Date   

Re: Can an FSL Antenna get Interference from a Strong Local Station?

Gary DeBock
 

Hi Jerry,

Thanks for your comments on the FSL designs.

The "Affordable" 7" diameter medium-wave FSL design does use the 140mm
x 8mm Russian surplus ferrite rods currently available on eBay from a
couple of sellers, and the entire requirement of 63 ferrite rods can
currently be obtained for $104 (US dollars), including airmail shipping
to North America. The price I quoted was from the seller "Alexer1" (who
may soon go into early retirement, after all of the multiple ferrite
orders that I have placed with him).

Of course the asking price of these Russian surplus ferrite rods on
eBay can always change for the worse, as sellers try their luck at
getting more rubles for the rod. There has been a curious supply and
demand situation for the past four months with these ferrite rod
sellers on eBay, as sellers who try to raise their prices suddenly find
themselves shunned by North American purchasers. The ferrite sellers
obviously know about the increased demand for their rods because of the
FSL experimentation, but so far the incresed demand hasn't been enough
for them to make the higher prices stick. That could change at any
time, however, so if a DXer is serious about building an FSL, it's best
to stock up on the Russian surplus ferrite rods while the prices are
still low (currently under $1 per 140mm x 8mm ferrite rod, before
shipping).

73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)

-----Original Message-----
From: Jerry Popiel <jerry_popiel@...>
To: ultralightdx <ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Tue, Aug 30, 2011 11:18 pm
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] Can an FSL Antenna get Interference from a
Strong Local Station?






Gary, thanks for the great detailed info. Its very easy to notice the
great care and planning that went into your FSL's. Do you know yet (re
your testing) if you will be recommending the 5.5 Inch Length   - 140
mm Ferrite Rods for your  "Affordable FSL  Design"  shown in your
detailed picture sent yesterday, or will it be the much more expensive
7.87  or  8 inch  -  200 mm length Rods? Or both!  (The way this
calculation seems to work is 140 mm / 25.4 mm = 5.5 inches). 
 
Jerry






From: "D1028Gary@..." <D1028Gary@...>
To: ultralightdx@...
Sent: Tuesday, August 30, 2011 8:06:32 PM
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] Can an FSL Antenna get Interference from a
Strong Local Station?


 

<<< Gary when you have time, do you know if I use one of those 10
inch diameter 4 inch wide solid Styrofoam Cake Forms (for the Ferrite
Bars & Litz wire) that Steve Ratzlaff is using, and put the PVC Pipe
right in the middle, would I need to somehow insulate or line the
middle of the Styrofoam Form before inserting the PVC pipe? Its a bit
difficult to tell on your detailed 64 Russian Rods picture, what the
middle section of your PVC Pipe is resting on.

Thanks
Jerry >>>

Hi Jerry,

Thanks for your question about the loop support systems. Steve's 10"
diameter 4" wide styrofoam cake forms are certainly fine to support his
14" Litz wire air core loop for usage inside the shack, considering
that an air core loop has much less weight than a ferrite-based FSL
loop. But I think that you need to take a serious look at the weight of
your chosen antenna (and its intended mission), before choosing a
suitable support structure.

When you add the serious weight of multiple ferrite bars onto a support
structure (and throw in a few possible bumps and drops from Murphy's
Law in a DXpedition situation), you then have quite a different design
challenge than that of supporting a lightweight air core loop inside
the shack. From the beginning of the FSL experimentation it seemed to
me that the main advantage of the FSL antenna would be its compact
portability, and portable antennas need to be ready for anything that
Murphy's Law can (and will) throw at them. Ferrite rods are naturally
fragile components (some more than others), and my own FSL support
designs always have multiple layers of soft, protective padding to
avoid any ferrite rod fractures. Multiple ferrite rod assemblies also
have serious weight challenges, so an FSL frame needs to both handle
the weight and cushion the ferrite rods from sudden shocks.

To show how various layers of FSL antenna cushioning material can
protect multiple ferrite rods from fractures, I've uploaded a side
photo of the new 7" Medium Wave FSL ("Affordable" model) at
http://www.mediafire.com/i/?47iunjk9ylafh5z . I've
found that Schedule 40 PVC water pipe of 3/4" diameter is strong
and shock-resistant enough to provide a nice support frame for any FSL
antenna, and it's an excellent insulating material. In the inner core
of my FSL's there is a soft, resilient 3" diameter section of the
Funnoodle "Monster" swimming aide for kids around the PVC pipe (this
comes with a convenient 3/4 hole through the middle, to accommodate the
PVC pipe). Next are multiple, cut up layers of soft pipe insulation,
followed by a 4" diameter rubber plumbing pipe coupler. The ferrite
rods are attached by J & J Waterproof tape (sticky side out) to the
soft rubber coupler, then wrapped with one layer of Oatey closet flange
foam spacing material (3/8" thickness) before the Litz wire is wrapped.

The use of so many layers of padding material in an FSL may seem
redundant, but it actually proved essential during my first FSL-based
DXpedition this summer. The 6.5" Longwave FSL actually fell off of its
5' PVC base in the predawn darkness at Lincoln City, Oregon and crashed
to the ground, subjecting the 35 ferrite rods to quite a shock. Because
of the multiple layers of padding the ferrite rods were unharmed,
though, and the antenna was receiving its best DX of the entire trip
(270-FA in Samoa, a 1 kw beacon at 5,200 miles) about 15 minutes later.

