Date   

Re: Used Eton E100

satya@...
 

Hey Chris:

My hands seem to have a lot of capacitance, which spurred experimentation
with the PVC version of the mod, so that my hand doesn't get near the
coil. So, the "PVC Slider e100" article at DXer.ca might be of use to
you.

73 - Kevin S
Bainbridge Island, WA

I find that hand capacitance is nil below about 1000 KHz. By the time I'm
up to say, 1630 Khz, the hand has a more noticable effect. I find that if
I tune to 1633 in this example, and use the slider to maximize the signal
at that point, the radio will be properly peaked when I remove my hand,
and retune to 1630 Khz.

Heatwave

--- On Wed, 2/11/09, Chris Knight <chris@...> wrote:

From: Chris Knight <chris@...>
Subject: [ultralightdx] Used Eton E100
To: "Ultralight Group" <ultralightdx@...>
Date: Wednesday, February 11, 2009, 12:35 AM






This has me wondering
though if hand capacitance will be a significant factor during post-mod
operation. Any comments or suggestions? ?



















Solution for Hand Capacitance Effects in E100 Slider Loopsticks

Gary DeBock
 

Chris and Kevin,
 
     I certainly have more "orphan" stock E100 loopsticks than anyone on the planet-- even after giving three to Steve Ratzlaff, I still have four here, that are available to anyone who wants them (free).  As you might guess, the E100 stock loopsticks are not very highly regarded here, especially in comparison to the Sliders.
 
     For the elimination of hand capacitance effects on the E100 Sliders, five 3/4" wide wraps of the 3M- Scotch "Extreme" band strapping tape on the left edge of the Slider coil will do the job very well.  A photo of this latest Slider coil is in the ultralightdx Photo album "Loopstick Lunacy," in the last photo of 9 in the album ("Fully Modified C.Crane SWP Model-- TP-DX Ready").  The left edge of the Slider coil has the five wraps of Scotch brand "Extreme" tape, which eliminates all hand capacitance as long as the DXer grasps the coil by this left edge only.  All the Slider coils made here since January use this system, both for the E100, SWP, and DT-200VX Slider loopsticks.
 
     73,  Gary
         
 
In a message dated 2/11/2009 7:33:18 P.M. Pacific Standard Time, satya@... writes:

Hey Chris:

Excellent idea! $200 seems a bit steep for an antenna coupler, but at
least you would have a lot of sliders to hook up to the Beverage!

GARY - don't be a tease: give us the scoop on the new hand
capacitance-free Slider!!!!

Kevin

> Kevin,
>
> Speaking of PVC forms, here's an idea for stock E100 ferrites: Collect six
> E100 stock ferrites, separate them into two groups of three. Glue them
> together in a "triangular" or w/e shape. Ditto the other group of three.
> Then glue the two groups together end to end. Wind a coil on them, slap
> them
> into a 1" (or so) PVC pipe with end caps so the form doesn't fall out.
> Drill
> a hole in one of the end caps to mount an SO239 or other suitable
> connector.
> Connect the coiled wire ends to the center and ground of the connector,
> respectively. Now all you need to do is string out a Beverage antenna (or
> longwire) and connect via coax to the SO239. The form would act as an
> antenna coupler. The hardest part would be obtaining six E100 ferrites.
> :-)
>
> 73. Chris
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com
> [mailto:ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of satya@sounddsl.com
> Sent: Wednesday, February 11, 2009 10:43 AM
> To: ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com
> Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] Used Eton E100
>
>
> Yes, the old loopstick is now taking up space in my junk box. I would
> note that John Bryant kindly put one of the "real" loopsticks in my older
> e100 a few months ago, which he had removed from his now-Slider unit, so
> you could do that as well if you're stuck with one of the older versions.
> With all the sliders now being created, there must be a burgeoning market
> of displaced stock ferrites!
>
> Kevin
>
>



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Re: ULR Loggings Over Last Few Days

jmallery2002
 

Re: Spanish speaking stations.

 

Gentlemen,

Thanks for all the replies. This is a robust group and your suggestions most helpful.

