Date   

Re: Ultralight DX-log from Vardø Island, Arctic Norway. March 3 - April 1 2012

Hans Ostnell
 

Hi Chris!

No, during "summer"-time, the MW-band is totally dead up here due to the midnight sun. We have midnight sun from about May 20 to the end of July/beginning of August. Actually, frequencies up to 7 MHz is more or less useless up here during this period. The only thing that is possible to hear right now on MW is the semi-local russian stations on the Kola peninsula and the Murmansk area.

However, from mid-November to mid January the sun is totally gone, and wer'e living in total darkness 24/7. Pretty good for MW-DX, haha! So, from the end og August to the end of March the MW-band is pretty good up here.

73, Hans
Vardo, Arctic Norway
http://barentsdx.wordpress.com/

--- In ultralightdx@..., "renton481" <renton481@...> wrote:

You have an interesting MWDX blog, Hans.

Have you heard any MW or SW DX at all this summer? Some of us here in the U.S. have actually logged new stations this summer season. After looking over your blog, I was wondering if you have encountered the same thing.

Chris -- Renton481

--- In ultralightdx@..., "LA2MOA" <hans.ostnell@> wrote:

Hi group!

Well, I just updated my DX-blog, and my complete Ultralight DX-log (well, "almost" ultralight, since the receiver was a DE-1103) is now available for everyone.

You find the log here:

http://barentsdx.wordpress.com/ultralight-dxing/

Really looking forward to next season and the new modified PL-380!


73,

Hans / LA2MOA
Vardo, Arctic Norway


Re: Ultralight DX-log from Vardø Island, Arctic Norway. March 3 - April 1 2012

Chris C.
 

You have an interesting MWDX blog, Hans.

Have you heard any MW or SW DX at all this summer? Some of us here in the U.S. have actually logged new stations this summer season. After looking over your blog, I was wondering if you have encountered the same thing.

Chris -- Renton481

--- In ultralightdx@..., "LA2MOA" <hans.ostnell@...> wrote:

Hi group!

Well, I just updated my DX-blog, and my complete Ultralight DX-log (well, "almost" ultralight, since the receiver was a DE-1103) is now available for everyone.

You find the log here:

http://barentsdx.wordpress.com/ultralight-dxing/

Really looking forward to next season and the new modified PL-380!


73,

Hans / LA2MOA
Vardo, Arctic Norway


Re: Oregon Cliff Ultralight DU's for 7-21

Chris C.
 

RE: guard rail as a possible antenna / reception enhancer.

Your suggestion wouldn't surprise me, John, as I think long ribbons of steel can act as antennas -- I think they can sometimes imitate beverage antennas.

Once, in the 1980's, I was out and about with my Realistic TRF, and happened to be near some disused railroad tracks. I held the back of the TRF next to one of the rails. I tuned near 750 and immediately, out of the mud I heard KFQD Anchorage, which is rare to hear in the Pacific Northwest.

When I pulled the TRF away from the tracks, KFQD immediately disappeared. I placed the back of the TRF next to the rail once more, and KFQD reappears.

The tracks ran in a straight stretch, in a roughly NW-SE direction, which would have pointed roughly in the direction of Alaska. I didn't have time to tune around and see what else was on the band. But that reception of KFQD (complete with an ID) was very interesting.

Unfortunately, they soon pulled up the tracks, before I was able to use the rails for DXing regularly. There are other railroad tracks around, but they are heavily used mainlines, so I have never tried experimenting with them, for obvious safety reasons.

I think it would be possible to use other similar structures. I have to admit I haven't experimented with the idea since then. My guess is that the rail in the railroad tracks acted like a beverage-on-ground. After all, it's a long ribbon of steel on wooden insulators (the ties). Maybe it would be the same with a guardrail, because most guardrails I've seen seem to be on thick, wooden posts.

Chris

--- In ultralightdx@..., "kugellagers" <kugellager@...> wrote:

I wonder if you are also getting coupling with the guardrail in your video. I read something a couple of years ago where some German DX'ers wer actually using long guardrails as their antenna.

John
];')


Oregon Cliff Utralight DXpedition South Pacific NDB Recordings

Gary DeBock
 

Hello All,

For those interested in the fanatical sport of chasing Trans-Oceanic
long range NDB's on steep ocean side cliffs with a hot-rodded (AM-only)
Ultralight radio and compact FSL antennas, several MP3 recordings from
the recent Cape Perpetua (Oregon state) DXpedition are linked below.

