Date   

Re: Tecsun PL-390 2 speaker SW radio on eBay

m_a_schuster
 

Proposed? The only place such an animal was mentioned was on a Chinese message board, where a "teaser" ad was posted with a caption indicating that it was a complete fabrication by someone with a long weekend and nothing to do...

It's imagineware, get over it..

--- In ultralightdx@..., Dave <amstereofan@...> wrote:

Thanks, hmm nice but not much point for it somehow....like to know what has
happend to the proposed PL-750

2010/7/6 Moisés Knochen <moises.knochen@...>



These are the links Ms Joyce sent me for the PL-390:

SILVER :
http://cgi.ebay.com/TECSUN-New-PL390-PLL-World-Band-w-Dual-Speaker-Radio-/120592182930?cmd=ViewItem&pt=Shortwave_Radios&hash=item1c13daae92

GREY:
http://cgi.ebay.com/TECSUN-New-PL390-PLL-World-Band-w-Dual-Speaker-Radio-/120592192434?cmd=ViewItem&pt=Shortwave_Radios&hash=item1c13dad3b2

Regards,

Moises

At 11:34 06/07/2010, you wrote:



What is the link for it on ebay please ?

On 6 July 2010 15:33, sjb92338 <sbass@...> wrote:




Joyce emailed me that the PL-390 has the 5 bandwidths like the PL-380, but
that the internal ferrite is only 2.4 inches long.

Steve Bass

--- In ultralightdx@... <ultralightdx%40yahoogroups.com>,
"thinkdx" <dx@> wrote:

I saw this model earlier today, George. It looks like a mini boombox!

The auction copy does not mention DSP or multiple bandwidths, but the
front panel clearly says "DSP" and there is an "AM BW" button.

Guy Atkins
Puyallup, WA
http://fivebelow.squarespace.com


--- In ultralightdx@... <ultralightdx%40yahoogroups.com>,
"georgesmn" <georgesmn@> wrote:

From Ms. Joyce Anon-co for just a couple dollars more we can have a 2nd
speaker which I guess means it won't fit in pocket or will at least stick
out more. Where it says features the ad goes into Chinese, no obvious specs.
Anyone know more? Guess it's the first day listed. Sorry for mentioning
something that's not an ultralight but someone might be interested? 73,
George S., MN

Moises Knochen
Montevideo, Uruguay



Re: FM station 500 on an UL

robert ross
 

Paul Logan wrote:
 

Hi all,

I wouldnt have thought it possible not so long ago..but I have yesterday logged station 500 on teh FM band using a barefoot Ultralight. It was 92.4 Radio Sintony from the Italian island of Sardinia via E skip. FM total is now 510 with 4/5th's being E skip rather than tropo. Receivers used have been the PL310 and PL300WT.

Heres what has been ehard over recent days.

97.0 1228 03/07/2010 Austria Ö1 Sankt Pölten/Jauerling nie 1706
94.4 1249 03/07/2010 Germany Bayern 3 Brotjacklriegel bay 1545



Bravo Paul.....your FM DX antics continue to amaze!!! 500 FMs on a BAREFOOT ULR.....is absolutely unbelievable!! I wish I could pry myself away from the Big Rigs on FM....but with 2,030 Stations heard....it's pretty hard to get new ones on an Ultralight from here!

I admire your persistence, and thanks for proving to the world just what can be accomplished on an Ultralight Receiver....especially on the FM Band!

Sure has been a Great Year for E-Skip so far!! Hopefully more to come...Maybe you can hit 600 before Season's end...especially when the Tropo starts!

Keep Loggin' 'Em Paul......

73...ROB VA3SW

Robert S. Ross
London, Ontario CANADA


Re: Deciphering the Kchibo Radio DSP-chip Puzzle

Gary DeBock
 

Hi Jim,
 
I've also transplanted a 7.5" type 61 AM loopstick into the KK-D6110 and obtained a great boost in AM sensitivity, although the poorly shielded digital board (with a tack-soldered copper shield) does allow some RF whining hash to escape to the upgrade loopstick, even when it is externally mounted. Considering the rather low price of the model, it might be worth it to install better shielding on the digital board, and see if this bargain modified ULR can chase TP's and TA's like the 7.5" loopstick PL-380's.
 
As for determining the best number of coil turns, the ultimate scientific procedure would be to run reception tests (using a signal generator) under controlled conditions for multiple test radios of differing coil inductances over the desired frequency range, such as was done using four different 7.5" loopstick PL-380's (300, 400, 500 and 550 uh) in the spring. This is probably unnecessary for the average tinkerer, who can get great results simply by trial and error.
 
73, Gary   
 
In a message dated 7/6/2010 5:35:41 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time, jm392c@... writes:

 

I transplanted a 7.5" loopstick wound with Litz onto the KK-D6110 and it does give it a substantial boost. The stock loopstick is easy to access, as are the solder terminals. It's disappointing, but not surprising, that this model does not contain the si4734 chip. My question to the group is: is there any way for a layman, other than trial and error, to determine the best number of turns of Litz wire?

