Date   

New Facebook Group - Photos of DXers

Paul Blundell
 

I have just created a new Facebook group which be of interest to some people.


"Photos of Radio DXers" 

Group to share photos of yourself or others undertaking any form of radio dxing. This can include:

- Amateur Radio

- SWL

- Mediumwave DXing

The only rule is that the photos must contain somebody undertaking radio dxing. Photos that are not of somebody undertaking radio dxing will be removed. Please see the photos already uploaded for examples of acceptable photos.


Log into Facebook | Facebook



Puyallup, WA Ultralight TP's for 11-22

Gary DeBock
 

Asian propagation was greatly improved this morning, resulting in one of the better sessions of the month. A dramatic sunrise enhancement boost after 1500 favored the high band Asian mainland stations, with 1593-CNR1 the star performer here.
 
At my 1430 start time the Asian propagation was already far above average, despite the subfreezing temperature in the totally dark back yard. The usual NHK big guns on 594, 693 and 774 were all at fair to good levels, along with 972-HLCA's bizarre singing practice. The high band was already the main attraction, though, with 1566-HLAZ having very good peaks, and 1377, 1503, 1575 and 1593 all at threshold level. With the first sign of daylight around 1445 some low band second tier Asians like 603-HLSA and a presumed 738-BEL2 came out of the noise, and HLSA maintained weak but steady signals up until around 1515. After 1500 the high band Asians all got a major boost, with 1593-CNR1 especially favored by the dramatic sunrise enhancement. 1377-CNR1 came up to a weak level // 1593 around 1505, and 1575-VOA was somewhat stronger with its male-female Asiatic language speech. Of course 1566-HLAZ was stronger than both, but it was surpassed in a major way by 1593-CNR1 around 1505, with its best signal here since last January. With very good peaks of female Chinese speech in and out around 1506, the station was far and away the best attraction of the morning. The subfreezing cold made it tough to stick around in the frozen back yard after around 1520, though, and TP signals were dropping off for the most part by that time. Overall the session was one of the best of November, and hopefully an indication of better DX to come.
 
1593-CNR1  Changzhou, China   Chinese female speech // 1377 at very good level in and out at 1506; best signal of the season
https://app.box.com/s/o9opa20lrivlbkj1lq5tqgn09xrn87xp  
 
73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
7.5" loopstick C.Crane Skywave Ultralight +
15" FSL antenna
 
 


1593-CNR1 This Morning

Gary DeBock
 

Nick was certainly correct about high band TP activity just after 1500 this morning. 1377, 1566, 1575 and 1593 were all in audio, with 1593-CNR1 managing its best signal here since last January (very good on peaks). A detailed report will follow.
 
1593-CNR1  Changzhou, China   Chinese female speech // 1377 at very good level in and out at 1506; best signals of the season
 
73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
7.5" loopstick C.Crane Skywave Ultralight +
15" FSL antenna
 
 


Re: County Comm GP-5/SSB ?'s- FARMERIK

Rik
 

Thanks for all the answers.

My main reason for wanting the GP5/SSB is for a new loop antenna I am working on, one more of dozens. Like the PL-360 it will tune the loop directly.The same jack for the little plug in loop connects the SW section to what ever loop I choose. Combined with the ETM feature for antenna tests like the midday AM station counts,  the GP5 the adds the ability to tune ALL of the SW spectrum and in SSB the Ham meter bands can be searched with ETM if I read reviews correctly. Usually I focus on a fairly narrow frequency spectrum, and have other radios with key pads.

Maybe all DSP radios do not have the frustrating problem of needing to be tuned off several 'channels' and brought back to the frequency of a TUNED in loop. That makes peaking a DSP radio to a tuned loop very difficult for me.  I have used an analog set to tune in a loop, then switched to a DSP radio, but that is cumbersome, and impossible to do the comparison ETM scans I like as well. Without modification, only the '360 & GP5 allow the direct tuning of loop antennas by the DSP radio  as far as I know. From some online source, I found the GP5 can also scan just one meter band. Not sure if that would be in ATS or ETM. That too would be great for antenna tests. With the PL-310 the SW meter band ETM scans are usually slow enough so I can take note of the number when it goes up to the next meter band, and later subtract to find the number of stations found in each SW meter band with an antenna. For example, this would tell me at what band my BOG  is no longer better than another antenna like my 50 foot aerial.