73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA

-----Original Message-----
From: Jerry Popiel <jerry_popiel@...>
To: ultralightdx <ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Mon, Aug 29, 2011 10:20 pm
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] Can an FSL Antenna get Interference from a
Strong Local Station?

Thanks for the detailed replies Gary and Michael. 
 
I think that Gary's 3/4 inch PVC Supporting Legs are a great idea for
supporting an FSL. Gary when you have time, do you know if I use one of
those 10 inch diameter 4 inch wide solid Styrofoam  Cake Forms (for the
Ferrite Bars & Litz wire)  that Steve Ratzlaff is using, and put the
PVC Pipe right in the middle, would I need to somehow insulate or line
the middle of the Styrofoam Form before inserting the PVC pipe?  Its a
bit difficult  to tell on your detailed 64 Russian Rods picture, what
the middle section of your PVC Pipe is resting on.
 
Thanks
Jerry 

From: "D1028Gary@..." <D1028Gary@...>
To: ultralightdx@...
Sent: Monday, August 29, 2011 2:26:37 PM
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] Can an FSL Antenna get Interference from a
Strong Local Station?

 
Hello Jerry and Michael,

Thanks for your questions regarding the FSL antenna's risk of
overloading a receiver, and its nulling ability.

After the construction of 7 of these models for both Medium Wave and
Longwave frequencies, it's very clear to me that because of the
extremely sharp tuning system a well-designed FSL antenna is very
unlikely to overload a receiver. A DXer using the Tecsun PL-380 model
quickly learns that stations on frequencies 2 or 3 kHz away from the
FSL's optimized (tuned in) frequency are reduced greatly in strength,
and stations farther away than that are almost never audible. This has
provided a lot of help to me during a couple of summer DXpeditions,
when I was trying to chase some weak South Pacific stations with
domestic pests only 2 or 3 kHz away. In fact, the FSL tuning system is
so sharp that unless you are exactly on the same frequency (within
about 500 Hz) as the DX station, the FSL will not provide its maximum
gain. This is a much different situation than with the large air core
tuned passive loops, where you can get a fairly nice gain boost on the
DX station even if your variable capacitor is tuned 2 or 3 kHz away
from the DX station frequency. The FSL antenna does require more
precise tuning, but the razor-sharp rejection of unwanted frequencies
is more than worth it.

As for nulling capability, as long as the collection of ferrite rods is
in an accurate cylindrical shape and the the tuning capacitor is
located as close as possible to the loop itself, the FSL should provide
nulling capability that will outperform any other tuned, high-gain
antenna (with the possible exception of the single-loopstick Quantum
Loops made by Gerry Thomas). It's helpful to think of an FSL as a large
collection of individual loopsticks, all working together to combine
their gain (on only one tuned frequency), and also all working together
to null out stations that are off the ends of the ferrite rods. As long
as the cylindrical shape of the ferrite sleeve is accurate and the
ferrite rods all point in exactly the same direction, both of these
capabilities can be optimized. The Longwave FSL's here can completely
null out any pest beacon on their own frequencies, and the MW FSL's
here can null the local pests down to about 2 kHz of spectrum on their
own frequencies. This nulling performance is almost identical to that
of a single, razor-sharp loopstick in the Ultralight models like the
SRF-59 or SRF-T615, but once again, it's very critical that care is
taken to ensure that all the ferrite rods are arranged in an accurate
cylindrical shape, and that the tuning capacitor is as close as
possible to the loop itself.

I'm aware that there is intense interest in the FSL antenna among
various DXers in the Ultralightdx group who would like to try one out,
but who feel perplexed about how to get started. With all the intrigue
about high component prices, Russian Roulette ferrite orders and
different physical designs, I know it's tough to get started. Several
models of the "affordable" 7" MW FSL design (shown at
http://www.mediafire.com/i/?lq2ummbunzz5p3s ) are being built here for
local DXers to test out, in the hope that this $150 FSL antenna design
will provide a reasonable starting point for other DXers to jump into
the fun. It has already outperformed a 4' sided tuned air core loop
here (the August 2010 South Pacific DXpedition antenna, no less), so it
seems like a nice basic design to get started.

73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)

-----Original Message-----
From: Michael <michael.setaazul@...>
To: ultralightdx <ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Mon, Aug 29, 2011 12:06 am
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] Can an FSL Antenna get Interference from a
Strong Local Station?

----- Original Message -----

From: jerry_popiel
Subject: Can an FSL Antenna get Interference from a Strong Local
Station?
. . .
My question is does anyone know that if I build a new FSL, will I be
subjected to
this same Interference from my local 50,000 watt station?
Any comments would be very much appreciated.

Thanks
Jerry
----------------------------------------------------------
------------

Jerry, my guess is that a FSL would be subject to your 50kW neighbour.
However, if well-built, rotating it to null the local would help -
unless a
wanted station was in line with the unwanted one. Gary and others who
have
built FSLs will be able to respond with more authority and their
experience.