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:
>
> Hello All,
>
> Those DXers (including me) who had thought that the new KK-D6110 model was
> a serious attempt by Kchibo to upgrade the D96L model now have serious
> evidence to the contrary. After multiple reports of lackluster performance on
> both the AM and FM bands, a detailed investigation and disassembly of the
> KK-D6110 model has revealed that the new radio is not an Si4734 DSP chip
> radio after all, but apparently uses the same DSP chip powering the Kchibo
> KK-D680, KK-210B, KK-D202 and KK-D220 models. This certainly explains the drop
> off in AM performance relative to the D96L model, a true Si4734 DSP chip
> receiver.
>
> The KK-D6110's lower AM sensitivity specification and much lower eBay
> selling price (relative to the D96L) created doubts about this from the
> beginning, but the sole eBay seller's KK-D6110 listing (obviously translated by
> Google from the original Chinese on the Kchibo web site) certainly doesn't
> make the DSP chip identity very clear.
>
> The KK-D6110 has a DSP filter selection switch which mimics the Si4734
> models quite well (although the filtering selections are backward, like in the
> D92L), and other functions also are apparently designed to resemble the
> D96L, such as the green display light and memory operations. But AM-DXing
> performance falls well short of the D96L, and full disassembly of the KK-D6110
> brought the truth to light.
>
> The stock loopstick has a single coil with an inductance measured at 630
> uh, which would certainly be an unusual value for an Si4734-chip radio with
> no LW-band responsibility. Subtracting coil turns on the stock loopstick
> did not significantly improve X-band performance on the KK-D6110, as it would
> with a true Si4734-chip radio having a 630 uh loopstick coil. The digital
> board copper shield was simply tack-soldered at a few places, resulting in
> a slight digital whining noise bleeding through to the loopstick (which
> also affected all upgrade loopsticks, both internal and external). Removal of
> the copper shield (photo at _http://www.mediafire.com/?xy2u3wnjvyn_
> (http://www.mediafire.com/?xy2u3wnjvyn) ) revealed various IC's, but certainly no
> Si4734 DSP chip. After the earlier indications, it wasn't a big surprise.
>
> The Kchibo model numbering system apparently gives an indication whether
> the Radio is a true Si4734 DSP chip model, or not. Those models with a DxxL
> numbering system (D92L, D95L, D96L, etc.) are the true Si4734 chip radios,
> while those with the KK-Dxxx numbering system (KK-D6110, KK-D680, KK-D220,
> etc.) are not. Kchibo advertises both types as DSP radios, and the Chinese
> documentation (with rough English translations) is confusing at best. Sorry
> for any inconvenience because of this, but those DXers who had planned to
> order the new KK-D6110 model as a upgraded replacement for the D96L should
> not proceed. The KK-D6110 is a decent radio for the money, but should not
> be confused with true Si4734 DSP receivers like the D96L, PL-310, PL-380,
> PL-360 etc. The detailed disassembly photos will be uploaded to the KK-D6110
> photo album on the Ultralightdx site.
>
> 73, Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
>


Re: Question about ultralight and loops for MW

Pollock,Raphael E <rpollock@...>
 




On Jul 6, 2010, at 5:26 PM, "Stephen" <pianoplayer88key@...> wrote:

 

But, Gary... will that PL-360 with its plug-in 7.5" loopstick still fit in a shirt pocket or pants pocket, and be properly oriented (i.e. not vertical, reducing the signal pickup)? If I understand correctly, one of the intents of having ULRs be no larger than a certain size was so they would fit in pockets.

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:
>
> "The directly-connected ferrite and air core loops always require
> modification to the radio (and possibly the addition of other external hard-wired
> components), but avoid the need for a separate tuning step."
>
> Hello All,
>
> This is one unique exception to the above statement-- the 7.5" plug-in
> loopstick PL-360, which requires no radio "surgery," but provides a nice AM
> performance boost. Having just sent out over 20 of these, I should have
> remembered this exception :-)
>
> 73, Gary
>
>
> In a message dated 7/6/2010 1:32:44 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
> D1028Gary@... writes:
>
>
>
>
> Hello Sarmento,
>
> Many air core and ferrite core external loops give excellent performance
> with the Tecsun PL-380 and PL-310 models, and make DXing a lot more fun.
>
> Depending upon your DXing preferences, you can choose a transplanted
> ferrite loop (like the 7.5" loopstick PL-380), an inductively coupled ferrite
> loop (like the Q-stick) or a direct or inductively-or a direct or
> inductively-<WBR>coupled air core loop. All of these antenna designs have performance
> tradeoffs, and no one design
>
> Most DXers who wish to avoid "surgery" on the radio use air or ferrite
> core loops with the inductive coupling system, which gives an excellent
> performance boost (depending on the size of the loop) with an extra tuned circuit
> to aid in selectivity. The directly-connected ferrite and air core loops
> always require modification to the radio (and possibly the addition of other
> external hard-wired components), but avoid the need for a separate tuning
> step.
>
> My own favorite for convenient DXpedition usage is the 3' portable PVC air
> core loop, which is described in the photo article at
> _http://www.mediafirhttp://www.mediaht_ (http://www.mediafire.com/?hqyzzu1mvyt) . This tuned
> passive loop provides a powerful inductive coupling boost for the barefoot
> PL-380, can be assembled in 2 minutes, and will fit inside a packed compact
> car trunk.
>
> 73 and Good DX,
> Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
>
>
>
>
> In a message dated 7/6/2010 4:12:29 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
> sarmento.campos@In a messIn a message d
>
>
> Hi
>
> After have seen info about these new DSP receivers (like PL310/380) :
>
> _http://bbs.tecsun.http://bbs.thttp://bbhttp:/_
> (http://bbs.tecsun.com.cn/0002.asp?open=186695)
>
> I wonder if it would support loop antennas, like square air coil or even
> ferrite loops.
>
> If one issue to add : living near big power MW stations.
>
> Have anyone tried MW dx in this conditions ?
>
> Regards
> Sarmento - Rio de Janeiro - Brazil
>


FM station 500 on an UL

Paul Logan
 

Hi all,

I wouldnt have thought it possible not so long ago..but I have yesterday logged station 500 on teh FM band using a barefoot Ultralight. It was 92.4 Radio Sintony from the Italian island of Sardinia via E skip. FM total is now 510 with 4/5th's being E skip rather than tropo. Receivers used have been the PL310 and PL300WT.