The 4-day DXpedition was conducted on a Highway 101 road side turnoff 2
miles south of Yachats, Oregon (with barely enough space to park your
car, set up an 8" FSL antenna on its PVC base, and feel like you had
some chance of survival as huge trucks thundered by in total darkness).
There was no AC power, running water, street lighting or weather
protection. The rough conditions and ocean cliff environment are shown
in the DXpedition video posted at
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VZzBfstOXA4

$50 AM-only Ultralight radios are obviously not state-of-the-art NDB
receivers, but when assisted by salt water propagation, ocean cliff
elevation and the new high-gain FSL antennas they can be surprisingly
effective Trans-Oceanic DX chasers. This weird new sport is also the
perfect cure for NDB-DXing boredom, as you are forced to use all of
your DXing skill and propagation knowledge to have any chance of
success. You literally will sink or swim depending upon your own live
DXing skill, rather than relying on advanced listening equipment. This
was the original challenge which make Ultralight Medium Wave DXing so
popular, and is in fact a concept directly borrowed from the amateur
radio QRP-DXing community. Ultralight radio ocean cliff NDB-DXing takes
this challenge one step further... you will be out in a rather harsh
listening environment, and will need to prove that you are tough enough
to handle all kinds of weather (and roadside distractions) while you
are chasing your Trans-Oceanic DX.

Thanks to the extremely helpful Pacific NDB-DXing reports posted by
Steve, Don and Mike, I had a very useful Wish List of South Pacific
NDB's to try for. I had previously enjoyed a superb DXing thrill by
receiving both 270-FA (1000 watts, in Samoa) and 260-NF (2000 watts, on
Australia's Norfolk Island) with similar equipment last August on
Oregon's Cape Falcon. The results during this DXpedition were even more
thrillling... in addition to the two previous South Pacific NDB
catches, 238-KT in New Zealand (2000 watts) was also weakly received,
breaking the Ultralight NDB-DXing distance record. Listed below are the
dates, times and distances of the long-distance NDB receptions, with a
link to the MP3 recordings made on the AM-only Ultralight radio.
Hopefully this will motivate other beacon DXers to give this exciting
new form of NDB-DXing a try... and obtain a permanent cure for
listening boredom :-)

73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)


238-KT Kaitaia, Waimanoni-Awanui, New Zealand
1216 UTC 7-19-2012 (6,738 miles /10,843 km)
http://www.mediafire.com/?m9urjoqxzjj3ev0
(weak; headphones recommended)

260-NF Puppy's Point, Norfolk Island
1218 UTC 7-19-2012 (6,627 miles / 10,664 km)
http://www.mediafire.com/?6c4rfhb4vrqumdh

270-FA Faleolo IAP, Apia, Upolu Isl., Samoa
1218 UTC 7-29-2012 (5,012 miles / 8065 km)
http://www.mediafire.com/?iqv8f63ez1zkomc


Top Ten South Pacific Signals from the Cape Perpetua (OR) Cliff

Gary DeBock
 

Hello All,

From July 17-21 Norm Clark and I had the exciting experience of DXing
from the Cape Perpetua cliff site on Oregon's central coast, setting
up with a hot-rodded PL-380 Ultralight radio and an 8" FSL antenna on a
Highway 101 road side turn off (with an awesome ocean view). The
operating conditions were rough (no AC power, running water, street
lights or weather protection) and setup space was extremely limited,
but the thrilling DU-DX was more than worth the hassle! Recordings from
the strongest DU stations are linked below.

567-Radio National (Wellington, NZ, 50 kW) A regular every morning on
the Cliff, with a mix of news, interviews and music. // 675
http://www.mediafire.com/?9z8vnphq6thc9p2

603-Radio Waatea (Auckland, NW, 5 kW) Maori-language music and news,
quite vibrant during good Kiwi conditions
http://www.mediafire.com/?fjsnsk95l62iims

657-Southern Star (Wellington, NZ, 50 kW) Christian music broadcaster
with extremely strong signals during good Kiwi propagation
http://www.mediafire.com/?ijcacg8uqmvian9

684-NZ Rhema (Gisborne, NZ, 5 kW) Another Christian music broadcaster
with an exceptional signal for its transmitter power level
http://www.mediafire.com/?bge7anmbo8j79a8

738-RFO Tahiti (Mahina, Tahiti, 20 kW) A French language blowtorch on
the Cliff almost every morning, this station frequently tested the
PL-380's crunch resistance. One of only two stations not from New
Zealand to make this "Top Ten" list
http://www.mediafire.com/?a4shuubhn36b6aa

765-Radio Kahungunu (Napier-Hastings, NZ, 2.5 kW) The booming signals
from this low-powered Maori language broadcaster almost reached
science fiction levels on the Cliff. Part of the mystique is that this
station (and 603-Waatea) have apparently never been received at the
famous Grayland DXpedition site in Washington state. The second MP3 has
a beautiful Maori-language rendition of the old Jackson 5 hit, "I'll Be
There."
http://www.mediafire.com/?my4o957wpjtve0m
http://www.mediafire.com/?53ixrx2kv109g34