-FARMERIK


Re: County Comm GP-5/SSB ?'s- FARMERIK

Gary Sargent
 

Yes .. the GP5/SSB is tall and narrow .. not so steady to stand up on its own without something tipping it over. But yes, take of the belt clip and it can lay nicely on its left side and that makes it a decent night stand radio. (or other table)

 

Gary KE8WO


Medium wave DXing Report - Launceston Tasmania

Paul Blundell
 

Medium wave DXing Report - Launceston Tasmania


Date: 21/11/2015

Time: 16:45 – 17:30 local 

Location: Punchbowl Reserve

Radio: Tecsun PL-360 / AR1748

Total medium wave stations logged: 28

New medium wave stations logged: 0

Notes: Late yesterday afternoon my wife, daughter and I headed to the Punchbowl reserve for a BBQ picnic; I also took along my radio DX kit. While my wife was cooking some sausages I watched our daughter playing and undertook a portable DXing session. In the 45 minutes I was setup I logged 28 medium wave stations, these were logged on a mix of my stock Tecsun PL-360 and AR1748. The lower half of the band produced results as I would have expected with all my “normal” day time ground wave stations being received at fair to good signal levels. My real shock was 2RN on 1512KHz, this station came out of the noise towards the end of this DXing session with very weak radio national. This was received on my AR1748, both my PL360 and AR1733 didn’t show any trace of a signal at this time.


Overall this was a very enjoyable session at this location. With our move to the other side of the city shortly I suspect I won’t be able to get back to this location in the near future. Below is a full list oif the stations I logged.


531 3GG

540 7SD

549 2CR

558 7BU

585 7RN

594 3WV

621 3RN

630 7RN

693 3AW

738 2NR

747 7PB

756 3RN

765 2EC

774 3LO

828 3GI

855 3CR

864 7RPH

900 7AD

927 3UZ

936 7ZR

945 0_HPON

1008 0_HPON

1080 HPON - Hobart

1089 3WM

1161 7FG

1341 HPON - Geelong

1422 HPON - Melbourne

1512 2RN


Photos can be seen here: http://ultralightdxing.blogspot.com.au/2015/11/portable-dxing-session-report-punchbowl.html 




Re: County Comm GP-5/SSB ?'s- FARMERIK

dave_m1ctk
 

I have yet to get one these, would be good if it had the Russian FM band on it also though I know this is pointless in the US but here in the UK often signals are heard in the 66 - 72 MHz range via Sporadic E of course (Summer months)

On 21 November 2015 at 22:43, dx@... [ultralightdx] <ultralightdx@...> wrote:
 


I totally agree with that assessment! I nice handheld radio with precise tuning of SSB, but rather fiddly to operate, especially if you're in a hurry.

One comment on the plastic belt clip. You don't need to stick paper beneath it to help keep the radio from rocking on a tilted stand. The clip is removable, so just pop it off. Then the back of the radio is perfectly flat.

73,

Guy Atkins
Puyallup, WA


---In ultralightdx@..., wrote :

Yes, I've had one for several months now and really like it. FM and SW, especially SSB performance is very good. AM/MW, even withe the external plug in antenna, is good but not as good as say a stock PL380. The tuning control is a clicky type encoder and there is a fraction of a second time for it tune from the last to the next frequency. So rapidly tuning through a band won't happen. The default tuning increments, even with a slow and fast modes, does not allow rapid tuning from one place to another. For example .. quickly going from the high end of the MW BCB to the low takes many spins of the tuning control.  The memories and the two methods of scanning a band and storing the frequencies works well and helps a lot in getting from one place to another. It is solidly built and I think sounds fine for such a small unit and small speaker. Of the small radios I have, the GP5 SSB is the easiest to tune in SSB.  Except for the AM MW performance, it compares very similar in what it hears to my DE1103. Recommended.



Re: County Comm GP-5/SSB ?'s- FARMERIK

Guy Atkins
 


I totally agree with that assessment! I nice handheld radio with precise tuning of SSB, but rather fiddly to operate, especially if you're in a hurry.

One comment on the plastic belt clip. You don't need to stick paper beneath it to help keep the radio from rocking on a tilted stand. The clip is removable, so just pop it off. Then the back of the radio is perfectly flat.