Heres what has been ehard over recent days.

97.0 1228 03/07/2010 Austria Ö1 Sankt Pölten/Jauerling nie 1706
94.4 1249 03/07/2010 Germany Bayern 3 Brotjacklriegel bay 1545
87.9 1256 03/07/2010 Italy Punto Radio Bologna-Colle Barbiano/Via Santa Liberata bo 1733
90.0 1315 03/07/2010 Germany B5 aktuell München-Ismaning bay 1487
88.5 1321 03/07/2010 Slovenia Slovenija 1 Maribor/Pohorje (RTVSLO) mb 1834
95.4 1332 03/07/2010 Austria Ö2 - Radio Tirol Kufstein/Kitzbüheler Horn tir 1578
91.8 1337 03/07/2010 Slovenia Slovenija 1 Krvavec lj 1784
93.5 1339 03/07/2010 Slovenia Val 202 Krim lj 1805
94.2 1340 03/07/2010 Germany Bayern 2 Oberbayern Hohenpeißenberg bay 1471
94.6 1341 03/07/2010 Slovenia Radio Sraka Trdinov Vrh nm 1868
95.9 1342 03/07/2010 Germany Bayern 3 Hochberg (Traunstein) bay 1568
96.1 1343 03/07/2010 Croatia HRT-HR 3 Ivanščica vz 1889
97.7 1346 03/07/2010 Croatia HRT-HR 3 Papuk vt 2043
98.5 1348 03/07/2010 Germany Bayern 3 Wendelstein bay 1538
102.0 1352 03/07/2010 Croatia HRT Radio Osijek Psunj sb 2018
102.0 1352 03/07/2010 Slovenia Slovenija 3 Krvavec lj 1784
103.8 1353 03/07/2010 Germany Antenne Bayern Hohenpeißenberg bay 1471
103.6 1354 03/07/2010 Austria FM 4 Spittal (Drau) 1/Goldeck kae 1688
104.0 1354 03/07/2010 Slovenia Val 202 Peč/Dreiländereck/M. Forno kr 1719
103.9 1356 03/07/2010 Croatia HKR - Hrvatski Katolicki Radio Psunj sb 2018
105.2 1357 03/07/2010 Germany Radio Arabella Isen bay 1513
105.7 1359 03/07/2010 Germany SWR2 Baden-Württemberg Stuttgart/Hoher Bopser bwü 1299
107.7 1405 03/07/2010 Germany Die Neue 107,7 Stuttgart Stuttgart/Frauenkopf bwü 1300
88.6 1411 03/07/2010 Slovenia Radio Koper Nanos po 1792
107.7 1423 03/07/2010 Germany Antenne Bayern Hochries bay 1549
88.0 1135 05/07/2010 Sardinia Radiolina Sassari/Monte Oro ss 1915
89.9 1149 05/07/2010 Sardinia Radio Studio One Cagliari/Palazzo Griffa ca 2084
92.4 1155 05/07/2010 Sardinia Radio Sintony Sant’Antioco/Monte Cresia ci 2069
88.6 1204 05/07/2010 Balearic Isles IB 3 Ràdio Monte Toro bal 1806
89.1 1214 05/07/2010 Spain Radio Marca/Radio Salud Barcelona/Torre de Collserola cat 1592
89.1 1223 05/07/2010 Spain Cadena 100 Badajoz Badajoz/Cansa Burros ext 1712
94.1 1239 05/07/2010 Portugal Diana FM Évora evo 1745
107.7 1322 05/07/2010 Portugal Record FM Sintra lis 1724
90.0 1613 05/07/2010 France Le Mouv Carcassonne/Pech Mary 11 1422
90.2 1616 05/07/2010 France France Bleu Gard Lozère Nîmes/les Capitelles 30 1435
88.8 1706 06/07/2010 Germany RBB Berlin 88,8 - Das Stadtradio Berlin/Scholzplatz brb 1379
92.4 1710 06/07/2010 Germany RBB Kulturradio Berlin/Scholzplatz brb 1379

regards and good DX to all.


Paul Logan,
Lisnaskea, N. Ireland

Listening Homepage: http://band2dx.webs.com/


Re: Question about ultralight and loops for MW

pianoplayer88key
 

But, Gary... will that PL-360 with its plug-in 7.5" loopstick still fit in a shirt pocket or pants pocket, and be properly oriented (i.e. not vertical, reducing the signal pickup)? If I understand correctly, one of the intents of having ULRs be no larger than a certain size was so they would fit in pockets.

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:

"The directly-connected ferrite and air core loops always require
modification to the radio (and possibly the addition of other external hard-wired
components), but avoid the need for a separate tuning step."

Hello All,

This is one unique exception to the above statement-- the 7.5" plug-in
loopstick PL-360, which requires no radio "surgery," but provides a nice AM
performance boost. Having just sent out over 20 of these, I should have
remembered this exception :-)

73, Gary


In a message dated 7/6/2010 1:32:44 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
D1028Gary@... writes:




Hello Sarmento,

Many air core and ferrite core external loops give excellent performance
with the Tecsun PL-380 and PL-310 models, and make DXing a lot more fun.

