Date   

Re: Diamond weave coil anteena, first reports-FARMERIK

Kevin S <satya@...>
 

I suspect that it is because of the geometry of the receiver's internal
ferrite: shape of the ferrite (round, square, flat, etc.), winding
pattern, etc. Once a loop gets big enough (15"x15" box loop, etc.), no
receiver can ignore the passive boost.

I have a little 4" Litz coil from the same guy that Farmerik got his coils
from, and again there are some receivers that love it and some that don't
even acknowledge its presence.

Kevin

On 8/5/2010 11:25 PM, dhsatyadhana wrote:
Just curious - which radios aren't helped much by the Terk or SAT? My
new PL-390 likes the Terk, but completely ignores a Quantum Stick.

Hi Kevin,

I have also noticed that some radios will not work with the Q Stick. My
PL-380 ignores it as did my Sangean made Radio Shack DX-398 and my
current Sangean PR-D5. I wrote Gerry Thomas at Radio Plus about this
and he was unaware of any radios not working with the Q Stick. My Sony
2010 and 7600GR work well with it. Frankly, the PR-D5 has excellent
sensitivity and doesn't really need it.. I seem to remember that the
Grundig Satellit 700 I had also didn't work with the Q Stick. That
radio was a big disappointment on MW.

Rick W4DST


KOA into NC

Rick Robinson <w4dst@...>
 

Last night while trying to pull out an ID on 850kHz from an oldies station, up from the noise comes a loud and clear "... home of the Rockies, 8-50 KOA Newstime 9:04". This was with my barefoot PL-380, and is the first time I've logged KOA on one of my ULRs. I was somewhat surprised because KOA usually doesn't make an appearance here in the Blue Ridge mountains of SW NC until winter. You just never know what can pop up during the summer. Two minutes later a distinct Morse code "RR" came through from one of Cuba's numerous Radio Reloj stations. In 3 minutes I got a new state and another Cuban to add to the log. I never did get an ID from that oldies station, just constant music. The NRC AM Log lists only WYLF in NY as an oldies station. They are listed as only running 45 watts at night and it's hard to believe 45 watts would come into this area so well, but the signal did null on a N/S axis. I'll be sitting on 850 for awhile trying for a TOH ID or something to pinpoint it as in NY.

Just because it's summer, doesn't mean there's not going to be some surprises.

Rick W4DST


Re: Diamond weave coil anteena, first reports-FARMERIK

Rick Robinson <w4dst@...>
 

On 8/5/2010 11:25 PM, dhsatyadhana wrote:
Just curious - which radios aren't helped much by the Terk or SAT? My new PL-390 likes the Terk, but completely ignores a Quantum Stick.

Hi Kevin,

I have also noticed that some radios will not work with the Q Stick. My PL-380 ignores it as did my Sangean made Radio Shack DX-398 and my current Sangean PR-D5. I wrote Gerry Thomas at Radio Plus about this and he was unaware of any radios not working with the Q Stick. My Sony 2010 and 7600GR work well with it. Frankly, the PR-D5 has excellent sensitivity and doesn't really need it.. I seem to remember that the Grundig Satellit 700 I had also didn't work with the Q Stick. That radio was a big disappointment on MW.

Rick W4DST


Re: Making my own LW ferrite bar. + kk-s500 hint on LW tuning

dmccorm@...
 

Gary,

It appears that you have done a new top mounted mod for the PL-380 to make the receptacle match the PL-360 so you can swap between units, is that right?

Do you feel that the 360 is as able as the 380 in DX respects?

73's, Dave

---- D1028Gary@aol.com wrote:

Hello Marc,

Thanks for your question about the LW ferrite bar.

I made a 7.5" LW plug-in loopstick for the PL-360 and PL-380, and it seems
to work very well on the LW international band. The LW loopstick has
approximately 120 windings of 40/44 Litz wire in a center-wound single coil on
the type 33 ferrite bar, and has a coil inductance of 2000 uh. The long coil
was wound on a thin base of Johnson & Johnson waterproof adhesive tape, to
hold the coil windings in place. A photo of the 2000 uh LW loopstick
(plugged in to the PL-380 model) is shown below.





This LW plug-in loopstick was used to chase LW Russian Trans-Pacific
stations last week in Oregon state, and easily received three of them (Radio
Rossii on 153, 180 and 279 kHz). When the fall DXing conditions improve, this
LW-enhanced PL-380 should be a lot of fun. I hope this information will be
useful to you, Marc, and good luck in your LW loopstick project!

73, Gary


In a message dated 8/5/2010 11:52:01 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
gratiscomputer@fulladsl.be writes:




Hello,

Dear Gary,

You have been making a LW ferrite, how many (aprox) windings have you
applied?? I ordered this wire from dave, and I want to make some
ferrite bars, starting with some old ferrite bars from all kind of
radio's (grundig, philips, etc).

Marc

PS: Here I'm gonna add a hint on howto tune the Kchibo kk-S500 dowto 0
Khz, using the external whip, NOT the ferrite bar (but an external
antenna can be added then ..)

Hello,

I must have made an error, but I suddenly was under 1620Khz on sw.

I know about other Kchibo radio's with about the same design, tuning
wheel +
up/down knobs, so it could exist in other models.

The trick is the following (software "feature", but a nice one):
- set the radio on sw
- tune it to eg 1850Khz
- set it to fast tuning mode
- now with the </> buttons (NOT the tuning wheel) tune down to 1800, 1700
and 1600. With fast tuning and the < button you go 100khz down at a time.
- normally the radio stops tuning on sw when you're on 1620khz, but because
of the "trick" you go under 1620, and can now tune with slow/fast 100khz,
1khz or 5khz at a time. You can tune downto 270khz (I hear Prague radio),
252 is the Irish, and RMC sis on 216. I hear something on
50khz, and between 70khz and 80khz it seems to be full too...
- the radio DOES NOT use the ferrite bar, but the whip, and the tuning
sounds cleaner than with the ferrite bar. The signal strenghth is also
much larger...

This makes the Kchibo a better LW radio in my garden than the sony icf-
sw2010D (!)

--
What's on Shortwave guide: choose an hour, go!
_http://shortwave.tk_ (http://shortwave.tk/)
700+ Radio Stations on SW _http://swstations.tk_ (http://swstations.tk/)
300+ languages on SW _http://radiolanguages.tk_
(http://radiolanguages.tk/)


Re: Chasing South Pacific DX on ULR's

pianoplayer88key
 

Thanks for the reply, Gary.