828-Radio Trackside (Palmerston North, NZ, 2 kW) Another low-powered
Kiwi station with amazing signals on the Cliff. Apparently helped by
bizarre propagation shutting out Australian stations, it frequently
ruled the roost on this frequency
http://www.mediafire.com/?53b7zau8787ie0j

891-5AN (Adelaide, Australia, 50 kW) The sole Aussie to make this
list, this ABC broadcaster apparently benefited from its central
Australia location, giving it booming signals while eastern Australia
was down in the noise. A frequent blowtorch on the Cliff
http://www.mediafire.com/?rsvoh1aro2w0xtr

1008-Newstalk ZB (Tauranga, NZ, 10 kW) One of the stronger Kiwis, but
its proximity to a 1010 kHz domestic station saddled it with a tedious
2 kHz heterodyne on the low-tech Tecsun ultralight. The strongest of
the Kiwi Newstalk ZB stations on the Cliff
http://www.mediafire.com/?nl9j9f242ldirfm

Of course, many other South Pacific stations were received on the
Cliff, but these were just the ten strongest ones. Low-powered New
Zealand stations (and one obscure 400w Aussie X-bander on 1701 kHz)
were the order of the day. A full DXpedition report on this bizarre
4-day trip will be prepared shortly, which hopefully will motivate
other DXing fanatics to push their luck on the cliffs!

73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
Cape Perpetua DXpedition video posted at
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VZzBfstOXA4


Re: Oregon Cliff Ultralight DU's for 7-21

kugellagers
 

I wonder if you are also getting coupling with the guardrail in your video. I read something a couple of years ago where some German DX'ers wer actually using long guardrails as their antenna.

John
];')


Re: Oregon Cliff Ultralight DU's for 7-21

Gary DeBock
 

Hi Tony,

Thanks for your comments on the Oregon cliff side DXpedition!

The NZ stations absolutely ruled on the cliff, with 8 of the Top 10
signals coming from Kiwi stations. The only other signals to make the
grade were 738-RFO and 891-5AN. I'll shortly be posting MP3's of these
Top 10 South Pacific signals, which include vibrant reception from
603-Waatea, 684-NZ Rhema, 765-Kahungunu, 828-Radio Trackside and
1008-Newstalk ZB. The Aussies did provide one exotic signal on 1701
kHz, however-- presumably because of the lack of Kiwi competition on
the X-band :-)

73, Gary

-----Original Message-----
From: Tony King <tonyzl@...>
To: ultralightdx <ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Mon, Jul 23, 2012 3:16 am
Subject: [ultralightdx] Re: Oregon Cliff Ultralight DU's for 7-21





Hi Gary and the group. Great to hear you're logging NZers so well. In
seasonal reverse from down here X band only brings me 1640 KDIA Vallejo
CA nightly, 1610 Anguilla, 1620 WDHP, and booming XERF and KUAU on 1570
from 0530 UTC - about 1030 PST. X band Aussies are at their peak now
and deceptive. The Vision Network carries US syndicated Focus on the
Family on 1611 1647 1665 1674 1692 almost at the same time as KDIA on
1640 (but a different 'episode.")
Tony


Re: Oregon Cliff Ultralight DU's for 7-21

Tony King <tonyzl@...>
 

Hi Gary and the group. Great to hear you're logging NZers so well. In seasonal reverse from down here X band only brings me 1640 KDIA Vallejo CA nightly, 1610 Anguilla, 1620 WDHP, and booming XERF and KUAU on 1570 from 0530 UTC - about 1030 PST. X band Aussies are at their peak now and deceptive. The Vision Network carries US syndicated Focus on the Family on 1611 1647 1665 1674 1692 almost at the same time as KDIA on 1640 (but a different 'episode.")
Tony 


Re: 2012 Cape Perpetua (Oregon) Cliff DXpedition Video

Guy Atkins
 

Hi Gary,

"Day Use Only"... that's not what I wanted to hear! Well, perhaps if I go there at the first hint of daylight, I can claim that early dawn is the start of a new day

I agree with you that days on the Oregon coast can start out dismal and drenching, or at least very foggy. I remember last year how my notebook paper curled up from the heavy fog and the ink from my pen blurred so much I couldn't read some of the frequencies I had written down. Next time I'll be prepared; the pens and papers from www.riteintherain.com are made just for these sort of nasty weather situations. Their products are even sold in Puyallup (Sportman's Emporium).

Despite the Day Use Only sign, I doubt a ranger would be checking up there at 5 a.m., given the dead end road and the remote location. Your run-in with the police in Lincoln City was at a city park along the main highway, wasn't it?

I'm curious of course to see if any difference can be noted at the higher elevation. The way to do it right would be to have another DXer at the highway location below, using the same radio and antenna setup at the same time.