73,

Guy Atkins
Puyallup, WA


---In ultralightdx@..., <GarySargent@...> wrote :

Yes, I've had one for several months now and really like it. FM and SW, especially SSB performance is very good. AM/MW, even withe the external plug in antenna, is good but not as good as say a stock PL380. The tuning control is a clicky type encoder and there is a fraction of a second time for it tune from the last to the next frequency. So rapidly tuning through a band won't happen. The default tuning increments, even with a slow and fast modes, does not allow rapid tuning from one place to another. For example .. quickly going from the high end of the MW BCB to the low takes many spins of the tuning control.  The memories and the two methods of scanning a band and storing the frequencies works well and helps a lot in getting from one place to another. It is solidly built and I think sounds fine for such a small unit and small speaker. Of the small radios I have, the GP5 SSB is the easiest to tune in SSB.  Except for the AM MW performance, it compares very similar in what it hears to my DE1103. Recommended.


Re: Degen DE221 Quick Look

Rik
 

I have a soft spot for inexpensive radios which work well for the money. Glad you found one. - FARMERIK


Re: Photos of the inside of the new Sony ICF-P26

Ryan Martin
 

Jay,
Thanks for the comparison to the srf-59. You saved me $26! Sony should have just slapped a speaker on the srf-59 for their new model.
Ryan


Degen DE221 Quick Look

Gary Sargent
 

I saw the announcement a few months ago about a number of new Degen small radios. The new DE221 caught my attention. I’ve been waiting for someone to buy one and report their observations. Not seeing this, I decided to buy one and give it a quick evaluation.


The DE221 is an upgrade of the Degen DE321 AM, FM and SW low cost small radio. Both are based on the Silicon Labs DSP chip. The major difference is that the DE321 is entirely looking like an old style mechanically tuned radio.  The DE221, even though based on the same DSP technology, it has most of the appearance and operation of a low end digital AM (MW), FM, and SW radio.

Some major points of the DE221


·         - Is a little smaller and thinner than the popular PL380. Pocketable.

·         - Digital display (non-backlit) of frequency, mode (I.e. MW, FM or SW)  time, alarm, sleep timer and battery strength

·          -Tuning is via a rotary control on the right side. The band is selected by a top mounted slider band switch (FM1, FM2, MW and 8 SW bands)

·         - As the band is tuned, a mechanical pointer on the right side of the front case moves from a value of 0 at the bottom to a 10 at the top. Think of this as a sort of band spread indication to show generally where you are in a band.

·         - As you tune, the digital display is showing the tuned frequency, in megahertz FM and SW and kilohertz MW. -There is a small and sensitive “Tune” LED that comes on when a station is exactly tuned in

·         - Volume is a rotary control on the right .. good speaker volume and good headphone sound

·         -There are 8 buttons with all legends in Chinese. But they are simple enough. The buttons from 1 to 8, from left to right and from top to bottom are:

1 – Stereo / mono for FM

2 – Alarm off / on (only when powered off). Alarm turns on the radio to last station tuned in.

3 – Set current time or alarm time hours (only when powered off)

4 – Select sleep timer minutes (steps from 90 to off with each press) and turns on the radio

5 – Set the current time (press and hold until display blinks, only when powered off)

6 – Set the alarm time (press and hold until display blinks, only when powered off)

7 - Set current time or alarm time minutes (only when powered off)

8 – Radio power on / off 

·     -   - Powered by 2 AA batteries or external 5 VDC. No feature to recharge batteries.

·         - Stereo headphone jack and a lock switch on the left side.


So how does it work?

·         In general the tuning control takes maybe two complete revolutions to span a band. So the tuning is not as difficult or ‘touchy’ as the DE321. The tuning seems smooth though mine seems to slip some. Time will tell if this is a chronic problem.  I had to take the radio apart and apply some auto belt conditioner to add a little grip to the dial cord (string, really) used inside. It has helped so far. The “tune” led comes on when a stronger station is tuned spot on say 88.1 not 88.0 or 88.2.


·         FM: good sensitivity and reasonable selectivity. Tunes in 100 khz increments. A given station can be heard even if the indicated frequency in the display is off by plus or minus a few hundred khz. Stereo in head phones. The DE221 heard almost all of the FM stations that my PL380 did. So FM performance is excellent.

