Even the usually heard Radio Nikkei broadcasts in the 75-meter band are barely audible.

Richard Allen,
near Perry OK USA,
Skywave + 8-inch FSL.
--
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dangerous content by MailScanner, and is
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