Yeah... unfortunately, at this time, getting to a beach location is virtually impossible for me. Also the biggest tuneable antenna I have access to is the SAT. I have found, though, that putting my radio on a metal fence will significantly amplify signals. I get even more amplification by putting it next to a power pole that has a ground wire running down the pole, although that picks up more noise as well. With the SAT + powerpole combination, I can actually make my PL-380 overload the audio amplifier with a 50kW station 9 miles away in the daytime, like you can hear starting about 20 seconds innto this sound clip:
http://cid-6bdd1917662288cb.office.live.com/self.aspx/AM%20radio%20files/1170%20KCBQ%20-%202010-04-16/KCBQ%201170%20-%20PL-380%20-%20overload%20demo%20-%202nd%20half%20SAT%20@%20PowerPole.mp3

Around here, the "noise floor" is typically 30dBu, except near the band edges where it's lower, and near my strong locals where it's higher. In areas with a lower noise floor, I've heard 25dB S/N signals with a RSSI as low as 20-22dBuV. Do you remember what the RSSI was on some of the DU frequencies (or other TPs at other times) you've logged? I know you said in one post that one of them was 55/25, which sounds like it must have been a very good signal. I do have a few locals with that level or higher RSSI, including 600 (IBOC), 690, 760, 910, 1130, 1170, 1240, 1360, and 1470. At night, I've seen KMIK-1580 sometimes hit that level on my barefoot PL-380, and wouldn't be surprised to see the same from KFBK-1530 as well, although I have yet to notice it.

One thing I've noticed is that frequencies in the upper end of the band seem to get out better via skywave. For example, my two strongest nighttime stations are both above 1400kHz - KMIK-1580 and KFBK-1530, and in wintertime I can sometimes hear those stations at noon, even though they are about 300 and 450 miles away, respectively. I almost wonder if I might have a better chance of doing some TP DXing at the upper end of the band? Most of the major blowtorches around here are lower on the dial, and the highest 63/25 station is KLSD-1360. Other than that, some of the stronger high-band stations around here are XEXX-1420 (47/25), XERCN-1470 (55/25), KOKC-1520 (35/25), KFBK-1530 (49/25), XEBG-1550 (40/25), KNZR-1560 (34/20), KMIK-1580 (52/25), KBLA-1580 (44/25), KHPY-1670 (36/25) and XEPE-1700 (50/25).

As for the frequencies you listed... I estimate my chances as follows:
567 - may be possible? KLAC-570 isn't exactly a blowtorch signal here, currently registering about 36/25, and KSFO-560 is weaker, at 24/18.
594 - depends on my ability to split it between KOGO-600's 5kW 8 miles west of me, at 63/25, or their lower IBOC sideband, which registers at 43/00 on 589 kHz.
675 - probably have a better chance than 594. KIRN-670 isn't all that strong, at 31/23, although KNBR-680 is a bit stronger at .... well, actually it's only 30/20 right now cause it's in a deep fade, but normally it's probably more like in the mid to upper 40s on the RSSI. Hopefully the local on 690, which is 57/25 at night and 63/25 in the day, is far enough away...
702 - not quite sure. KALL-700 is 32/25, and has been occasionally heard with the SAT from here in the daytime, and is my current record holder for daytime DX at 626 miles. KSPN-710 is showing 42/25, but hopefully it's far enough up the dial to not pose too much of a threat.
738 - probably a bit of a challenge. KCBS-740 may pose a bit of a threat at 46/25, and even if that one fades, there still is 50kW KFMB-760, 7 miles north/northwest, which is 63/25 on its frequency, and about 41/00 on 738kHz when the PL-380 is pointed toward their transmitter.
774 - this would be challenging as well, but I may have a slightly better chance with this than I would with 594. Due to the poor front-end selectivity, I'm reading 43/00 due to KFMB-760's blowtorch signal. KKOB-770 is at 42/25 with noticeable chatter from KFMB, and KKOH-780 is also at 42/25.
792 - may be a little easier than 738 or 774? KABC-790 is showing about 36/25, and XESPN-800 is 52/25.
891 - I'm not quite sure about this one. Sure, it's 19 kHz away from the 5kW 63/25 KECR-910, but only 1 kHz away from KDXU-890, which is registering here at 46/25.
1116 - would be yet another difficult one. Thanks to KSDO-1130, I'm getting a reading of 37/00 on that frequency. KDIS-1110 is showing about 35/20, and often dropping below the soft-mute threshold but still audible, and 1120 is virtually wiped out by KSDO's splatter.

Since I'm mentioning the RSSI of signals here.... Is there any type of guideline I could use to determine whether I have a fighting chance on anything, depending on what the barefoot RSSI of signals in the area is? I would assume that if I have a station that's showing 63/25 on-channel and 50/00 into the longwave and shortwave bands, I should probably find something else to do than try DX'ing DUs, but what about if the local pests aren't quite that strong? Should I not even attempt anything considering that several stations are 63/25 here, and at least one or two can be heard on a crystal set with only a few meters of wire for an antenna?

If it's not possible to receive DUs in my back yard, can you suggest any other countries / continents / regions I should target, not including the 48 states or Mexico? If I could get a definite logging on that Canadian station on 1130 that you can probably hear in the daytime, that would be nice, but it would be a bit of a challenge with my local 10kW co-channel KSDO being 6 miles to the north and indicating 63/25 all the time.

--- In ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com, D1028Gary@... wrote:

Hi Stephen,

Thanks for your comments, and yes, I did see your post the other day (but
currently lack the time to reply in detail).

Your chances of receiving South Pacific DX in Southern California are
directly related to your ability to get on an ocean beach away from domestic
splatter just before sunrise, and boost up the sensitivity of your PL-380
(with the SAT, or preferably something bigger) to give it a fighting chance.
This is easier said than done, but it isn't impossible.

Last week on an Oregon beach I had 738-2NR (in Grafton, Australia) pegging
the PL-380's S/N display reading at 25, for example, so DU's aren't always
weak. Some "big gun" frequencies are 567, 594, 675, 702, 738, 774, 792,
891 and 1116. If you can schedule such an ocean beach run just before sunrise,
you don't need to pick a beach spot where all these frequencies are
clear-- just where a few of them are, to give you a decent chance at success.