 

Regards,

John

Shawnee, KS


UL Graveyarder #30- WRBS-1230 #30-

John Cereghin <jcereghin@...>
 

Finally got my 30th graveyarder on a UL- one I had been targeting for
a while:

WRBS-1230, Baltimore MD, Feb 11, 1640, "Point of View" talk show,
//webstream. Only 53 miles away but WCMC usually dominates and WRBS
is seldom heard here.

My graveyarder-by-channel breakdown for the first 30 is:
1230- 6 stations
1240- 3 stations
1340- 6 stations
1400- 4 stations
1450- 4 stations
1490- 7 stations

John Cereghin
Smyrna DE


Re: Used Eton E100

lrdheat
 

I find that hand capacitance is nil below about 1000 KHz. By the time I'm up to say, 1630 Khz, the hand has a more noticable effect. I find that if I tune to 1633 in this example, and use the slider to maximize the signal at that point, the radio will be properly peaked when I remove my hand, and retune to 1630 Khz.
 
Heatwave
 

--- On Wed, 2/11/09, Chris Knight wrote:
From: Chris Knight
Subject: [ultralightdx] Used Eton E100
To: "Ultralight Group"
Date: Wednesday, February 11, 2009, 12:35 AM

 This has me wondering
though if hand capacitance will be a significant factor during post-mod
operation. Any comments or suggestions? ?




Re: Used Eton E100

Gary DeBock
 

Chris, Richard & Kevin,
 
     The latest version of the E100 Slider coil made here eliminates all hand capacitance effects, even on the high band.  It took about 7 months to perfect a system of coil construction which was attractive, effective, easy to slide (but not too easy), and without hand capacitance-- but now they routine to make (details on request).
 
      By the way, the new C.Crane SWP Sliders made here during winter experimentation (using the identical 7.5" Amidon ferrite bar and 40/44 Litz wire) have never had any hand capacitance effects, because of the different RF front end of the SWP model.  The Slider loopsticks for the SWP are very easy to tune, even with multiple locals on the high end.
 
     73,  Gary 


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Re: Used Eton E100

satya@...
 

Yes, the old loopstick is now taking up space in my junk box. I would
note that John Bryant kindly put one of the "real" loopsticks in my older
e100 a few months ago, which he had removed from his now-Slider unit, so
you could do that as well if you're stuck with one of the older versions.
With all the sliders now being created, there must be a burgeoning market
of displaced stock ferrites!

Kevin

Hi Chris,

Great work on getting your bargain E100 ready for exciting
Ultralight
DX!

Some very early serial # E100's have a loopstick which is fixed, and
not designed to be peaked at the 600 kHz point. These usually come
accompanied
with jumbled and/or mangled coil windings, exactly as you described.
Kevin
Schanilec sent me one of these a year ago for alignment, but all I could
do
was adjust the 1400 kHz trimmer, and ignore the lame loopstick.

Even in such a situation, the E100 will still receive great DX,
especially on the high end of the AM band. And should you choose to
install a
Slider loopstick at a later date, not only would your radio be a perfect
candidate
for a "transplant operation," but your model would receive a greater DX
performance boost from the Slider than would any other type of stock
E100.
Kevin's old E100 unit now has a Slider loopstick which he built himself,
and the
old lame loopstick has presumably been retired.

73, Gary DeBock


In a message dated 2/10/2009 10:35:24 P.M. Pacific Standard Time,
chris@... writes:




First off, Thank you to John B. for inviting me to this cool group.
Secondly, if I'm going to join this group, I ought to purchase an
ultralight. So, last week the opportunity presented itself on Ebay. It
was
an Eton E100 which had a speaker that didn't work and shortwave was
pretty
much non-existant. Perhaps some of you saw the auction or even bid on it.
Time ticking away with a few seconds left, I purchased (ie: "sniped")
this
little radio at $14.52. I didn't need shortwave to DX mediumwave BCB and
I
almost never use an external speaker. So it was a good deal.

The radio worked well! The Cuban Reloj was heard on 570, 790, and 870
without any external antenna. Pretty good for out west! Could this radio
possibly perform better? After asking myself that very question, I got
online and downloaded the alignment article by John and Gary. After
opening
the radio, I noticed the picture didn't quite match what I saw. There was
no
wire between the whip and the circuit board. None! That explains why
shortwave didn't work. Not only that, there was no evidence a wire had
ever
been installed!

