Date   

Re: indoor homebrew fm yagi

gratiscomputer <gratiscomputer@...>
 

Carl schreef:
Does any one in the group know of any plans for a homebrew indoor fm yagi ?I would like a portable fm yagi for ulr's.It could be used out doors if not small enough for indoors.I am thinking that the frame including the boom could be made from PVC like Gary's PVC am loop and hold at least 3 or preferably 4 or more elements.How could this be connected to a Grundig G-8 or other ulr with good fm performance ?
Any ideas ?Even one that could be put together from a kit would be great. Thanks.
Carl DeWhitt
Maryville,Tn.

And also this one:

http://www.dxzone.com/cgi-bin/dir/jump2.cgi?ID=3267

Marc

--
What's on Shortwave guide: choose an hour, go!
http://shortwave.tk
700+ Radio Stations on SW http://swstations.tk
300+ languages on SW http://radiolanguages.tk


Re: indoor homebrew fm yagi

gratiscomputer <gratiscomputer@...>
 

Carl schreef:
Does any one in the group know of any plans for a homebrew indoor fm yagi ?I would like a portable fm yagi for ulr's.It could be used out doors if not small enough for indoors.I am thinking that the frame including the boom could be made from PVC like Gary's PVC am loop and hold at least 3 or preferably 4 or more elements.How could this be connected to a Grundig G-8 or other ulr with good fm performance ?
Any ideas ?Even one that could be put together from a kit would be great. Thanks.
I've taken a 3 meter pvc tube, cut in 4 pieces, added corners, and made a square of about 80 x 80 cm, that is some kind of quad:
http://signalengineering.com/ultimate/cubical_quad.html
Feed at the botom = H polarisation, at the side: V.


I've seen other designs, where sides are disconnected, and it should give ?more signal or ?directivity...


This guy sells them: (stacked version)
http://www.gbanttow.nl/Antennes/UHF-VHF_Quads/UHF-VHF_Quadsfoto41.htm
http://www.gbanttow.nl/


Marc

--
What's on Shortwave guide: choose an hour, go!
http://shortwave.tk
700+ Radio Stations on SW http://swstations.tk
300+ languages on SW http://radiolanguages.tk


indoor homebrew fm yagi

Carl DeWhitt
 

Does any one in the group know of any plans for a homebrew indoor fm yagi ?I would like a portable fm yagi for ulr's.It could be used out doors if not small enough for indoors.I am thinking that the frame including the boom could be made from PVC like Gary's PVC am loop and hold at least 3 or preferably 4 or more elements.How could this be connected to a Grundig G-8 or other ulr with good fm performance ?
Any ideas ?Even one that could be put together from a kit would be great. Thanks.
Carl DeWhitt
Maryville,Tn.


FM logs for evening of 8.3.10 and 8.4.10 morning

Carl DeWhitt
 

My FM state total is now up to 7 after logging two new states plus new logs in 6 states.I logged 7 states in a 12 period and none of the logs were by e-skip.All were logged on a Grundig G-8 barefoot.
WDJC 93.7 Birmingham,Al.2205-2227 EDT 8.3.10 v.poor to good.
Tom Walton Show -testimony Tuesday.I.D."Birmingham's Christian Music Station,93.7, WDJC." 100kw.new state #6
WDNS 93.3 Bowling Green,Ky.2236-2240 EDT.10.3.10.v.poor to fair.slogan D93 heard.ad for specials at Mexican restaraunt"good at any of 4 Bowling Green locations."new station.12kw
WTPT 93.3 Forest City,N.C. 2250-2300 EDT.10.3.10.v.poor to fair.slogan 93.3 The Planet heard.City of license heard in partial i.d. heard.hard rock.93kw.new station
WESC 92.5 Greenville,S.C. 2305-2310 EDT.8.3.10.i.d."92.5 WESC,home of Carolina's best country.c&w mx.poor-fair. re-log
WHCB 91.5 Kingsport,Tn.2325-2330 EDT.8.3.10 v.poor-fair."Night Sounds" program."91.5 The Blessing" .new station.
WSTR 94.1 Smyrna,Ga.0047-0104 EDT.8.4.10.v.poor-fair.rock mx.i.d."Star 94,,WSTR.Smyrna-Atalanta & worldwide at star94.com"." Star 94,Atlanta's hit music station".new station.
WMEV 93.9 Marion,Va.0922-0935 EDT.8.4.10.fair-good."94 Country"ad for truck and tractor event in Ivanhoe,Va.wx for parts of Va,W.Va,N.C. and Tn.i.d."93.9 WMEV,serving the Wonderful Mountain Empire of Virginia"100kw.new state #7
WMXL 94.5 Lexington,Ky.0944-0949 EDT.fair..ads for Half Price Books in Lexington and Louisville."Music from the 80's to today on Mix 94.5."85kw.new station.
I going to try to add some new ones tonight and hopefully at least one new state.I might as well take advantage of my time off due to some surgery I had.
Carl DeWhitt
Maryville,Tn.