Last week in Oregon there was domestic splatter from Portland on the back
side of the 3' loop on several frequencies, but it wasn't a deal-breaker. No
beach location is ever perfect. Just give it your best shot, and try DXing
on the frequencies that are relatively clear.

As far as receiving DU's in your back yard, it may be possible once in a
blue moon, but your chances of winning the lottery would probably be far
greater.

73, Gary


In a message dated 8/5/2010 9:52:55 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, piano
player88key@... writes:




Sounds like it could be interesting. Do I have any chance from here in
Southern California to log anything with my PL-380 in my back yard?
_http://picasaweb.google.com/PianoPlayer88Key/RadioPicsStuff?authkey=Gv1sRgC
Ier0efojpPg8AE#5501810777831424738_
(http://picasaweb.google.com/PianoPlayer88Key/RadioPicsStuff?authkey=Gv1sRgCIer0efojpPg8AE#5501810777831424738)
(The arrow points to where I would do my DXing if I can't get anything in the
house.)
Or, does the fact that I have been able to hear some local stations on a
crystal set a few years ago with only a few meters of wire antenna make it a
bit difficult?

Also, what are some good frequencies / stations to look for?
Alternatively, is there a good website (or a few) where I could basically look them up
for myself, and be able to group stations by transmitter power or frequency,
for example, and view the antenna pattern plots for the directional ones?
(I don't think it'd be much use trying for a 500kW station when it has a
deep null toward the USA and actually only sends 500 watts toward us... but
if a 5kW station has a narrow lobe that sends 50kW toward here, that might
be worth a shot IF it's not too close to my numerous local blowtorches.)

Of course, I'm still trying to find ideas on how to get improved daytime
reception in a pocket-size package. I posted the other day about this, so
won't go into much detail here, although many of the 50kW stations I want to
listen to at home or around town are at least 200 to 300 miles distant,
with a few possibly being over 400 miles away. Even more important, though,
would be having better front-end selectivity in front of the DSP chip. There
are distant stations 10kHz off two of my strongest locals that I would like
to hear, for example 10kW KNWQ-1140 @ 81 miles (pest = 10kW KSDO-1130, 6
miles) and KERN-1180 @ 237 miles (pest = 50kW KCBQ-1170, 9 miles).

In the meantime, while I'm limping along on my PL-380 and Select-A-Tenna,
are there any particular TP frequencies I should try for, considering the
local RF saturation? My 60+/25 RSSI/SNR local pests are on 600 (IBOC), 690,
760, 910, 1130, 1170 and 1360, with other not-as-strong (50+/25) signals
scattered pretty much throughout the dial.
I tried googling a few station databases, sites, etc, but couldn't make
heads or tails of anything.

--- In _ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com)
, D1028Gary@ wrote:

Hello All,

When John Bryant first told me (in early 2008) that it was possible to
receive Australia and New Zealand stations on the AM band right in the
middle
of the static-filled summer, it sounded like science fiction. The
concept
of chasing "down under" DX 7,000 miles (or more) away seemed too bizarre
to
be true, especially during the worst possible season of the year. I had
already received several Asian TP's on ULR's (from Japan and Korea)
during the
fall season, but never a trace of anything from the South Pacific.

One of the special traits of John, though, was his great patience in
teaching a newcomer how to accomplish a certain task. John had
appreciated the
way that the ULR boom was bringing new enthusiasm back to the AM-DXing
hobby,
and I think he had the sneaky idea that if he could turn me on to
DU-DXing, my own ULR enthusiasm would get a turbo boost. John invited me
to a join
a DXpedition at Grayland in July of 2008, during which he would be
chasing
South Pacific DX with Guy Atkins.

Both John and Guy were DU-DXing veterans with decades of experience, and
I
was a total novice. To prepare for the trip, I scheduled various solo
trips
to Grayland, trying to hear Australia or New Zealand on the hot-rodded
SRF-39FP "prison radios" (with 20" loopsticks). These radios had awesome
sensitivity, but awful selectivity. Any DU station within 5 kHz of an
audible
domestic station (that's about 99% of them, by the way) were covered by
splatter. My lack of DU success soon caused my enthusiasm to sink Down
Under.

John and Guy (among others) had perfected DU-DXing with communication
receivers and large external antennas, but I still felt that the
Ultralight
radio had a place in DU-DXing-- and John and Guy somehow agreed with me!
Together we worked to create the Slider E100 (with Murata CFJ455K5
filter), the
first stand-alone Ultralight radio capable of chasing DU's with a
reasonable chance of success. I was on Cloud Nine, and found myself
finally able to
receive Australia, New Zealand and Fiji on the AM band right in the
middle
of summer, like John had said!

Much more than Asian TP-DXing, DU-DXing is an ocean beach pursuit. South
Pacific DXing seems to require a healthy dose of salt water for success,
at
least on ULR's. West coast DXers should head for the beach about an hour
before sunrise, and bring along a selective ULR (Tecsun PL-310, PL-380,
D96L,
or a Slider E100 with Murata filter). DX signal boosters like tuned
passive
loops certainly raise your chances of success (the bigger the better).
To
my knowledge, Guy Atkins, Kevin Schanilec, Norm Clark and Colin Newell
have
all received South Pacific DX on ULR's, and if you are on the West
Coast,
right now is the peak season for YOU to try it!

73 and Good Luck,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA)


Re: New logs from Connecticut

terribly wet
 

I'd swear I heard ESPN myself on 990 but it was last winter. Never could find a match. CKGM comes through with 'sports' but no mention of ESPN on their website. Also I know I've heard ESPN with Canadian programming but forget if it was 990. (No ESPN Canadian Stations ?)


This area without a directional antenna to me is all mixed up. I mostly hear WDCX on 990 Rochester,NY with religious programming but it comes and goes every few minutes. Sports in background. (CKGM assumed)

980 nothing clear here but hear baseball all the time. I guess this is the Albany,NY area station.

With stations in and out every few minutes or less hard to get an ID. ESPN might only ID on the hour except call itself ESPN 990, etc. Baseball maybe more frequent. Ads Ads Ads on the breaks. Mostly 'national' ads vs. local. Talk ? ID on hour ?

I'm not looking at a list now but I've only been doing this for a few months after being away from the hobby for a long time.