I would be intruigued to know whether a secondary ferrite or FSL in
proximity
to the main one could be tuned and positioned to usefully "absorb" an
intruding signal.
Relative positioning would be critical - if it works at all. If the FSL
were directly wired
into the receiver, inserting a notch filter or phasing network would
probably be better
- but then we would be wandering away from simplicity and uldx maxims!

Michael UK


Re: PL-380

Russ Edmunds <wb2bjh@...>
 

The USB cable should be for providing power or charging. It isn't intended for recording. To record directly you will need to have recording software on your computer, and then simply connecting an audio cable from the PL-380's earphone jack to the line input of your computer's sound card should enable you to direct record.

Russ Edmunds
15 mi NNW of Philadelphia
Grid FN20id

FM: Yamaha T-80 & Onkyo T-450RDS w/ APS9B @15'; Grundig G8
AM:  Modified Sony ICF 2010's barefoot


--- On Wed, 8/31/11, patrice.privat wrote:

From: patrice.privat
Subject: [ultralightdx] PL-380
To: "ultralight"
Date: Wednesday, August 31, 2011, 8:20 AM

 

Hi
 
i have just noticed that the usb cable delivered with my 380 does not fit in the receiver's side socket, so much for my plans to record direct from the pc !!
 
 
anyone experienced the same ?
 
Pat
 


Re. ULR LONGWAVE DX......

bbwrwy
 

I heard Radio Monte Carlo, poor, man talking in
French, at 0355 UTC, on PL-360 + 7.5-inch ferrite
antenna. The distance is 8257 km (5131 miles). My
first TA signal of the new season.

Richard.

Richard Allen
36°22'51"N / 97°26'35"W
(near Perry OK USA)


Re: PL-380

Michael <michael.setaazul@...>
 

The USB cable is for recharging batteries in the PL-380 from a 5volt PC USB socket.

Michael UK

----- Original Message -----
From: patrice.privat
To: ultralight
Sent: 31 August 2011 13:20
Subject: [ultralightdx] PL-380


i have just noticed that the usb cable delivered with my 380 does not fit in the receiver's side
socket, so much for my plans to record direct from the pc !!

anyone experienced the same ?

Pat


Re: PL-380

Charly <calpublic@...>
 

Le 31/08/2011 14:20, patrice.privat a crit:

Hi
i have just noticed that the usb cable delivered with my 380 does not fit in the receiver's side socket, so much for my plans to record direct from the pc !!

Bonjour Patrice,

It should connect ! I have the 390 and can connect the radio to the computer. But unfortunately the USB socket of the radio is for charging / power supply only ! You can't get any audio from/to the radio via the USB cable.

Charly
(rgion parisienne).


PL-380

patrice.privat
 

Hi
 
i have just noticed that the usb cable delivered with my 380 does not fit in the receiver's side socket, so much for my plans to record direct from the pc !!
 
 
anyone experienced the same ?
 
Pat
 


Re: Need Info on Radio Grande Mexico 630 kHz from Canada?

jerry_popiel
 

Thanks a lot Mike I believe you are correct - its probably highly unlikely I got a station in Mexico since I'm getting many stations in that area in North and South Dakota and in Minnesota from here in Canada.  But that was the first time I received that one at 630 kHz last night. I am surprised that they can broadcast all in Mexican in the USA.
 
Thanks
Jerry


Re: Can an FSL Antenna get Interference from a Strong Local Station?

jerry_popiel
 

Gary, thanks for the great detailed info. Its very easy to notice the great care and planning that went into your FSL's. Do you know yet (re your testing) if you will be recommending the 5.5 Inch Length   - 140 mm Ferrite Rods for your  "Affordable FSL  Design"  shown in your detailed picture sent yesterday, or will it be the much more expensive 7.87  or  8 inch  -  200 mm length Rods? Or both!  (The way this calculation seems to work is 140 mm / 25.4 mm = 5.5 inches). 
 
Jerry


From: "D1028Gary@..."
To: ultralightdx@...
Sent: Tuesday, August 30, 2011 8:06:32 PM
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] Can an FSL Antenna get Interference from a Strong Local Station?

 

<<< Gary when you have time, do you know if I use one of those 10
inch diameter 4 inch wide solid Styrofoam Cake Forms (for the Ferrite
Bars & Litz wire) that Steve Ratzlaff is using, and put the PVC Pipe
right in the middle, would I need to somehow insulate or line the
middle of the Styrofoam Form before inserting the PVC pipe? Its a bit
difficult to tell on your detailed 64 Russian Rods picture, what the
middle section of your PVC Pipe is resting on.

Thanks
Jerry >>>

Hi Jerry,

Thanks for your question about the loop support systems. Steve's 10"
diameter 4" wide styrofoam cake forms are certainly fine to support his
14" Litz wire air core loop for usage inside the shack, considering
that an air core loop has much less weight than a ferrite-based FSL
loop. But I think that you need to take a serious look at the weight of
your chosen antenna (and its intended mission), before choosing a
suitable support structure.

