Date   

Re: Received the NatGeo G8

dhsatyadhana <satya@...>
 

Stu:

Do you have a stock number for the RS adapter? Others I've got there were anything but quiet.

Thanks - Kevin S
Bainbridge Island, WA

--- In ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com, "Stu" <StuMorri0@...> wrote:


I found a voltage/polarity-selectable, multiple-tip, regulated and filtered 300mw one at Radio Shack for $20+. Dead quiet on my G-8.


Stu Morrison

--- In ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com, "ppasteur" <ppasteur@> wrote:

I got mine today. Pretty nifty little radio. So far (only cursory testing for a short time)it does not seem to be as good as the PL-310 or 380 ON MW. Lack signal indicators and multiple bandwidths, but I guess everybody but me knew that :)

Still a good deal for less than $25 delivered.

Phil
Anyone know where to get a power supply for the G8? (Wall wart). As normal, Eton did not choose to include one.

--- In ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com, "surveyor6180" <hmgaffney@> wrote:

A little over 5 days after ordering it I got it via UPS today.
It's identical to the one I bought from Eton 3 months ago.
I haven't compared it performance wise as I might gift it but either way I'm pleased considering the price.[$19.95+$5.95 shipping]

Harold


Tecsun PL-210 available

dhsatyadhana <satya@...>
 

Hi all:

I am seeing the new Tecsun PL-210 getting some buzz. While not available on eBay just yet, several Taobao sellers have it up for sale, and it could be had for about $50-60 delivered via a Taobao agent such as Obook. The size and features indicate that it probably meets the Ultralight definitions. It looks just like the previous PL-200 (Eton e100) and has similar features, so presumably the performance is similar.

Does anyone have a PL-210, or have one on the way? It would be great to see if it is an ULR and how it performs.

Kevin S
Bainbridge Island, WA


Re: Tecsun pl-390

dhsatyadhana <satya@...>
 

As soon as my 390 rolls in, it will take on the 310 and 380 for a little MW shoot-out, as well as Rachmaninov's Piano Concerto #2 to see how well it functions as an mp3 amplifier!

And thanks to Keith for posting the internal pictures!

Kevin S
Bainbridge Island, WA

--- In ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com, "Pollock,Raphael E" <rpollock@...> wrote:

I'd love to see the results of a 390 vs 380 head to head MW sensitivity/soft mute comparison...!

Salmonguy
________________________________
From: ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com [ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of farmerik [farmerik@...]
Sent: Thursday, July 22, 2010 10:20 AM
To: ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [ultralightdx] Re: Tecsun pl-390



The lone speaker in the PL-360 is less than 1.5 inches, and speech is quite clear, so maybe the two speakers in the PL-390 will do OK. It sounds like the '390 has a longer ferrite rod than the '310, so maybe it will have better sensitivity AND less muting problems as well as the Easy Tuning. Too bad it does not qualify as a ULR. - FARMERIK

--- In ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com<mailto:ultralightdx%40yahoogroups.com>, Mark Roberts <markrobt@> wrote:

Thank you all, Marc, Henk, and Kevin, for your information and observations.

I will definitely be in Paris, Brussels, and near Eindhoven (NL);
we'll also have a car from Paris, going through the battlefields and
Luxembourg and thence through Wallonia into Brussels. The Eindhoven
visit is one I've made many times before, but this will be the first
one with a good, solid FM radio, I hope. Dutch FM ERPs seem to be
rather low; the last time I was in suburban Eindhoven, I had really
lousy reception.

Back on topic, the PL-390 is sort of tempting, but I doubt that the
speaker quality would be of much use. I might think about a PL-310
instead, but I really, really like Easy Tuning Mode on the PL-380.


signal strength readings

Rick Robinson <w4dst@...>
 

Anyone wishing to understand the signal strength readings on Si4734 receivers, should go to the list website and do an advanced search for the string "G8 signal strength readings". This thread dates from Jan. 26, 2010 and if you've retained the list posts, you can easily find this thread via your email reader with a sort by date. There were several very informative posts from Jim Kearman, KR1S, Scott Willingham of Silicon Labs and others. These posts will fully explain the signal strength and RSSI readings common to the Si4734 receivers and how they are derived.

For an understanding of the amateur radio RS system, which dates to the early days of radio, I'd suggest a Google of "amateur radio rst system".

Hopefully these 2 suggestions will help with the confusion regarding what we see on the LCD and what it means.

Rick W4DST


Insignia NS-HD01 RDS question

Antonios Kekalos <akekalos@...>
 

Anyone,

Listening to WGFM, Cheboygan, MI on 105.1 this morning. Very good signal with RDS displaying 105.1 N10.  Does anyone happen to know what that means? First time I've seen anything like this. Valid data or is the radio going south?