I'm in SW Connecticut and under the influence of New York City HD stuff that makes some frequencies difficult.--but 900 area nothing but 970 NJ ? (station with power) 930 weak here. (NJ) WELI 960 New Haven, Ct.does a number here. Hate to be in New Haven with it's HD hsssssssssssss.

990 Southington, Ct. I think I finally caught their ID for recording. Not sure anybody could understand it. (Spanish I think)


Here the whole AM BCB is a mess at night. Only thing you can hope to do is pick something out of the mess by oddball luck.

I can't believe their are not other areas more open to dx'ing than the NE USA. Look at all the stations from Virginia, PA.DE,NJ,NY,CT,MA etc. Many with 'enhanced power' vs years ago.

I've logged only 3 Vermont's 550,620..and 1380 is it ? (Rutland) Maine is as scarce as can be. I hear 1280 Gardner/Augusta ? and rare WZON 620. (Bangor)

--- In ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com, "farmerik" <farmerik@...> wrote:

Just trying to fill in my log in the 900 to 1000 segment tonight.

950 WIBX Utica, NY 5 kW
970 WNYM serving NYC, but New Jersey address 5 kW
980 WOFX Troy, NY [near Albany] 5kW

The above are 5 kW stations within a few hundred miles.

This one looks to good to be true-

990 WTIG Massilion,Ohio 112W [only 250W day] ?

ESPN Radio. I clearly heard a 'Subway' restaurant ad, ESPN Radio ID, and sports talk for awhile. No Call letters, but I can't find a listing for any other ESPN station on 990 any closer. I can still hear it under a religious station with Chuck Colson, and one or two Spanish stations with music formats. I wish I stayed with it longer when it was coming in better. Anyone know if there power went up, or of any recent format changes to ESPN Radio in the Northeast on 990?

PL-360 with Jim's style transformer Hoop loop with a diamond weave antenna. - FARMERIK


Re: Chasing South Pacific DX on ULR's

pianoplayer88key
 

Sounds like it could be interesting. Do I have any chance from here in Southern California to log anything with my PL-380 in my back yard?
http://picasaweb.google.com/PianoPlayer88Key/RadioPicsStuff?authkey=Gv1sRgCIer0efojpPg8AE#5501810777831424738 (The arrow points to where I would do my DXing if I can't get anything in the house.)
Or, does the fact that I have been able to hear some local stations on a crystal set a few years ago with only a few meters of wire antenna make it a bit difficult?

Also, what are some good frequencies / stations to look for? Alternatively, is there a good website (or a few) where I could basically look them up for myself, and be able to group stations by transmitter power or frequency, for example, and view the antenna pattern plots for the directional ones? (I don't think it'd be much use trying for a 500kW station when it has a deep null toward the USA and actually only sends 500 watts toward us... but if a 5kW station has a narrow lobe that sends 50kW toward here, that might be worth a shot IF it's not too close to my numerous local blowtorches.)

Of course, I'm still trying to find ideas on how to get improved daytime reception in a pocket-size package. I posted the other day about this, so won't go into much detail here, although many of the 50kW stations I want to listen to at home or around town are at least 200 to 300 miles distant, with a few possibly being over 400 miles away. Even more important, though, would be having better front-end selectivity in front of the DSP chip. There are distant stations 10kHz off two of my strongest locals that I would like to hear, for example 10kW KNWQ-1140 @ 81 miles (pest = 10kW KSDO-1130, 6 miles) and KERN-1180 @ 237 miles (pest = 50kW KCBQ-1170, 9 miles).

In the meantime, while I'm limping along on my PL-380 and Select-A-Tenna, are there any particular TP frequencies I should try for, considering the local RF saturation? My 60+/25 RSSI/SNR local pests are on 600 (IBOC), 690, 760, 910, 1130, 1170 and 1360, with other not-as-strong (50+/25) signals scattered pretty much throughout the dial.
I tried googling a few station databases, sites, etc, but couldn't make heads or tails of anything.

--- In ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com, D1028Gary@... wrote:

Hello All,

When John Bryant first told me (in early 2008) that it was possible to
receive Australia and New Zealand stations on the AM band right in the middle
of the static-filled summer, it sounded like science fiction. The concept
of chasing "down under" DX 7,000 miles (or more) away seemed too bizarre to
be true, especially during the worst possible season of the year. I had
already received several Asian TP's on ULR's (from Japan and Korea) during the
fall season, but never a trace of anything from the South Pacific.

One of the special traits of John, though, was his great patience in
teaching a newcomer how to accomplish a certain task. John had appreciated the
way that the ULR boom was bringing new enthusiasm back to the AM-DXing hobby,
and I think he had the sneaky idea that if he could turn me on to
DU-DXing, my own ULR enthusiasm would get a turbo boost. John invited me to a join
a DXpedition at Grayland in July of 2008, during which he would be chasing
South Pacific DX with Guy Atkins.

Both John and Guy were DU-DXing veterans with decades of experience, and I
was a total novice. To prepare for the trip, I scheduled various solo trips
to Grayland, trying to hear Australia or New Zealand on the hot-rodded
SRF-39FP "prison radios" (with 20" loopsticks). These radios had awesome
sensitivity, but awful selectivity. Any DU station within 5 kHz of an audible
domestic station (that's about 99% of them, by the way) were covered by
splatter. My lack of DU success soon caused my enthusiasm to sink Down Under.

John and Guy (among others) had perfected DU-DXing with communication
receivers and large external antennas, but I still felt that the Ultralight
radio had a place in DU-DXing-- and John and Guy somehow agreed with me!
Together we worked to create the Slider E100 (with Murata CFJ455K5 filter), the
first stand-alone Ultralight radio capable of chasing DU's with a
reasonable chance of success. I was on Cloud Nine, and found myself finally able to
receive Australia, New Zealand and Fiji on the AM band right in the middle
of summer, like John had said!

Much more than Asian TP-DXing, DU-DXing is an ocean beach pursuit. South
Pacific DXing seems to require a healthy dose of salt water for success, at
least on ULR's. West coast DXers should head for the beach about an hour
before sunrise, and bring along a selective ULR (Tecsun PL-310, PL-380, D96L,
or a Slider E100 with Murata filter). DX signal boosters like tuned passive
loops certainly raise your chances of success (the bigger the better). To
my knowledge, Guy Atkins, Kevin Schanilec, Norm Clark and Colin Newell have
all received South Pacific DX on ULR's, and if you are on the West Coast,
right now is the peak season for YOU to try it!