When you add the serious weight of multiple ferrite bars onto a support
structure (and throw in a few possible bumps and drops from Murphy's
Law in a DXpedition situation), you then have quite a different design
challenge than that of supporting a lightweight air core loop inside
the shack. From the beginning of the FSL experimentation it seemed to
me that the main advantage of the FSL antenna would be its compact
portability, and portable antennas need to be ready for anything that
Murphy's Law can (and will) throw at them. Ferrite rods are naturally
fragile components (some more than others), and my own FSL support
designs always have multiple layers of soft, protective padding to
avoid any ferrite rod fractures. Multiple ferrite rod assemblies also
have serious weight challenges, so an FSL frame needs to both handle
the weight and cushion the ferrite rods from sudden shocks.

To show how various layers of FSL antenna cushioning material can
protect multiple ferrite rods from fractures, I've uploaded a side
photo of the new 7" Medium Wave FSL ("Affordable" model) at
http://www.mediafire.com/i/?47iunjk9ylafh5z . I've
found that Schedule 40 PVC water pipe of 3/4" diameter is strong
and shock-resistant enough to provide a nice support frame for any FSL
antenna, and it's an excellent insulating material. In the inner core
of my FSL's there is a soft, resilient 3" diameter section of the
Funnoodle "Monster" swimming aide for kids around the PVC pipe (this
comes with a convenient 3/4 hole through the middle, to accommodate the
PVC pipe). Next are multiple, cut up layers of soft pipe insulation,
followed by a 4" diameter rubber plumbing pipe coupler. The ferrite
rods are attached by J & J Waterproof tape (sticky side out) to the
soft rubber coupler, then wrapped with one layer of Oatey closet flange
foam spacing material (3/8" thickness) before the Litz wire is wrapped.

The use of so many layers of padding material in an FSL may seem
redundant, but it actually proved essential during my first FSL-based
DXpedition this summer. The 6.5" Longwave FSL actually fell off of its
5' PVC base in the predawn darkness at Lincoln City, Oregon and crashed
to the ground, subjecting the 35 ferrite rods to quite a shock. Because
of the multiple layers of padding the ferrite rods were unharmed,
though, and the antenna was receiving its best DX of the entire trip
(270-FA in Samoa, a 1 kw beacon at 5,200 miles) about 15 minutes later.

73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA

-----Original Message-----
From: Jerry Popiel <jerry_popiel@...>
To: ultralightdx <ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Mon, Aug 29, 2011 10:20 pm
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] Can an FSL Antenna get Interference from a
Strong Local Station?

Thanks for the detailed replies Gary and Michael. 
 
I think that Gary's 3/4 inch PVC Supporting Legs are a great idea for
supporting an FSL. Gary when you have time, do you know if I use one of
those 10 inch diameter 4 inch wide solid Styrofoam  Cake Forms (for the
Ferrite Bars & Litz wire)  that Steve Ratzlaff is using, and put the
PVC Pipe right in the middle, would I need to somehow insulate or line
the middle of the Styrofoam Form before inserting the PVC pipe?  Its a
bit difficult  to tell on your detailed 64 Russian Rods picture, what
the middle section of your PVC Pipe is resting on.
 
Thanks
Jerry 

From: "D1028Gary@..." <D1028Gary@...>
To: ultralightdx@...
Sent: Monday, August 29, 2011 2:26:37 PM
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] Can an FSL Antenna get Interference from a
Strong Local Station?

 
Hello Jerry and Michael,

Thanks for your questions regarding the FSL antenna's risk of
overloading a receiver, and its nulling ability.

After the construction of 7 of these models for both Medium Wave and
Longwave frequencies, it's very clear to me that because of the
extremely sharp tuning system a well-designed FSL antenna is very
unlikely to overload a receiver. A DXer using the Tecsun PL-380 model
quickly learns that stations on frequencies 2 or 3 kHz away from the
FSL's optimized (tuned in) frequency are reduced greatly in strength,
and stations farther away than that are almost never audible. This has
provided a lot of help to me during a couple of summer DXpeditions,
when I was trying to chase some weak South Pacific stations with
domestic pests only 2 or 3 kHz away. In fact, the FSL tuning system is
so sharp that unless you are exactly on the same frequency (within
about 500 Hz) as the DX station, the FSL will not provide its maximum
gain. This is a much different situation than with the large air core
tuned passive loops, where you can get a fairly nice gain boost on the
DX station even if your variable capacitor is tuned 2 or 3 kHz away
from the DX station frequency. The FSL antenna does require more
precise tuning, but the razor-sharp rejection of unwanted frequencies
is more than worth it.

As for nulling capability, as long as the collection of ferrite rods is
in an accurate cylindrical shape and the the tuning capacitor is
located as close as possible to the loop itself, the FSL should provide
nulling capability that will outperform any other tuned, high-gain
antenna (with the possible exception of the single-loopstick Quantum
Loops made by Gerry Thomas). It's helpful to think of an FSL as a large
collection of individual loopsticks, all working together to combine
their gain (on only one tuned frequency), and also all working together
to null out stations that are off the ends of the ferrite rods. As long
as the cylindrical shape of the ferrite sleeve is accurate and the
ferrite rods all point in exactly the same direction, both of these
capabilities can be optimized. The Longwave FSL's here can completely
null out any pest beacon on their own frequencies, and the MW FSL's
here can null the local pests down to about 2 kHz of spectrum on their
own frequencies. This nulling performance is almost identical to that
of a single, razor-sharp loopstick in the Ultralight models like the
SRF-59 or SRF-T615, but once again, it's very critical that care is
taken to ensure that all the ferrite rods are arranged in an accurate
cylindrical shape, and that the tuning capacitor is as close as
possible to the loop itself.