As far as the speaker, the red wire worked itself loose. Aha! Well, that
wasn't the problem. I replaced the red wire with a black wire (egad!)
since
all I had was black wire. The connection is labelled on the speaker
anyway.
I then checked for shorted connections, ohmed the wires to the circuit
board
and found they are connected. Ohming between the + and - terminals of the
speaker showed wide open. If a speaker is akin to a coil of wire,
shouldn't
I expect a DC short? I moved on to alignment...

The slider portion of the coil had some disturbed wires in the center. I
don't want to use the word "mangled", but "mangled" may not be far off
from
what I saw as a matter of perception. Still, I moved away some of the wax
and slid the coil as far as it would go to either direction. The big
problem
was hand capacitance. Every time I moved the slider coil with my hand or
even put my hand near the assembly, the signal would go way up. I tried
moving the slider with a small screwdriver with the same effect, though
not
as pronounced. Consequently, I never found the exact spot for 600kHz and
may
have made low-band alignment worse. Not really a big deal as this point
as
the radio is a candidate for the external slider mod. This has me
wondering
though if hand capacitance will be a significant factor during post-mod
operation. Any comments or suggestions?o

For the high-band alignment, I chose 1380. Tweaking the trimmer cap
helped
that signal substantially and made the radio perform much better on the
high
end.

I put the radio back together (after adding a wire from the whip antenna
to
the correct place on the circuit board). Shortwave now works. The speaker
still doesn't, but that's OK. I took the radio outside away from all the
indoor computer/TV hash and pulled in a couple of normally uncommon to
rare
stations. Very impressive! The audio sounds great on the E100, very
pleasing
on the ears especially after DXing with the Drake R8 using just sideband
modes.

73,

Chris Knight
Fort Lupton, CO





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Re: Used Eton E100

Gary DeBock
 

Hi Chris,
 
     Great work on getting your bargain E100 ready for exciting Ultralight DX!
 
     Some very early serial # E100's have a loopstick which is fixed, and not designed to be peaked at the 600 kHz point.  These usually come accompanied with jumbled and/or mangled coil windings, exactly as you described.  Kevin Schanilec sent me one of these a year ago for alignment, but all I could do was adjust the 1400 kHz trimmer, and ignore the lame loopstick.
 
     Even in such a situation, the E100 will still receive great DX, especially on the high end of the AM band.  And should you choose to install a Slider loopstick at a later date, not only would your radio be a perfect candidate for a "transplant operation," but your model would receive a greater DX performance boost from the Slider than would any other type of stock E100.  Kevin's old E100 unit now has a Slider loopstick which he built himself, and the old lame loopstick has presumably been retired.
 
     73,  Gary DeBock 
 
In a message dated 2/10/2009 10:35:24 P.M. Pacific Standard Time, chris@... writes:

First off, Thank you to John B. for inviting me to this cool group.
Secondly, if I'm going to join this group, I ought to purchase an
ultralight. So, last week the opportunity presented itself on Ebay. It was
an Eton E100 which had a speaker that didn't work and shortwave was pretty
much non-existant. Perhaps some of you saw the auction or even bid on it.
Time ticking away with a few seconds left, I purchased (ie: "sniped") this
little radio at $14.52. I didn't need shortwave to DX mediumwave BCB and I
almost never use an external speaker. So it was a good deal.

The radio worked well! The Cuban Reloj was heard on 570, 790, and 870
without any external antenna. Pretty good for out west! Could this radio
possibly perform better? After asking myself that very question, I got
online and downloaded the alignment article by John and Gary. After opening
the radio, I noticed the picture didn't quite match what I saw. There was no
wire between the whip and the circuit board. None! That explains why
shortwave didn't work. Not only that, there was no evidence a wire had ever
been installed!

As far as the speaker, the red wire worked itself loose. Aha! Well, that
wasn't the problem. I replaced the red wire with a black wire (egad!) since
all I had was black wire. The connection is labelled on the speaker anyway.
I then checked for shorted connections, ohmed the wires to the circuit board
and found they are connected. Ohming between the + and - terminals of the
speaker showed wide open. If a speaker is akin to a coil of wire, shouldn't
I expect a DC short? I moved on to alignment...