73 and Good Luck,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA)


Re: Diamond weave coil anteena, first reports-FARMERIK

dhsatyadhana <satya@...>
 

Hey Farmerik:

Thanks for the initial download on the coils! Can you quantify via the Tecsun's db meter how much more gain you get off of the 9.25" coil as compared to the Terk or SAT? I can imagine that the tuning sharpness is also significantly better as well. Placing the coil in a housing with a good varicap would make a great alternative to a Terk or SAT. I need another Litz coil like I need a hole in the head, but that doesn't seem to stop me...

Just curious - which radios aren't helped much by the Terk or SAT? My new PL-390 likes the Terk, but completely ignores a Quantum Stick.

I'll be curious to hear your reports as you put the coils through their paces!

Kevin S
Bainbridge Island, WA

--- In ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com, "farmerik" <farmerik@...> wrote:

All three coils arrived today, but I have only had a few hours to fiddle with them. They all work very well, but I am finding some surprises. For one thing, they appear to pick up signals off the rim instead of broad side, and inductive coupling when tuned with a cap is also best with the windings in the radio ferrite antenna parallel to the diamond weave coil windings. Even good radios which are not helped much by the SAT or TERK can receive a huge boost from the 9.25 inch OD AM BCB 350 uH coil. On some sets like that, there is a huge peak at a certain point along the internal ferrite antenna, and others not so much. I noticed on one modest portable tuned to a fairly weak, but listen able station, when I brought it near the coil tuned with a cap to the same frequency, it completely nulled the signal when broadside to the coil, and had a strong signal when in a parallel position. I am tuning with a vernier cap from Crystal Radio Supply, and there is no sign of a sharp peak which is hard to tune. I haven't tried a cap without a vernier yet.

The RSSI readings with just the MW coil hardwired to the PL-360 are greatly improved over the tiny factory ferrite, and so far seem at least as strong as Gary's 7.5 inch ferrite custom made antenna. They do behave differently as far as noise and nulling, so it is hard to make comparisons.

-FARMERIK


New logs from Connecticut

Rik
 

Just trying to fill in my log in the 900 to 1000 segment tonight.

950 WIBX Utica, NY 5 kW
970 WNYM serving NYC, but New Jersey address 5 kW
980 WOFX Troy, NY [near Albany] 5kW

The above are 5 kW stations within a few hundred miles.

This one looks to good to be true-

990 WTIG Massilion,Ohio 112W [only 250W day] ?

ESPN Radio. I clearly heard a 'Subway' restaurant ad, ESPN Radio ID, and sports talk for awhile. No Call letters, but I can't find a listing for any other ESPN station on 990 any closer. I can still hear it under a religious station with Chuck Colson, and one or two Spanish stations with music formats. I wish I stayed with it longer when it was coming in better. Anyone know if there power went up, or of any recent format changes to ESPN Radio in the Northeast on 990?

PL-360 with Jim's style transformer Hoop loop with a diamond weave antenna. - FARMERIK


Re: Chasing South Pacific DX on ULR's

Gary DeBock
 

Hi Stephen,
 
Thanks for your comments, and yes, I did see your post the other day (but currently lack the time to reply in detail).
 
Your chances of receiving South Pacific DX in Southern California are directly related to your ability to get on an ocean beach away from domestic splatter just before sunrise, and boost up the sensitivity of your PL-380 (with the SAT, or preferably something bigger) to give it a fighting chance. This is easier said than done, but it isn't impossible.
 
Last week on an Oregon beach I had 738-2NR (in Grafton, Australia) pegging the PL-380's S/N display reading at 25, for example, so DU's aren't always weak. Some "big gun" frequencies are 567, 594, 675, 702, 738, 774, 792, 891 and 1116. If you can schedule such an ocean beach run just before sunrise, you don't need to pick a beach spot where all these frequencies are clear-- just where a few of them are, to give you a decent chance at success.
 
Last week in Oregon there was domestic splatter from Portland on the back side of the 3' loop on several frequencies, but it wasn't a deal-breaker. No beach location is ever perfect. Just give it your best shot, and try DXing on the frequencies that are relatively clear.
 
As far as receiving DU's in your back yard, it may be possible once in a blue moon, but your chances of winning the lottery would probably be far greater.
 
73, Gary      
 

In a message dated 8/5/2010 9:52:55 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, pianoplayer88key@... writes:
 

Sounds like it could be interesting. Do I have any chance from here in Southern California to log anything with my PL-380 in my back yard?
http://picasaweb.google.com/PianoPlayer88Key/RadioPicsStuff?authkey=Gv1sRgCIer0efojpPg8AE#5501810777831424738 (The arrow points to where I would do my DXing if I can't get anything in the house.)
Or, does the fact that I have been able to hear some local stations on a crystal set a few years ago with only a few meters of wire antenna make it a bit difficult?

Also, what are some good frequencies / stations to look for? Alternatively, is there a good website (or a few) where I could basically look them up for myself, and be able to group stations by transmitter power or frequency, for example, and view the antenna pattern plots for the directional ones? (I don't think it'd be much use trying for a 500kW station when it has a deep null toward the USA and actually only sends 500 watts toward us... but if a 5kW station has a narrow lobe that sends 50kW toward here, that might be worth a shot IF it's not too close to my numerous local blowtorches.)

Of course, I'm still trying to find ideas on how to get improved daytime reception in a pocket-size package. I posted the other day about this, so won't go into much detail here, although many of the 50kW stations I want to listen to at home or around town are at least 200 to 300 miles distant, with a few possibly being over 400 miles away. Even more important, though, would be having better front-end selectivity in front of the DSP chip. There are distant stations 10kHz off two of my strongest locals that I would like to hear, for example 10kW KNWQ-1140 @ 81 miles (pest = 10kW KSDO-1130, 6 miles) and KERN-1180 @ 237 miles (pest = 50kW KCBQ-1170, 9 miles).

In the meantime, while I'm limping along on my PL-380 and Select-A-Tenna, are there any particular TP frequencies I should try for, considering the local RF saturation? My 60+/25 RSSI/SNR local pests are on 600 (IBOC), 690, 760, 910, 1130, 1170 and 1360, with other not-as-strong (50+/25) signals scattered pretty much throughout the dial.
I tried googling a few station databases, sites, etc, but couldn't make heads or tails of anything.