I'm aware that there is intense interest in the FSL antenna among
various DXers in the Ultralightdx group who would like to try one out,
but who feel perplexed about how to get started. With all the intrigue
about high component prices, Russian Roulette ferrite orders and
different physical designs, I know it's tough to get started. Several
models of the "affordable" 7" MW FSL design (shown at
http://www.mediafire.com/i/?lq2ummbunzz5p3s ) are being built here for
local DXers to test out, in the hope that this $150 FSL antenna design
will provide a reasonable starting point for other DXers to jump into
the fun. It has already outperformed a 4' sided tuned air core loop
here (the August 2010 South Pacific DXpedition antenna, no less), so it
seems like a nice basic design to get started.

73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)

-----Original Message-----
From: Michael <michael.setaazul@...>
To: ultralightdx <ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Mon, Aug 29, 2011 12:06 am
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] Can an FSL Antenna get Interference from a
Strong Local Station?

----- Original Message -----

From: jerry_popiel
Subject: Can an FSL Antenna get Interference from a Strong Local
Station?
. . .
My question is does anyone know that if I build a new FSL, will I be
subjected to
this same Interference from my local 50,000 watt station?
Any comments would be very much appreciated.

Thanks
Jerry
----------------------------------------------------------
------------

Jerry, my guess is that a FSL would be subject to your 50kW neighbour.
However, if well-built, rotating it to null the local would help -
unless a
wanted station was in line with the unwanted one. Gary and others who
have
built FSLs will be able to respond with more authority and their
experience.

I would be intruigued to know whether a secondary ferrite or FSL in
proximity
to the main one could be tuned and positioned to usefully "absorb" an
intruding signal.
Relative positioning would be critical - if it works at all. If the FSL
were directly wired
into the receiver, inserting a notch filter or phasing network would
probably be better
- but then we would be wandering away from simplicity and uldx maxims!

Michael UK




ULR LONGWAVE DX......3 Trans-Atlantics with Audio tonight....

robert ross
 

Hi Guys:

Just checked out the Longwave Band and some decent signals on Trans-Atlantic Broadcast Stations tonight. 3 Stations had enough Audio to make out words and Music....while several others were barely audible. Still ..it's nice to see these Stations making it across the Pond so early in the DX Season!! Everything logged this evening is a RELOG...Nothing New.

RADIO USED..........TECSUN PL-380 ULR with Gary DeBock 7.5 Inch Longwave Ferrite Rod Antenna


73........ROB VA3SW

Robert S. Ross
London, Ontario CANADA

********************************************************************************************
183 Europe 1 Felsberg, GERMANY Aug/31/11 0240 UTC FRENCH GOOD
Male and Female with FRENCH Commentary.

2000 KW 4025 Miles
ROSS, ONT.
********************************************************************************************
198 BBC Radio 4 Droitwich, ENGLAND Aug/31/11 0245 UTC ENGLISH GOOD
English News items from the BBC and Commentary by Male and Female Announcers.

500 KW 3549 Miles
ROSS, ONT.
*******************************************************************************************
189 RUV-Rikisutvarpid Gufuskalar, ICELAND Aug/31/11 0252 UTC ICELANDIC POOR-FR
Icelandic Vocals and Music with Talk by Male Announcer.

300 KW 2697 MIles
ROSS, ONT.
********************************************************************************************


Hurricane Irene Dxing on SONY ICF-S22-FARMERIK

Rik
 

I ignored all the stations I recognized right away, but logged these. I used a PL-600 to find the frequency the little S-22 was tuned to, and then shut it off, and set it aside. Both were operated barefoot, no nearby loops.

I am in Northeast Connecticut, about in the center of the 3 Southern New England states of MA RI and CT.

550 WDEV Waterbury VT - This was coming in very well, and is a relog. Normally this station is very weak and maybe 200 miles or more north of me. Listed as 5KW Days and only 1 KW nights. I suspect they were still on daytime power since the signal was so strong, and they were giving detailed storm info for all or northern VT, NH and parts of NY and ME. There was a lot of flooding and danger in the area they were reporting about it.

This was coming in much stronger than 560, which should be WHYN from Springfield MA, only about 20 miles from me. In fact more distant stations on 560 from Maine and probably the one from NY were stronger, and WHYN may not have even been on the air.

1150 WDEL Wilmington Delaware. This is new to my ULR log, 5KW D/N with a directional pattern. It must be at least few hundred miles from my CT location. so it is a good catch.

I camped out on 1260 where a few stations were fading in and out. I believe the strongest was C&W on CKHJ from Frederickton NB, a relog. I could also hear a Radio Disney station on a NW/SE axis, which from here would be southern Rhode Island or far eastern Long Island to my SE or western MA or Upstate NY to my NW. I could not find any likely matches, anyone have any ideas for me?