Depending upon your DXing preferences, you can choose a transplanted
ferrite loop (like the 7.5" loopstick PL-380), an inductively coupled ferrite
loop (like the Q-stick) or a direct or inductively-or a direct or
inductively-<WBR>coupled air core loop. All of these antenna designs have performance
tradeoffs, and no one design

Most DXers who wish to avoid "surgery" on the radio use air or ferrite
core loops with the inductive coupling system, which gives an excellent
performance boost (depending on the size of the loop) with an extra tuned circuit
to aid in selectivity. The directly-connected ferrite and air core loops
always require modification to the radio (and possibly the addition of other
external hard-wired components), but avoid the need for a separate tuning
step.

My own favorite for convenient DXpedition usage is the 3' portable PVC air
core loop, which is described in the photo article at
_http://www.mediafirhttp://www.mediaht_ (http://www.mediafire.com/?hqyzzu1mvyt) . This tuned
passive loop provides a powerful inductive coupling boost for the barefoot
PL-380, can be assembled in 2 minutes, and will fit inside a packed compact
car trunk.

73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)




In a message dated 7/6/2010 4:12:29 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
sarmento.campos@In a messIn a message d


Hi

After have seen info about these new DSP receivers (like PL310/380) :

_http://bbs.tecsun.http://bbs.thttp://bbhttp:/_
(http://bbs.tecsun.com.cn/0002.asp?open=186695)

I wonder if it would support loop antennas, like square air coil or even
ferrite loops.

If one issue to add : living near big power MW stations.

Have anyone tried MW dx in this conditions ?

Regards
Sarmento - Rio de Janeiro - Brazil


Re: Question about ultralight and loops for MW

pianoplayer88key
 

He also asked about the issue of living near high powered MW stations. I'll share a little of my experience. In rural areas (or other areas that don't have a strong signal nearby), I've found that the noise floor, as indicated on the radio, is 15dBu RSSI. I've seen stations that had a listenable signal at 15dBu RSSI, 18dB SNR or so. Yesterday I saw a 17dBu RSSI, 22dB SNR signal while my radio was inside a car (which attenuated the strong signals).
However.... when there are strong signals, it seems to desensitize the radio some. This is manifested by elevated RSSI readings across much of the band. For example, I live about 9 miles from a 50kW daytimer (2.9kW night) on 1170, 6 miles from a 10kW on 1130, and 7 miles from a 50kW nighttimer (5kW daytime) on 760. Except for the extreme edges of the band, the RSSI reading across most of the band on my Tecsun PL-380 is about 30dBu on otherwise "empty" channels. Within about 20-30kHz or so of the strong stations I mentioned, the RSSI will hit 39dBu or 41dBu, sometimes 43dBu between channels.
Also, my grandparents in San Gabriel, CA, live about 0.3 mi from a 23kW on 1300 and a 50kW on 1430, and about 5 mi from a 50kW IBOC on 1110. When I last visited them a few months ago, the RSSI throughout most of the band above about 1000 kHz or so was 49 to 50dBu on the "blank" channels.
Also, I experimented (and posted the results in an earlier post) with taking an older radio I have, generating the local oscillator carrier, and putting my PL-380 near it. When the other radio was on, the PL-380 would be showing 50dBu about +/- 150kHz from the frequency the other radio's LO was on. So, with the other radio turned off, and being in a car to partially shield the strong signals (so I wouldn't get the aforementioned 41dBu RSSI on a few frequencies, or 30dBu across the band; it was 15dBu across most of the band, maybe 20dBu near the strong stations), I would find a few stations to compare. Basically, with the other interference/carrier turned off, I might be able to hear a station that was about 35 to 40 dBu or so quite well. However, when turning that other radio (and its local oscillator) on, the target station went to fairly clear (with a little static) to virtually undetectable, if I remember correctly.
Also, I went near the transmitter site of a semi-local on 1450, and compared my PL-380 with a radio I have, the Panasonic RQ-SW20, which has selectivity comparable to the Sony SRF-M37 series radios. I also posted links to mp3 recordings of some of those comparisons, which I will not repeat here, except that there were several stations that, in spite of the horrible selectivity on the RQ-SW20 (1450 was being heard across several hundred kHz on frequencies where there weren't other stations on the dial), could be heard fairly well on the SW20, but were either extremely faint or just not there at all on the PL-380. Normally, the PL-380 is at least several dB more sensitive than the SW20, at least when it's not swamped by strong signals.

Now... Gary... what's your experience? I understand you can get perfectly clean audio from a distant station on 1460 (for which you're almost on radio-locator's fringe contour if I remember correctly), while you're about 3 miles from a local on 1450. I don't think my PL-380 would have a chance at that... not to mention that even in the 1kHz bandwidth mode, I often get somewhat noticeable splatter 10kHz away from 10kW stations about 30 miles away or so. (Also I think you've mentioned that my own PL-380 is probably defective. Any ideas on how to get it replaced? I would prefer not to spend the money on buying another one, unless I can get a vertically-oriented radio with multiple bandwidths and a good built-in Amidon-61 loopstick that doesn't protrude above the cabinet. The PL-360 won't cut it for me - single bandwidth, I'm afraid that the antenna will break off when I put the radio in my pants pocket where it will be primarily used (and where I was originally hoping to use the PL-380 but it won't fit there so by my definition it's not a ULR (although it still is by the committee's definition))... and I would prefer one a little wider (max of 4 inches IF the cabinet is no more than an inch thick, preferably 3.5" wide or less) so it can have a better loopstick in it, but shorter to keep its size under control.