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:
>
> Hello All,
>
> When John Bryant first told me (in early 2008) that it was possible to
> receive Australia and New Zealand stations on the AM band right in the middle
> of the static-filled summer, it sounded like science fiction. The concept
> of chasing "down under" DX 7,000 miles (or more) away seemed too bizarre to
> be true, especially during the worst possible season of the year. I had
> already received several Asian TP's on ULR's (from Japan and Korea) during the
> fall season, but never a trace of anything from the South Pacific.
>
> One of the special traits of John, though, was his great patience in
> teaching a newcomer how to accomplish a certain task. John had appreciated the
> way that the ULR boom was bringing new enthusiasm back to the AM-DXing hobby,
> and I think he had the sneaky idea that if he could turn me on to
> DU-DXing, my own ULR enthusiasm would get a turbo boost. John invited me to a join
> a DXpedition at Grayland in July of 2008, during which he would be chasing
> South Pacific DX with Guy Atkins.
>
> Both John and Guy were DU-DXing veterans with decades of experience, and I
> was a total novice. To prepare for the trip, I scheduled various solo trips
> to Grayland, trying to hear Australia or New Zealand on the hot-rodded
> SRF-39FP "prison radios" (with 20" loopsticks). These radios had awesome
> sensitivity, but awful selectivity. Any DU station within 5 kHz of an audible
> domestic station (that's about 99% of them, by the way) were covered by
> splatter. My lack of DU success soon caused my enthusiasm to sink Down Under.
>
> John and Guy (among others) had perfected DU-DXing with communication
> receivers and large external antennas, but I still felt that the Ultralight
> radio had a place in DU-DXing-- and John and Guy somehow agreed with me!
> Together we worked to create the Slider E100 (with Murata CFJ455K5 filter), the
> first stand-alone Ultralight radio capable of chasing DU's with a
> reasonable chance of success. I was on Cloud Nine, and found myself finally able to
> receive Australia, New Zealand and Fiji on the AM band right in the middle
> of summer, like John had said!
>
> Much more than Asian TP-DXing, DU-DXing is an ocean beach pursuit. South
> Pacific DXing seems to require a healthy dose of salt water for success, at
> least on ULR's. West coast DXers should head for the beach about an hour
> before sunrise, and bring along a selective ULR (Tecsun PL-310, PL-380, D96L,
> or a Slider E100 with Murata filter). DX signal boosters like tuned passive
> loops certainly raise your chances of success (the bigger the better). To
> my knowledge, Guy Atkins, Kevin Schanilec, Norm Clark and Colin Newell have
> all received South Pacific DX on ULR's, and if you are on the West Coast,
> right now is the peak season for YOU to try it!
>
> 73 and Good Luck,
> Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA)
>


Tecsun PL-310 free shipping on eBay

dmccorm@...
 

Good deal for those looking for the PL-310:
http://stores.ebay.com/fumin-Wholesale


Chasing South Pacific DX on ULR's

Gary DeBock
 

Hello All,
 
When John Bryant first told me (in early 2008) that it was possible to receive Australia and New Zealand stations on the AM band right in the middle of the static-filled summer, it sounded like science fiction. The concept of chasing "down under" DX 7,000 miles (or more) away seemed too bizarre to be true, especially during the worst possible season of the year. I had already received several Asian TP's on ULR's (from Japan and Korea) during the fall season, but never a trace of anything from the South Pacific. 
 
One of the special traits of John, though, was his great patience in teaching a newcomer how to accomplish a certain task. John had appreciated the way that the ULR boom was bringing new enthusiasm back to the AM-DXing hobby, and I think he had the sneaky idea that if he could turn me on to DU-DXing, my own ULR enthusiasm would get a turbo boost. John invited me to a join a DXpedition at Grayland in July of 2008, during which he would be chasing South Pacific DX with Guy Atkins.
 
Both John and Guy were DU-DXing veterans with decades of experience, and I was a total novice. To prepare for the trip, I scheduled various solo trips to Grayland, trying to hear Australia or New Zealand on the hot-rodded SRF-39FP "prison radios" (with 20" loopsticks). These radios had awesome sensitivity, but awful selectivity. Any DU station within 5 kHz of an audible domestic station (that's about 99% of them, by the way) were covered by splatter. My lack of DU success soon caused my enthusiasm to sink Down Under. 
 
John and Guy (among others) had perfected DU-DXing with communication receivers and large external antennas, but I still felt that the Ultralight radio had a place in DU-DXing-- and John and Guy somehow agreed with me! Together we worked to create the Slider E100 (with Murata CFJ455K5 filter), the first stand-alone Ultralight radio capable of chasing DU's with a reasonable chance of success. I was on Cloud Nine, and found myself finally able to receive Australia, New Zealand and Fiji on the AM band right in the middle of summer, like John had said!
 
Much more than Asian TP-DXing, DU-DXing is an ocean beach pursuit. South Pacific DXing seems to require a healthy dose of salt water for success, at least on ULR's. West coast DXers should head for the beach about an hour before sunrise, and bring along a selective ULR (Tecsun PL-310, PL-380, D96L, or a Slider E100 with Murata filter). DX signal boosters like tuned passive loops certainly raise your chances of success (the bigger the better). To my knowledge, Guy Atkins, Kevin Schanilec, Norm Clark and Colin Newell have all received South Pacific DX on ULR's, and if you are on the West Coast, right now is the peak season for YOU to try it!
 
73 and Good Luck,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA)                  


Making my own LW ferrite bar. + kk-s500 hint on LW tuning

gratiscomputer <gratiscomputer@...>
 

Hello,

Dear Gary,

You have been making a LW ferrite, how many (aprox) windings have you applied?? I ordered this wire from dave, and I want to make some ferrite bars, starting with some old ferrite bars from all kind of radio's (grundig, philips, etc).

Marc

PS: Here I'm gonna add a hint on howto tune the Kchibo kk-S500 dowto 0 Khz, using the external whip, NOT the ferrite bar (but an external antenna can be added then ..)


Hello,

I must have made an error, but I suddenly was under 1620Khz on sw.

I know about other Kchibo radio's with about the same design, tuning wheel +
up/down knobs, so it could exist in other models.