Re: July 2010 Oregon Beach Ultralight DXpedition Report

Gary DeBock
 

Hello Tony and Stephen,
 
Tony, that was a very profound and thorough discussion of a DXer's options in dealing with RF overload issues (certainly worthy of re-posting in our Ultralightdx file section in article form, if you are so inclined).
 
Stephen, like Tony says, if you are already having severe RF overload issues with your local pests, the last thing you should be doing is trying to boost the sensitivity of your ULR by going for larger loopsticks. Plastic-cabinet Ultralight radios lack the extensive RF shielding used in expensive communications receivers, which typically use coaxial antenna connectors and grounding posts to minimize the household RF hash coming from computers, plasma TV's, etc. Since we choose to use Ultralight radios anyway (despite this limitation), it is up to us to find solutions to RF overload problems.
 
There is a very good reason why DXpeditioners try to set up in isolated locations, far away from urban RF pests, and household RF hash. The 9 kHz-split DX signals from overseas are usually very weak in comparison to domestic pest stations, and serious domestic splatter or spurious products would be a deal-breaker. For Ultralight radio users, it is especially important to get away from these type of problems, since our radios lack the internal shielding and overload protection common in communications receivers. Frankly, Stephen, if you want better DXing results from overseas, your best option would be to "get out of Dodge," and head for an isolated ocean beach DXing location as far away as possible from urban RF blowtorches. Then you can reasonably consider mega-loopsticks, monster loops and/or beverages to boost up your weak-signal AM sensitivity.
 
Keep in mind that there is no perfect DXing location in California, or in any other state. I lived in San Diego from 1974-1975 while in the Navy, and even with many of the stations signing off at midnight, my impression was that the entire Southern California area was an RF hash zoo. We all need to do the best we can with the resources we have available, and my advice would be to just get started, and do the best you can on the AM frequencies that you have open. As long as you have reasonable expectations, you can still have plenty of DXing fun in the fall season as conditions improve.
 
73 and Good Luck,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA)                
 
 
 

In a message dated 8/4/2010 8:08:30 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time, germanotta.tony@... writes:
 

Stephen, you  keep asking the same question in different ways, but the answer can't change. If you are in an area where your portable radio is being overwhelmed by RF splatter from other stations, it's pretty much impossible to hear the, by definition, faint signals from DX stations. It's like trying to DX under the noise of a bad fluorescent bulb. I have one in a back room that just wipes out the entire band when I forget to turn it off. 


Can you build a preselector? Sure. What will it do. Well, there are types that peak up just one narrow band of frequencies. That helps sometimes, and others that block out either everything above its designed frequency or everything below. And those can help sometimes and some that just notch out one slice of the bandwidth. Again, it can help in some conditions. 

But if your area is buried by off-frequency splatter, which seems to be the case from your various postings, then none of those will help at all because the offending frequency will be on the same frequency you are trying to DX. If you filter it out, your DX is also blocked from the receiver. The FCC in recent years has become pretty lax on keeping AM stations to their specs, I have discovered. There just aren't that many folks like us out there who get offended by the local talk station bleeds over 10KHz, since there is usually no other local station on the air there. And the days of clear channel stations designed to cover wide sections of the country are over. Those frequencies are now shared by several stations with national coverage now something ceded to the internet, satellite radios or just not deemed a national priority anymore. 

You keep searching for more sensitivity when your problem is probably too much signal already. 

Changing out the internal ferrite won't help if it makes the radio more sensitive in an area already over washed by RF. What you might want to do is cut sensitivity some. That's easy on radio's with a DX/Local switch that puts an attenuator between the antenna and the front end. You can do that yourself on shortwave or FM with your radio, but the AM circuit doesn't have that kind of outside input unless you go to the little one with the external antenna jack. On that one, you could put a variable resistor, or Pot, in line and use that to cut signal. There are better ways to do it, with resistance boxes, if you find the rough method works. With your radio, the antenna is always in line. So you can try reducing signal by putting the radio in a grounded metal can, for instance, with just a small opening for RF to get through. That might reduce the RF to below the point where it is overwhelming the chip and causing it to do weird things by going what they call non-linear.  Before you do that, though, try to borrow a radio with an attenuator on board and see if it does anything for you. Again, if the locals are broadcasting over adjacent frequencies rather than your radio just being overwhelmed and reproducing them on those frequencies, attenuation won't help. It will just reduce both the DX and the local pest equally and the DX is going to be the loser, since it is much, much weaker. If the attenuation helps, then you know it's overload causing the majority of your problems. And you can build your attenuating can. 