The slider portion of the coil had some disturbed wires in the center. I
don't want to use the word "mangled", but "mangled" may not be far off from
what I saw as a matter of perception. Still, I moved away some of the wax
and slid the coil as far as it would go to either direction. The big problem
was hand capacitance. Every time I moved the slider coil with my hand or
even put my hand near the assembly, the signal would go way up. I tried
moving the slider with a small screwdriver with the same effect, though not
as pronounced. Consequently, I never found the exact spot for 600kHz and may
have made low-band alignment worse. Not really a big deal as this point as
the radio is a candidate for the external slider mod. This has me wondering
though if hand capacitance will be a significant factor during post-mod
operation. Any comments or suggestions??

For the high-band alignment, I chose 1380. Tweaking the trimmer cap helped
that signal substantially and made the radio perform much better on the high
end.

I put the radio back together (after adding a wire from the whip antenna to
the correct place on the circuit board). Shortwave now works. The speaker
still doesn't, but that's OK. I took the radio outside away from all the
indoor computer/TV hash and pulled in a couple of normally uncommon to rare
stations. Very impressive! The audio sounds great on the E100, very pleasing
on the ears especially after DXing with the Drake R8 using just sideband
modes.

73,

Chris Knight
Fort Lupton, CO



The year's hottest artists on the red carpet at the Grammy Awards. AOL Music takes you there.


Used Eton E100

Chris Knight <chris@...>
 

First off, Thank you to John B. for inviting me to this cool group.
Secondly, if I'm going to join this group, I ought to purchase an
ultralight. So, last week the opportunity presented itself on Ebay. It was
an Eton E100 which had a speaker that didn't work and shortwave was pretty
much non-existant. Perhaps some of you saw the auction or even bid on it.
Time ticking away with a few seconds left, I purchased (ie: "sniped") this
little radio at $14.52. I didn't need shortwave to DX mediumwave BCB and I
almost never use an external speaker. So it was a good deal.

The radio worked well! The Cuban Reloj was heard on 570, 790, and 870
without any external antenna. Pretty good for out west! Could this radio
possibly perform better? After asking myself that very question, I got
online and downloaded the alignment article by John and Gary. After opening
the radio, I noticed the picture didn't quite match what I saw. There was no
wire between the whip and the circuit board. None! That explains why
shortwave didn't work. Not only that, there was no evidence a wire had ever
been installed!

As far as the speaker, the red wire worked itself loose. Aha! Well, that
wasn't the problem. I replaced the red wire with a black wire (egad!) since
all I had was black wire. The connection is labelled on the speaker anyway.
I then checked for shorted connections, ohmed the wires to the circuit board
and found they are connected. Ohming between the + and - terminals of the
speaker showed wide open. If a speaker is akin to a coil of wire, shouldn't
I expect a DC short? I moved on to alignment...

The slider portion of the coil had some disturbed wires in the center. I
don't want to use the word "mangled", but "mangled" may not be far off from
what I saw as a matter of perception. Still, I moved away some of the wax
and slid the coil as far as it would go to either direction. The big problem
was hand capacitance. Every time I moved the slider coil with my hand or
even put my hand near the assembly, the signal would go way up. I tried
moving the slider with a small screwdriver with the same effect, though not
as pronounced. Consequently, I never found the exact spot for 600kHz and may
have made low-band alignment worse. Not really a big deal as this point as
the radio is a candidate for the external slider mod. This has me wondering
though if hand capacitance will be a significant factor during post-mod
operation. Any comments or suggestions??

For the high-band alignment, I chose 1380. Tweaking the trimmer cap helped
that signal substantially and made the radio perform much better on the high
end.

I put the radio back together (after adding a wire from the whip antenna to
the correct place on the circuit board). Shortwave now works. The speaker
still doesn't, but that's OK. I took the radio outside away from all the
indoor computer/TV hash and pulled in a couple of normally uncommon to rare
stations. Very impressive! The audio sounds great on the E100, very pleasing
on the ears especially after DXing with the Drake R8 using just sideband
modes.