The trick is the following (software "feature", but a nice one):
- set the radio on sw
- tune it to eg 1850Khz
- set it to fast tuning mode
- now with the </> buttons (NOT the tuning wheel) tune down to 1800, 1700
and 1600. With fast tuning and the < button you go 100khz down at a time.
- normally the radio stops tuning on sw when you're on 1620khz, but because
of the "trick" you go under 1620, and can now tune with slow/fast 100khz,
1khz or 5khz at a time. You can tune downto 270khz (I hear Prague radio),
252 is the Irish, and RMC sis on 216. I hear something on
50khz, and between 70khz and 80khz it seems to be full too...
- the radio DOES NOT use the ferrite bar, but the whip, and the tuning
sounds cleaner than with the ferrite bar. The signal strenghth is also much larger...


This makes the Kchibo a better LW radio in my garden than the sony icf-
sw2010D (!)



--
What's on Shortwave guide: choose an hour, go!
http://shortwave.tk
700+ Radio Stations on SW http://swstations.tk
300+ languages on SW http://radiolanguages.tk


Re: indoor homebrew fm yagi

Carl DeWhitt
 

Thanks ,Marc,for your suggestions.
Carl

--- In ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com, gratiscomputer <gratiscomputer@...> wrote:

Carl schreef:


Does any one in the group know of any plans for a homebrew indoor fm
yagi ?I would like a portable fm yagi for ulr's.It could be used out
doors if not small enough for indoors.I am thinking that the frame
including the boom could be made from PVC like Gary's PVC am loop and
hold at least 3 or preferably 4 or more elements.How could this be
connected to a Grundig G-8 or other ulr with good fm performance ?
Any ideas ?Even one that could be put together from a kit would be
great. Thanks.
Carl DeWhitt
Maryville,Tn.

And also this one:

http://www.dxzone.com/cgi-bin/dir/jump2.cgi?ID=3267

Marc

--
What's on Shortwave guide: choose an hour, go!
http://shortwave.tk
700+ Radio Stations on SW http://swstations.tk
300+ languages on SW http://radiolanguages.tk


Re: indoor homebrew fm yagi

Carl DeWhitt
 

Thanks,Kevin for your suggestion of how to connect the G-8 to the Moxon.I have printed out the Moxon plans you have in the files section.
Carl

--- In ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com, "Kevin S" <satya@...> wrote:

Hey Carl:

I have a portable Moxon (a folded 2-element) made out of wire and PVC: the
plans are here:
http://www.moxonantennaproject.com/fmdxer/fmdxer.htm
Although 3 or 4 elements would obviously perform somewhat better, the
advantage of a Moxon is that it has surprising directivity (easily better
than a normal yagi) and is very compact for travelling. Plus, a Moxon is
natively a 50 ohm antenna, meaning you don't need a matching balun. Check
out all things Moxon at:
http://www.moxonantennaproject.com/

As for connecting an antenna to a G-8 (Tecsun PL-300WT), it's a snap!
Simply connect one lead with a clip to the base of the FM whip, and the
other lead to the spring in the battery compartment. I snaked a short
wire out of the battery compartment, filing a little notch in the battery
compartment cover, to make it easier. The joy of the Tecsun PL-310 is
that it has an actual FM/SW antenna jack; however, I verified that the
same level of performance is obtainable by clipping the antenna to the
whip and battery spring when compared to using the jack, so you're not
missing anything with the G-8, which is as hot as any other rig on FM
(including the 310 and 380), so you already have the best FM receiver.

Kevin S
Bainbridge Island, WA

Does any one in the group know of any plans for a homebrew indoor fm yagi
?I would like a portable fm yagi for ulr's.It could be used out doors if
not small enough for indoors.I am thinking that the frame including the
boom could be made from PVC like Gary's PVC am loop and hold at least 3 or
preferably 4 or more elements.How could this be connected to a Grundig G-8
or other ulr with good fm performance ?
Any ideas ?Even one that could be put together from a kit would be great.
Thanks.
Carl DeWhitt
Maryville,Tn.


New FM logs

Carl DeWhitt
 

I have a few new fm logs since yesterday's posting.Again,all were on the barefoot G-8.No new states this time though.

WMIT 106.9 Black Mountain,N.C. 162-1634 EDT 8.4.10 "106.9 The Light"PSA for author Sreve Brown appearing at The Cove near Asheville.wx.contemporary Christian music. fair.

WKXD-FM 106.9 Monterrey,Tn 1650-1657 EDT 8.4.10 fair.ad for El Tapatio Mexican restaraunts with locations in Cookeville i.d. slogan"Kicks 106.9"

WYGE 92.3 London.Ky 2330-2340 EDT 8.4.10
fair.i.d. "on WYGE"program "Night Sounds"

WEKS 92.5 Zebulon.Ga. 0853-0902 EDT 8.5.10 poor-fair.Garth Brooks song.i.d."On the air and on the web,92.5 The Bear is WEKS,Zebulon,Ga."more c&w mx.

Carl DeWhitt
Maryville,Tn.


Re: Tecsun PL-310 antenna input mod.

Gary DeBock
 

Hi Richard,
 
Great work on being the first to successfully complete these useful modifications on the PL-310 cabinet! As most of us discover when trying a new tinkering project, sometimes the most difficult part is just getting started :-)
 
During similar modification work here on the PL-380 cabinet (and in making the PL-360 7.5" plug-in loopsticks), I also found it a challenge to get the 1/8" plug-in jacks mounted at a perfectly perpendicular angle. The eventual solution was to use an old woodworking trick and mount the jack with the 7.5" loopstick already plugged in, so that I could make sure that the jack was perpendicular before gluing its plastic mounting assembly in place.
 
Good luck in DXing with your modified PL-310, Richard, and I'm sure our mutual friend John B. would have been very proud of your efforts.
 
73, Gary         
 

In a message dated 8/5/2010 7:12:20 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time, richarda@... writes:
 

Yesterday I modified one of my PL-310 receivers by installing a LW/MW antenna input. Besides the antenna input jack, I also added a support for the 7.5" loop antenna made for the PL-360. The most difficult part was removal of the original ferrite antenna. I slowly slid an Exacto knife under the antenna to cut through the silicon glue securing it to the chassis. Once it was separated, I ensured there was enough Litz wire left for the connecting the receiver to a Radio Shack mini-jack. Then I cut away a small amount of plastic to allow placement of the jack and support, and drilled two holes on the top (left of the TIME key) for the jack and a support screw. Then I soldered the Litz wire leads to the mini-jack and put it through the hole. After tightening the jack and support, the receiver was re-assembled the for testing.