Of course, you won't be able to fit that in your pants pocket. Then again, DXing isn't something you do while taking a walk. Moving a couple feet inside a house can make a ton of difference in DX sometimes because of the way the radio waves are being reflected and blocked by stuff in your walls an attic.  That said, sometimes heading to the far reaches of the back yard can improve things by getting away from near field RF noise. Then again, you may just be moving closer to the neighbor with the bad bulb, aquarium heater or touch lamp that causes all sorts of problems. The first thing I would do is look for noise sources. Find a spot on the radio that just crackles with noise and try to track down the source. 

My plasma TV is a real nuisance when I try to DX. Some computers are just noise generators. The solution, shut off the problems when you start a session. One method that works is to turn off all the circuit breakers in your house and then flick them on, individually, and listen for the noise. When you find one or more that has problems, then you DF in the areas those breakers serve. You will be surprised what kinds of things can cause problems. The wall wart charger on a portable phone or cordless razor, for instance. Light dimming switches are notorious. Microwave ovens or the digital displays on appliances have been known to radiate noise if you're too close.

And remember, all of this can vary from frequency to frequency. On some, the radio may just be overloaded. On others, the local may be operating out of its assigned bandwidth. I'd do that kind of work first before trying to gut the 380 and replace anything. You have to identify the problem before you can engineer the solution, I've always found.

Good luck. And don't just give up the radio. You might find a lot of fun taking it on summer vacation trips or discover a world of DX if you and your family go camping. And it's still a great SW and FM receiver and there's lots of DX fun available on those bands as well.



On Aug 4, 2010, at 12:57 AM, Stephen wrote:

 

So are there any tips, short of going to an alternate location, to try for international DX with my PL-380 and Select-A-Tenna? I live in a fairly RF-saturated environment, which doesn't help, and it's difficult, if not impossible, for me to travel to other locations at this time. (If I had the opportunity, I might want to try going to somewhere west of Santa Barbara, CA (on the California coast) to try for some DX, but that doesn't look like it will happen anytime in the near future.) For now, though, the maximum extent of my "DXpedition trek" would extend to my back yard on the 1/2-acre lot.
And, for "international", for purposes of this post, I'm not including Mexico - I can get several AM and FM stations 24/7, some of which peg the SNR meter, and one AM pegs the RSSI meter in the daytime as well.

Or, should I resign myself to never doing any meaningful DX from here, and sell my PL-380? I do remember Scott Willingham in a post last week or so mentioning something about 3 ways to improve selectivity, one of which was to install passive filtering in front of the DSP chip. Is doing something like that that even remotely a possibility? And, while I'm at it (if I was to attempt something like that), what about pulling the guts out of the PL-380 cabinet, substituting a separate loopstick (would have to be no longer than 3 to 4 inches long and 1/2 inch thick, assuming it takes the entire width and almost the entire thickness of the radio, as it will have to fit in my pants pocket and 4" is the absolute maximum width that would reasonably go in there - my PL-380 will go in there but it's awkward), and basically crafting my own vertically-oriented ultralight based on the PL-380's guts, or would it not even be considered in the "unlimited" category? :(

--- In ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com, D1028Gary@... wrote:
>
> Hi Richard,
>
> Yes, I also wish you could have been in Oregon to enjoy the wild DXing
> fun-- chasing AM stations in Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific (from the
> west coast) is about the only way to have much AM-DXing fun in the middle of
> summer. It's kind of like a head start on the Fall Season!
>
> The 7.5" loopstick PL-360 would have received all the South Pacific DX at
> the same signal levels as the 7.5" loopstick PL-380, but with more domestic
> splatter in some cases (because of the fixed 3 kHz DSP selectivity in the
> PL-360). This wouldn't have happened in all cases, though, like in
> receiving 891-5AN, which had no domestic splatter anywhere nearby. The 7.5"
> loopstick PL-360 should be a fun radio for domestic DXing, where the selectivity
> requirements aren't as great as in 9 kHz-split DXing.
>
> 73, Gary
>
>
> In a message dated 8/3/2010 4:41:46 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
> richarda@... writes:
>
>
>
>
> Gary:
>
> Thanks for the report. I wish I could have been there to enjoy the DXing
> fun. It would have been nice to see how the PL-360/7.5" combo might have
> performed.
>
> Richard.
>
> Richard Allen
> 3622'51N / 9726'35"W
>