--
Tony, N4RNI
Traverse City, MI
EN74dq
FISTS #14949, SWLR-RN072

I'm apathetic, but I don't care



Re: Oregon Beach DXpedition

pianoplayer88key
 

Interesting. I'll be looking forward to reading more. :) What, if you remember, was the dBu reading? My PL-380 maxes out at 63dBu (although I've heard yours will read higher). I've rated signals around 60-63dBu as S7, signals that have a noise floor over 40dBu within 20kHz of the assigned frequency (meaning you tune to a frequency within +/-20kHz where you're not hearing any station, and your radio's indicating 41dBu RSSI, 0dB SNR, for example) get a S8 rating, and a signal that's causing 49dBu to 50dBu readings a few channels or more off the assigned frequency gets S9 ratings. When I saw originally that S9 meant "extremely strong signal" using the amateur radio classification system, I took that to mean it's starting to overload the front end of the radio, compromising the selectivity thereof.
For me, an S10, if it existed, for me, would mean you are TOTALLY overloading the radio, and the audio is distorted on its assigned frequency. For example, if I take my Select-A-Tenna and PL-380 next to a power pole outside, KCBQ-1170 will overload it from 9 miles away, as can be heard about 20 seconds or more into this: http://cid-6bdd1917662288cb.office.live.com/self.aspx/AM%20radio%20files/1170%20KCBQ%20-%202010-04-16/KCBQ%201170%20-%20PL-380%20-%20overload%20demo%20-%202nd%20half%20SAT%20@%20PowerPole.mp3
If I remember correctly, the 2nd harmonic was indicating a RSSI of 63dBu, and the 3rd was indicating a RSSI of about 56dBu or so. The minimum RSSI across the entire AM band was at least 50dBu if I remember correctly (KCBQ's currently on their 2.9kW night pattern so I can't verify right now), except for a little bit at the bottom end that may have been 49dBu, and I think I was getting a 45dBu reading on 153kHz or so, as well as a 41dBu reading on 2300kHz (bottom end of the shortwave band).

So maybe my interpretation of the S9 signal is much stronger than other interpretations? (For example, by my interpretation, where you live, if KSUH, KKOL and KHHO were on the same frequency fighting it out, those would probably be two S8's (or maybe S7 and S8 - I've never been up that way so I don't know how strong they actually are) and a S9.)

Also, I've noticed that the S/N and RSSI readings will often vary greatly. For example, if I'm in an area with an extremely strong local signal and trying to listen to another weaker station on a different frequency, I might have a RSSI of 50dBu and a S/N of 0 or 1dB, although I can still easily hear the programming on the target station. On the other hand, if I'm not near a strong signal, I might have a station that has a S/N of 18dB (in the 1kHz BW mode) and a RSSI of 15dBu, and can be heard better than the 50/00-01 station.

--- In ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com, D1028Gary@... wrote:


Hi Stephen,

Thanks for your multiple posts, during this Oregon DXing trip. Sorry that there is limited time here to answer emails, but I'll try to respond in detail after returning to Puyallup.

The "S9" signal reports indicate an extremely strong signal, using the amateur radio clasification system. The DU mix on 738 kHz on Tuesday morning actually maxed out the modified PL-380's S/N display reading at 25, something that I never thought could happen with a 3' loop on the west coast. I have an MP3 of the weird event, during which both stations boomed in so loud that they sounded like two local pests on the same frequency (Tahiti and 2NR-Grafton, Australia). Weird!

73, Gary







-----Original Message-----
From: Stephen <pianoplayer88key@...>
To: ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thu, Jul 22, 2010 9:05 pm
Subject: [ultralightdx] Re: Oregon Beach DXpedition




Sounds like you're in ULDX heaven. :) Here, though, I'm almost in ULDX hell, as I have yet to log a single TP with my PL-380 even with the Select-A-Tenna. I'm sure it doesn't help that I have several local 63dBu (max my PL-380 will display) blowtorches within 10 miles (the ground conductivity is fairly good here as well), which seem to cause me to have 40+dBu readings on some frequencies nearby even though there's no signal to be heard. (At least I'm not trying to DX from my grandparents' house about 110-120 miles north/northwest of here, where only 3 stations over 20kW within 5 miles are responsible for 50dBu off-channel RSSI readings across most of the band.)

Here, it seems I have no chance of any of the stations you listed. For example:
639 (40,00) is pretty much KFI-640, with an occasional mexican in the background
594 (29,00) is sandwiched between KOGO-600 and its lower IBOC carrier
585 (40,00) is on the bottom edge of KOGO's lower IBOC sideband
531 (20,00 is owned by weak TIS's on 530
738 (37,00) is next to KCBS-740, and also in the desensitization zone caused by KFMB-760
KFMB contributes to a 41dBu noise floor on 747 and 774, making those Japanese stations inaudible barefoot here (unless there's something I haven't tried - any suggestions? I don't have, nor can afford, a SSB spotting receiver. I possibly could use another radio to generate a local oscillator heterodyne above 970kHz, but I doubt if that would do the same thing, and it wouldn't work lower than that anyway.)