73,

Guy Atkins
Puyallup, WA
 

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:
>
> Hi Guy,
>
> Thanks for your comments on the DXpedition video... and of course you
> are far more familiar with the Yachats area than me!
>
> <<< Is this the particular "wide spot in the road" that you and Norm
> were at: http://goo.gl/maps/9Kax ? When I look at it in Street View
> mode, it appears to be the same place as shown in your video, and it is
> near the base of Cape Perpetua. However, if this was your location or
> anywhere near this turnout, the elevation is nowhere near 400 feet
> above sea level. If you switch to Terrain View in Google Maps, you can
> see that this stretch of Highway 101 is just above the 200 foot line.
> The fact that you were hearing such good DX at half the altitude you
> thought you were at is a very encouraging. >>>
>
> Yes, that does appear to be the DXing spot. As I was telling Steve, the
> Highway 101 road side turnoff space is just barely large enough to park
> your car, set up an 8" FSL on its PVC base, and feel halfway safe as a
> huge 18 wheeler thunders by in total darkness at 1100 UTC. As for the
> elevation of the cliff site, I must confess that I didn't go down to
> sea level with a tape measure, and your correction is appreciated.
> Regardless of the elevation, I think that the site derives some weird
> DXing benefit from the sheer drop off of the cliff, with the ocean
> seeming unusually close in to those who dare to look down from the side
> of the road!
>
> <<< While doing some "virtual sightseeing" in Google Maps near Cape
> Perpetua, I accidentally dropped the little Street View man (icon) on
> this spot: http://goo.gl/maps/t1Hx Bingo! This is the end of National
> Forest Road #5553, which is a scenic viewpoint from the 800 foot level
> !! There's a nice parking lot here (no cars whizzing by on the
> highway), and even restrooms across from the lot. I note at least one
> picnic table near the parking lot, overlooking the Pacific. That would
> be a great spot to DX from, perhaps using the Perseus as a "spotting
> scope" for the ULR rig. (Of course, it doesn't seem you had any
> trouble spotting the low power Kiwis even from Highway 101's altitude
> :^)
> In all the years my family has vacationed in nearby Yachats, I can't
> believe I never drove up the Forest Service Rd. #5553! This looks to be
> a superb spot for DXing. There's even room for a temporary Flag, E WE,
> or other modest loop antenna in the grassy area across from the parking
> lot. >>>
>
> Actually, Guy, I checked out that very spot at he end of National
> Forest Service Rd. #5553 during our first night in Yachats, and it did
> indeed have an extremely high elevation. What deterred me from setting
> up there for DXing was the "Day Use Only" sign at the start of the road
> (since I have already run afoul of the police in Lincoln City for
> violating one of these signs during the July 2011 DXpedition), and the
> fact that the site is highly prone to severe wind and drenching rain
> (much more so than the Highway 101 road side turn off site). On the
> very first DXing morning (Wednesday the 18th) I actually drove up the
> Forest Road #5553 road to the 800' level at 1100 UTC with intentions of
> chasing TP-DX, but since the site was in total darkness at that hour
> (with no lights anywhere within 2 miles, and thick forest on all 4
> sides), I had the distinct impression that a herd of elk was about to
> forcibly evict me from their turf, and that the Highway 101 turnoff
> site would at least solve my claustrophobia problem :-) As it turned
> out, the Highway 101 site was more than sufficient for amazing
> Ultralight radio reception from the South Pacific.
>
> 73, Gary


Re: 2012 Cape Perpetua (Oregon) Cliff DXpedition Video

Gary DeBock
 

Hi Guy,

Thanks for your comments on the DXpedition video... and of course you
are far more familiar with the Yachats area than me!

<<< Is this the particular "wide spot in the road" that you and Norm
were at: http://goo.gl/maps/9Kax ? When I look at it in Street View
mode, it appears to be the same place as shown in your video, and it is
near the base of Cape Perpetua. However, if this was your location or
anywhere near this turnout, the elevation is nowhere near 400 feet
above sea level. If you switch to Terrain View in Google Maps, you can
see that this stretch of Highway 101 is just above the 200 foot line.
The fact that you were hearing such good DX at half the altitude you
thought you were at is a very encouraging. >>>

Yes, that does appear to be the DXing spot. As I was telling Steve, the Highway 101 road side turnoff space is just barely large enough to park
your car, set up an 8" FSL on its PVC base, and feel halfway safe as a
huge 18 wheeler thunders by in total darkness at 1100 UTC. As for the
elevation of the cliff site, I must confess that I didn't go down to
sea level with a tape measure, and your correction is appreciated.
Regardless of the elevation, I think that the site derives some weird
DXing benefit from the sheer drop off of the cliff, with the ocean
seeming unusually close in to those who dare to look down from the side
of the road!