8.4.10 Logs Continued

Antonios Kekalos <akekalos@...>
 

0843EDT, 93.3, WLDB, Milwaukee, WI, 16K, 166mi/267km, "B93.3", Insignia NS-HD01
0851EDT, 94.1, WUPK, Marquette MI (UP), 4.4K, 148mi/239km, Insignia NS-HD01
0854EDT, 96.5, WKLH, Milwaukee, WI, 20K, 166mi/267km, Insignia NS-HD01
0904EDT, 99.5, WPKR, Omro, WI, 25K, 164mi/265km, "99.5 The Wolf", Insignia NS-HD01
0910EDT, 102.7, WMOM, Pentwater, MI, 6K, 76mi/122km, Insignia NS-HD01
0912EDT, 103.7, WXSS, Wauwatosa, WI, 19.5K, 167mi/270km, "103.7 Kiss FM", RDS, NS-HD01
0916EDT, 106.1, WMIL, Waukesha, WI, 12K, 179mi/288km, "Milwaukee Country FM 106.1", RDS, Insignia NS-HD01
0921EDT, 107.9, WSHZ, Muskegon, MI, 15K, 109mi/176km, "Star 108", NS-HD01

--
Tony, N4RNI
Traverse City, MI
EN74dq
FISTS #14949, SWLR-RN072, WA8050SWL

Not every conspiracy is a theory-AMC's Rubicon




Re: July 2010 Oregon Beach Ultralight DXpedition Report

Tony Germanotta
 

Stephen, you  keep asking the same question in different ways, but the answer can't change. If you are in an area where your portable radio is being overwhelmed by RF splatter from other stations, it's pretty much impossible to hear the, by definition, faint signals from DX stations. It's like trying to DX under the noise of a bad fluorescent bulb. I have one in a back room that just wipes out the entire band when I forget to turn it off. 

Can you build a preselector? Sure. What will it do. Well, there are types that peak up just one narrow band of frequencies. That helps sometimes, and others that block out either everything above its designed frequency or everything below. And those can help sometimes and some that just notch out one slice of the bandwidth. Again, it can help in some conditions. 

But if your area is buried by off-frequency splatter, which seems to be the case from your various postings, then none of those will help at all because the offending frequency will be on the same frequency you are trying to DX. If you filter it out, your DX is also blocked from the receiver. The FCC in recent years has become pretty lax on keeping AM stations to their specs, I have discovered. There just aren't that many folks like us out there who get offended by the local talk station bleeds over 10KHz, since there is usually no other local station on the air there. And the days of clear channel stations designed to cover wide sections of the country are over. Those frequencies are now shared by several stations with national coverage now something ceded to the internet, satellite radios or just not deemed a national priority anymore. 

You keep searching for more sensitivity when your problem is probably too much signal already. 

Changing out the internal ferrite won't help if it makes the radio more sensitive in an area already over washed by RF. What you might want to do is cut sensitivity some. That's easy on radio's with a DX/Local switch that puts an attenuator between the antenna and the front end. You can do that yourself on shortwave or FM with your radio, but the AM circuit doesn't have that kind of outside input unless you go to the little one with the external antenna jack. On that one, you could put a variable resistor, or Pot, in line and use that to cut signal. There are better ways to do it, with resistance boxes, if you find the rough method works. With your radio, the antenna is always in line. So you can try reducing signal by putting the radio in a grounded metal can, for instance, with just a small opening for RF to get through. That might reduce the RF to below the point where it is overwhelming the chip and causing it to do weird things by going what they call non-linear.  Before you do that, though, try to borrow a radio with an attenuator on board and see if it does anything for you. Again, if the locals are broadcasting over adjacent frequencies rather than your radio just being overwhelmed and reproducing them on those frequencies, attenuation won't help. It will just reduce both the DX and the local pest equally and the DX is going to be the loser, since it is much, much weaker. If the attenuation helps, then you know it's overload causing the majority of your problems. And you can build your attenuating can. 

Of course, you won't be able to fit that in your pants pocket. Then again, DXing isn't something you do while taking a walk. Moving a couple feet inside a house can make a ton of difference in DX sometimes because of the way the radio waves are being reflected and blocked by stuff in your walls an attic.  That said, sometimes heading to the far reaches of the back yard can improve things by getting away from near field RF noise. Then again, you may just be moving closer to the neighbor with the bad bulb, aquarium heater or touch lamp that causes all sorts of problems. The first thing I would do is look for noise sources. Find a spot on the radio that just crackles with noise and try to track down the source. 

My plasma TV is a real nuisance when I try to DX. Some computers are just noise generators. The solution, shut off the problems when you start a session. One method that works is to turn off all the circuit breakers in your house and then flick them on, individually, and listen for the noise. When you find one or more that has problems, then you DF in the areas those breakers serve. You will be surprised what kinds of things can cause problems. The wall wart charger on a portable phone or cordless razor, for instance. Light dimming switches are notorious. Microwave ovens or the digital displays on appliances have been known to radiate noise if you're too close.