So... Gary... when do you think you'll have the opportunity to check the RSSI near your strong signals? I would think your PL-380 shows 63dBu at 1450kHz (mine is capped at 63dBu, and it shows that on 5kW stations 8-10 miles away)... and based on how good the selectivity is on your specific PL-380, it would show 15dBu on 1440 and maybe 1460, right? Or what does it read? (Mine would probably read upwards of 30-45dBu where you are, not 15dBu. :( )

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:

Hello Sarmento,

Many air core and ferrite core external loops give excellent performance
with the Tecsun PL-380 and PL-310 models, and make DXing a lot more fun.

Depending upon your DXing preferences, you can choose a transplanted
ferrite loop (like the 7.5" loopstick PL-380), an inductively coupled ferrite
loop (like the Q-stick) or a direct or inductively-coupled air core loop. All
of these antenna designs have performance tradeoffs, and no one design is
perfect for every situation.

Most DXers who wish to avoid "surgery" on the radio use air or ferrite core
loops with the inductive coupling system, which gives an excellent
performance boost (depending on the size of the loop) with an extra tuned circuit
to aid in selectivity. The directly-connected ferrite and air core loops
always require modification to the radio (and possibly the addition of other
external hard-wired components), but avoid the need for a separate tuning
step.

My own favorite for convenient DXpedition usage is the 3' portable PVC air
core loop, which is described in the photo article at
_http://www.mediafire.com/?hqyzzu1mvyt_ (http://www.mediafire.com/?hqyzzu1mvyt) . This tuned
passive loop provides a powerful inductive coupling boost for the barefoot
PL-380, can be assembled in 2 minutes, and will fit inside a packed compact
car trunk.

73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)




In a message dated 7/6/2010 4:12:29 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
sarmento.campos@... writes:




Hi

After have seen info about these new DSP receivers (like PL310/380) :

_http://bbs.tecsun.com.cn/0002.asp?open=186695_
(http://bbs.tecsun.com.cn/0002.asp?open=186695)

I wonder if it would support loop antennas, like square air coil or even
ferrite loops.

If one issue to add : living near big power MW stations.

Have anyone tried MW dx in this conditions ?

Regards
Sarmento - Rio de Janeiro - Brazil


Re: Question about ultralight and loops for MW

Pollock,Raphael E <rpollock@...>
 

The trick is how to peak the inductively coupled loop, be it air core or ferrite bar.  Any tips?

From: ultralightdx@... [ultralightdx@...] On Behalf Of D1028Gary@... [D1028Gary@...]
Sent: Tuesday, July 06, 2010 3:32 PM
To: ultralightdx@...
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] Question about ultralight and loops for MW

 

Hello Sarmento,
 
Many air core and ferrite core external loops give excellent performance with the Tecsun PL-380 and PL-310 models, and make DXing a lot more fun.
 
Depending upon your DXing preferences, you can choose a transplanted ferrite loop (like the 7.5" loopstick PL-380), an inductively coupled ferrite loop (like the Q-stick) or a direct or inductively-coupled air core loop. All of these antenna designs have performance tradeoffs, and no one design is perfect for every situation.
 
Most DXers who wish to avoid "surgery" on the radio use air or ferrite core loops with the inductive coupling system, which gives an excellent performance boost (depending on the size of the loop) with an extra tuned circuit to aid in selectivity. The directly-connected ferrite and air core loops always require modification to the radio (and possibly the addition of other external hard-wired components), but avoid the need for a separate tuning step. 
 
My own favorite for convenient DXpedition usage is the 3' portable PVC air core loop, which is described in the photo article at  http://www.mediafire.com/?hqyzzu1mvyt . This tuned passive loop provides a powerful inductive coupling boost for the barefoot PL-380, can be assembled in 2 minutes, and will fit inside a packed compact car trunk.
 
73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
 
 
 
In a message dated 7/6/2010 4:12:29 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time, sarmento.campos@sarmento.eng.br writes:

 

Hi

After have seen info about these new DSP receivers (like PL310/380) :

http://bbs.tecsun.com.cn/0002.asp?open=186695

I wonder if it would support loop antennas, like square air coil or even ferrite loops.

If one issue to add : living near big power MW stations.

Have anyone tried MW dx in this conditions ?

Regards
Sarmento - Rio de Janeiro - Brazil


Re: Deciphering the Kchibo Radio DSP-chip Puzzle

sdwillingham
 

Thanks Gary. Looks like there's only one more place for the
radio chip to be hidden -- under the display! An interesting
choice. It also appears that some of the 8-pin header traces
go up into that region.

-Scott-

--- In ultralightdx@..., D1028Gary@... wrote:

Hi Scott,

The reverse side of the KK-D6110 digital board (pictured below) apparently
only has digital switches, the digital display housing, and the male 8-pin
connector to the RF board. A higher resolution photo of this will be
uploaded to the album, but nothing like a DSP chip is in evidence.

73, Gary




In a message dated 7/6/2010 9:31:59 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
sdwillingham@... writes:




Gary,

Do you have any pictures of the other side of the PCB? I suspect the radio
chip is on that side.

Thanks,
Scott


Re: More on my ultralight experience

Rik
 

I do hope Jim is well. He was helping me understand how to figure the correct number of turns, but hasn't been heard from here lately. I might be able to wind ONE with my hands or maybe not. I bought the stuff to try, but I won't bother unless I am pretty sure I know the correct # of turns. - FARMERIK

--- In ultralightdx@..., "sdwillingham" <sdwillingham@...> wrote:

I have played around with various ways to shield a loopstick.
This provides some improvement, but I have not found anything
very satisfying. Jim's "hoop-loop" design, on the other
hand, has given me far better results. The balanced design
(with shielding on the secondary wires), plus the ability to
locate the antenna away from interference, works very well
around my computer. The sharp nulling ability is also a
big advantage.