<<< While doing some "virtual sightseeing" in Google Maps near Cape
Perpetua, I accidentally dropped the little Street View man (icon) on
this spot: http://goo.gl/maps/t1Hx Bingo! This is the end of National
Forest Road #5553, which is a scenic viewpoint from the 800 foot level
!! There's a nice parking lot here (no cars whizzing by on the
highway), and even restrooms across from the lot. I note at least one
picnic table near the parking lot, overlooking the Pacific. That would
be a great spot to DX from, perhaps using the Perseus as a "spotting
scope" for the ULR rig. (Of course, it doesn't seem you had any
trouble spotting the low power Kiwis even from Highway 101's altitude
:^)
In all the years my family has vacationed in nearby Yachats, I can't
believe I never drove up the Forest Service Rd. #5553! This looks to be
a superb spot for DXing. There's even room for a temporary Flag, E WE,
or other modest loop antenna in the grassy area across from the parking
lot. >>>

Actually, Guy, I checked out that very spot at he end of National
Forest Service Rd. #5553 during our first night in Yachats, and it did
indeed have an extremely high elevation. What deterred me from setting
up there for DXing was the "Day Use Only" sign at the start of the road
(since I have already run afoul of the police in Lincoln City for
violating one of these signs during the July 2011 DXpedition), and the
fact that the site is highly prone to severe wind and drenching rain
(much more so than the Highway 101 road side turn off site). On the
very first DXing morning (Wednesday the 18th) I actually drove up the
Forest Road #5553 road to the 800' level at 1100 UTC with intentions of
chasing TP-DX, but since the site was in total darkness at that hour
(with no lights anywhere within 2 miles, and thick forest on all 4
sides), I had the distinct impression that a herd of elk was about to
forcibly evict me from their turf, and that the Highway 101 turnoff
site would at least solve my claustrophobia problem :-) As it turned
out, the Highway 101 site was more than sufficient for amazing
Ultralight radio reception from the South Pacific.

73, Gary

-----Original Message-----
From: thinkdx <dx@...>
To: ultralightdx <ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Sun, Jul 22, 2012 6:57 pm
Subject: [ultralightdx] Re: 2012 Cape Perpetua (Oregon) Cliff
DXpedition Video





Hi Gary,


Thanks for sharing your video. Great stuff! It was great to see Norm
with you too; he and I had some nice correspondence a few years ago
when I sold him an Eton E1oo, modified with a Murata filter and a long
Stormwise ferrite rod antenna.


Is this the particular "wide spot in the road" that you and Norm were
at:  http://goo.gl/maps/9Kax ?  When I look at it in Street View mode,
it appears to be the same place as shown in your video, and it is near
the base of Cape Perpetua.


However, if this was your location or anywhere near this turnout, the
elevation is nowhere near 400 feet above sea level. If you switch to
Terrain View in Google Maps, you can see that this stretch of Highway
101 is just above the 200 foot line. The fact that you were hearing
such good DX at half the altitude you thought you were at is a very
encouraging.


While doing some "virtual sightseeing" in Google Maps near Cape
Perpetua, I accidentally dropped the little Street View man (icon) on
this spot: http://goo.gl/maps/t1Hx   Bingo! This is the end of National
Forest Road #5553, which is a scenic viewpoint from the 800 foot level
!!   There's a nice parking lot here (no cars whizzing by on the
highway), and even restrooms across from the lot. I note at least one
picnic table near the parking lot, overlooking the Pacific. That would
be a great spot to DX from, perhaps using the Perseus as a "spotting
scope" for the ULR rig.  (Of course, it doesn't seem you had any
trouble spotting the low power Kiwis even from Highway 101's altitude
 :^)


In all the years my family has vacationed in nearby Yachats, I can't
believe I never drove up the Forest Service Rd. #5553! This looks to be
a superb spot for DXing. There's even room for a temporary Flag, E WE,
or other modest loop antenna in the grassy area across from the parking
lot.


73,


Guy Atkins
Puyallup, WA




--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:

Hello All,

For those interested in the latest wacky idea to track down exotic
South Pacific DX on Ultralight radios, a brief video of the 400' high
Cape Perpetua ocean cliff site on Highway 101 in Oregon has been
uploaded to YouTube at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VZzBfstOXA4

Included in the video are the two fanatical DXpeditioners pushing
their
luck this past week on the cliff (Norm Clark of Monmouth, Oregon and
yours truly), the 8" Medium Wave DXpedition FSL antenna on its 5' PVC
base, the new-design 7.5" MW loopstick Tecsun PL-380 Ultralight, and
scenery from the sheer ocean cliff site. The Spartan road side
conditions are on full display in this video, showing the lack of AC
power, running water, weather protection or adequate lighting. Despite
all these challenges the Medium Wave and Longwave DXpedition results
proved to be successful beyond all expectations, and a perfect cure
for
DXing boredom for decades to come!