73,

Chris Knight
Fort Lupton, CO


ULTRALIGHT DX...NEW ONE Logged Tonight................

robert ross
 

Hi Guys:

Just logged a NEW ONE on ULR tonight after nothing of note for a few days!!!

Radio used is................SRF-T615 BAREFOOT

ULR LOG is now ..............632 Stations Heard
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

********************************************************************
1480 WCNS Latrobe, PA. Feb/10/09 2135 EST EE FAIR
Oldies Music. ID by Male DJ as "My Radio 1480 WCNS". More Music.
Mixing badly with WHBC Canton, OHIO.

RELOG...But NEW to ULR # 632 500 Watts/1 KW Nights.
ROSS, ONT.
*********************************************************************

73..............ROB.

Robert S. Ross VA3SW
London, Ontario CANADA


New Articles on Recording Audio from Ultralights Posted

John H. Bryant <bjohnorcas@...>
 

Friends,

There are two new articles posted at the Ultralight Files area of dxer.ca.  The first article posted is a great article by Brandon Jordan that outlines his use of a laptop and two simultaneous "instances" of Total Recorder stereo software to record simultaneously from FOUR barefoot ULRs. Fabulous!!!  Brandon's article was published about a week ago and has already been viewed by 71 folks.

The second article, just posted by me, is Recording Audio from Ultralight Radios: Part 1.  That part of the collective article covers the use of hand-held digital recorders to record live DX sessions. It includes brief reviews of sample equipment and should be a real assist if that approach to recording is in your future. The current prices of the recorders discussed varies from about $30 USD to about $300 USD.  Many thanks to co-authors Kevin Schanilec,  Richard Allen, Colin Newell, Mark Connelly, Kelvin, Gary Deacon and Guy Atkins!

The second part of the article will also be a collective article and will feature ideas and experiences of using laptop computers and recording software with ULRs.  That article will incorporate Brandon's work, as well, so we will have a one-stop shop for this subject.

Both Brandon's article and PART 1 are in the files area now!

John B.
Stillwater, OK, USA
Rcvrs: Hotrodded NRD-535, Slider e100's
Antennas: Wellbrook Phased Array


Re: Stations 500 and 501!

Carl DeWhitt
 

---Congrats,John on making 500 stations ! Good luck on the next 500.
Carl DeWhitt
Maryville,Tn.

In ultralightdx@..., "John Cereghin" <jcereghin@...>
wrote:

After a bit of a drought, I finally got UL stations 500 and 501.

Number 500- WBTK-1380, Richmond VA
Number 501- WNSS-1260, Syracuse NY

Looking over my first 500 UL stations:
1. I started on July 16 of last year
2. I have 34 states and 12 countries
3. Most of my stations are from Pennsylvania (with 74) followed by
New
York (54) and Virginia (49).
4. I have 24 Canadian stations
5. I am currently at 29 graveyarders, looking for my 30th.

I do the bulk of my DXing barefoot, except when looking for TAs.
I've
been using an SRF-59, DT-200VX, DT400W and an E-100.

On to 600!

John Cereghin
Smyrna DE


Re: [ABDX] FW: [RT] Good Use of Google Earth

Brandon Jordan <bcdx.org@...>
 

Very interesting link. My apologies if this has already been cross-posted.


Brian Leyton wrote:

Courtesy of Fee Lee on the Radio Tech list:
Radio-Tech@... <mailto:Radio-Tech%40broadcast.net>
http://www.broadcast.net/mailman/listinfo/radio-tech <http://www.broadcast.net/mailman/listinfo/radio-tech>
----
Here is a interesting use of Google Earth.
http://www.fccinfo.com/fccinfo_google_earth.php <http://www.fccinfo.com/fccinfo_google_earth.php>


Re: Spanish speaking stations

Brandon Jordan <bcdx.org@...>
 

Another good resource for XE stations, free that I might add, is the KOMEX List from Finnish DX Association, and it can be downloaded here:

http://www.tapiokalmi.net/dx/koje/koje1.html

For you GeoClock fans, check out the KOMEX version for GeoClock. Pretty nifty!