And remember, all of this can vary from frequency to frequency. On some, the radio may just be overloaded. On others, the local may be operating out of its assigned bandwidth. I'd do that kind of work first before trying to gut the 380 and replace anything. You have to identify the problem before you can engineer the solution, I've always found.

Good luck. And don't just give up the radio. You might find a lot of fun taking it on summer vacation trips or discover a world of DX if you and your family go camping. And it's still a great SW and FM receiver and there's lots of DX fun available on those bands as well.



On Aug 4, 2010, at 12:57 AM, Stephen wrote:

 

So are there any tips, short of going to an alternate location, to try for international DX with my PL-380 and Select-A-Tenna? I live in a fairly RF-saturated environment, which doesn't help, and it's difficult, if not impossible, for me to travel to other locations at this time. (If I had the opportunity, I might want to try going to somewhere west of Santa Barbara, CA (on the California coast) to try for some DX, but that doesn't look like it will happen anytime in the near future.) For now, though, the maximum extent of my "DXpedition trek" would extend to my back yard on the 1/2-acre lot.
And, for "international", for purposes of this post, I'm not including Mexico - I can get several AM and FM stations 24/7, some of which peg the SNR meter, and one AM pegs the RSSI meter in the daytime as well.

Or, should I resign myself to never doing any meaningful DX from here, and sell my PL-380? I do remember Scott Willingham in a post last week or so mentioning something about 3 ways to improve selectivity, one of which was to install passive filtering in front of the DSP chip. Is doing something like that that even remotely a possibility? And, while I'm at it (if I was to attempt something like that), what about pulling the guts out of the PL-380 cabinet, substituting a separate loopstick (would have to be no longer than 3 to 4 inches long and 1/2 inch thick, assuming it takes the entire width and almost the entire thickness of the radio, as it will have to fit in my pants pocket and 4" is the absolute maximum width that would reasonably go in there - my PL-380 will go in there but it's awkward), and basically crafting my own vertically-oriented ultralight based on the PL-380's guts, or would it not even be considered in the "unlimited" category? :(

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:
>
> Hi Richard,
>
> Yes, I also wish you could have been in Oregon to enjoy the wild DXing
> fun-- chasing AM stations in Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific (from the
> west coast) is about the only way to have much AM-DXing fun in the middle of
> summer. It's kind of like a head start on the Fall Season!
>
> The 7.5" loopstick PL-360 would have received all the South Pacific DX at
> the same signal levels as the 7.5" loopstick PL-380, but with more domestic
> splatter in some cases (because of the fixed 3 kHz DSP selectivity in the
> PL-360). This wouldn't have happened in all cases, though, like in
> receiving 891-5AN, which had no domestic splatter anywhere nearby. The 7.5"
> loopstick PL-360 should be a fun radio for domestic DXing, where the selectivity
> requirements aren't as great as in 9 kHz-split DXing.
>
> 73, Gary
>
>
> In a message dated 8/3/2010 4:41:46 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
> richarda@... writes:
>
>
>
>
> Gary:
>
> Thanks for the report. I wish I could have been there to enjoy the DXing
> fun. It would have been nice to see how the PL-360/7.5" combo might have
> performed.
>
> Richard.
>
> Richard Allen
> 36°22'51N / 97°26'35"W
>



MI LOG - FM

wa8lcz
 

4AUG2010 WEN
099.7 WUGN MIDLAND MI CHRISTIAN FAMILY LIFE 0844EDT 100KW 102MI (MI69) ***** HEARD ON 99.8

The band is noisier than usual.

TOTALS: 135, MI69,OH24,NC01,PA01,ONTARIO 38,TX01,NM01
RCVR: Eton E10
ANT: Moxon 2 ele folded wire yagi

Byron WA8LCZ nr Detroit Michigan


8.4.10 Log

Antonios Kekalos <akekalos@...>
 

0711EDT, 94.7, WZOR, Mishicot, WI, 21.5K, 105mi/170km, "Razor 94.7", Playing Nirvana "Smells Like Teen", RDS, Insignia NS-HD01

--
Tony, N4RNI
Traverse City, MI
EN74dq
FISTS #14949, SWLR-RN072, WA8050SWL

Not every conspiracy is a theory-AMC's Rubicon




Re: July 2010 Oregon Beach Ultralight DXpedition Report

pianoplayer88key
 

So are there any tips, short of going to an alternate location, to try for international DX with my PL-380 and Select-A-Tenna? I live in a fairly RF-saturated environment, which doesn't help, and it's difficult, if not impossible, for me to travel to other locations at this time. (If I had the opportunity, I might want to try going to somewhere west of Santa Barbara, CA (on the California coast) to try for some DX, but that doesn't look like it will happen anytime in the near future.) For now, though, the maximum extent of my "DXpedition trek" would extend to my back yard on the 1/2-acre lot.
And, for "international", for purposes of this post, I'm not including Mexico - I can get several AM and FM stations 24/7, some of which peg the SNR meter, and one AM pegs the RSSI meter in the daytime as well.