Needless to say, I've NEVER heard even ONE single station on a barefoot ultralight, nevermind hearing 2 fight it out on the same frequency! So when you get home... any chance of you being able to hear a bunch of DU's battling on 1449, making it sound like one of the USA graveyard channels, and completely obliterating any trace of KSUH? ;)

Also, what is meant by the S1 to S9 signal ratings? I've always thought an S1 ("faint signal barely perceptible" was basically anything from carrier / het only to just barely able to hear modulation and decipher some clue of programming. An S4 ("fair signal"), to me, has been about the threshold for lighting the tuning indicator, or stoppping the seek/scan function on a consumer radio. An S7 ("strong signal") would be at a level where there's no audible background static (something about 60dBu+ on the PL-380, and on poorly selective radios would be as loud 10kHz off channel as it is on-channel)), and an S9 ("extremely strong signal") would be a signal which would be splattering several channels each way on a poorly-selective radio like the Sony SRF-M37W, and still just as loud 30-50kHz away as it is on the fundamental (and a PL-380 would be showing 49-50dBu in blank channels over about a 100kHz range, if not more). (Also, I couldn't tell the difference from an S7 vs. an S9 just by listening to the station on its frequency, as both would have the same level of background noise quieting. I could tell, though, by how wide the station splatters on a poorly selective radio, though, with the station that splatters wider getting the higher reading (for me, any station that lit the tuning indicator 30 or 40 kHz away from the fundamental on my Panasonic RQ-SW20 got an S9 rating.)) So, to me, a S9+, like you describe on 738, would be about like two stations of KSUH's strength (measured where you live) battling it out. :) So do I need to readjust my concept of what S1 to S9 means?

--- In ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com, D1028Gary@ wrote:


Hello All,

Thanks to both Patrick and Tony for the suggestion of Noumea, New Caledonia as the likely French station heard on 666 kHz here in Lincoln City, OR this week. This was never heard during any of my visits to Grayland, and its signal strength was only decent on one out of four days this week.

Another mystery solved this week was the 684 kHz perenially weak station (which was finally IDed as a parallel of the much stronger 639-Radio Fiji One, for my second Fiji logging). A pesky UnID DU (possibly with a foreign language) is mixing almost every morning on 594 kHz with the ABC station, and an Australian talk station is giving 639-Fiji fits on certain mornings, depending upon propagation. 585 kHz apparently has two different DU's mixing-- one with an easy-listening music format, and the other with classic rock (decent MP3's were made of both, at different times). 531 kHz usually has the typical DU mix of competing Aussies (from which I've never heard any actual ID), but the NZ Samoan station has been strangely absent.

There was a bizarre DU propagation pipeline on Tuesday morning which made both 738-Tahiti and 2NR-Grafton, Australia mix together in a S9+ snarl around 1250, making both stations easily audible on the barefoot Sony SRF-T615 Ultralight. This was the first time I've ever heard two DU's fight it out on a barefoot ULR! The same thing was happening on 639 kHz with Radio Fiji One and the UnID Aussie talk station, both of which were snarling together at around an S8 level.

My listening equipment is very basic-- a modified Tecsun PL-380 DSP Ultralight (with remarkably effective 1 kHz DSP filtering from the stock Si4734 chip) and two newly-designed 7.5" plug-in loopsticks, one for MW, and one for LW. This enables me to chase DX on both bands with one PL-380 (and avoid any TSA hassles). For chasing DU's I'm using a portable 3' PVC tuned passive loop, which is designed to fit in a crammed compact car trunk. Every morning the loop is assembled in total darkness within a couple of minutes, and it provides a very potent DXing boost when inductively coupled to the PL-380. Not counting the ICF-2010 SSB spotting receiver, the total cost of the station is about $125-- about the same as one night's charge here at the Liberty Inn Motel!

I'll be writing a full DXpedition report (with MP3's and photos) upon our return to Puyallup, WA on Saturday. Thanks again for any help in sorting out the UnID's-- I'm far from a DU expert, and all suggestions are greatly appreciated.

73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Lincoln City, OR)


Re: Oregon Beach DXpedition

Gary DeBock
 

Hi Stephen,
 
Thanks for your multiple posts, during this Oregon DXing trip. Sorry that there is limited time here to answer emails, but I'll try to respond in detail after returning to Puyallup.
 
The "S9" signal reports indicate an extremely strong signal, using the amateur radio clasification system. The DU mix on 738 kHz on Tuesday morning actually maxed out the modified PL-380's S/N display reading at 25, something that I never thought could happen with a 3' loop on the west coast. I have an MP3 of the weird event, during which both stations boomed in so loud that they sounded like two local pests on the same frequency (Tahiti and 2NR-Grafton, Australia). Weird!
 
73, Gary 

 


-----Original Message-----
From: Stephen
To: ultralightdx@...
Sent: Thu, Jul 22, 2010 9:05 pm
Subject: [ultralightdx] Re: Oregon Beach DXpedition

 
Sounds like you're in ULDX heaven. :) Here, though, I'm almost in ULDX hell, as I have yet to log a single TP with my PL-380 even with the Select-A-Tenna. I'm sure it doesn't help that I have several local 63dBu (max my PL-380 will display) blowtorches within 10 miles (the ground conductivity is fairly good here as well), which seem to cause me to have 40+dBu readings on some frequencies nearby even though there's no signal to be heard. (At least I'm not trying to DX from my grandparents' house about 110-120 miles north/northwest of here, where only 3 stations over 20kW within 5 miles are responsible for 50dBu off-channel RSSI readings across most of the band.)