73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (now back in Puyallup, WA, USA)


Re: 2012 Cape Perpetua (Oregon) Cliff DXpedition Video

Guy Atkins
 

Hi Gary,

Thanks for sharing your video. Great stuff! It was great to see Norm with you too; he and I had some nice correspondence a few years ago when I sold him an Eton E1oo, modified with a Murata filter and a long Stormwise ferrite rod antenna.

Is this the particular "wide spot in the road" that you and Norm were at:  http://goo.gl/maps/9Kax ?  When I look at it in Street View mode, it appears to be the same place as shown in your video, and it is near the base of Cape Perpetua.

However, if this was your location or anywhere near this turnout, the elevation is nowhere near 400 feet above sea level. If you switch to Terrain View in Google Maps, you can see that this stretch of Highway 101 is just above the 200 foot line. The fact that you were hearing such good DX at half the altitude you thought you were at is a very encouraging.

While doing some "virtual sightseeing" in Google Maps near Cape Perpetua, I accidentally dropped the little Street View man (icon) on this spot: http://goo.gl/maps/t1Hx   Bingo! This is the end of National Forest Road #5553, which is a scenic viewpoint from the 800 foot level !!   There's a nice parking lot here (no cars whizzing by on the highway), and even restrooms across from the lot. I note at least one picnic table near the parking lot, overlooking the Pacific. That would be a great spot to DX from, perhaps using the Perseus as a "spotting scope" for the ULR rig.  (Of course, it doesn't seem you had any trouble spotting the low power Kiwis even from Highway 101's altitude  :^)

In all the years my family has vacationed in nearby Yachats, I can't believe I never drove up the Forest Service Rd. #5553! This looks to be a superb spot for DXing. There's even room for a temporary Flag, EWE, or other modest loop antenna in the grassy area across from the parking lot.

73,

Guy Atkins
Puyallup, WA


--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:
>
> Hello All,
>
> For those interested in the latest wacky idea to track down exotic
> South Pacific DX on Ultralight radios, a brief video of the 400' high
> Cape Perpetua ocean cliff site on Highway 101 in Oregon has been
> uploaded to YouTube at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VZzBfstOXA4
>
> Included in the video are the two fanatical DXpeditioners pushing their
> luck this past week on the cliff (Norm Clark of Monmouth, Oregon and
> yours truly), the 8" Medium Wave DXpedition FSL antenna on its 5' PVC
> base, the new-design 7.5" MW loopstick Tecsun PL-380 Ultralight, and
> scenery from the sheer ocean cliff site. The Spartan road side
> conditions are on full display in this video, showing the lack of AC
> power, running water, weather protection or adequate lighting. Despite
> all these challenges the Medium Wave and Longwave DXpedition results
> proved to be successful beyond all expectations, and a perfect cure for
> DXing boredom for decades to come!
>
> 73 and Good DX,
> Gary DeBock (now back in Puyallup, WA, USA)
>


Re: TECSUN PL-360 7.5 loopstick transplant antenna

bbwrwy
 

Jerry:

When combined with a 7.5-inch loopstick, the PL-360 becomes a very good receiver for DXing long or medium wave signals.

Richard.

Richard Allen
36°22'51"N / 97°26'35"W
(near Perry OK USA)


2012 Cape Perpetua (Oregon) Cliff DXpedition Video

Gary DeBock
 

Hello All,

For those interested in the latest wacky idea to track down exotic
South Pacific DX on Ultralight radios, a brief video of the 400' high
Cape Perpetua ocean cliff site on Highway 101 in Oregon has been
uploaded to YouTube at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VZzBfstOXA4

Included in the video are the two fanatical DXpeditioners pushing their
luck this past week on the cliff (Norm Clark of Monmouth, Oregon and
yours truly), the 8" Medium Wave DXpedition FSL antenna on its 5' PVC
base, the new-design 7.5" MW loopstick Tecsun PL-380 Ultralight, and
scenery from the sheer ocean cliff site. The Spartan road side
conditions are on full display in this video, showing the lack of AC
power, running water, weather protection or adequate lighting. Despite
all these challenges the Medium Wave and Longwave DXpedition results
proved to be successful beyond all expectations, and a perfect cure for
DXing boredom for decades to come!

73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (now back in Puyallup, WA, USA)


Re: TECSUN PL-360 7.5 loopstick transplant antenna

Gary DeBock
 

Hi Jerry,

<<< Is it possible to add the 7.5 loopstick, or any external loopstick
to the Tecsun PL-360 via the AM antenna jack on top? >>>

Yes, it is very possible to do this.