I think winding a transformer puts people off from trying
the hoop-loop, but it really is not a difficult project. See
Chris Knight's postings from a month or two ago for a very
practical setup.

-Scott-

--- In ultralightdx@..., "farmerik" <farmerik@> wrote:

I still suspect there is a way to shield a loop or ferrite antenna with a grounded grid or solid 'screen'. I was hoping an engineer here would have already done this or at least give me ideas for experiments. Use of my hands and arms is pretty limited, but after awhile I can build some crude things. I do get less interference from computer equipment by hanging small loops close to the ceiling. If a shielding screen could be rigged under and behind a loop, it might become unidirectional. I am relatively near the East coast myself, so most all DX domestic targets are to my West, but there are locals to my East. If you have room for a Beverage, they can be unidirectional with a distal ground. - FARMERIK


Re: Deciphering the Kchibo Radio DSP-chip Puzzle

Mike Mayer <mwmayer@...>
 

Hmmmm….the other photo clearly showed a via pattern for a PLCC chip, but no chip. I think that’s what prompted Scott’s question. It looks like it is the LCD footprint that we are seeing on the digital board.

 

==========================================================
Mike Mayer
mwmayer@...


From: ultralightdx@... [mailto:ultralightdx@...] On Behalf Of D1028Gary@...
Sent: Tuesday, July 06, 2010 2:03 PM
To: ultralightdx@...
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] Re: Deciphering the Kchibo Radio DSP-chip Puzzle

 

Hi Scott,

 

The reverse side of the KK-D6110 digital board (pictured below) apparently only has digital switches, the digital display housing, and the male 8-pin connector to the RF board. A higher resolution photo of this will be uploaded to the album, but nothing like a DSP chip is in evidence.

 

73, Gary

 

                                                               

 

In a message dated 7/6/2010 9:31:59 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time, sdwillingham@... writes:

 

Gary,

Do you have any pictures of the other side of the PCB? I suspect the radio chip is on that side.

Thanks,
Scott


Re: Question about ultralight and loops for MW

Gary DeBock
 

"The directly-connected ferrite and air core loops always require modification to the radio (and possibly the addition of other external hard-wired components), but avoid the need for a separate tuning step."
 
Hello All,
 
This is one unique exception to the above statement-- the 7.5" plug-in loopstick PL-360, which requires no radio "surgery," but provides a nice AM performance boost. Having just sent out over 20 of these, I should have remembered this exception :-)
 
73, Gary  
 
In a message dated 7/6/2010 1:32:44 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, D1028Gary@... writes:

 

Hello Sarmento,
 
Many air core and ferrite core external loops give excellent performance with the Tecsun PL-380 and PL-310 models, and make DXing a lot more fun.
 
Depending upon your DXing preferences, you can choose a transplanted ferrite loop (like the 7.5" loopstick PL-380), an inductively coupled ferrite loop (like the Q-stick) or a direct or inductively-coupled air core loop. All of these antenna designs have performance tradeoffs, and no one design is perfect for every situation.
 
Most DXers who wish to avoid "surgery" on the radio use air or ferrite core loops with the inductive coupling system, which gives an excellent performance boost (depending on the size of the loop) with an extra tuned circuit to aid in selectivity. The directly-connected ferrite and air core loops always require modification to the radio (and possibly the addition of other external hard-wired components), but avoid the need for a separate tuning step. 
 
My own favorite for convenient DXpedition usage is the 3' portable PVC air core loop, which is described in the photo article at  http://www.mediafire.com/?hqyzzu1mvyt . This tuned passive loop provides a powerful inductive coupling boost for the barefoot PL-380, can be assembled in 2 minutes, and will fit inside a packed compact car trunk.
 
73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
 
 
 
In a message dated 7/6/2010 4:12:29 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time, sarmento.campos@sarmento.eng.br writes:
 

Hi

After have seen info about these new DSP receivers (like PL310/380) :

http://bbs.tecsun.com.cn/0002.asp?open=186695

I wonder if it would support loop antennas, like square air coil or even ferrite loops.

If one issue to add : living near big power MW stations.

Have anyone tried MW dx in this conditions ?

Regards
Sarmento - Rio de Janeiro - Brazil


Re: Question about ultralight and loops for MW

Gary DeBock
 

Hi Ralph,
 
As you probably know, because of the response delay in the RSSI and S/N readings on the PL-380 digital display, simply watching the readings in unlikely to be of much benefit in peaking the inductively-coupled external loops. For casual DXing I've had good results listening carefully for an audio signal peak while slowly tuning the external loops, and then fine-tuning the peak (using the display's S/N reading) as the loop's frequency is carefully adjusted from that point.
 
For urgent DXpedition situations like a sunrise TP opening on an ocean beach (which may be in total darkness) I simply use a modified ICF-2010 SSB spotting receiver to find TP targets, then tune the external loop to light up the ICF-2010's LED signal display on that frequency. The external loop is then perfectly peaked to boost reception on the PL-380, which only needs to be brought within inductive coupling range for a huge DXing boost. The entire procedure can be done in total darkness, and provides great results.
 
73, Gary   
 
In a message dated 7/6/2010 1:54:22 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, rpollock@... writes:

 

The trick is how to peak the inductively coupled loop, be it air core or ferrite bar.  Any tips?