Or, should I resign myself to never doing any meaningful DX from here, and sell my PL-380? I do remember Scott Willingham in a post last week or so mentioning something about 3 ways to improve selectivity, one of which was to install passive filtering in front of the DSP chip. Is doing something like that that even remotely a possibility? And, while I'm at it (if I was to attempt something like that), what about pulling the guts out of the PL-380 cabinet, substituting a separate loopstick (would have to be no longer than 3 to 4 inches long and 1/2 inch thick, assuming it takes the entire width and almost the entire thickness of the radio, as it will have to fit in my pants pocket and 4" is the absolute maximum width that would reasonably go in there - my PL-380 will go in there but it's awkward), and basically crafting my own vertically-oriented ultralight based on the PL-380's guts, or would it not even be considered in the "unlimited" category? :(

--- In ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com, D1028Gary@... wrote:

Hi Richard,

Yes, I also wish you could have been in Oregon to enjoy the wild DXing
fun-- chasing AM stations in Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific (from the
west coast) is about the only way to have much AM-DXing fun in the middle of
summer. It's kind of like a head start on the Fall Season!

The 7.5" loopstick PL-360 would have received all the South Pacific DX at
the same signal levels as the 7.5" loopstick PL-380, but with more domestic
splatter in some cases (because of the fixed 3 kHz DSP selectivity in the
PL-360). This wouldn't have happened in all cases, though, like in
receiving 891-5AN, which had no domestic splatter anywhere nearby. The 7.5"
loopstick PL-360 should be a fun radio for domestic DXing, where the selectivity
requirements aren't as great as in 9 kHz-split DXing.

73, Gary


In a message dated 8/3/2010 4:41:46 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
richarda@... writes:




Gary:

Thanks for the report. I wish I could have been there to enjoy the DXing
fun. It would have been nice to see how the PL-360/7.5" combo might have
performed.

Richard.

Richard Allen
36°22'51N / 97°26'35"W


Re: WJNL-1210 Kingsley MI

Kevin S <satya@...>
 

Hey John:

It's amazing that you can get a new logging like that in the middle of
summer - keep going! Hopefully you will have #800 this time next year.

Kevin S
Bainbridge Island, WA

Just had a probable log of WJNL Kingsley MI on 1210 at 2200 mixing with
WPHT
Philadelphia. CBS news, ads for the "Bayview Festival on Lake Michigan"
(which is in Petrosky MI), into Clark Howard show, all of which matches
WJNL. Very usual to hear anything on 1210 here since WPHT usually
dominates!

UL Log 709, heard on the PL-310.

--
John Cereghin WDX3IAO KB3LYP
Smyrna DE
My radio page www.pilgrimway.org/dx
The Ultralight Scoreboard www.pilgrimway.org/ulradio


WJNL-1210 Kingsley MI

John Cereghin <jcereghin@...>
 

Just had a probable log of WJNL Kingsley MI on 1210 at 2200 mixing with WPHT Philadelphia.  CBS news, ads for the "Bayview Festival on Lake Michigan" (which is in Petrosky MI), into Clark Howard show, all of which matches WJNL. Very usual to hear anything on 1210 here since WPHT usually dominates!

UL Log 709, heard on the PL-310.

--
John Cereghin WDX3IAO  KB3LYP
Smyrna DE
My radio page www.pilgrimway.org/dx
The Ultralight Scoreboard  www.pilgrimway.org/ulradio


WTB: PL-310

Rick Robinson <w4dst@...>
 

I'm looking for a PL-310, doesn't have to be pretty, just stock and in good working order. Let me know the price including shipping and I'll pay via Paypal. I thought I'd ask here before heading to ebay.

Thanks,

Rick W4DST


Re: July 2010 Oregon Beach Ultralight DXpedition Report

bbwrwy
 

Gary:

Thanks for the report. I wish I could have been there to enjoy the DXing fun. It would have been nice to see how the PL-360/7.5" combo might have performed.

Richard.