Here, it seems I have no chance of any of the stations you listed. For example:
639 (40,00) is pretty much KFI-640, with an occasional mexican in the background
594 (29,00) is sandwiched between KOGO-600 and its lower IBOC carrier
585 (40,00) is on the bottom edge of KOGO's lower IBOC sideband
531 (20,00 is owned by weak TIS's on 530
738 (37,00) is next to KCBS-740, and also in the desensitization zone caused by KFMB-760
KFMB contributes to a 41dBu noise floor on 747 and 774, making those Japanese stations inaudible barefoot here (unless there's something I haven't tried - any suggestions? I don't have, nor can afford, a SSB spotting receiver. I possibly could use another radio to generate a local oscillator heterodyne above 970kHz, but I doubt if that would do the same thing, and it wouldn't work lower than that anyway.)

Needless to say, I've NEVER heard even ONE single station on a barefoot ultralight, nevermind hearing 2 fight it out on the same frequency! So when you get home... any chance of you being able to hear a bunch of DU's battling on 1449, making it sound like one of the USA graveyard channels, and completely obliterating any trace of KSUH? ;)

Also, what is meant by the S1 to S9 signal ratings? I've always thought an S1 ("faint signal barely perceptible" was basically anything from carrier / het only to just barely able to hear modulation and decipher some clue of programming. An S4 ("fair signal"), to me, has been about the threshold for lighting the tuning indicator, or stoppping the seek/scan function on a consumer radio. An S7 ("strong signal") would be at a level where there's no audible background static (something about 60dBu+ on the PL-380, and on poorly selective radios would be as loud 10kHz off channel as it is on-channel)), and an S9 ("extremely strong signal") would be a signal which would be splattering several channels each way on a poorly-selective radio like the Sony SRF-M37W, and still just as loud 30-50kHz away as it is on the fundamental (and a PL-380 would be showing 49-50dBu in blank channels over about a 100kHz range, if not more). (Also, I couldn't tell the difference from an S7 vs. an S9 just by listening to the station on its frequency, as both would have the same level of background noise quieting. I could tell, though, by how wide the station splatters on a poorly selective radio, though, with the station that splatters wider getting the higher reading (for me, any station that lit the tuning indicator 30 or 40 kHz away from the fundamental on my Panasonic RQ-SW20 got an S9 rating.)) So, to me, a S9+, like you describe on 738, would be about like two stations of KSUH's strength (measured where you live) battling it out. :) So do I need to readjust my concept of what S1 to S9 means?

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:
>
>
> Hello All,
>
> Thanks to both Patrick and Tony for the suggestion of Noumea, New Caledonia as the likely French station heard on 666 kHz here in Lincoln City, OR this week. This was never heard during any of my visits to Grayland, and its signal strength was only decent on one out of four days this week.
>
> Another mystery solved this week was the 684 kHz perenially weak station (which was finally IDed as a parallel of the much stronger 639-Radio Fiji One, for my second Fiji logging). A pesky UnID DU (possibly with a foreign language) is mixing almost every morning on 594 kHz with the ABC station, and an Australian talk station is giving 639-Fiji fits on certain mornings, depending upon propagation. 585 kHz apparently has two different DU's mixing-- one with an easy-listening music format, and the other with classic rock (decent MP3's were made of both, at different times). 531 kHz usually has the typical DU mix of competing Aussies (from which I've never heard any actual ID), but the NZ Samoan station has been strangely absent.
>
> There was a bizarre DU propagation pipeline on Tuesday morning which made both 738-Tahiti and 2NR-Grafton, Australia mix together in a S9+ snarl around 1250, making both stations easily audible on the barefoot Sony SRF-T615 Ultralight. This was the first time I've ever heard two DU's fight it out on a barefoot ULR! The same thing was happening on 639 kHz with Radio Fiji One and the UnID Aussie talk station, both of which were snarling together at around an S8 level.
>
> My listening equipment is very basic-- a modified Tecsun PL-380 DSP Ultralight (with remarkably effective 1 kHz DSP filtering from the stock Si4734 chip) and two newly-designed 7.5" plug-in loopsticks, one for MW, and one for LW. This enables me to chase DX on both bands with one PL-380 (and avoid any TSA hassles). For chasing DU's I'm using a portable 3' PVC tuned passive loop, which is designed to fit in a crammed compact car trunk. Every morning the loop is assembled in total darkness within a couple of minutes, and it provides a very potent DXing boost when inductively coupled to the PL-380. Not counting the ICF-2010 SSB spotting receiver, the total cost of the station is about $125-- about the same as one night's charge here at the Liberty Inn Motel!
>
> I'll be writing a full DXpedition report (with MP3's and photos) upon our return to Puyallup, WA on Saturday. Thanks again for any help in sorting out the UnID's-- I'm far from a DU expert, and all suggestions are greatly appreciated.
>
> 73 and Good DX,
> Gary DeBock (in Lincoln City, OR)
>


Re: Oregon Beach DXpedition

pianoplayer88key
 

Sounds like you're in ULDX heaven. :) Here, though, I'm almost in ULDX hell, as I have yet to log a single TP with my PL-380 even with the Select-A-Tenna. I'm sure it doesn't help that I have several local 63dBu (max my PL-380 will display) blowtorches within 10 miles (the ground conductivity is fairly good here as well), which seem to cause me to have 40+dBu readings on some frequencies nearby even though there's no signal to be heard. (At least I'm not trying to DX from my grandparents' house about 110-120 miles north/northwest of here, where only 3 stations over 20kW within 5 miles are responsible for 50dBu off-channel RSSI readings across most of the band.)