·         

MWMW: Poor sensitivity and selectivity. Touchy to tune to get exactly on the desired frequency. However the tuning is so broad, per the display, that you can receive the station even if the display indicates the frequency 20 or more kilohertz plus or minus from the actual frequency. So it’s easy to tune. Only tunes to 1620 khz. Only good for the medium and stronger local stations. The ferrite bar antenna looks to be just short of two inches long. The muting / volume reduction seems aggressive such that turning up the volume for a weak station may well blast you when you tune through a stronger station.


·         SW: Tunes in 5 khz increments.  Same broad tuning of a station as above for MW stations. Very sensitive off whip but burdened by some garble from the local MW stations on some SW bands. It was able to hear almost all of the SW stations that the PL380 did. Plus this tunes very much like an analog type of radio … meaning that you can fairly quickly scan across a band looking for stations. Overall, decent SW performance.


Summary

For a just over $20 price point the DE221 is just ok performance wise. The FM performance is very good and makes the DE221 acceptable for the price. SW performance is ok but MW is so-so. And this is assuming that my DE221 slipping tuning control is not an issue with all DE221’s.  Overall I feel there are other receivers at the price point with better overall performance. I’ve compared the DE221 to the PL380 that costs twice the price of the DE221 but the performance and features comparison is like night and day in favor of the PL380.


Gary KE8WO



Re: County Comm GP-5/SSB ?'s- FARMERIK

Gary Sargent
 

Yes, I've had one for several months now and really like it. FM and SW, especially SSB performance is very good. AM/MW, even withe the external plug in antenna, is good but not as good as say a stock PL380. The tuning control is a clicky type encoder and there is a fraction of a second time for it tune from the last to the next frequency. So rapidly tuning through a band won't happen. The default tuning increments, even with a slow and fast modes, does not allow rapid tuning from one place to another. For example .. quickly going from the high end of the MW BCB to the low takes many spins of the tuning control.  The memories and the two methods of scanning a band and storing the frequencies works well and helps a lot in getting from one place to another. It is solidly built and I think sounds fine for such a small unit and small speaker. Of the small radios I have, the GP5 SSB is the easiest to tune in SSB.  Except for the AM MW performance, it compares very similar in what it hears to my DE1103. Recommended.


County Comm GP-5/SSB ?'s- FARMERIK

Rik
 

I am thinking about one of these GP-5/SSB radios to tune my ferrite antenna project. The input for the MW/LW antenna also connects to SW so it could tune an antenna coil wound  for the Tropical bands which interest me  as well as MW.

I am thinking I would cut card stock to fit under the 'pocket clip' so the radio does not fall to the sides on an angled plastic stand.

I am familiar with the PL-360. Adding SSB with ETM for the Ham bands may prove interesting.

Anybody here use the County Comm?

-FARMERIK


Interchangable coil ferrite antenna-FARMERIK

Rik
 

I just uploaded a photo here in this group of the core I am making for an antenna based on Everett's work. On a 20 inch long  X 1 inch diameter dowel I slid 18 ferrite toroids 2.125 OD X 1 ID X 0.75 inches thick. [13.5 inches long]. At each end is a PVC conduit fitting to hold the cores in place and offer a 1.5 inch diameter to support 1.5 X 3 inch  pipe adapters.  The core is secured permanently, but the pipe adapters and section of 3 inch PVC are slip fit so different 3 inch pipe sleeves can be wound with different coils and all will use the same ferrite core.

-FARMERIK



Puyallup, WA Ultralight TP's for 11-20

Gary DeBock
 

Asian signals recovered somewhat from their disastrous drop off yesterday, although they still ended up somewhat short of their energetic performance two days ago.
 
In the predawn darkness at 1430 it was mostly a high band show, with good audio in ands out from 1566-HLAZ, and threshold peaks from both 1575-VOA and 1593-CNR1. As daylight increased around 1440 several low band big guns came out of the noise, with 594 and 693 reaching fair levels, and 603 managing threshold audio (but not enough to distinguish HLSA or China). 972-HLCA was also having fair peaks around 1445, but none of the low or middle band TP's lasted very long in the increasing daylight. 1593-CNR1 was the best late performer with the usual male-female Chinese speech in and out at a fair level until around 1500, but it fizzled pretty quickly after that. That was pretty much the story of yet another lackluster session, although it was probably above average for this dreary month.
 