A couple of effective 7.5" Medium Wave and Longwave plug-in loopsticks
(each mounted on a custom plastic frame) have been developed expressly
for the PL-360 model, in experimentation described in the "7.5
inch-LS.doc" selection in the Ultralightdx File Section at
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ultralightdx/files/5%20Antennas%20and%20Equipment/

25 of these PL-360 Medium Wave plug-in loopsticks and 5 of the Longwave
plug-in loopsticks were constructed and sent out to various DXers in
the spring of 2010, and have been used very effectively for both Medium
Wave and Longwave DX. Richard Allen in Perry, Oklahoma became the first
ULR DXer in North Ameriica to receive a Longwave TA station by using
his PL-360 and one of these 7.5" Longwave plug-in loopsticks.

73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)

-----Original Message-----
From: ww0e <ww0e@q.com>
To: ultralightdx <ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Sun, Jul 22, 2012 12:00 pm
Subject: [ultralightdx] TECSUN PL-360 7.5 loopstick transplant antenna






Is it possible to add the 7.5 loopstick, or any external loopstick
to the Tecsun PL-360 via the AM antenna jack on top?


Jerry  WWØE


TECSUN PL-360 7.5 loopstick transplant antenna

ww0e@...
 

Is it possible to add the 7.5 loopstick, or any external loopstick

to the Tecsun PL-360 via the AM antenna jack on top?

Jerry  WWØE


July 18-21 Oregon Ocean Cliff Ultralight Radio NDB-DXpedition

Gary DeBock
 

Hello All,

Thanks very much to Steve, Don and Mike for their daily Pacific
NDB-DXing reports this summer, which motivated me to once again push my
luck and try for (Trans-Equatorial) South Pacific NDB reception on a
$50 (AM-only) Ultralight radio and compact FSL antenna on ocean coast
cliff sites this summer.

The first of these weird DXpeditions is now complete, which featured 4
days at the Cape Perpetua (OR) ocean view site on Highway 101, about 2
miles south of Yachats. The estimated elevation of this site is about
400 feet, but its primary advantage is a sheer rock cliff, plunging
almost directly down to the ocean below. Unfortunately our vacation
motel in Yachats did not offer Internet service for guests, which made
it tricky to provide daily NDB-DXing reports of the long-distance
Ultralight radio beacon receptions from this awesome cliff site.

The first morning (Wednesday the 18th) was somewhat of a DXing dud,
with only the Hawaiian beacons 332-POA and 353-LLD and several Alaskans
(209-CYT, 212-CGL, 219-GAV, 233-ALJ, 266-ICK, 283-DUT, 358-SIT, 391-EEF
and 394-RWO) being received on the modified PL-380 Ultralight and 8"
DXpedition FSL.

The second morning (Thursday the 19th) was much better, with 270-FA in
Samoa (5012 miles/ 8065 km), 260-NF on Norfolk Island (6627 miles/
10,664 km) and 238-KT in New Zealand (6738 miles/ 10,664 km) all being
received on the $50 Ultralight radio and 8" FSL at the cliff site. The
reception of 238-KT at this Oregon cliff location broke the Ultralight
NDB-DXing distance record (previously set with the reception of 260-NF
at the "Rockwork" Oregon coast cliff site last August), and was a great
thrill.

Friday the 20th was fairly good for South Pacifics also, with 270-FA
having its best signal ever heard on these basic radios, and 260-NF
making a fair repeat appearance. 238-KT was missing in action,
however--which was not very surprising considering that its signal
strength the previous day was barely above the noise level.

This morning (the 21st) was primarily devoted to assisting Medium Wave
DXer Norm Clark (of Monmouth, OR) enjoy his first ocean cliff DXing
experience, and a serious search for South Pacific NDB's was not made.
332-POA and 353-LLD were around as usual, but from what I could gather
from the propagation hints at the cliff site, I didn't seem to miss
very much by foregoing another search for South Pacific NDB's this
morning. I plan to upload a full DXpedition report and MP3's of the
above South Pacific NDB receptions soon, which I hope will prove
interesting to both NDB-DXers and Ultralight radio enthusiasts alike.

73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock, N7EKX (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
7.5" LW Loopstick Tecsun PL-380 + 8" Longwave DXpedition FSL
(design photo at http://www.mediafire.com/view/?ylwafuea34ax5cm )


FM DXing with PL-606.

bbwrwy
 

This morning there was a good tropospheric opening into Iowa and Nebraska. Using my PL-606, I logged 11 new stations with the furthest being 686 km (426 mi). Recently I found the PL-606 is an excellent receiver for FM DXing, rivalling the PL-310 and -380. The lack of a keyboard isn't a problem. I simply do an ETM scan first and then use the memory to tune the receiver. When I come to one of the few frequencies not in the memory, I switch from ETM to VF and manually tune the receiver. In many ways it's easier than tuning the slightly larger Tecsun ULR's.

This morning I had a bit of a problem with the PL-606. The telescopic antenna seized up and I couldn't rotate it. The problem was easily fixed by replacing it with the antenna from my modified PL-310.

Good DX.

Richard.