73,
Brandon


Re: Spanish speaking stations

John H. Bryant <bjohnorcas@...>
 

I speak about three phrases of street Spanish and that is all, but I've come to love DXing Spanish-speaking stations.... So far in Ultralighting, I'm almost to cross the 50 Latins Heard barrier and loving every minute of it.  I also have logged about a dozen SS language US stations. I should mention, too, that combined with the other two Okie Ultralighters, we have now heard just over 100 Latin stations... Kirk and Richard Allen (the other two) don't speak anymore Spanish than I do.

Mark mentioned parallels... that works well for a number of different circumstances with the Spanish, the Cubans and  few of the Mexicans.  There is also the possibility of SW parallels in some cases and paralleling live feeds on the internet, too. Google helps a lot.

For Mexicans, there are two EXCELLENT references.  The IRCA Mexican Log is top-rate and I find it very useful.  It sounds dumb, but the listing of the Spanish pronunciation of the Alphabet in the IRCA Log has helped me immensely with call letters. The Mexican Log is available on-line and modestly priced.  The other "don't be without it" resource for Mexican is the Mexican List kept privately by one of the dean of the hobby, John Callerman. That list, last updated about a year ago is meticulously researched and contains a wealth of information.  I could share that list with anyone interested, I'm sure....  Contact me off-list.

Finally, I find recording the catches is critical to IDing foreign language stations of any sort, but especially the Mexicans.... I still don't have that alphabet memorized even yet... and reviewing the audio and even enhancing it with Cool Edit Pro has gotten me about a third of my confirmed IDs.  If you have not yet started recording from Ultralights and are unsure of the techniques, I've edited a composite article on that subject that will be released in just the next day or two. You may find that useful.

So.... don't dodge the Spanish.... it can really be fun and you DO NOT have to understand much to positively ID the station...  Besides that, if you don't understand the language, you don't have to listen to the program.... now, if I could just get Rush and a few others to start speaking Spanish or ANYTHING except English... 

Good luck and Hasta La Vista, Babee!


John B.
Stillwater, OK, USA
Rcvrs: Hotrodded NRD-535, Slider e100's
Antennas: Wellbrook Phased Array
 







At 02:50 AM 2/10/2009 +0000, you wrote:

One thing that makes ID'ing stations from Spain easy is all the
parallel channels, e.g. RNE on 531, 558, 567, 576, 585, 603, 621,
639, 657, 684, 729, 738, 747, 774, 801, 855, 936, 972, 1107, 1152,
etc.

Other networks in Spain such as COPE, SER, and EI have similarly
large groups of parallel frequencies.

Cuba's Progreso, Rebelde, and Reloj networks are also large with
many parallel channels. The clock-ticking and once-a-minute
Morse "RR" beeps on the Cuban Reloj stations such as 570 blowtorch
make ID'ing those quite simple.

Mark Connelly, WA1ION - Billerica, MA

--- In ultralightdx@..., Allen Willie
wrote:
Hi John,

Welcome aboard our group . I don't speak Spanish myself either but
after being here in the North Atlantic for the past 7 years I've
sort of got an ear for Spanish from hearing all the Transatlantics
from Spain here in Newfoundland nightly.

I've found through my own experience that repitition is the key,
listening to a Spanish station over several different times for a
lengthy period each time can help.

Even though a person may not fully understand the entire speech,
certain words similar to English in amongst the speech tend to stand
out as recognizable to the listener.

As John Cereghin in Deleware mentioned the top of the hour at ID
time is probably the best time to figure out what the station is ,
but even off the top of the hour I've found through this method of
repitition it has yielded me some great catches as well .

Best of DX

Allen Willie
St. John's, Newfoundland

John B.
Stillwater, OK, USA
Rcvrs: Hotrodded NRD-535, Slider e100's
Antennas: Wellbrook Phased Array


Re: Spanish speaking stations

MarkWA1ION
 

One thing that makes ID'ing stations from Spain easy is all the
parallel channels, e.g. RNE on 531, 558, 567, 576, 585, 603, 621,
639, 657, 684, 729, 738, 747, 774, 801, 855, 936, 972, 1107, 1152,
etc.

Other networks in Spain such as COPE, SER, and EI have similarly
large groups of parallel frequencies.

Cuba's Progreso, Rebelde, and Reloj networks are also large with
many parallel channels. The clock-ticking and once-a-minute
Morse "RR" beeps on the Cuban Reloj stations such as 570 blowtorch
make ID'ing those quite simple.