Here, it seems I have no chance of any of the stations you listed. For example:
639 (40,00) is pretty much KFI-640, with an occasional mexican in the background
594 (29,00) is sandwiched between KOGO-600 and its lower IBOC carrier
585 (40,00) is on the bottom edge of KOGO's lower IBOC sideband
531 (20,00 is owned by weak TIS's on 530
738 (37,00) is next to KCBS-740, and also in the desensitization zone caused by KFMB-760
KFMB contributes to a 41dBu noise floor on 747 and 774, making those Japanese stations inaudible barefoot here (unless there's something I haven't tried - any suggestions? I don't have, nor can afford, a SSB spotting receiver. I possibly could use another radio to generate a local oscillator heterodyne above 970kHz, but I doubt if that would do the same thing, and it wouldn't work lower than that anyway.)

Needless to say, I've NEVER heard even ONE single station on a barefoot ultralight, nevermind hearing 2 fight it out on the same frequency! So when you get home... any chance of you being able to hear a bunch of DU's battling on 1449, making it sound like one of the USA graveyard channels, and completely obliterating any trace of KSUH? ;)

Also, what is meant by the S1 to S9 signal ratings? I've always thought an S1 ("faint signal barely perceptible" was basically anything from carrier / het only to just barely able to hear modulation and decipher some clue of programming. An S4 ("fair signal"), to me, has been about the threshold for lighting the tuning indicator, or stoppping the seek/scan function on a consumer radio. An S7 ("strong signal") would be at a level where there's no audible background static (something about 60dBu+ on the PL-380, and on poorly selective radios would be as loud 10kHz off channel as it is on-channel)), and an S9 ("extremely strong signal") would be a signal which would be splattering several channels each way on a poorly-selective radio like the Sony SRF-M37W, and still just as loud 30-50kHz away as it is on the fundamental (and a PL-380 would be showing 49-50dBu in blank channels over about a 100kHz range, if not more). (Also, I couldn't tell the difference from an S7 vs. an S9 just by listening to the station on its frequency, as both would have the same level of background noise quieting. I could tell, though, by how wide the station splatters on a poorly selective radio, though, with the station that splatters wider getting the higher reading (for me, any station that lit the tuning indicator 30 or 40 kHz away from the fundamental on my Panasonic RQ-SW20 got an S9 rating.)) So, to me, a S9+, like you describe on 738, would be about like two stations of KSUH's strength (measured where you live) battling it out. :) So do I need to readjust my concept of what S1 to S9 means?

--- In ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com, D1028Gary@... wrote:


Hello All,

Thanks to both Patrick and Tony for the suggestion of Noumea, New Caledonia as the likely French station heard on 666 kHz here in Lincoln City, OR this week. This was never heard during any of my visits to Grayland, and its signal strength was only decent on one out of four days this week.

Another mystery solved this week was the 684 kHz perenially weak station (which was finally IDed as a parallel of the much stronger 639-Radio Fiji One, for my second Fiji logging). A pesky UnID DU (possibly with a foreign language) is mixing almost every morning on 594 kHz with the ABC station, and an Australian talk station is giving 639-Fiji fits on certain mornings, depending upon propagation. 585 kHz apparently has two different DU's mixing-- one with an easy-listening music format, and the other with classic rock (decent MP3's were made of both, at different times). 531 kHz usually has the typical DU mix of competing Aussies (from which I've never heard any actual ID), but the NZ Samoan station has been strangely absent.

There was a bizarre DU propagation pipeline on Tuesday morning which made both 738-Tahiti and 2NR-Grafton, Australia mix together in a S9+ snarl around 1250, making both stations easily audible on the barefoot Sony SRF-T615 Ultralight. This was the first time I've ever heard two DU's fight it out on a barefoot ULR! The same thing was happening on 639 kHz with Radio Fiji One and the UnID Aussie talk station, both of which were snarling together at around an S8 level.

My listening equipment is very basic-- a modified Tecsun PL-380 DSP Ultralight (with remarkably effective 1 kHz DSP filtering from the stock Si4734 chip) and two newly-designed 7.5" plug-in loopsticks, one for MW, and one for LW. This enables me to chase DX on both bands with one PL-380 (and avoid any TSA hassles). For chasing DU's I'm using a portable 3' PVC tuned passive loop, which is designed to fit in a crammed compact car trunk. Every morning the loop is assembled in total darkness within a couple of minutes, and it provides a very potent DXing boost when inductively coupled to the PL-380. Not counting the ICF-2010 SSB spotting receiver, the total cost of the station is about $125-- about the same as one night's charge here at the Liberty Inn Motel!