From: ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com [ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of D1028Gary@aol.com [D1028Gary@aol.com]
Sent: Tuesday, July 06, 2010 3:32 PM
To: ultralightdx@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] Question about ultralight and loops for MW

 

Hello Sarmento,
 
Many air core and ferrite core external loops give excellent performance with the Tecsun PL-380 and PL-310 models, and make DXing a lot more fun.
 
Depending upon your DXing preferences, you can choose a transplanted ferrite loop (like the 7.5" loopstick PL-380), an inductively coupled ferrite loop (like the Q-stick) or a direct or inductively-coupled air core loop. All of these antenna designs have performance tradeoffs, and no one design is perfect for every situation.
 
Most DXers who wish to avoid "surgery" on the radio use air or ferrite core loops with the inductive coupling system, which gives an excellent performance boost (depending on the size of the loop) with an extra tuned circuit to aid in selectivity. The directly-connected ferrite and air core loops always require modification to the radio (and possibly the addition of other external hard-wired components), but avoid the need for a separate tuning step. 
 
My own favorite for convenient DXpedition usage is the 3' portable PVC air core loop, which is described in the photo article at  http://www.mediafire.com/?hqyzzu1mvyt . This tuned passive loop provides a powerful inductive coupling boost for the barefoot PL-380, can be assembled in 2 minutes, and will fit inside a packed compact car trunk.
 
73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
 
 
 
In a message dated 7/6/2010 4:12:29 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time, sarmento.campos@sarmento.eng.br writes:
 

Hi

After have seen info about these new DSP receivers (like PL310/380) :

http://bbs.tecsun.com.cn/0002.asp?open=186695

I wonder if it would support loop antennas, like square air coil or even ferrite loops.

If one issue to add : living near big power MW stations.

Have anyone tried MW dx in this conditions ?

Regards
Sarmento - Rio de Janeiro - Brazil


Re: More on my ultralight experience

sdwillingham
 

I have played around with various ways to shield a loopstick.
This provides some improvement, but I have not found anything
very satisfying. Jim's "hoop-loop" design, on the other
hand, has given me far better results. The balanced design
(with shielding on the secondary wires), plus the ability to
locate the antenna away from interference, works very well
around my computer. The sharp nulling ability is also a
big advantage.

I think winding a transformer puts people off from trying
the hoop-loop, but it really is not a difficult project. See
Chris Knight's postings from a month or two ago for a very
practical setup.

-Scott-

--- In ultralightdx@..., "farmerik" <farmerik@...> wrote:

I still suspect there is a way to shield a loop or ferrite antenna with a grounded grid or solid 'screen'. I was hoping an engineer here would have already done this or at least give me ideas for experiments. Use of my hands and arms is pretty limited, but after awhile I can build some crude things. I do get less interference from computer equipment by hanging small loops close to the ceiling. If a shielding screen could be rigged under and behind a loop, it might become unidirectional. I am relatively near the East coast myself, so most all DX domestic targets are to my West, but there are locals to my East. If you have room for a Beverage, they can be unidirectional with a distal ground. - FARMERIK


Re: Question about ultralight and loops for MW

sdwillingham
 

Sarmento,

A transformer-coupled air-loop is very effective. See:

http://kr1s.kearman.com/html/hooploop.html

Note that the transformer design will work with all kinds of
loops which have inductance in the 10 to 20 uH range. Results
with 12 inch or even 6 inch loops can be impressive and a
little more portable. You may also use ferrite loopsticks
wound for low inductance. The balanced design and relocation
of the antenna outside the radio cabinet both contribute to
superior noise immunity and nulling capabilities.

-Scott-

--- In ultralightdx@..., "Sarmento" <sarmento.campos@...> wrote:

Hi

After have seen info about these new DSP receivers (like PL310/380) :

http://bbs.tecsun.com.cn/0002.asp?open=186695

I wonder if it would support loop antennas, like square air coil or even ferrite loops.

If one issue to add : living near big power MW stations.

Have anyone tried MW dx in this conditions ?

Regards
Sarmento - Rio de Janeiro - Brazil


Re: Question about ultralight and loops for MW

Gary DeBock
 

Hello Sarmento,
 
Many air core and ferrite core external loops give excellent performance with the Tecsun PL-380 and PL-310 models, and make DXing a lot more fun.
 
Depending upon your DXing preferences, you can choose a transplanted ferrite loop (like the 7.5" loopstick PL-380), an inductively coupled ferrite loop (like the Q-stick) or a direct or inductively-coupled air core loop. All of these antenna designs have performance tradeoffs, and no one design is perfect for every situation.
 
Most DXers who wish to avoid "surgery" on the radio use air or ferrite core loops with the inductive coupling system, which gives an excellent performance boost (depending on the size of the loop) with an extra tuned circuit to aid in selectivity. The directly-connected ferrite and air core loops always require modification to the radio (and possibly the addition of other external hard-wired components), but avoid the need for a separate tuning step. 
 
My own favorite for convenient DXpedition usage is the 3' portable PVC air core loop, which is described in the photo article at  http://www.mediafire.com/?hqyzzu1mvyt . This tuned passive loop provides a powerful inductive coupling boost for the barefoot PL-380, can be assembled in 2 minutes, and will fit inside a packed compact car trunk.
 
73 and Good DX,
Gary DeBock (in Puyallup, WA, USA)
 
 
 
In a message dated 7/6/2010 4:12:29 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time, sarmento.campos@... writes:

 

Hi

After have seen info about these new DSP receivers (like PL310/380) :

http://bbs.tecsun.com.cn/0002.asp?open=186695

I wonder if it would support loop antennas, like square air coil or even ferrite loops.