Richard Allen
36°22'51N / 97°26'35"W


Re: July 2010 Oregon Beach Ultralight DXpedition Report

Tony King <tonyzl@...>
 

Great reception bites of Waatea Rhema and National Radio stations – hope next summer I get the same of stateside stations. Regards,

 

Tony King

Greytown NZ


Re: July 2010 Oregon Beach Ultralight DXpedition Report

Gary DeBock
 

Hi Richard,
 
Yes, I also wish you could have been in Oregon to enjoy the wild DXing fun-- chasing AM stations in Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific (from the west coast) is about the only way to have much AM-DXing fun in the middle of summer. It's kind of like a head start on the Fall Season!
 
The 7.5" loopstick PL-360 would have received all the South Pacific DX at the same signal levels as the 7.5" loopstick PL-380, but with more domestic splatter in some cases (because of the fixed 3 kHz DSP selectivity in the PL-360). This wouldn't have happened in all cases, though, like in receiving 891-5AN, which had no domestic splatter anywhere nearby. The 7.5" loopstick PL-360 should be a fun radio for domestic DXing, where the selectivity requirements aren't as great as in 9 kHz-split DXing.
 
73, Gary    
 

In a message dated 8/3/2010 4:41:46 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, richarda@... writes:
 

Gary:

Thanks for the report. I wish I could have been there to enjoy the DXing fun. It would have been nice to see how the PL-360/7.5" combo might have performed.

Richard.

Richard Allen
36°22'51N / 97°26'35"W


Re: July 2010 Oregon Beach Ultralight DXpedition Report

Rik
 

Thanks for that excellent report! You certainly did very well without spending a lot of money on the radio and antenna. It is more fun that way for me as well.

One thing I noticed is your VERY early listening time. I don't think I would get up well before dawn on my vacation.

I am planning to try for TA logging this Fall while vacationing on the coast of Maine. I hope the evening is a good time for listening. -FARMERIK

--- In ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com, D1028Gary@... wrote:

Hello All,

For those interested in the rather new sport of Ultralight Radio
Dxpeditions, a detailed file describing the results of a recent 7-day trip to
Seaside and Lincoln City, Oregon has been prepared.

With unusually good South Pacific propagation continuing for almost a
week, the modified Tecsun PL-380 and 3' portable loop (with a total cost of
$125) went into overdrive, logging many DU's that had never managed even a
trace for John Bryant or me on ULR's at Grayland, WA. The DXpedition report
includes photos of the overachieving equipment, and includes links to 27
MP3's recorded at the beach (including some South Pacific stations that are
fairly obscure). It has been uploaded to the ULR feature article section on
DXer.Ca at
_http://www.dxer.ca/file-area/cat_view/87-ultra-light-radio-files-area/99-ulr-feature-articles_
(http://www.dxer.ca/file-area/cat_view/87-ultra-light-radio-files-area/99-ulr-feature-articles) , to the Yahoo
Ultralightdx File Section under Members' DXpedition reports at

_http://f1.grp.yahoofs.com/v1/MIZXTHnyBjpUSAhtecD4IPeopYbvPYtKsBYdo1ZALlUnLj
DgZnT_zlQ2Md_ZmT-E8NNwUUITlwF9EJiGadRr7rCoHeN9qTc/Members%20Loggings%20%26%2
0DXpeditions/July%202010%20Oregon%20Beach%20Ultralight%20DXpedition.doc_
(http://f1.grp.yahoofs.com/v1/MIZXTHnyBjpUSAhtecD4IPeopYbvPYtKsBYdo1ZALlUnLjDgZ
nT_zlQ2Md_ZmT-E8NNwUUITlwF9EJiGadRr7rCoHeN9qTc/Members%20Loggings%20&%20DXpe
ditions/July%202010%20Oregon%20Beach%20Ultralight%20DXpedition.doc) ,

and has also been uploaded to _http://www.mediafire.com/?we4r6gh50gaa4i6_
(http://www.mediafire.com/?we4r6gh50gaa4i6) .


Sincere thanks are in order for Patrick Martin, Chuck Hutton, Bruce
Portzer, Guy Atkins and Walt Salmaniw, all of whom provided useful station
information to help make the DXpedition successful. Thanks a bunch, guys!

73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA)


Re: July 2010 Oregon Beach Ultralight DXpedition Report

Gary DeBock
 

Thanks Tony,
 
Your comment is appreciated, and I sure wish you could have been with me in Oregon to help sort out the Kiwi station mysteries :-)
 
603-Waatea was a solid regular every morning, along with 675-National Radio and 657-Southern Star. 648-Rhema kept me well inspired. The entire DXpedition was a total blast for the humble setup I was using, but I hope your results in the summer will be even better!
 