- FARMERIK


Re: Can an FSL Antenna get Interference from a Strong Local Station?

Gary DeBock
 

<<< Gary when you have time, do you know if I use one of those 10
inch diameter 4 inch wide solid Styrofoam Cake Forms (for the Ferrite
Bars & Litz wire) that Steve Ratzlaff is using, and put the PVC Pipe
right in the middle, would I need to somehow insulate or line the
middle of the Styrofoam Form before inserting the PVC pipe? Its a bit
difficult to tell on your detailed 64 Russian Rods picture, what the
middle section of your PVC Pipe is resting on.

Thanks
Jerry >>>

Hi Jerry,

Thanks for your question about the loop support systems. Steve's 10"
diameter 4" wide styrofoam cake forms are certainly fine to support his
14" Litz wire air core loop for usage inside the shack, considering
that an air core loop has much less weight than a ferrite-based FSL
loop. But I think that you need to take a serious look at the weight of
your chosen antenna (and its intended mission), before choosing a
suitable support structure.

When you add the serious weight of multiple ferrite bars onto a support
structure (and throw in a few possible bumps and drops from Murphy's
Law in a DXpedition situation), you then have quite a different design
challenge than that of supporting a lightweight air core loop inside
the shack. From the beginning of the FSL experimentation it seemed to
me that the main advantage of the FSL antenna would be its compact
portability, and portable antennas need to be ready for anything that
Murphy's Law can (and will) throw at them. Ferrite rods are naturally
fragile components (some more than others), and my own FSL support
designs always have multiple layers of soft, protective padding to
avoid any ferrite rod fractures. Multiple ferrite rod assemblies also
have serious weight challenges, so an FSL frame needs to both handle
the weight and cushion the ferrite rods from sudden shocks.

To show how various layers of FSL antenna cushioning material can
protect multiple ferrite rods from fractures, I've uploaded a side
photo of the new 7" Medium Wave FSL ("Affordable" model) at
http://www.mediafire.com/i/?47iunjk9ylafh5z . I've
found that Schedule 40 PVC water pipe of 3/4" diameter is strong
and shock-resistant enough to provide a nice support frame for any FSL
antenna, and it's an excellent insulating material. In the inner core
of my FSL's there is a soft, resilient 3" diameter section of the
Funnoodle "Monster" swimming aide for kids around the PVC pipe (this
comes with a convenient 3/4 hole through the middle, to accommodate the
PVC pipe). Next are multiple, cut up layers of soft pipe insulation,
followed by a 4" diameter rubber plumbing pipe coupler. The ferrite
rods are attached by J & J Waterproof tape (sticky side out) to the
soft rubber coupler, then wrapped with one layer of Oatey closet flange
foam spacing material (3/8" thickness) before the Litz wire is wrapped.

The use of so many layers of padding material in an FSL may seem
redundant, but it actually proved essential during my first FSL-based
DXpedition this summer. The 6.5" Longwave FSL actually fell off of its
5' PVC base in the predawn darkness at Lincoln City, Oregon and crashed
to the ground, subjecting the 35 ferrite rods to quite a shock. Because
of the multiple layers of padding the ferrite rods were unharmed,
though, and the antenna was receiving its best DX of the entire trip
(270-FA in Samoa, a 1 kw beacon at 5,200 miles) about 15 minutes later.

73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA

-----Original Message-----
From: Jerry Popiel <jerry_popiel@...>
To: ultralightdx <ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Mon, Aug 29, 2011 10:20 pm
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] Can an FSL Antenna get Interference from a
Strong Local Station?






Thanks for the detailed replies Gary and Michael. 
 
I think that Gary's 3/4 inch PVC Supporting Legs are a great idea for
supporting an FSL. Gary when you have time, do you know if I use one of
those 10 inch diameter 4 inch wide solid Styrofoam  Cake Forms (for the
Ferrite Bars & Litz wire)  that Steve Ratzlaff is using, and put the
PVC Pipe right in the middle, would I need to somehow insulate or line
the middle of the Styrofoam Form before inserting the PVC pipe?  Its a
bit difficult  to tell on your detailed 64 Russian Rods picture, what
the middle section of your PVC Pipe is resting on.
 
Thanks
Jerry 



From: "D1028Gary@..." <D1028Gary@...>
To: ultralightdx@...
Sent: Monday, August 29, 2011 2:26:37 PM
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] Can an FSL Antenna get Interference from a
Strong Local Station?


 
Hello Jerry and Michael,

Thanks for your questions regarding the FSL antenna's risk of
overloading a receiver, and its nulling ability.

After the construction of 7 of these models for both Medium Wave and
Longwave frequencies, it's very clear to me that because of the
extremely sharp tuning system a well-designed FSL antenna is very
unlikely to overload a receiver. A DXer using the Tecsun PL-380 model
quickly learns that stations on frequencies 2 or 3 kHz away from the
FSL's optimized (tuned in) frequency are reduced greatly in strength,
and stations farther away than that are almost never audible. This has
provided a lot of help to me during a couple of summer DXpeditions,
when I was trying to chase some weak South Pacific stations with
domestic pests only 2 or 3 kHz away. In fact, the FSL tuning system is
so sharp that unless you are exactly on the same frequency (within
about 500 Hz) as the DX station, the FSL will not provide its maximum
gain. This is a much different situation than with the large air core
tuned passive loops, where you can get a fairly nice gain boost on the
DX station even if your variable capacitor is tuned 2 or 3 kHz away
from the DX station frequency. The FSL antenna does require more
precise tuning, but the razor-sharp rejection of unwanted frequencies
is more than worth it.