Richard Allen
36°22'51"N / 97°26'35"W
(near Perry OK USA)


Oregon Cliff Ultralight DU's for 7-21

Gary DeBock
 

Hello All,

Thanks again to Dennis, Nick and Steve for their relative TP and DU
signal reports (although they may all feel like throwing me off of the
Oregon Cliff by now).

This morning the Cape Perpetua Oregon Cliif DXpedition wrapped up, and
I was very pleased to welcome fellow Ultralight radio DXer Norm Clark
(of Monmouth, OR) to join in the wild fun. Norm has a 7.5" MW loopstick
PL-380 (of the new design, just concocted last week) and a 5" Medium
Wave FSL (the model previously published with "Heathkit-like" building
instructions).

Norm arrived at the cliff around 1210 UTC, and was promptly greeted by
an unexpected Far East visitor, 774-JOUB, which pegged his PL-380's S/N
display at 25. He then managed to receive 738-Tahiti without blowing
out his Tecsun Ultralight's front end, although the French-language
station's strength made the outcome questionable for an extended
period. What really made Norm absolutely astonished was a booming
signal from the New Zealand 5 kW Christian music broadcaster 684-NZ
Rhema on his hot-rodded PL-380 and FSL, which convinced him that the
normal rules of MW propagation do not apply on this Cliff!

It was another Kiwi-slanted morning at this 400' high ocean view site,
with New Zealand running roughshod over all other South Pacifics. Once
again 567-RN, 603-Waatea, 657-Southern Star, 675-RN and 684-NZ Rhema
were pegging the PL-380 (+ 8" DXpedition FSL) S/N display at 25, and
1008-Newstalk ZB joined this select group for a short period around
1300. The Aussie X-banders were down for the count, making the 1701 kHz
reception (and ID) yesterday the DXpedition's sole success in this
aspect. 1584 kHz had weak music audio around 1250, but since even the
Aussie Big Guns were anemic, this flea-powered station had a hopeless
task in making itself heard with any strength. But the New Zealand
stations really were on the Warpath this morning, and I'm glad that
Norm was able to join in the Kiwi-slanted fun.

Last evening Ruth, Danny and I had the great pleasure of being invited
to the best restaurant in Yachats, Oregon (at the Adobe Inn Motel) by
Norm and his beautiful wife Dawn. Norm and I both shared some
interesting stories about action in Vietnam, military life and other
matters. Dawn listened patiently to our rambling about DXing and other
matters, while I expressed my sincere apology for turning her husband
into another Ocean Cliff DU-DXing fanatic.

Sorry for all the delayed resonses to emails during this DXpedition--
we are at the mercy of public library computers, which seem to be
trained to cut off your access immediately before you have completed
typing a lengthy upload.

73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (now at the Alsea, OR public library computer, which is
about to cut me off)


Es- Nova Scotia to Just About Everywhere

John Cereghin <jcereghin@...>
 

Finally! Got Es tonight while at Port George, Nova Scotia, heard on a
PL-380 barefoot.

Times are Atlantic:

88.7 WJFR Jacksonville FL, Family Radio, 2015
91.1 WYFG Gaffney SC, Bible Broadcasting Network, 2015
89.3 WJKN, Jackson MI, CCM "The Message", 2040
92.7 WKKZ Dublin GA, "K92.7", country, 2045
92.9 WFHG Blountville TN, Fox News, "Super Talk 92.9:, into Michael
Savage, 2105
93.7 WDJC Birmingham AL, call ID w/CCM, 2107

Plus several unids.

John Cereghin
Smyrna DE, on vacation in Nova Scotia


Re: Loopstick question

Tony Germanotta
 

Yes, Chuck. That would be my unusual hood ornament, well not quite hood. That would have made more sense.

Chuck is recalling a time I brought that loop to his house for a little DXing and, since my wife was off with the real car, I had to transport it the several miles in my Miata. 

A 4-foot loop doesn't fit into a Miata, even with the top down. There is no back seat to stick it in.  So I had to put it around my body and drive that way from my house to his. Good news, nobody stopped me. Bad news, it really didn't help the AM reception on the car radio. (Just a joke, I realize that the loop would not inductively couple to the car's rod antenna.)  I wouldn't trade my Miata for anything, but it is a bit ultralight for anything but barefoot ultralight DXing. And probably couldn't make it up a hill with one of those huge, heavy Ferrite Sleeve Loops either. 



On Jul 18, 2012, at 4:31 PM, chuck_rippel wrote:

 

That would have been the loop last seen in automotive use, yes ?

Chuck

--- In ultralightdx@..., Tony Germanotta wrote:
>
> That's right. there used to be a NRC circuit that used a 1meg ohm variable resistor wired across the capacitor (connect to each end of the loop coil) as a Q spoiler. I used it on a 4-foot box loop to broaden the peak. Worked great and simple to use.


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