73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
7.5" loopstick C.Crane Skywave Ultralight +
15" FSL antenna
 
 


Re: Toroid Ferrite Loop Stick

Rik
 

Thanks. I should try the regular wire to see what happens.- FARMERIK


Re: Toroid Ferrite Loop Stick

Everett N4CY
 

It does not work that way, it will take more total turns than one coil. You might try wrapping the 4 coils with some expendable wire to get an idea as to how many turns each coils is going to take and then replace it with the litz wire. As I have said before, it is a trial and error process. You will need to wrap each coil with more wire than you need, then start taking a turn off each coil until you reach the desired band top end. There is just no easy way to do it.
 
Everett N4CY 
 

In a message dated 11/20/2015 7:58:24 A.M. Central Standard Time, ultralightdx@... writes:
 

Yet another question for Everett or others here- If I copy your core and use the same Litz, but want to use multiple coils in series, can I just divide the 22 turns you used into several smaller coils of the same total number of turns and get about the same uH? For example, instead of one 22 turn coil, have three coils of say 8-6-8 turns, or 11-11.  Is it possible to somewhat accurately guess like that?

-FARMERIK


Re: Toroid Ferrite Loop Stick

Rik
 

Yet another question for Everett or others here- If I copy your core and use the same Litz, but want to use multiple coils in series, can I just divide the 22 turns you used into several smaller coils of the same total number of turns and get about the same uH? For example, instead of one 22 turn coil, have three coils of say 8-6-8 turns, or 11-11.  Is it possible to somewhat accurately guess like that?

-FARMERIK


Re: Project - New Radio DX Kei

Paul Blundell
 

The price for the AR1748 has come down of late, I had looked online for some other models but wanted to go with a model I knew and had a local warranty.

On Fri, Nov 20, 2015 at 11:49 AM, Clyde Smith hkryclyde@... [ultralightdx] <ultralightdx@...> wrote:
 

interesting.  what made you choose the jaycar.  thanks   clyde



On Thursday, November 19, 2015 4:35 PM, "tanger32au@... [ultralightdx]" <ultralightdx@...> wrote:


 
Over the past few months I have taken a step back from the radio dxing hobby as a whole to focus on some other areas of my life. With some recent changes and summer now almost here I will be able again to spend more time in the radio dxing hobby. Based on this I have recently purchased a new radio, this is the Jaycar AR1748 World Band AM/FM/SW PLL Radio, while this is not an "ultralight radio" it will serve as my main DXing set and a spotting receiver for my ultralight dxing adventures. 

I have also sorted my various other radios and now have all of these mounted in the Jaycar ABS Instrument Case with Purge Valve MPV4 along with my accessories, log sheets and information documents. This case was chosen as it will fit the AR1748 plus allow enough space for my other radios.

To do this I have removed half the foam on the left hand side of the case, this provides enough space for the AR1748. On the right hand side I have made a hole for my AR1733 in the foam. Behind this I have mounted a large plastic container with two small bolts which contains my PL-360, 7.5" lookstick aerial plus other accessories. 

Ultralight DXing: Project - New Radio DX Kit
Over the past few months I have taken a step back from the radio dxing hobby as a whole to focus on some other areas of my life.
Preview by Yahoo





Re: Project - New Radio DX Kei

Clyde Smith <hkryclyde@...>
 

interesting.  what made you choose the jaycar.  thanks   clyde



On Thursday, November 19, 2015 4:35 PM, "tanger32au@... [ultralightdx]" <ultralightdx@...> wrote:


 
Over the past few months I have taken a step back from the radio dxing hobby as a whole to focus on some other areas of my life. With some recent changes and summer now almost here I will be able again to spend more time in the radio dxing hobby. Based on this I have recently purchased a new radio, this is the Jaycar AR1748 World Band AM/FM/SW PLL Radio, while this is not an "ultralight radio" it will serve as my main DXing set and a spotting receiver for my ultralight dxing adventures. 

I have also sorted my various other radios and now have all of these mounted in the Jaycar ABS Instrument Case with Purge Valve MPV4 along with my accessories, log sheets and information documents. This case was chosen as it will fit the AR1748 plus allow enough space for my other radios.

To do this I have removed half the foam on the left hand side of the case, this provides enough space for the AR1748. On the right hand side I have made a hole for my AR1733 in the foam. Behind this I have mounted a large plastic container with two small bolts which contains my PL-360, 7.5" lookstick aerial plus other accessories. 




8301 - 8320 of 34094