As for nulling capability, as long as the collection of ferrite rods is
in an accurate cylindrical shape and the the tuning capacitor is
located as close as possible to the loop itself, the FSL should provide
nulling capability that will outperform any other tuned, high-gain
antenna (with the possible exception of the single-loopstick Quantum
Loops made by Gerry Thomas). It's helpful to think of an FSL as a large
collection of individual loopsticks, all working together to combine
their gain (on only one tuned frequency), and also all working together
to null out stations that are off the ends of the ferrite rods. As long
as the cylindrical shape of the ferrite sleeve is accurate and the
ferrite rods all point in exactly the same direction, both of these
capabilities can be optimized. The Longwave FSL's here can completely
null out any pest beacon on their own frequencies, and the MW FSL's
here can null the local pests down to about 2 kHz of spectrum on their
own frequencies. This nulling performance is almost identical to that
of a single, razor-sharp loopstick in the Ultralight models like the
SRF-59 or SRF-T615, but once again, it's very critical that care is
taken to ensure that all the ferrite rods are arranged in an accurate
cylindrical shape, and that the tuning capacitor is as close as
possible to the loop itself.

I'm aware that there is intense interest in the FSL antenna among
various DXers in the Ultralightdx group who would like to try one out,
but who feel perplexed about how to get started. With all the intrigue
about high component prices, Russian Roulette ferrite orders and
different physical designs, I know it's tough to get started. Several
models of the "affordable" 7" MW FSL design (shown at
http://www.mediafire.com/i/?lq2ummbunzz5p3s ) are being built here for
local DXers to test out, in the hope that this $150 FSL antenna design
will provide a reasonable starting point for other DXers to jump into
the fun. It has already outperformed a 4' sided tuned air core loop
here (the August 2010 South Pacific DXpedition antenna, no less), so it
seems like a nice basic design to get started.

73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)

-----Original Message-----
From: Michael <michael.setaazul@...>
To: ultralightdx <ultralightdx@...>
Sent: Mon, Aug 29, 2011 12:06 am
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] Can an FSL Antenna get Interference from a
Strong Local Station?

----- Original Message -----

From: jerry_popiel
Subject: Can an FSL Antenna get Interference from a Strong Local
Station?
. . .
My question is does anyone know that if I build a new FSL, will I be
subjected to
this same Interference from my local 50,000 watt station?
Any comments would be very much appreciated.

Thanks
Jerry
----------------------------------------------------------
------------

Jerry, my guess is that a FSL would be subject to your 50kW neighbour.
However, if well-built, rotating it to null the local would help -
unless a
wanted station was in line with the unwanted one. Gary and others who
have
built FSLs will be able to respond with more authority and their
experience.

I would be intruigued to know whether a secondary ferrite or FSL in
proximity
to the main one could be tuned and positioned to usefully "absorb" an
intruding signal.
Relative positioning would be critical - if it works at all. If the FSL
were directly wired
into the receiver, inserting a notch filter or phasing network would
probably be better
- but then we would be wandering away from simplicity and uldx maxims!

Michael UK


Re: the UAE on my ULR !!

robert ross
 


On 2011-08-30, at 5:30 PM, patrice privat wrote:

 

Me again, with good news !

My barefoot Tecsun PL-380 at 2120 UTC with Radio Farda in Farsi, numerous ID's, pop music (Village People's "In the Navy" ! ).

I have to calculate the QRB between Beauvais and Al Dhabbiya !!

Frequency : 1314 khz

Cheers


Patrice:

  Congratulations on all of your recent DX Catches with the Tecsun PL-380!! I'm glad to hear you are having FUN with your New ULR!! Also nice to see all of the Great Loggings you are making with it!! Keep Loggin' em Patrice and Keep having FUN!!

73.....ROB VA3SW

Robert S. Ross
London, Ontario CANADA


my record QRB with ultralight

patrice.privat
 

My new Ultralight record , folks
 
Beauvais ---------- Al Dhabbiya !!   5,286 km (3,285 miles)
(jn 19 bk)---------(ll 74 de)
 
Radio Farda-1314 khz 21h20 UTC 20110830
 
Pat


the UAE on my ULR !!

patrice.privat
 

Me again, with good news !

My barefoot Tecsun PL-380 at 2120 UTC with Radio Farda in Farsi, numerous ID's, pop music (Village People's "In the Navy" ! ).

I have to calculate the QRB between Beauvais and Al Dhabbiya !!

Frequency : 1314 khz

Cheers


ULR report

patrice.privat
 

Hi
 
 
More of the Tecsun PL-380 which did me the nice surprise to catch TABRIZ on 1026 khz !!
First time here !!
 
No offense meant, but Spain should reduce its MW activity, they're everywhere !!
 