Mounting the 7.5 loop, I found the support and jack slightly misaligned, but acceptable. When compared with a barefoot PL-310 (the same one that received 10 TP stations last season), the signal strength of mid-day broadcasts were noticeably stronger. It was the same when I connected the receiver to a long-wire aerial and my Quantum QX Loop. This morning I the small PL-360 plug-in antenna and was surprised to find the signal strength was almost equal that of the barefoot PL-310. So maybe the little antenna is better than first thought.

My only warning to anyone considering this mod is about the soft, thin plastic used for the case and chassis of the PL-310. Also, with the 7.5" loop mounted, the radio needs extra support because it tends to be top-heavy.

This was my first receiver modification in decades and I deem it a success, far easier than I anticipated.

Good DX all.

Richard

Richard Allen
36°22'51"N / 97°26'35"W


Re: Making my own LW ferrite bar. + kk-s500 hint on LW tuning

Gary DeBock
 

Hello Marc,
 
Thanks for your question about the LW ferrite bar.
 
I made a 7.5" LW plug-in loopstick for the PL-360 and PL-380, and it seems to work very well on the LW international band. The LW loopstick has approximately 120 windings of 40/44 Litz wire in a center-wound single coil on the type 33 ferrite bar, and has a coil inductance of 2000 uh. The long coil was wound on a thin base of Johnson & Johnson waterproof adhesive tape, to hold the coil windings in place. A photo of the 2000 uh LW loopstick (plugged in to the PL-380 model) is shown below.
 
 
  
 
This LW plug-in loopstick was used to chase LW Russian Trans-Pacific stations last week in Oregon state, and easily received three of them (Radio Rossii on 153, 180 and 279 kHz). When the fall DXing conditions improve, this LW-enhanced PL-380 should be a lot of fun. I hope this information will be useful to you, Marc, and good luck in your LW loopstick project!
 
73, Gary  
 

In a message dated 8/5/2010 11:52:01 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time, gratiscomputer@... writes:
 

Hello,

Dear Gary,

You have been making a LW ferrite, how many (aprox) windings have you
applied?? I ordered this wire from dave, and I want to make some
ferrite bars, starting with some old ferrite bars from all kind of
radio's (grundig, philips, etc).

Marc

PS: Here I'm gonna add a hint on howto tune the Kchibo kk-S500 dowto 0
Khz, using the external whip, NOT the ferrite bar (but an external
antenna can be added then ..)

Hello,

I must have made an error, but I suddenly was under 1620Khz on sw.

I know about other Kchibo radio's with about the same design, tuning
wheel +
up/down knobs, so it could exist in other models.

The trick is the following (software "feature", but a nice one):
- set the radio on sw
- tune it to eg 1850Khz
- set it to fast tuning mode
- now with the buttons (NOT the tuning wheel) tune down to 1800, 1700
and 1600. With fast tuning and the < button you go 100khz down at a time.
- normally the radio stops tuning on sw when you're on 1620khz, but because
of the "trick" you go under 1620, and can now tune with slow/fast 100khz,
1khz or 5khz at a time. You can tune downto 270khz (I hear Prague radio),
252 is the Irish, and RMC sis on 216. I hear something on
50khz, and between 70khz and 80khz it seems to be full too...
- the radio DOES NOT use the ferrite bar, but the whip, and the tuning
sounds cleaner than with the ferrite bar. The signal strenghth is also
much larger...

This makes the Kchibo a better LW radio in my garden than the sony icf-
sw2010D (!)

--
What's on Shortwave guide: choose an hour, go!
http://shortwave.tk
700+ Radio Stations on SW http://swstations.tk
300+ languages on SW http://radiolanguages.tk


MI LOG - FM

wa8lcz
 

3AUG2010 TUE
NOISY, SIGS WEAK

4AUG2010 WEN
099.7 WUGN MIDLAND MI FAMILY LIFE 0844EDT 100KW 102MI (MI69)

5AUG2010 THUR
092.1 WFGF LIMA OH THE FROG, NEW COUNTRY 0601EDT 3KW 137MI (OH25)
094.5 WXKR PORT CLINTON OH CLASSIC ROCK 0621EDT 30K 70MI (OH26)
103.3 WQLB TAWAS CITY MI ADULT, HITS FM 0758EDT 25K 124MI (MI70)
096.9 WLAV GRAND RAPIDS MI CLASSIC ROCK 0819EDT 50K 143MI (MI71)
100.7 WITL LANSING MI COUNTRY 0831EDT 26.5KW 83MI (MI72)
102.1 WLEW BAD AXE MI ADULT HITS 0839EDT 50K 89MI (MI73)
103.3 WCRF CLEVELAND OH CHRISTIAN 0844EDT 25K 97MI (OH27)


TOTALS: 142, MI73,OH27,NC01,PA01,ONTARIO 38,TX01,NM01,
51 LOG ENTRIES IN JULY, 19 LOG ENTRIES IN AUG
RCVRS: Eton E10
ANTS: Moxon 2 ele folded wire yagi indoors

Byron WA8LCZ nr Detroit


MI LOG - FM

wa8lcz
 

3AUG2010 TUE
NOISY, SIGS WEAK

4AUG2010 WEN
099.7 WUGN MIDLAND MI FAMILY LIFE 0844EDT 100KW 102MI (MI69)

5AUG2010 THUR
092.1 WFGF LIMA OH THE FROG, NEW COUNTRY 0601EDT 3KW 137MI (OH25)
094.5 WXKR PORT CLINTON OH CLASSIC ROCK 0621EDT 30K 70MI (OH26)
103.3 WQLB TAWAS CITY MI ADULT, HITS FM 0758EDT 25K 124MI (MI70)
096.9 WLAV GRAND RAPIDS MI CLASSIC ROCK 0819EDT 50K 143MI (MI71)
100.7 WITL LANSING MI COUNTRY 0831EDT 26.5KW 83MI (MI72)
102.1 WLEW BAD AXE MI ADULT HITS 0839EDT 50K 89MI (MI73)
103.3 WCRF CLEVELAND OH CHRISTIAN 0844EDT 25K 97MI (OH27)


TOTALS: 142, MI73,OH27,NC01,PA01,ONTARIO 38,TX01,NM01,
51 LOG ENTRIES IN JULY, 19 LOG ENTRIES IN AUG
RCVRS: Eton E10
ANTS: Moxon 2 ele folded wire yagi indoors

Byron WA8LCZ nr Detroit