I'll be writing a full DXpedition report (with MP3's and photos) upon our return to Puyallup, WA on Saturday. Thanks again for any help in sorting out the UnID's-- I'm far from a DU expert, and all suggestions are greatly appreciated.

73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Lincoln City, OR)


Oregon Beach DXpedition

Gary DeBock
 

Hello All,
 
Thanks to both Patrick and Tony for the suggestion of Noumea, New Caledonia as the likely French station heard on 666 kHz here in Lincoln City, OR this week. This was never heard during any of my visits to Grayland, and its signal strength was only decent on one out of four days this week.
 
Another mystery solved this week was the 684 kHz perenially weak station (which was finally IDed as a parallel of the much stronger 639-Radio Fiji One, for my second Fiji logging). A pesky UnID DU (possibly with a foreign language) is mixing almost every morning on 594 kHz with the ABC station, and an Australian talk station is giving 639-Fiji fits on certain mornings, depending upon propagation. 585 kHz apparently has two different DU's mixing-- one with an easy-listening music format, and the other with classic rock (decent MP3's were made of both, at different times). 531 kHz usually has the typical DU mix of competing Aussies (from which I've never heard any actual ID), but the NZ Samoan station has been strangely absent. 
 
There was a bizarre DU propagation pipeline on Tuesday morning which made both 738-Tahiti and 2NR-Grafton, Australia mix together in a S9+ snarl around 1250, making both stations easily audible on the barefoot Sony SRF-T615 Ultralight. This was the first time I've ever heard two DU's fight it out on a barefoot ULR! The same thing was happening on 639 kHz with Radio Fiji One and the UnID Aussie talk station, both of which were snarling together at around an S8 level.
 
My listening equipment is very basic-- a modified Tecsun PL-380 DSP Ultralight (with remarkably effective 1 kHz DSP filtering from the stock Si4734 chip) and two newly-designed 7.5" plug-in loopsticks, one for MW, and one for LW. This enables me to chase DX on both bands with one PL-380 (and avoid any TSA hassles). For chasing DU's I'm using a portable 3' PVC tuned passive loop, which is designed to fit in a crammed compact car trunk. Every morning the loop is assembled in total darkness within a couple of minutes, and it provides a very potent DXing boost when inductively coupled to the PL-380. Not counting the ICF-2010 SSB spotting receiver, the total cost of the station is about $125-- about the same as one night's charge here at the Liberty Inn Motel!
 
I'll be writing a full DXpedition report (with MP3's and photos) upon our return to Puyallup, WA on Saturday. Thanks again for any help in sorting out the UnID's-- I'm far from a DU expert, and all suggestions are greatly appreciated.
 
73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Lincoln City, OR)
           


Re: Tecsun PL380

pianoplayer88key
 

I would be interested to know too. Also, Sarmento, you say it doesn't overload the front end of your 7600GR, which is an issue for me with my PL-380. How close are you geographically to your local blowtorches?
I've had my PL-380 for probably several months now. I've noticed that in rural areas (or places where there is no strong signal nearby), the RSSI will be 15dBu when tuned to a frequency on which no station is received. I've even had the RSSI stay at 15dBu, or maybe climb a little to 17dBu, even when a station was strong enough to indicate a SNR of around 17 to 22dB.

Where I live, I have a 5kW IBOC local on 600 kHz about 8 miles west, a 77kW (50kW night) on 690 that's 32 miles south/southwest, a 5kW (50kW night) on 760 that's 7 miles north/northwest, a 5kW on 910 that's 9 miles north, a 10kW on 1130 that's 6 miles north, a 50kW (2.9kW) on 1170 that diplexes with 910, and a 5kW (1kW night) on 1360 that's 8 miles west, along with numerous other weaker signals. The typical RSSI on my PL-380 averages about 30dBu on "blank" channels throughout most of the band, although in the 1100s it will rise to around 41 or 45dBu on, say, 1150 for example. At night, I get 41dBu readings on 747 and 774kHz (on either side of 50kW blowtorch 760), the frequencies of two Japanese TPs, although I've never heard those stations.
Also, my grandparents in San Gabriel, CA, are about 1/3 mile from a 23kW on 1300 and a 50kW on 1430, and 5 miles from a 50kW IBOC on 1110. Last time I was there, the RSSI in the blank channels was 50dBu across almost the entire upper half of the band, and many local stations that should have had a good signal, like 1230, 1260, 1280, 1330, 1390, 1460, etc, were almost unreadable.

I also have another radio which is ultralight-sized and priced, although is not recognized as an ultralight due to the fact that it had already been discontinued several years before the ultralightdx definitions came into existence, and that is the Panasonic RQ-SW20. Before I got my PL-380, I also briefly bought the Sony SRF-M37W, then promptly returned it due to its horrid selectivity. I noted that my Panasonic's selectivity was comparable to that of the Sony I just mentioned.