If one issue to add : living near big power MW stations.

Have anyone tried MW dx in this conditions ?

Regards
Sarmento - Rio de Janeiro - Brazil


Re: Deciphering the Kchibo Radio DSP-chip Puzzle

sdwillingham
 

Gary,

Do you have any pictures of the other side of the PCB? I suspect the radio chip is on that side.

Thanks,
Scott


Re: Hopalong Cassidy at the Dials?????............

john445 <john445@...>
 

Robert, all the best with your knee and maybe not a speedier recovery. Enjoy the five weeks and a great knee!! :)


On Tue, Jul 6, 2010 at 9:57 AM, Robert S.Ross VA3SW <va3sw@...> wrote:
 

HI Guys:

Well...after a trip to see the Surgeon yesterday, it looks like I'm
gonna have some Extra DXing time after Aug/10th!! They are gonna fix my
Knee for me .....hopefully, and with Holidays and sick time I will be
off for 5 Weeks from Aug/10 to Sept/13. With any luck the AM BCB will be
back to DX quality by then....and if I'm really lucky, there will be a 5
week TROPO opening on the FM Band at the same time. With a Bunged up
knee....and nowhere to go, I will mercifully be TRAPPED in my Radio
Room!! HAHHAHAHHA

Actually....can't think of a better place to be trapped for 5 weeks...as
long as conditions are good...and the Central Air doesn't fail!! Man it
was HOT here yesterday.....Peaked out at 35 Degrees C.

So......after Aug/10th, I should be in here buggin' everyone for 5 weeks
or so.....

Salute...ROB VA3SW

Robert S. Ross
London, Ontario CANADA




--
John Mosman
Sometimes it's better to travel than to arrive.
Discover joy in life and savor it everyday
847-350-9566


Re: More on my ultralight experience

Rik
 

I still suspect there is a way to shield a loop or ferrite antenna with a grounded grid or solid 'screen'. I was hoping an engineer here would have already done this or at least give me ideas for experiments. Use of my hands and arms is pretty limited, but after awhile I can build some crude things. I do get less interference from computer equipment by hanging small loops close to the ceiling. If a shielding screen could be rigged under and behind a loop, it might become unidirectional. I am relatively near the East coast myself, so most all DX domestic targets are to my West, but there are locals to my East. If you have room for a Beverage, they can be unidirectional with a distal ground. - FARMERIK

--- In ultralightdx@..., "neilbellgroups" <neil.bell@...> wrote:

As a friend (Mike Maghakian) pointed out to me, our location on the extreme west coast of California near SF presents a major issue for MW DXing.

To the west we have nothing but ocean, many, many hundred miles of ocean, with only infrequent TP DX possible. If you are a few miles inland, (in my case 30 plus miles), TPs are very difficult.

To the east we have large deserts with sparsely populated areas like Nevada, Utah, Arizona, New Mexico etc. Compounding this there is
the large and high Sierra mountain range running the length of eastern California!

This means many MW stations lie either to the north or to the south. Using loops or loopsticks means that trying to null out a station to the north also nulls stations to the south. Obviously, this complicates DXing to the north or south. Using loops in this situation requires very careful positioning of the antenna/radio, sometimes working just the edge of the lobes of the antenna pattern.

I assume that DXers in Oregon and Washington face the same sorts of issues as do those on the extreme east coast.

Receiving a co-channel station when the other station on the same frequency is about 180 degrees opposite is a challenge requiring favorable propagation and close attention to the grey line. in this situation using my Phaser and paired random-wires is the best option.

Makes me envy the people living in middle parts of the country with DX opportunities in all directions or even people on the east coast with many more stations to chase and less challenging topography!

Despite the lack of a keypad for tuning, the PL360, when combined with Gary's 7.5 inch loop-stick works quite well even considering my arthritic hands. I have rigged a nice stand to hold the radio and still give free access to the loop-stick.

Neil Bell
KJ6FBA


More on my ultralight experience

neilbellgroups <neil.bell@...>
 

As a friend (Mike Maghakian) pointed out to me, our location on the extreme west coast of California near SF presents a major issue for MW DXing.

To the west we have nothing but ocean, many, many hundred miles of ocean, with only infrequent TP DX possible. If you are a few miles inland, (in my case 30 plus miles), TPs are very difficult.

To the east we have large deserts with sparsely populated areas like Nevada, Utah, Arizona, New Mexico etc. Compounding this there is
the large and high Sierra mountain range running the length of eastern California!

This means many MW stations lie either to the north or to the south. Using loops or loopsticks means that trying to null out a station to the north also nulls stations to the south. Obviously, this complicates DXing to the north or south. Using loops in this situation requires very careful positioning of the antenna/radio, sometimes working just the edge of the lobes of the antenna pattern.

I assume that DXers in Oregon and Washington face the same sorts of issues as do those on the extreme east coast.

Receiving a co-channel station when the other station on the same frequency is about 180 degrees opposite is a challenge requiring favorable propagation and close attention to the grey line. in this situation using my Phaser and paired random-wires is the best option.

Makes me envy the people living in middle parts of the country with DX opportunities in all directions or even people on the east coast with many more stations to chase and less challenging topography!

Despite the lack of a keypad for tuning, the PL360, when combined with Gary's 7.5 inch loop-stick works quite well even considering my arthritic hands. I have rigged a nice stand to hold the radio and still give free access to the loop-stick.

Neil Bell
KJ6FBA