Mark Connelly, WA1ION - Billerica, MA

--- In ultralightdx@..., Allen Willie <vo1_001_swl@...>
wrote:
Hi John,

Welcome aboard our group . I don't speak Spanish myself either but
after being here in the North Atlantic for the past 7 years I've
sort of got an ear for Spanish from hearing all the Transatlantics
from Spain here in Newfoundland nightly.

I've found through my own experience that repitition is the key,
listening to a Spanish station over several different times for a
lengthy period each time can help.

Even though a person may not fully understand the entire speech,
certain words similar to English in amongst the speech tend to stand
out as recognizable to the listener.

As John Cereghin in Deleware mentioned the top of the hour at ID
time is probably the best time to figure out what the station is ,
but even off the top of the hour I've found through this method of
repitition it has yielded me some great catches as well .

Best of DX

Allen Willie
St. John's, Newfoundland


spanish1

Russ Edmunds <wb2bjh@...>
 

Some on this list may find this site useful in view of the current thread.

http://www.ielanguages.com/spanish1.html

Russ Edmunds
Blue Bell, PA ( 360' ASL )
[15 mi NNW of Philadelphia]
40:08:45N; 75:16:04W, Grid FN20id
<wb2bjh@...>
FM: Yamaha T-80 & Onkyo T-450RDS w/ APS9B @15'
AM: Modified Sony ICF 2010 barefoot


Spanish speaking stations

Allen Willie
 

 
Hi John,
 
Welcome aboard our group . I don't speak Spanish myself either but after being here in the North Atlantic for the past 7 years I've sort of  got an ear for Spanish from hearing all the Transatlantics from Spain  here in Newfoundland  nightly.
 
I've found through my own experience  that  repitition is the key, listening to a Spanish station over several different times for a lengthy period  each time can help.
 
Even though a person may not fully understand the entire speech, certain words similar to English in amongst the speech tend to stand out as recognizable to the listener.
 
As John Cereghin in Deleware mentioned the top of the hour at ID time is probably the best time to figure out what  the station is , but  even off the top of the hour I've found through this method of repitition it  has yielded me some great catches as well .
 
Best of DX
 
Allen Willie
St. John's, Newfoundland


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Re: Spanish Speaking Stations

John Cereghin <jcereghin@...>
 

John,

I'm in the same pickle.  I can sorta handle Spanish but I tend to shy away from DXing Spanish stations if I can help it.  The best you can do is sit on a frequency at the Top of the Hour and wait for an English or pseudo-English ID.  But you should be able to pick our locations in ads that will also give you some clues as to a location- English place names sound very similar in Spanish.

John Cereghin
Smyrna DE


On Mon, Feb 9, 2009 at 12:17 PM, jmallery2002 <jmallery@...> wrote:

Do all you guys speak spanish? I pretty much skip over the spanish
speaking programs because I can't understand them. Am I missing
something.
Regards to all,
John (fairly new member..)



thanks and some interesting propagation

Allen Willie
 

 
 
  Hi Guys,
 
First of all Thanks to the Awards Committee for the recent award for 20 Latin stations heard. Much appreciated.
 
Secondly some interesting propagation  early this morning as I heard  CBC One Programming on 1340 khz with my SFR-M37V barefoot   . It included a jazz music program  but faded by the top of the hour before I could catch possible  mention of local news or weather update as most regional CB stations tend to do. Apparently in researching there are  3  such stations or relays throughout Ontario on 1340 as well as CFYK in Yellowknife NWT .
 
 It would be great if it was  Yellowknife  as I have not heard Yellowknife  (CJCD then ) since 1986 and that was heard from Alberta on a car radio.  R. Ulster from Northern Ireland usually dominates 1341 here even nights covering up 1340 most times so it's interesting to ponder  what that could have been . Unidentified for now .
 
Also  sitting on 1490  I thought I heard KNDC ID by a man which would be Hettinger, North Dakota  but it also faded  abruptly. Another unidentified  for the time being.  Will hit the graveyarders again tonight  with high hopes of similar  propagation.
 
73
 
Allen Willie
St. John's, Newfoundland


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