Several weeks ago, I took my two radios (RQ-SW20 and PL-380) near the transmitter site of a semi-local station, 1kW 1450 KFSD. From about 20 meters from their tower, I compared the reception of several stations on the two radios, and what I learned surprised me. In spite of its worse overall selectivity, it appears that the Panasonic has much better front-end selectivity than the PL-380. There were several moderately readable stations on the RQ-SW20 that were completely unreadable on the PL-380. Examples can be heard at: http://cid-6bdd1917662288cb.office.live.com/browse.aspx/AM%20radio%20files/PL-380%20vs%20RQ-SW20%20comparisons/near%20KFSD%201450%20transmitter
This was in spite of the fact that the PL-380 is normally at least several dB more sensitive than the PL-380, for example locally there's a station on 980 that, while it is weak and kind-of hiding under a 30dBu noise floor on the PL-380, is just about completely unreadable on the RQ-SW20.

Also, I have a Select-A-Tenna, and while it has done fairly well with some things, including enabling me to hear 700 KALL North Salt Lake City in the daytime from about 625 miles away, I still would like something more selective and sensitive. So what's the performance of your ultralight ferrite loop like when used with your PL-380, compared to just the stock barefoot PL-380?

--- In ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com, "Pollock,Raphael E" <rpollock@...> wrote:

Hi Sarmento!

Is the "ultralight ferrite loop" a tuned or an unturned loop? Could you post some details of construction?

Raphael

From: ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Sarmento
Sent: Thursday, July 22, 2010 3:18 PM
To: ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [ultralightdx] Tecsun PL380



Hi, I've just purchased a Tecsun PL380 in order to have it tested for MW Dxing. I mainly intend to use it with magnetically coupling loops, both ferrite and air coil.

I have read something about it, and I wonder about using its narrow filter capability through DSP together with a high selective loop antenna could give good results.

I made another experimental loop antenna which I think it could be considered as a "ultralight ferrite loop" using Litz wire and covering from 520 kHz to 1700 kHz. Using it with a Sony 7600GR has proven to be adequate to get better signal level and selectivity without front-end overload.

Main consideration here is performance and portability for MW dxing using the ultralight concept.

Regards

Sarmento Campos - Rio de Janeiro - Brazil
www.sarmento.net.br


Re: Tecsun PL380

Pollock,Raphael E <rpollock@...>
 

Hi Sarmento!

 

Is the “ultralight ferrite loop” a tuned or an unturned loop? Could you post some details of construction?

 

Raphael

 

From: ultralightdx@... [mailto:ultralightdx@...] On Behalf Of Sarmento
Sent: Thursday, July 22, 2010 3:18 PM
To: ultralightdx@...
Subject: [ultralightdx] Tecsun PL380

 

 

Hi, I've just purchased a Tecsun PL380 in order to have it tested for MW Dxing. I mainly intend to use it with magnetically coupling loops, both ferrite and air coil.

I have read something about it, and I wonder about using its narrow filter capability through DSP together with a high selective loop antenna could give good results.

I made another experimental loop antenna which I think it could be considered as a "ultralight ferrite loop" using Litz wire and covering from 520 kHz to 1700 kHz. Using it with a Sony 7600GR has proven to be adequate to get better signal level and selectivity without front-end overload.

Main consideration here is performance and portability for MW dxing using the ultralight concept.

Regards

Sarmento Campos - Rio de Janeiro - Brazil
www.sarmento.net.br


Tecsun PL380

sarmento2k
 

Hi, I've just purchased a Tecsun PL380 in order to have it tested for MW Dxing. I mainly intend to use it with magnetically coupling loops, both ferrite and air coil.

I have read something about it, and I wonder about using its narrow filter capability through DSP together with a high selective loop antenna could give good results.

I made another experimental loop antenna which I think it could be considered as a "ultralight ferrite loop" using Litz wire and covering from 520 kHz to 1700 kHz. Using it with a Sony 7600GR has proven to be adequate to get better signal level and selectivity without front-end overload.

Main consideration here is performance and portability for MW dxing using the ultralight concept.

Regards

Sarmento Campos - Rio de Janeiro - Brazil
www.sarmento.net.br


Re: Received the NatGeo G8

Phil Pasteur
 

You are correct on the RSSI and S/N. I mentioned it was a cursory test last night. All of about 45 minutes at about 6:00 PM local. I had the three radios out checking on some marginal locals. I did not (as usual) read the manual. As the G8 is real similar in function to the PL-310 and PL380, I should have guessed the display could be changed to show signal parameters.

Thanks for the info, I did locate the power supply on the Eton web site. I have an E10 and I picked up the supply for it awhile back when it was new. The ploarity and connector are the same as the G8. Both radios are marked for 6 volts in. The E10 supply is labeled as putting out 6.7 volts. I am thinking that it is probably fine, especially as none of those things are regulated and sag considrably under load.. As I will not likely be using the radios at the same time, I think that I am covered.

I have often wondered why Eton does not see fit to include an AC/DC supply ofor any of its radios??

Thanks for the response.

Phil

--- In ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com, "Harold" <hmgaffney@...> wrote:

You can get a wall wart directly from the Eton store under parts/accessories.
By "lack of signal indicators" do you mean the signal strength and signal to noise ratio? My G8 has this.


Hi I need help in deciding

jen w
 

Hi I am need for help. I am a newbie to UL Dx. I live in the Rockies were DX is good TA's And a Few TP's on my comunications reciver with loop.