BTW all "various" entries (several transmitters) will count only once, therefore RNE5 and RNE1, and COPE and SER will count as one, except in these (very few frequencies) where I can surely pinpoint a specific transmitter site.
I could select the most powerful TX for each "various" frequencies, but it would not do as sometimes the weak outperform the strong !!
 
Good Night Irene/Pat
 

990 SER, Various,E,Spanish

999 COPE Madrid,E,Spanish

999 RAI1 Various,I,Italian

1008 SER,Various, E,Spanish

1017 RNE5 Various,E, Spanish

1026 SER,Various, E,Spanish

1026 IRIB Tabriz, IRN,Farsi

1026 BBC Cambridgeshire,Chesterton Fen, G,English

1044 SER Various,E,Spanish

1053 Talksport,Various, G,English

1062 RAI1, Various,I,Italian

1080 SER Various, E,Spanish

1089 Talksport, Various, G,English

1107 RNE5 Various,E,Spanish

1116 SER,Various, E,Spanish

1116 RAI1,Various,I,Italian

1125 RNE5,Various,E,Spanish

1134 Hrvatski Radio,Zadar,HRV,Croatian

1143 COPE,Various,E,Spanish

1152 RNE5,Various,E,Spanish

1161 Classic Gold,Swindon,G,English

1170 Classic Gold,Ipswich,G,English

1170 Capodistria,Beli Kriz,SVN,Italian

1179 SER,Various,E,Spanish

1179 Macedonias 2,Thessaloniki,GRC,Greek

1188 MDR Info,Goerlitz,D,German


Re: Need Info on Radio Grande Mexico 630 kHz from Canada?

Mike <tuggle@...>
 

Possibly WREY, a regional Mexican station in St. Paul, MN (?).


Re: see mu ULR catch Iran

patrice.privat
 

Hi
 
around 11pm local time, say 2100 zulu.
Syria pops up on 783 then, Iran on 1512, sometimes 1503.
Egypt on 819,Arabia on 1521,...
 
and it's as barefoot as you can be, no change whatsoever to the factory thing.
BTW, following my dear colleagues' advice,I checked all the files explaining how to switch to a longer Ferrite and installing an external aerial port to my PL-380, I still claim that you gotta be good at DIY to do that, and I certainly won't risk my 49.90 euros worth RX by opening its belly with a screwdriver.
so I think that the solution is to kkep it as it is, really barefoot (let's call it Sore Feet) ; that's what our friendly couple does at Bristol's Hope, and they seem to do well..
unless you point me to a file I have overlooked and a way to boost my PL380 WITHOUT solding, coiling, switching Ferrites, you name it...
 
I tried to place it inside my Loop (Wellbrook ALA1530) to see if it gained something in terms of either nulling power or sensitivity, nothing happened.
 
I indeed find the 380 weakish after sunrise is past compared to a higher class RX as the old Panasonic RFB45, I could hear Dutch and German stations in the broad day light, long after they were gone from the Tecsun, but still for a receiver so tiny, it performs damn well.
 
I tried the tropical bands too and it's good, Radio Clube do Para on 4885 coming nicely at sunrise.
 
Cheers lads
 
Pat

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, August 30, 2011 8:34 PM
Subject: [ultralightdx] Re: see mu ULR catch Iran

 

Great catch but what time was the station logged ?

There is a lots of Europe between us and Iran so any assistance is helpful !

Thanks
Dave


Re: see mu ULR catch Iran

dave_hackwell <dave_hackwell@...>
 

Great catch but what time was the station logged ?

There is a lots of Europe between us and Iran so any assistance is helpful !

Thanks
Dave


Re: Patrice in France Receiving Iran on 1512

patrice.privat
 

My pleasure...
 
I usually get several NL stations on MW but deeper into the season and with the "heavy SSB gear".
After all, you're my first Terra when I point towards the Americas !!
 
Thanks for the kind words.
 
Pat

----- Original Message -----
From: Allen
Sent: Tuesday, August 30, 2011 4:33 PM
Subject: [ultralightdx] RE: Patrice in France Receiving Iran on 1512

 



Hello Patrice,

Just a note to say thanks for sharing the video of the Iran catch with us in the group. Great to have you with us and we enjoy hearing and seeing what you are hearing on your side of the Atlantic.
It's really nice to be able to compare notes from day to day on the Trans-Atlantic propagation on both sides.

Regards and Good DX

Allen Willie & Dianne Froude
Bristol's Hope,Newfoundland


Need Info on Radio Grande Mexico 630 kHz from Canada?

jerry_popiel
 

Last night if I can believe this, I went outside with the PL 380 with my new Longwave 7.5 inch G Loopstick, and I listened to a Station from here in Canada that sounded like "Radio Grande Mexico" it was at 1:30 AM and with a lot of upbeat fast paced Mexican music. Every few munites between songs the announcer in a deep voice would say Radio Grande, Radio Grande, or something like that. It lasted off and on for about 40 minutes and then it was gone.

Does anyone have any info on how I can get Data on that possible Mexican Station at 630kHz called Radio Grande? And is there a Listing of International and Mexican Stations?

Thanks
Jerry

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