73, Gary
 

 In a message dated 8/3/2010 4:07:15 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, tonyzl@... writes:
 

Great reception bites of Waatea Rhema and National Radio stations – hope next summer I get the same of stateside stations. Regards,

Tony King

Greytown NZ


Re: July 2010 Oregon Beach Ultralight DXpedition Report

Gary DeBock
 

Hi Richard,
 
Thanks for your kind comments on the DXpedition report, and yes, it's always far more fun to receive lots of transoceanic DX on a radio and loop that only cost about $125! Selectivity advancements in the new DSP receivers (like the PL-380) have made this bargain DXing concept possible, and once a few other DXers try chasing TA's or TP's this way, I think the idea will catch on like wildfire.
 
Here on the west coast we can't do too much about the early hour sunrise enhancement period to chase DU's, unfortunately. The worst of the sunrise time slots here is around June 21st (the earliest possible), where the DU's start fading in around 0445 local time. John Bryant and I had a joint Grayland DXpedition on July 9th last year (pretty close to the earliest sunrise), when we both got up around 0230 local time to set up everything :-)  East Coast DXers have all the luck, it seems, with convenient sunset TA fade-ins...
 
73, Gary    
 

 In a message dated 8/3/2010 3:06:57 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, farmerik@... writes:
 

Thanks for that excellent report! You certainly did very well without spending a lot of money on the radio and antenna. It is more fun that way for me as well.

One thing I noticed is your VERY early listening time. I don't think I would get up well before dawn on my vacation.

I am planning to try for TA logging this Fall while vacationing on the coast of Maine. I hope the evening is a good time for listening. -FARMERIK

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:
>
> Hello All,
>
> For those interested in the rather new sport of Ultralight Radio
> Dxpeditions, a detailed file describing the results of a recent 7-day trip to
> Seaside and Lincoln City, Oregon has been prepared.
>
> With unusually good South Pacific propagation continuing for almost a
> week, the modified Tecsun PL-380 and 3' portable loop (with a total cost of
> $125) went into overdrive, logging many DU's that had never managed even a
> trace for John Bryant or me on ULR's at Grayland, WA. The DXpedition report
> includes photos of the overachieving equipment, and includes links to 27
> MP3's recorded at the beach (including some South Pacific stations that are
> fairly obscure). It has been uploaded to the ULR feature article section on
> DXer.Ca at
> _http://www.dxer.ca/file-area/cat_view/87-ultra-light-radio-files-area/99-ulr-feature-articles_
> (http://www.dxer.ca/file-area/cat_view/87-ultra-light-radio-files-area/99-ulr-feature-articles) , to the Yahoo
> Ultralightdx File Section under Members' DXpedition reports at
>
> _http://f1.grp.yahoofs.com/v1/MIZXTHnyBjpUSAhtecD4IPeopYbvPYtKsBYdo1ZALlUnLj
> DgZnT_zlQ2Md_ZmT-E8NNwUUITlwF9EJiGadRr7rCoHeN9qTc/Members%20Loggings%20%26%2
> 0DXpeditions/July%202010%20Oregon%20Beach%20Ultralight%20DXpedition.doc_
> (http://f1.grp.yahoofs.com/v1/MIZXTHnyBjpUSAhtecD4IPeopYbvPYtKsBYdo1ZALlUnLjDgZ
> nT_zlQ2Md_ZmT-E8NNwUUITlwF9EJiGadRr7rCoHeN9qTc/Members%20Loggings%20&%20DXpe
> ditions/July%202010%20Oregon%20Beach%20Ultralight%20DXpedition.doc) ,
>
> and has also been uploaded to _http://www.mediafire.com/?we4r6gh50gaa4i6_
> (http://www.mediafire.com/?we4r6gh50gaa4i6) .
>
>
> Sincere thanks are in order for Patrick Martin, Chuck Hutton, Bruce
> Portzer, Guy Atkins and Walt Salmaniw, all of whom provided useful station
> information to help make the DXpedition successful. Thanks a bunch, guys!
>
> 73 and Good DX,
> Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA)
>


8.3.10 Loggings

Antonios Kekalos <akekalos@...>
 

0607EDT, 91.3, WCSG, Grand Rapids, MI, Cornerstone University, 37K, 124mi/200km, Insignia NS-HD01
0610EDT, 92.1, WGHN, Grand Haven, MI, 3K, 123mi/198km, Insignia NS-HD01
0625EDT, 94.1, WWKR, Hart, MI, 5K, 78mi/126km, Insignia NS-HD01
0645EDT, 99.9, WHAK, Rogers City, MI, 50K, 96mi/154km, "The Wave", Insignia NS-HD01

--
Tony, N4RNI
Traverse City, MI
EN74dq
FISTS #14949, SWLR-RN072

Not every conspiracy is a theory-AMC's Rubicon