Now I want to Join the UL revolution!

I dx the Tropical Band and higher and MW So what radio is the best I like the PL360 for its size perfect for my purse.. I am looking to Dx in high and Low Dx area's. I am not a techie in the bulding sense..only Dx'ing Hi..

So what do you guys think I would like to get a UL with all the good stuff.. So If I can get one thats modified...Thats fine..

I can wait until the Dx season in The Fall so what do you guys think..

73's


Re: Tecsun pl-390

Pollock,Raphael E <rpollock@...>
 

I'd love to see the results of a 390 vs 380 head to head MW sensitivity/soft mute comparison...!
 
Salmonguy


From: ultralightdx@... [ultralightdx@...] On Behalf Of farmerik [farmerik@...]
Sent: Thursday, July 22, 2010 10:20 AM
To: ultralightdx@...
Subject: [ultralightdx] Re: Tecsun pl-390

 

The lone speaker in the PL-360 is less than 1.5 inches, and speech is quite clear, so maybe the two speakers in the PL-390 will do OK. It sounds like the '390 has a longer ferrite rod than the '310, so maybe it will have better sensitivity AND less muting problems as well as the Easy Tuning. Too bad it does not qualify as a ULR. - FARMERIK

--- In ultralightdx@..., Mark Roberts wrote:
>
> Thank you all, Marc, Henk, and Kevin, for your information and observations.
>
> I will definitely be in Paris, Brussels, and near Eindhoven (NL);
> we'll also have a car from Paris, going through the battlefields and
> Luxembourg and thence through Wallonia into Brussels. The Eindhoven
> visit is one I've made many times before, but this will be the first
> one with a good, solid FM radio, I hope. Dutch FM ERPs seem to be
> rather low; the last time I was in suburban Eindhoven, I had really
> lousy reception.
>
> Back on topic, the PL-390 is sort of tempting, but I doubt that the
> speaker quality would be of much use. I might think about a PL-310
> instead, but I really, really like Easy Tuning Mode on the PL-380.
>


Re: Tecsun pl-390

Rik
 

The lone speaker in the PL-360 is less than 1.5 inches, and speech is quite clear, so maybe the two speakers in the PL-390 will do OK. It sounds like the '390 has a longer ferrite rod than the '310, so maybe it will have better sensitivity AND less muting problems as well as the Easy Tuning. Too bad it does not qualify as a ULR. - FARMERIK

--- In ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com, Mark Roberts <markrobt@...> wrote:

Thank you all, Marc, Henk, and Kevin, for your information and observations.

I will definitely be in Paris, Brussels, and near Eindhoven (NL);
we'll also have a car from Paris, going through the battlefields and
Luxembourg and thence through Wallonia into Brussels. The Eindhoven
visit is one I've made many times before, but this will be the first
one with a good, solid FM radio, I hope. Dutch FM ERPs seem to be
rather low; the last time I was in suburban Eindhoven, I had really
lousy reception.

Back on topic, the PL-390 is sort of tempting, but I doubt that the
speaker quality would be of much use. I might think about a PL-310
instead, but I really, really like Easy Tuning Mode on the PL-380.


Re: Fw: Tecsun PL-310 or PL-380

drbreslin@...
 

0p$mn
Sent via BlackBerry by AT&T


Re: Received the NatGeo G8

Harold
 

You can get a wall wart directly from the Eton store under parts/accessories.
By "lack of signal indicators" do you mean the signal strength and signal to noise ratio? My G8 has this.


Re: Received the NatGeo G8

Stuart
 

I found a voltage/polarity-selectable, multiple-tip, regulated and filtered 300mw one at Radio Shack for $20+. Dead quiet on my G-8.


Stu Morrison

--- In ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com, "ppasteur" <ppasteur@...> wrote:

I got mine today. Pretty nifty little radio. So far (only cursory testing for a short time)it does not seem to be as good as the PL-310 or 380 ON MW. Lack signal indicators and multiple bandwidths, but I guess everybody but me knew that :)

Still a good deal for less than $25 delivered.

Phil
Anyone know where to get a power supply for the G8? (Wall wart). As normal, Eton did not choose to include one.

--- In ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com, "surveyor6180" <hmgaffney@> wrote:

A little over 5 days after ordering it I got it via UPS today.
It's identical to the one I bought from Eton 3 months ago.
I haven't compared it performance wise as I might gift it but either way I'm pleased considering the price.[$19.95+$5.95 shipping]

Harold


Re: Tecsun pl-390

Mark Roberts
 

Thank you all, Marc, Henk, and Kevin, for your information and observations.

I will definitely be in Paris, Brussels, and near Eindhoven (NL);
we'll also have a car from Paris, going through the battlefields and
Luxembourg and thence through Wallonia into Brussels. The Eindhoven
visit is one I've made many times before, but this will be the first
one with a good, solid FM radio, I hope. Dutch FM ERPs seem to be
rather low; the last time I was in suburban Eindhoven, I had really
lousy reception.

Back on topic, the PL-390 is sort of tempting, but I doubt that the
speaker quality would be of much use. I might think about a PL-310
instead, but I really, really like Easy Tuning Mode on the PL-380.